Gateway ALR 9200 User Manual

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Maintaining and

Troubleshooting

the Gateway

ALR 9200 Server

Part # 8503424

A MAN SYS US 9200 TECH REF R0

8/98

In our effort to use nature’s resources efficiently and wisely, we print all manuals on recycled papers that meet the minimum requirements established by the Federal EPA in its guidelines for recycled paper products.

Notices

Copyright © 1998 Gateway 2000, Inc.

All Rights Reserved

610 Gateway Drive

N. Sioux City, SD 57049 USA

All Rights Reserved

This publication is protected by copyright and all rights are reserved. No part of it may be reproduced or transmitted by any means or in any form, without prior consent in writing from Gateway 2000.

The information in this manual has been carefully checked and is believed to be accurate. However, changes are made periodically. These changes are incorporated in newer publication editions. Gateway 2000 may improve and/or change products described in this publication at any time. Due to continuing system improvements, Gateway 2000 is not responsible for inaccurate information which may appear in this manual. For the latest product updates, consult the Gateway 2000 web site at www.gateway.com. In no event will Gateway 2000 be liable for direct, indirect, special, exemplary, incidental, or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual, even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

In the interest of continued product development, Gateway 2000 reserves the right to make improvements in this manual and the products it describes at any time, without notices or obligation.

Trademark Acknowledgments

AnyKey, black-and-white spot design, CrystalScan, Destination, EZ Pad, EZ Point, Field Mouse, Solo, TelePath, Vivitron, stylized “G” design, and “You’ve got a friend in the business” slogan are registered trademarks and GATEWAY, Gateway Solo, green stylized GATEWAY, green stylized Gateway logo, and the black-and-white spotted box logo are trademarks of Gateway 2000, Inc. Intel, Intel Inside logo, and Pentium are registered trademarks and MMX is a trademark of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, MS, MS-DOS, and Windows are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. All other product names mentioned herein are used for identification purposes only, and may be the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.

Copyright © 1998 Advanced Logic Research, Inc. (ALR)

All Rights Reserved

9401 Jeronimo

Irvine, CA 92618 USA

All Rights Reserved

This publication is protected by copyright and all rights are reserved. No part of it may be reproduced or transmitted by any means or in any form, without prior consent in writing from ALR.

The information in this manual has been carefully checked and is believed to be accurate. However, changes are made periodically. These changes are incorporated in newer publication editions. ALR may improve and/or change products described in this publication at any time. Due to continuing system improvements, ALR is not responsible for inaccurate information which may appear in this manual. For the latest product updates, consult the ALR web site at www.alr.com. In no event will ALR be liable for direct, indirect, special, exemplary, incidental, or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual, even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

In the interest of continued product development, ALR reserves the right to make improvements in this manual and the products it describes at any time, without notices or obligation.

Trademark Acknowledgments

ALR is a registered trademark of Advanced Logic Research, Inc. All other product names mentioned herein are used for identification purposes only, and may be the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.

Some portions of this document are copyright © 1998, Intel Corporation.

Contents

 

Preface .....................................................................................

vii

About This Guide ................................................................................

viii

Conventions Used in This Guide...........................................................

ix

Important Safety Instructions..................................................................

x

Chapter 1: System Access .......................................................

1

Static Electricity Precautions ..................................................................

2

Opening the System ................................................................................

3

Removing the Access Cover............................................................

3

Opening the Front Door ...................................................................

4

Opening the Subchassis and Electronics Bay .................................

5

Closing the System..................................................................................

7

Closing the Subchassis and Electronics Bay...................................

7

Installing the Access Cover..............................................................

8

Installing the Front Door..................................................................

8

Chapter 2: Components ...........................................................

9

System Board Features..........................................................................

10

System Board Connectors.....................................................................

10

Drive Controllers and Connectors .................................................

12

System Jumpers (B) .......................................................................

13

Miscellaneous Connectors.............................................................

14

Expansion Slot Connectors............................................................

15

Memory Module Connector (I) .....................................................

16

System Management Connectors..................................................

16

Back Panel I/O Connectors............................................................

18

Processors and Related Connectors...............................................

20

Power Connectors ..........................................................................

21

Memory..................................................................................................

23

DIMM Installation Sequence.........................................................

24

System Memory Addressing .........................................................

24

Memory Configuration ..................................................................

25

System Security.....................................................................................

26

Mechanical Locks and Monitoring................................................

26

Software Locks via the SSU or BIOS Setup .................................

26

Contents i

Chapter 3: Installing Components ...........................................

31

Introduction...........................................................................................

32

Replacing the Processor........................................................................

32

Installing Another Processor ................................................................

36

Installing Hardware...............................................................................

40

Memory..........................................................................................

40

Drives .............................................................................................

45

Installing Fans for High-Power Drives .........................................

57

Expansion Cards ............................................................................

62

Power Supplies ..............................................................................

65

Replacing the Battery ....................................................................

68

Chapter 4: Jumpers and Drivers .............................................

71

Setting the Jumpers ...............................................................................

72

Changing a Jumper Setting............................................................

73

CMOS Clear Jumper .....................................................................

74

Password Clear Jumper .................................................................

75

Recovery Boot Jumper ..................................................................

75

Installing Software and Drivers............................................................

77

Installing Video Drivers ................................................................

77

Chapter 5: BIOS Setup ...........................................................

79

Introduction...........................................................................................

80

Using BIOS Setup.................................................................................

81

Record Your Setup Settings ..........................................................

81

If You Cannot Access Setup .........................................................

82

Starting Setup.................................................................................

82

Setup Menus..........................................................................................

83

Setup Key Commands...................................................................

84

Special Display Items ....................................................................

84

Main Menu.....................................................................................

85

Advanced Menu.............................................................................

87

Security Menu................................................................................

92

Server Menu...................................................................................

93

Boot Menu......................................................................................

95

Exit Menu.......................................................................................

97

ii Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Upgrading the BIOS..............................................................................

98

Preparing for the Upgrade..............................................................

98

Upgrading the BIOS.....................................................................

100

Recovering the BIOS ...................................................................

101

Changing the BIOS Language.....................................................

101

Chapter 6: The Server Setup Utility .......................................

103

Introduction..........................................................................................

104

Using the System Setup Utility...........................................................

105

When to Run the SSU ..................................................................

105

What You Need to Do..................................................................

106

Running the SSU.................................................................................

107

Running the SSU Locally ............................................................

107

Running the SSU Remotely.........................................................

107

Starting the SSU ...........................................................................

108

Customizing the SSU ..........................................................................

109

Launching a Task ................................................................................

111

Resource Configuration Add-in Window ..........................................

112

Using the RCA Window..............................................................

112

Defining an ISA Board.................................................................

113

Adding and Removing ISA Boards.............................................

114

Modifying Resources ...................................................................

114

System Resource Usage...............................................................

115

Multiboot Options Add-in...................................................................

115

Security Add-in ...................................................................................

116

Security Options...........................................................................

117

System Event Log Viewer Add-in......................................................

118

Sensor Data Record Manager

 

Add-In..................................................................................................

120

Field Replaceable Unit Manager Add-In ...........................................

122

Exiting the SSU ...................................................................................

124

Chapter 7: Other Utilities .......................................................

125

Introduction..........................................................................................

126

Power-on Self Test ..............................................................................

127

Emergency Management Port Console..............................................

129

How the EMP Console Works.....................................................

130

EMP Console Requirements........................................................

132

Contents iii

Setting Up the Server for the EMP..............................................

133

Main EMP Console Window......................................................

134

Server Control Operations...........................................................

136

Phonebook....................................................................................

140

Management Plug-ins..................................................................

141

FRU and SDR Load Utility ................................................................

145

When to Run the FRUSDR Load Utility....................................

145

What You Need to Do .................................................................

145

How You Use the FRUSDR Load Utility ..................................

146

Cleaning Up and Exiting .............................................................

150

Using the Firmware Update Utility....................................................

151

Running the Firmware Update Utility ........................................

151

Using the Symbios SCSI Utility.........................................................

152

Running the SCSI Utility.............................................................

152

Chapter 8: Troubleshooting ..................................................

153

Introduction.........................................................................................

154

Computer Virus Notice.......................................................................

155

Viruses..........................................................................................

155

Types of Viruses ..........................................................................

155

Virus Contamination....................................................................

155

Protecting Your System...............................................................

156

Virus Prevention ..........................................................................

156

Troubleshooting Checklist .................................................................

158

Verifying the Configuration ........................................................

158

Troubleshooting Guidelines ........................................................

158

Solving Problems................................................................................

159

Resetting the System....................................................................

159

Initial System Startup...................................................................

159

Running New Application Software...........................................

160

The System Has Been Running Correctly..................................

161

More Problem-solving Procedures .............................................

162

Specific Problems and Corrective Actions .................................

164

Error and Informational Messages.....................................................

170

POST Codes and Countdown Codes ..........................................

170

POST Error Codes and Messages ...............................................

173

iv Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Appendix A: Reference Data ................................................

175

Specifications.......................................................................................

176

System Specifications ..................................................................

176

Environmental Specifications......................................................

177

System I/O Addresses .........................................................................

178

Memory Map.......................................................................................

181

Interrupts..............................................................................................

182

Video Modes .......................................................................................

183

DMA Usage.........................................................................................

187

Appendix B: Regulatory Compliance Statements ................

189

Electromagnetic Compatibility...........................................................

190

FCC Notice ..........................................................................................

191

Industry Canada Notice.......................................................................

192

CE Notice.............................................................................................

192

VCCI Notice........................................................................................

193

Australia/New Zealand Notice ...........................................................

193

Declaration of the Manufacturer or Importer .....................................

194

Safety Compliance ..............................................................................

194

Index .....................................................................................

195

Contents v

vi Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Preface

Contents

About This Guide .................................................

viii

Conventions Used in This Guide ...........................

ix

Important Safety Instructions..................................

x

About This Guide

This document provides step-by-step installation instructions along with detailed illustrations to help maintain the hardware components and peripherals of the computer.

Chapter 1: System Access provides instructions on opening and closing the case.

Chapter 2: Components covers information on maintaining, replacing, and upgrading the components in the system. This section includes information about options for the system and installation instructions.

Chapter 3: Installing Components describes the procedures for installing or replacing the hardware components.

Chapter 4: Jumpers and Drivers describes setting the jumpers and provides basic information about operating systems and software.

Chapter 5: BIOS Setup briefly explains the system basic input/output system (BIOS) and provides instructions on how to update the BIOS.

Chapter 6: The Server Setup Utility describes the system setup utility and provides instructions on using it to set up the server.

Chapter 7: Other Utilities describes the other utilities provided with the system and provides instructions for their use.

Chapter 8: Troubleshooting provides reference material on troubleshooting your system.

viii Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Conventions Used in This Guide

Throughout this document, you will see the following conventions:

Convention

Description

ENTER

Key names, which correspond to keys

 

on the keyboard, are printed in small

 

capitals.

 

 

CTRL+ALT+DEL

A plus sign indicates that the keys

 

must be pressed simultaneously.

 

 

Setup

Commands to be entered, options to

 

select, and messages that appear on

 

your monitor are printed in bold.

 

 

User’s Guide

Names of publications and files are

 

printed in italic.

 

 

Sidebars

Sidebars give critical information such

 

as warnings and important notes.

Note:

This is an example of an important note that may appear in the manual.

Conventions Used in This Guide ix

 

 

Important Safety Instructions

 

 

Observe the following guidelines when performing any work on your

Warning!

 

Do not attempt to service

 

system:

the system yourself except

 

Follow all instructions marked on the server and in the

as explained elsewhere in

 

the manual. Adjust only

 

documentation.

those controls covered in

 

Unplug this product from the wall outlet before cleaning. Do not

the instructions.

 

Opening or removing covers

 

use liquid or aerosol cleaners. Use a damp cloth for cleaning.

 

Do not use this product near water. Do not spill liquid on or into the

marked “Do Not Remove”

 

may expose you to

 

server.

dangerous voltages or other

 

Do not place the server on an unstable surface.

risks.

 

Refer all servicing of those

 

Openings in the system cabinet are provided for ventilation. Do not

compartments to qualified

 

block or cover these openings. Do not place the server near or upon

service personnel.

 

a radiator or heat register.

 

 

 

Use only the power source shown on the power supply. If you are

 

 

 

 

not certain about the power source, ask the local power company.

 

 

The server is equipped with a 3-wire grounding plug (a plug with a

 

 

grounding pin). This plug only fits into a grounded power outlet.

 

 

This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the

 

 

outlet, contact your electrician to replace the outlet.

 

 

Do not walk on the power cord or allow anything to rest on it.

 

 

If you use an extension cord with this system, make sure the total

 

 

ampere ratings on the products plugged into the extension cord do

Important!

 

 

not exceed the extension cord ampere rating. Also, the total ampere

The system power cord

 

requirements for all products plugged into the wall outlet must not

serves as the main

 

exceed 15 amperes.

disconnect for the

 

 

Never insert objects of any kind into the system ventilation slots.

computer. The wall outlet

 

must be easily accessible by

 

Unplug the system from the wall outlet and refer servicing to

the operator.

 

 

 

qualified personnel if:

 

 

The power cord or plug is damaged.

Liquid has been spilled into the system.

The system does not operate properly when the operating instructions are followed.

The system was dropped or the cabinet is damaged.

The system’s performance changes.

xMaintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

System

 

Access

 

Contents

 

Static Electricity Precautions ..................................

2

Opening the System.................................................

3

Removing the Access Cover............................

3

Opening the Front Door ...................................

4

Opening the Subchassis and Electronics Bay . 5

Closing the System ..................................................

7

Closing the Subchassis and Electronics Bay...

7

Installing the Access Cover..............................

8

Installing the Front Door ..................................

8

Static Electricity Precautions

Caution! Prevent Static-Electricity Damage

Static Electricity Preventions

1.WEAR A GROUNDING WRIST STRAP (available at most electronic stores).

2.Turn off the system power.

3.Touch the back of the power supply fan, located on the back of the case.

4.UNPLUG ALL CORDS FROM WALL OUTLET.

5.Remove the system case cover.

Static Electricity Precautions

Avoid static-causing surfaces such as plastic and styrofoam in your work area.

Remove the parts from their antistatic bags only when you are ready to use them. Do not lay parts on the outside of antistatic bags since only the inside provides antistatic protection.

Always hold cards by their edges and their metal mounting bracket. Avoid touching components on the cards and the edge connectors that connect to expansion slots.

Never slide cards or other parts over any surface.

2 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Opening the System

Depending on your purpose, you may need to remove the access cover or both the access cover and the bezel. You may also need to open the subchassis or the electronics bay to reach certain components. Follow the instructions specific to the item you wish to remove or open as indicated in each section.

Removing the Access Cover

You need to remove the system access cover to reach components inside the system. Facing the front of the system, the access cover is on the right side of the server.

To Remove the Access Cover

1.Observe the ESD precautions in “Static Electricity Precautions” on page 2.

2.Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system.

3.Turn off the system by using the power on/off switch on the front panel and unplugging all AC power cords.

4.Label and disconnect all peripheral cables attached to the input/output (I/O) panel on the back of the system.

Caution!

Power the system off and disconnect all power cords before proceeding. Installing any component while the power is on may cause permanent damage to the system.

Opening the System 3

5.Remove and save the three screws from the back of the access cover (see Figure 1); you will need them later to reattach the cover.

Figure 1: Removing the Access Cover

6.Place the fingertips of your right hand under the built-in handle on the back of the cover. A rounded, rectangular depression in the front middle of the access cover serves as another handle.

7.Using an even pull, slide the cover backward, about an inch, until it stops.

8.Pull the entire cover outward, straight away from the chassis, to disengage the rows of tabs from the notches in the top and bottom edges of the chassis. Set the cover aside.

Opening the Front Door

The front door is secured to the bezel by a key lock. This lock has three positions: fully locked, front door unlocked, and front and access cover unlocked. When the front door is unlocked, you can remove it by opening it fully and lifting the hinges out of the slots that hold them.

4 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Opening the Subchassis and Electronics Bay

The chassis is comprised of three parts: the main chassis, a swing-out subchassis at the front, and a swing-out subchassis, called the electronics bay, at the rear. To access components in some instances, you must remove the foam covers and swing away and/or completely remove the subchassis and electronics bay.

To open the subchassis and electronics bay, you must first remove the foam covers. The subchassis and electronics bays are secured using phillips head screws.

To Open the Subchassis and Electronics Bay

1.Observe the safety and ESD precautions in “Static Electricity Precautions” on page 2.

2.Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system.

3.Turn off the system power by using the power on/off switch on the front panel and unplugging all AC power cords.

4.Label and disconnect all peripheral cables attached to the I/O panel on the back of the system.

5.Remove and save the three screws from the back of the access cover; you will need them later to reattach the cover.

6.Remove the access cover.

7.Remove the foam blocks by pulling them out of the subchassis and electronics bay. These blocks form an important part of the airflow and electromotive compatibility (EMC) characteristics of the system. The foam in the subchassis also forms the support structure for most of the system fans.

Opening the System 5

Caution!

You must disconnect all cabling to the electronics bay before rotating/ removing the bay. Failure to do so can result in serious damage to system components. The location of the main connectors in the electronics bay is marked as D in Figure 2.

Note:

It may be easier to disconnect the cables if you remove the foam pad first.

8.Loosen the two screws on the top and bottom edges of the chassis (A in Figure 2). These screws attach the front subchassis and the electronics bay to the main chassis.

A

B

C

D

Figure 2: Opening the Subchassis and Electronics Bay

9.Using the edges of the subchassis as handles, rotate the front subchassis left, away from the main chassis, until it stops (B in Figure 2).

10.Disconnect all cabling to the electronics bay (D in Figure 2).

11.Using the vertical edge of the electronics bay as a handle, rotate the bay right, away from the main chassis, until it stops (C in Figure 2).

12.If necessary, completely remove the subchassis and electronics bay: rotate the bays outward until the two pins that function as hinges for the bays slide out of their slots. Set the bays aside.

6 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Closing the System

Before closing the system, verify that all connectors and boards are properly installed and firmly seated.

Closing the Subchassis and Electronics Bay

As you close the subchassis and electronics bay, carefully observe the internal components to ensure that you do not pinch or twist any of the cables or components.

To Close the Subchassis and Electronics Bay

1.Verify that all internal components are fully installed and secured.

2.Press down on the tab on the top of the electronics bay to release it and swing it closed.

3.Attach any cables to the electronics bay components.

4.Press down on the tab at the top of the subchassis to free it and swing it closed.

5.Secure the subchassis with the two screws you removed earlier.

6.If necessary, reinstall the foam bracketing for the fans in the subchassis and reinstall the fans.

7.Reinstall the foam over the subchassis and electronics bay.

8.Replace the access cover and power up the system.

Closing the System 7

Note:

The bezel key lock must be in the open position before reinstalling the access cover.

Installing the Access Cover

Be careful to avoid pinching any internal cables in the access cover when closing the system.

To Replace the Access Cover

1.Before replacing the access cover, check that you have not left loose tools or parts inside the system.

2.Check that cables, expansion cards, foam pad, and other components are properly installed.

3.Position the cover over the chassis so that the rows of tabs align with slots in the chassis. While pressing inward, slide the cover toward the front of the system until the tabs on the cover firmly engage in the chassis.

4.Attach the cover to the chassis with the three screws you removed earlier, and tighten them firmly.

5.Connect all external cables and the power cords to the system.

Installing the Front Door

To replace the front door, insert the hinges into the slots on the front of the chassis and close the door. Secure it by turning the bezel keylock to the second locked position. The first position allows you to open the front door and locks the side access panel. The fully locked position prevents all access to the system controls by locking both the access panel and the bezel door.

8 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Components

 

Contents

 

System Board Features...................................................

10

System Board Connectors ..............................................

10

Drive Controllers and Connectors..........................

12

System Jumpers (B)................................................

13

Miscellaneous Connectors......................................

14

Expansion Slot Connectors ....................................

15

Memory Module Connector (I)..............................

16

System Management Connectors...........................

16

Back Panel I/O Connectors ....................................

18

Processors and Related Connectors .......................

20

Power Connectors...................................................

21

Memory...........................................................................

23

DIMM Installation Sequence .................................

24

System Memory Addressing..................................

24

Memory Configuration...........................................

25

System Security ..............................................................

26

Mechanical Locks and Monitoring ........................

26

Software Locks via the SSU or BIOS Setup..........

26

System Board Features

The system board functions as the main interface between the processor, memory, and peripherals.

Table 1 lists the features of the system board. Figure 3 on page 11 shows the components on the system board and their locations.

 

Table 1: System Board Features

 

 

Feature

Description

Processor

Installed: Up to four Pentium® II Xeon™ processors, in single

 

edge contact (SEC) cartridges installed in Slot 2 connectors.

 

Includes connectors for six VRM 8.3-compliant plug-in voltage-

 

regulator modules (VRMs).

 

 

Main memory

Single plug-in module containing 16 dual in-line memory module

 

(DIMM) sockets for up to 4 GB of extended data output (EDO)

 

dynamic random access memory (DRAM).

 

Installed: 256 MB–4 GB of EDO error correcting code (ECC)

 

random access memory (RAM).

 

 

Video memory

Installed: 2 MB of video memory.

 

 

PCI bus(es)

PCI-A—Three expansion connectors

 

PCI-B—Four expansion connectors (one shared with the

 

ISA slot)

 

 

ISA bus

One expansion slot for expansion boards (shared with a

 

PCI-B slot).

 

 

Server management

Thermal/voltage monitoring and error handling.

 

Front panel controls and indicator light emitting diodes (LEDs).

 

 

Graphics

Integrated onboard Cirrus Logic GD5480 super video graphics

 

array (SVGA) controller.

 

 

SCSI

Two embedded small computer systems interface (SCSI)

 

controllers:

 

Symbios SYM53C810AE—narrow SCSI controller providing

 

support for legacy 8-bit SCSI devices

 

Symbios SYM53C896—dual-channel wide low voltage

 

differential (LVD)/single-ended (SE) (ultra2/ultra) SCSI controller

 

driving one SCSI backplane in the system and providing support

 

for external expansion.

 

 

System I/O

PS/2-compatible keyboard and mouse ports, parallel port,

 

video port, USB port, and two serial ports (serial port 1 is the left

 

connector).

 

 

System Board Connectors

Figure 3 shows the connectors on the system board. Some of these connectors may not be used, depending on the configuration of the server. The table below provides the key to Figure 3.

10 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

B C D

E

F

 

 

LL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GG

HH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EE

FF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J

 

AA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

Z

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q

 

 

 

 

L

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

N

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3: System Board Components and Connectors

 

A

Wide SCSI B connector (J9J1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

VRM connector for processors 2 & 1 (J4A2)

B

System jumpers (J6J1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

U

VRM connector for processor 1 (J4A1)

C

Hard drive input LED connector (J6J3)

V

Processor 1 Slot 2 connector (J9A1)

D

System speaker connector (J6J2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

W Main power connector, primary (J9B1)

E

Lithium battery (B4H1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Processor 2 Slot 2 connector (J9B2)

F

Wake-on-LAN technology connector (J4H1)

Y

Processor 3 Slot 2 connector (J9D1)

G

ISA slot (J1J1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Z

Main power connector, secondary (J9D2)

H

PCI slots B4 (top), B3, B2, B1, A3, and A2

AA Front panel connector (J8E1)

 

I

Memory module connector (J3G1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

BB Processor 4 Slot 2 connector (J9E1)

J

ICMB connector (J1E1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CC

IDE connector (J9E2)

 

K

PCI slot A1 (J2D1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

DD

Diskette drive connector (J9E3)

 

L

Video and parallel port connectors (J1C1)

EE Auxiliary power connector (J9E4)

 

M

Serial port connectors (J1B2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

FF USB internal header (JC9F14)

 

N

Keyboard and mouse connectors (J1B1)

GG

SMBus connector (J9F2)

 

O

USB external connector (J1A1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

HH F16 expansion connector (J7G1)

 

P

VRM connector for processor 4 (J4E1)

II

Narrow SCSI connector (J9H1)

 

Q

VRM connector for processors 4 & 3 (J4C2)

JJ External IPMB connector (J7H1)

 

R

VRM connector for processor 3 (J4C1)

KK

SMM connector (J8H1)

 

S

VRM connector for processor 2 (J4B1)

LL Wide SCSI A connector (J9H2)

 

System Board Connectors 11

Drive Controllers and Connectors

The system board supports several controllers and connectors for the control of the various drives that are or can be installed in the system.

SCSI Connectors

The system board includes two SCSI controllers. A narrow SCSI controller (SYM53C810AE) is on the PCI-A bus, and a dual-channel wide LVD/SE (Ultra2/Ultra) SCSI controller (SYM53C896) is on the PCI-B bus. The narrow controller provides support for legacy 8-bit SCSI devices that may be installed in the 5.25-inch drive bays. The wide controller drives one SCSI backplane and provides support for external expansion.

Each controller has its own set of PCI configuration registers and SCSI I/O registers. As a PCI 2.1 bus master, the wide controller supports burst data transfers on PCI up to the maximum rate of 132 MB/sec using on-chip buffers.

No logic, termination, or resistor loads are required to connect devices to the SCSI controller other than termination in the device at the end of the cable. The SCSI bus is terminated on the system board with active terminators that can be disabled.

Wide SCSI A (LL) and Wide SCSI B Connectors (A)

Internally, each wide channel is identical, capable of operations using either 8- or 16-bit SCSI providing 10 MB/sec (Fast-10) or 20 MB/sec (Fast-20) throughput, or 20 MB/sec (Ultra) or 40 MB/sec (Ultra-wide).

The wide controller contains a high-performance SCSI bus interface. It supports SE mode with 8-bit (10 or 20 MB/sec) or 16-bit (20 or 40 MB/sec) transfers and LVD mode with 8-bit (40 MB/sec) or 16-bit (80 MB/sec) transfers.

Narrow SCSI Connector (II)

The narrow controller contains a high-performance SCSI core capable of Fast 8-bit SCSI transfers in single-ended mode. It provides programmable active negation, PCI zero wait-state bursts of faster than 110 MB/sec at 33 MHz, and SCSI transfer rates from 5 to 10 MB/sec.

12 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

IDE Connector (CC)

This is an integrated Ultra-DMA PCI/IDE interface with an IDE connector capable of controlling up to two IDE devices. Ultra-DMA provides faster access to IDE devices that are Ultra-DMA compliant while maintaining support for IDE devices that do not support the Ultra-DMA specification.

The IDE controller supports:

PIO and IDE DMA/bus master operations

Mode 4 timings

Transfer rates up to 33 MB/sec

Buffering for PCI/IDE burst transfers

Master/slave IDE mode

Up to two drives for one IDE channel

Diskette Drive Connector (DD)

The diskette drive controller and connector on the system board can support up to two diskette drives of 1.44-MB and 2.88-MB formats.

System Jumpers (B)

These jumpers allow you to set certain characteristics of the system. Some jumpers are reserved and are not described in this section. Do not change any jumper unless it is necessary to configure the system. In some cases, changing the settings of reserved jumpers can cause damage to the system board.

Clear CMOS Jumper

This jumper allows you to clear the complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) memory. You should only do this if you cannot access the normal methods of modifying the CMOS and modifications to the CMOS are necessary. Clearing CMOS memory returns all BIOS Setup settings to the default values. This jumper occupies pins 1-3 of the connector. See “Setting the Jumpers” on page 72 for more information on setting the CMOS clear jumper.

Note:

You can connect an IDE signal cable, up to a maximum of 18 inches, to the IDE connector on the system board. The cable can support two devices, one at the end of the cable and one six inches from the end.

System Board Connectors 13

Password Clear Jumper

Momentarily setting this jumper allows you to clear the passwords. The normal jumper position protects the passwords. Use this jumper only if you have forgotten the passwords and cannot access the system. This jumper occupies pins 5-7 of the connector. See “Setting the Jumpers” on page 72 for more information on setting the password clear jumper.

Recovery Boot Jumper

The recovery boot jumper should be used only in the event of a failed BIOS update. If you attempt a BIOS update and the update fails, set this jumper and reboot the system. The system attempts to recover the previous version of the BIOS as it boots up. This jumper occupies pins 9-11 of the connector. See “Setting the Jumpers” on page 72 for more information on setting the recovery boot jumper.

Miscellaneous Connectors

Hard Drive Input LED Connector (C)

This connector allows you to connect a cable from an add-in hard disk controller to the system board to allow the add-in controller to activate the hard drive activity LED on the control panel.

System Speaker Connector (D)

Connects the internal speaker to the system board.

Wake-on-LAN Technology Connector (F)

The wake on local area network (LAN) technology connector allows you to connect a magic packet-enabled LAN adapter to the system board to support wake on LAN functionality. Wake on LAN functionality allows a system in power conservation mode to be awakened by an incoming message on the network.

14 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Front Panel Connector (AA)

The front panel connector provides the signals for the front cover indicator LEDs and the front cover buttons.

USB Internal Connector (FF)

This connector allows you to connect internal devices that use the USB interface to the USB controller on the system board.

Lithium Battery (E)

Provides the power to maintain the CMOS memory when the system is turned off or unplugged.

Expansion Slot Connectors

ISA Slot (G)

The system board has one industry standard architecture (ISA) slot that is full-length if you do not use the wide SCSI-B connector (and half-length if you use the wide SCSI-B connector); the ISA slot supports slave-only boards and is shared with PCI-B slot 4. The ISA bus also supports three embedded devices: the Super I/O chip, system board management controller (BMC), and flash memory for the system BIOS. ISA bus features:

Bus speed up to 8.33 MHz

16-bit memory addressing

Type A transfers at 5.33 MB/sec

Type B transfers at 8 MB/sec

8- or 16-bit data transfers

Plug and Play ready

System Board Connectors 15

PCI slots B4 (top), B3, B2, B1, A3, A2 (H), A1 (K)

The system board has two 32-bit peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus segments: PCI-A and PCI-B. These provide seven slots for PCI expansion cards: three on PCI-A and four on PCI-B. PCI-B4 is shared with the ISA slot. PCI-A1 supports half-length boards only. The other slots support full-length boards. PCI bus features:

33 MHz bus speed

32-bit memory addressing

5 V signaling environment

Burst transfers of up to 133 MB/sec

8-, 16-, or 32-bit data transfers

Plug and Play ready

Parity enabled

Memory Module Connector (I)

The memory module connector supports the memory module. The memory module is a proprietary card that supports all of the main memory for the system. The memory module is described in “Memory” on page 23.

System Management Connectors

Server Management features are implemented using one microcontroller, the system board management controller (BMC).

The BMC and associated circuitry are powered from the 5 V standby line, which remains active when the system power is switched off.

The primary function of the BMC is to autonomously monitor system management events and log their occurrence in the nonvolatile system event log (SEL). These events include overtemperature and overvoltage conditions, fan failure, or chassis intrusion. While monitoring, the BMC maintains the nonvolatile sensor data record repository (SDRR), from which run-time information can be retrieved. The BMC provides an ISA

16 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

host interface to SDRR information, so software running on the server can poll and retrieve the current status of the hardware. A shared register interface is defined for this purpose.

SEL contents can be retrieved after system failure for analysis by field service personnel using system management tools like Intel®LANDesk® Server Manager. Because the BMC is powered by 5V_Standby, SEL (and SDRR) information is also available via the interperipheral management bus (IPMB). An emergency management board like the Intel LANDesk server management module (SMM) board can obtain the SEL and make it remotely accessible using a LAN or telephone line connection.

During monitoring, the BMC performs the following functions:

System board temperature and voltage monitoring

Processor presence monitoring and fault resilient boot (FRB) control

System board fan failure detection and indicator control

SEL interface management

SDRR interface management

SDR/SEL timestamp clock

System board field replaceable unit (FRU) information interface

System management watchdog timer

Periodic system management interrupt (SMI) timer

Front panel non-maskable interrupt (NMI) handling

Event receiver

ISA host and IPMB interface management

Secure mode control, front panel lock/unlock initiation, and video blank and diskette write protect monitoring and control

Sensor event initialization agent

Wake-on-LAN via Magic Packet support

ACPI Support

Emergency Management Port (EMP) support

System Board Connectors 17

ICMB Connector (J)

The intelligent chassis management bus (ICMB) connector allows the connection of a system management component to monitor the chassis characteristics including temperature, voltages, intrusion detection, and fan speeds.

SMBus Connector (GG)

This connector supports an SMBus card that provides system management functions.

F16 Expansion Connector (HH)

The F16 expansion connector allows you to connect a component to the F16 bus which communicates between the memory and I/O controller (MIOC) and the PCI expansion bridge (PXB).

External IPMB connector (JJ)

This connector allows you to connect an “external” device to the IPMB to help determine the cause of a system failure from a remote terminal.

SMM connector (KK)

The SMM connector allows you to connect a system management module to the system board to monitor the system and perform other system management functions.

Back Panel I/O Connectors

Video Port Connector (L)

The onboard, integrated Cirrus Logic CL-GD5480 64-bit VGA chip contains an SVGA controller that is fully compatible with the VGA video standard. The system board provides 2 MB of 10 ns onboard video

18 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

memory. The video controller supports pixel resolutions of up to

1600 x 1200 and up to 16.7 M colors. You cannot add video memory to this system.

The SVGA controller supports analog VGA monitors (single and multiple frequency, interlaced and noninterlaced) with a maximum vertical retrace noninterlaced frequency of 100 Hz. Depending on the environment, the controller displays up to 16.7 M colors in some video resolutions.

Compatible video drivers are provided with the operating system or the utilities.

Parallel Port Connector (L)

The 25/15-pin connector stacks the parallel port beside the VGA video port. BIOS programming of the super I/O chip registers enables the parallel port and determines the port address and interrupt. The system BIOS provides fields in the setup utility to easily enable the parallel port and set the port address and interrupt. When disabled, the interrupt is available to expansion cards.

Serial Port Connectors (M)

Both serial ports are relocatable. By default, port 1 is the left connector, port 2 on the right. Each serial port can be set to one of four different COMx ports, and each can be enabled separately. The system BIOS provides fields in the setup utility to easily enable both serial ports and set the port addresses and interrupts. When disabled, serial port interrupts are available to expansion cards.

Keyboard and Mouse Connectors (N)

The PS/2-compatible keyboard and mouse connectors are mounted in a single-stacked housing with the mouse connector to the left of the keyboard. External to the system, they appear as two connectors.

You can plug in the keyboard and mouse to either connector before powering up the system. BIOS detects the device connected at each connector and configures the keyboard controller accordingly.

System Board Connectors 19

Note:

A second USB port internal to the system chassis is provided at position FF as shown in Figure 3 on

page 11

The keyboard controller is functionally compatible with the 8042A microcontroller. The system can be locked automatically if no keyboard or mouse activity occurs for a predefined length of time, if specified through the SSU. Once the inactivity (lockout) timer has expired, the keyboard and mouse do not respond until the previously stored password is entered.

USB External Connector (O)

One universal serial bus (USB) port provides connection for a growing list of peripheral components including mouse, keyboard, joystick, monitor, tape and diskette drives. Up to 127 devices can be daisy-chained from the port. The USB port also provides hot-swap capability and dynamic resource allocation for all peripherals attached to it with data transfer rates of up to 12 Mbps. USB drivers are provided as a part of most major operating systems and should require no special procedures for implementation or use.

Processors and Related Connectors

VRM Connectors (P, Q, R, S, T, U)

In this system each processor must have one VRM to adjust the voltage supplied to the processor core and one to adjust the voltage supplied to the second-level cache in the SEC cartridge. The first VRM is dedicated to a single processor and provides the correct power to the processor core. The second VRM provides power to the integrated second-level cache and can support the cache on two SEC cartridges. Therefore each processor requires 1.5 VRMs. See Table 2 for the allowed processor and VRM configurations.

Table 2: Processors and VRMs

Processor

VRM

VRM Function

Installed

Installed

 

Processor 1

VRM 1

Powers the processor core for processor 1

 

 

 

 

VRM 2

Powers the second-level cache for processors 1 and 2

 

 

 

Processor 2

VRM 3

Powers the processor core for processor 2

 

 

 

Processor 3

VRM 4

Powers the processor core for processor 3

 

 

 

 

VRM 5

Powers the second-level cache for processors 3 and 4

 

 

 

Processor 4

VRM 6

Powers the processor core for processor 4

 

 

 

20 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Processor Slots (V, X, Y, AB)

Each Pentium® II Xeonprocessor is packaged in a SEC cartridge. The cartridge includes the processor core with an integrated 16 KB primary (L1) cache; the secondary (L2) cache; a thermal plate; and a back cover.

The processor implements MMXtechnology and maintains full

backward compatibility with the 8086, 80286, Intel386, Intel486, Pentium, and Pentium Pro processors.

Each SEC cartridge connects to the system board through a Slot 2 edge connector. The cartridge is secured by a retention bracket attached to the system board. Depending on configuration, the server has one to four processors.

The processor external interface is multiprocessor (MP)-ready and operates at 100 MHz. The processor contains a local advanced programmable interrupt controller (APIC) for interrupt handling in MP and uniprocessor (UP) environments. The system SMP design supports up to four processors and is Intel MP Specification v1.1 and 1.4 compliant.

The second-level cache is located inside the SEC cartridge. The cache includes burst pipelined synchronous static RAM (BSRAM) and is offered in 512 KB, 1 MB, and 2 MB configurations, with ECC that operates at the full core clock rate.

Each processor cartridge requires two VRMs to provide power to the processor core and the second-level cache, respectively. The full details of the installation of processors and VRMs are provided in “VRM Connectors (P, Q, R, S, T, U)” on page 20.

Power Connectors

There are several power connectors that provide power for the system board. Some of these connectors provide power for specialized functions.

Main Power Connector, Primary (W)

The primary power connectors provide the majority of the power to the system board. These connectors are designed to accommodate the power supply installed in the system.

System Board Connectors 21

Main Power Connector, Secondary (Z)

The primary power connectors provide the majority of the power to the system board. These connectors are designed to accommodate the power supply installed in the system.

Auxiliary Power Connector (EE)

The auxiliary power connector provides for the connection of an additional power source.

22 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Memory

The system comes standard with 256-MB of ECC RAM. System RAM is expandable up to 4-GB using ECC 50or 60-ns 72-bit EDO DIMMs

(16 DIMM sockets) with gold contacts.

Main memory resides on an expansion card, called a memory module, designed specifically for this server. The memory module contains slots for 16 DIMMs, each of which must be at least 32 MB, and is attached to the system board through a dedicated connector. Memory amounts from

128 MB to 4 GB of RAM are supported, with a 64/72-bit four-way-interleaved pathway to main memory.

The 16 slots are divided into four banks of four slots each, labeled A through D. These banks support 4:1 interleaving. The memory controller supports EDO DRAMs. The ECC used for the memory module is capable of correcting single-bit errors (SBEs) and detecting 100 percent of doublebit errors over one code word. Nibble error detection is also provided.

E

J16

D

J14

J15

J13

J12

C

J10

J11

J9

J8

B

J6

J7

J5

J4

A

J2

J3

J1

 

Figure 4: Memory Banks

Memory 23

Note:

Each memory bank includes two DIMM sockets in each row of connectors. When installing DIMMs, be careful to install the DIMMs in the correct sockets for the bank.

DIMM Installation Sequence

You must install DIMMs in the correct order and in entire banks. All DIMMs in the bank must be the same size and speed. DIMMs in other banks may differ in size. If you use slower DIMMs in another bank, all DIMMs operate at the slower speed (see Figure 4 on page 23).

The sequence in which you must fill the banks is:

1.Memory bank A

2.Memory bank B

3.Memory bank C

4.Memory bank D

System Memory Addressing

System memory begins at address 0 and is continuous (flat addressing) up to the maximum amount of DRAM installed (exception: system memory is noncontiguous in the ranges defined as memory holes using configuration registers). The system supports both base (conventional) and extended memory.

Base memory is located at addresses 00000h to 9FFFFh (the first 1 MB).

Extended memory begins at address 0100000h (1 MB) and extends to FFFFFFFFh (4 GB), which is the limit of supported addressable memory. The top of physical memory is a maximum of 4 GB (to FFFFFFFFh)

Memory holes can be configured in Setup or the SSU and are used by some legacy ISA boards. If you do not need to set up a memory hole for an ISA expansion board, leave the memory in a contiguous state for optimal performance.

24 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Memory Configuration

BIOS automatically detects, sizes, and initializes the memory array, depending on the type, size, and speed of the installed DIMMs, and reports memory size and allocation to the system via configuration registers.

In a 4 GB configuration, a small part of memory (typically 32 MB) is not remapped above 4 GB. If your OS does not support more than 4 GB of physical memory, this small part of the memory is effectively lost.

Table 3: Sample DIMM Component Combinations

Bank A

Bank B

Bank C

Bank D

Total

(slots J1 - 4)

(slots J5 - 8)

(slots J9 - 12)

(slots J13 - 16)

Memory

4x64

 

 

 

256 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x64

4x32

 

 

384 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x64

4x32

4x32

 

512 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x64

4x64

 

 

512 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x64

4x64

4x32

4x32

768 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x64

4x64

4x64

4x64

1024 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x128

4x64

4x32

4x32

1024 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x128

4x128

4x64

4x64

1536 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x128

4x128

4x128

4x128

2048 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x256

4x128

4x64

4x64

2048 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x256

4x256

4x128

4x128

3072 MB

 

 

 

 

 

4x256

4x256

4x256

4x256

4096 MB

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

Use DIMMs that have been tested for compatibility with the system board. Contact your sales representative or dealer for a list of approved DIMMs. Table 3 lists some sample size combinations.

Memory 25

System Security

To help prevent unauthorized entry or use of the system, the system includes a three-position key lock/switch to permit selected access to drive bays (position is communicated to the BMC, see “System Management Connectors” on page 16). The system also includes server management software that monitors the chassis intrusion switch.

Mechanical Locks and Monitoring

The system includes a chassis intrusion switch. When the access cover is opened, the switch transmits an alarm signal to the system board, where server management software processes the signal. You can program a response to an intrusion, for example, the system may power down or lock the keyboard.

Software Locks via the SSU or BIOS Setup

The system setup utility (SSU) provides a number of security features to prevent unauthorized or accidental access to the system. Once the security measures are enabled, access to the system is allowed only after you enter the correct password(s). For example, the SSU allows you to:

Enable the keyboard lockout timer so the server requires a password to reactivate the keyboard and mouse after a specified time-out period of 1 to 120 minutes

Set and enable administrator and user passwords

Set secure mode to prevent keyboard or mouse input and to prevent use of the front panel reset and power switches

Activate a hot-key combination to enter secure mode quickly

Disable writing to the diskette drive when secure mode is set

26 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Using Passwords

If you set and enable a user password but not an administrator password, enter the user password to boot the system and run the SSU.

If you set and enable both a user and an administrator password:

Enter either one to boot the server and enable the keyboard and mouse

Enter the administrator password to access the SSU or BIOS Setup to change the system configuration

Secure Mode

Configure and enable the secure boot mode by using the SSU. When secure mode is in effect, you:

Can boot the system and run the OS, but you must enter the user password to use the keyboard or mouse

Cannot turn off system power or reset the system from the front panel switches

Secure mode has no effect on functions enabled via the Server Manager Module or power control via the real-time clock (RTC).

Taking the system out of secure mode does not change the state of system power. That is, if you press and release the power switch while secure mode is in effect, the system will not power off when secure mode is later removed. However, if the front panel power switch remains depressed when secure mode is removed, the system will power off.

System Security 27

Summary of Software Security Features

Table 4 lists the software security features and describes what protection each offers. In general, to enable or set the features listed here, you must run the SSU and go to the Security Menu (described in “Security Add-in” on page 116). The table also refers to other SSU menus and to the Setup utility. For more information on setting the security features, see “Security Menu” on page 92, and “Security Add-in” on page 116.

Table 4: Software Security Features

 

 

Feature

Description

Secure boot mode

To enter secure mode:

 

Set and enable a password to automatically put the system into secure

 

mode.

 

If you set a hot-key combination, you can secure the system by pressing

 

the key combination. This means you do not have to wait for the

 

inactivity time-out period. See “Security Menu” on page 92.

 

When the system is in secure mode:

 

The system boots and runs the OS, but does not accept mouse or

 

keyboard input until you enter the user password.

 

At bootup, if the system detects a CD in the CD-ROM drive or a diskette

 

in drive A, it requests a password. When you enter the password, the

 

system boots from CD or diskette and disables secure mode.

 

If you have not installed a CD-ROM drive or if there is no CD in the drive

 

or diskette in drive A, the system boots from drive C and automatically

 

enters secure mode. All enabled secure mode features go into effect at

 

bootup.

 

To leave secure mode:

 

Enter the correct password(s).

 

 

Disable writing to diskette

In secure mode, the system will not boot from or write to a diskette

 

unless a password is entered. To set these features, see “Security

 

Menu” on page 92 and “Security Options” on page 117.

 

 

Disable the power and reset

If you enable this protection feature in the SSU, the system disables the

buttons

power and reset buttons when in secure mode. See “Security Options”

 

on page 117.

 

 

Set a time-out period so that

You can specify and enable an inactivity time-out period of from 1 to

keyboard and mouse input

120 minutes. If no keyboard or mouse action occurs for the specified

are not accepted.

period, keyboard and mouse input is not accepted. To set this feature,

Also, blank screen and inhibit

see “Security Menu” on page 92.

writes to diskette

If video blanking is enabled, the monitor display goes blank until you

 

enter the correct password(s). To set this feature, see “Security Menu”

 

on page 92.

 

 

Control access to the SSU:

To control access to the system configuration, set an administrator

set administrator password

password and enable it through Setup or the SSU.

 

If both the administrator and user passwords are enabled, either can be

 

used to boot the system or enable the keyboard and/or mouse, but only

 

the administrator password allows changes to Setup and the SSU.

 

Once set, passwords can be disabled by setting the password to a null

 

string or by changing the Clear Password jumper. See “Security Add-in”

 

on page 116 to set the password to a null string; or, to change the

 

jumper, see “Password Clear Jumper” on page 75.

 

 

28 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Table 4: Software Security Features (Continued)

Feature

Description

Control access to the system

To control access to the system, set a user password and enable the

other than SSU: set user

Password on Boot field through Setup or the SSU.

password

Once set, passwords can be disabled by setting the password to a null

 

string or by changing the Clear Password jumper. See “Security Add-in”

 

on page 116 to set the password to a null string; or, to change the

 

jumper, see “Password Clear Jumper” on page 75.

 

 

Boot without keyboard

The system can boot with or without a keyboard. During POST and

 

before the system boots, BIOS automatically detects and tests the

 

keyboard, if present, and displays a message. No entry exists in the SSU

 

for enabling or disabling a keyboard. Do not plug in a keyboard while

 

power is applied to the system.

 

 

Specify the boot sequence

The sequence you specify in the BIOS (see “Boot Device Priority

 

Submenu” on page 96) or the SSU (see “Multiboot Options Add-in” on

 

page 115) determines the boot order. If secure mode is enabled (user

 

password is set), you are prompted for a password before the system

 

boots fully. If secure mode is enabled and the Secure Mode Boot option

 

is also enabled, the system boots fully but requires a password before

 

accepting any keyboard or mouse input.

 

 

System Security 29

30 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

Installing

 

Components

 

Contents

 

Introduction............................................................

32

Replacing the Processor ........................................

32

Installing Another Processor.................................

36

Installing Hardware ...............................................

40

Memory...........................................................

40

Drives..............................................................

45

Installing Fans for High-Power Drives..........

57

Expansion Cards.............................................

62

Power Supplies ...............................................

65

Replacing the Battery .....................................

68

Caution!

ESD can damage disk drives, expansion cards, and other components. The server can withstand normal levels of environmental ESD while you hot-swap SCSI hard drives. However, we recommend doing all procedures at an ESDprotected workstation. If one is not available, you can provide some ESD protection by wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground of the server when handling components.

Note:

If the server has less than four processors and you are adding one, then you must remove the termination board assembly from the next Slot 2 connector before you install the new processor. If you plan to reduce the number of processors in your system, then you must replace a processor with a termination board assembly.

Introduction

This chapter provides step-by-step instruction for installing, removing, or replacing several system components. Only authorized service personnel should perform these procedures. Follow all standard safety and ESD precautions when servicing the server. See “Static Electricity Precautions” on page 2 for more information on ESD precautions.

“Opening the System” on page 3 provides detailed instructions for opening the system. All procedures in this chapter assume that any necessary access covers have been removed and that the subchassis and electronics bays have been removed, if necessary.

Replacing the Processor

The system is compatible with Intel Pentium® II Xeonprocessors. You can either upgrade the existing Pentium II Xeon processor or install up to three more processors of the same speed and cache size as the first processor.

When replacing a processor, order a Pentium II Xeon processor upgrade kit. The kit includes the Pentium II Xeon processor, a heat sink, and latches.

It is critical that a heat sink be installed on each processor. The Pentium II Xeon processor overheats and fails if it is not cooled sufficiently. The heat sink provided with the processor in the system provides all necessary cooling for the processor.

For the latest details on the availability of the upgrade kits, contact one of the sources listed in the Assistance Resources document.

To Replace the Processor

1.Turn off the system and disconnect all the power cords.

2.Open the case, observing the static electricity precautions in “Static Electricity Precautions” on page 2 and remove the foam cover on the electronics bay.

32 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

3.Wear an anti-static wristband grounded to the system chassis and place processors on a grounded, static-free surface or conductive foam pad.

4.With your right thumb on the face of the retention module bracket (A in Figure 5), wrap your right index finger around the tab (B in Figure 5) protruding from the right edge of the bracket.

A

B

Latch

Figure 5: Releasing the Retention Module Bracket

5.Use your index finger to slightly pull the tab outward and to the left. You should not try to pull the entire bracket; rather, the back of the tab has a latch (C in Figure 5) that releases when the tab is pulled slightly.

6.When you have released the right edge of the bracket, rotate it 90° to the left until it is perpendicular to the front of the retention module. The left edge of the bracket has an open hinge that can release from the module when you rotate the bracket to the left.

7.Disengage the open hinge by moving (not rotating) the entire bracket to the right. Remove the bracket and set it aside.

Replacing the Processor 33

8.Pull the two tabs attached to the single edge contact (SEC) cartridge

(visible after you remove the bracket—C in Figure 6) straight away from the system board. As you do, the cartridge disengages from the connector on the system board.

Tab on SEC cartridge

Retention module guide rails

SEC cartridge

Retention module guide rails

Tab on SEC cartridge

Processor heat sink

Figure 6: Removing a Processor

9.Slide the SEC cartridge straight away from the system board, out of the retention module. Put it on a piece of conductive foam and store it in an antistatic package.

10.Remove the replacement processor cartridge from its protective wrapping.

11.Orient the SEC cartridge so that the heat sink faces away from the center of the system board.

If you are installing a termination card assembly, orient it so that the side with the label faces toward the center of the system board.

34 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

12.With the tabs at the top of the SEC cartridge completely open (pulled outward, away from the center of the cartridge—C in Figure 7), slide the cartridge into the guide rails of the retention module (B in Figure 7). When done properly, the triangular ends of the tabs (with two round pegs on each) fit into the entrance to the guide rails.

SEC cartridge

Retention module guide rails

Tab on SEC cartridge

Processor heat sink (must face away from the center of the system board

Figure 7: Installing a Processor

13.When the cartridge meets resistance, push the two tabs toward each other (E in Figure 7) until the processor is fully seated.

14.Reattach the retention module bracket:

a.With the bracket in an open position (perpendicular to the front of the retention module), slide the open hinge at the left of the bracket into its receptacle at the left of the retention module.

b.Rotate the bracket to the right until it reaches the retention module. With your right thumb on the face of the bracket and your right index finger around the tab at the right of the bracket, slightly pull the tab outward and to the left to open the latch at the back of the tab.

c.As you open the latch on the back of the tab, slide the right edge of the bracket onto the retention module and release the tab. If done correctly, the bracket will latch securely.

Replacing the Processor 35

Note:

The foam cover is required to control airflow past the processors for proper cooling. Failure to install the foam cover could result in damage to the processors and other system components.

Note:

If the server has less than four processors and you are adding one, then you must remove the termination board assembly from the next Slot 2 connector before you install the new processor. If you plan to reduce the number of processors in your system, then you must replace a processor with a termination board assembly.

15.Reinstall the foam cover.

16.Close the case, as described in “Closing the System” on page 7.

17.Reconnect the power cord and turn on the system.

Installing Another Processor

The system is compatible with Intel Pentium® II Xeonprocessors. You can either upgrade the existing processor or install another processor of the same speed as the original processor.

When adding a processor, order a Pentium II Xeon processor upgrade kit. The kit includes the Pentium II Xeon processor, a heat sink, and latches.

It is critical that a heat sink be installed on each processor. The Pentium II Xeon processor overheats and fails if it is not cooled sufficiently. The heat sink provided with the processor in the system provides all necessary cooling for the processor.

For the latest details on the availability of the upgrade kits, contact one of the sources listed in the Assistance Resources document.

To Install a Second Processor

1.Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord.

2.Open the case, observing the static electricity precautions in “Static Electricity Precautions” on page 2 and remove the foam cover on the electronics bay.

3.Wear an anti-static wristband grounded to the system chassis and place processors on a grounded, static-free surface or conductive foam pad.

4.Remove the termination card in the lowest numbered empty processor slot. (Processor slots are numbered from the bottom up or from the edge of the system board toward the center of the board.) With your

36 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

right thumb on the face of the retention module bracket (A in

Figure 8), wrap your right index finger around the tab (B in Figure 8) protruding from the right edge of the bracket.

A

B

Latch

Figure 8: Releasing the Retention Module Bracket

5.Use your index finger to slightly pull the tab outward and to the left. You should not try to pull the entire bracket; rather, the back of the tab has a latch that releases when the tab is pulled slightly.

6.When you have released the right edge of the bracket, rotate it 90° to the left until it is perpendicular to the front of the retention module. The left edge of the bracket has an open hinge that can release from the module when you rotate the bracket to the left.

7.Disengage the open hinge by moving (not rotating) the entire bracket to the right. Remove the bracket and set it aside.

Installing Another Processor 37

8.Pull the two tabs attached to the termination module (visible after you remove the bracket—C in Figure 9) straight away from the system board. As you do, the termination module disengages from the connector on the system board.

Tab on retention module

Retention module guide rail

Termination module

Retention module guide rail Tab on retention module

Figure 9: Removing the Termination Module

9.Slide the termination module straight away from the system board, out of the retention module. Put it on a piece of conductive foam and store it in an antistatic package.

10.Remove the processor cartridge from its protective wrapping.

11.Orient the S.E.C. cartridge so that the heat sink faces away from the center of the system board.

12.With the tabs at the top of the S.E.C. cartridge completely open (pulled outward, away from the center of the cartridge, Figure 10), slide the cartridge into the guide rails of the retention module (Figure 10). When done properly, the triangular ends of the tabs (with two round pegs on each) fit into the entrance to the guide rails.

38 Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Gateway ALR 9200 Server

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