Gateway 7400 User Manual

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Gateway® 7400 Server

System Manual

October 2001

8508366

Notices

Copyright © 2001 Gateway, Inc.

All Rights Reserved

4545 Town Centre Court

San Diego, CA 92121 USA

All Rights Reserved

This publication is protected by copyright and all rights are reserved. No part of it may be reproduced or transmitted by any means or in any form, without prior consent in writing from Gateway.

The information in this manual has been carefully checked and is believed to be accurate. However, changes are made periodically. These changes are incorporated in newer publication editions. Gateway may improve and/or change products described in this publication at any time. Due to continuing system improvements, Gateway is not responsible for inaccurate information which may appear in this manual. For the latest product updates, consult the Gateway Web site at www.gateway.com. In no event will Gateway be liable for direct, indirect, special, exemplary, incidental, or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual, even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

In the interest of continued product development, Gateway reserves the right to make improvements in this manual and the products it describes at any time, without notices or obligation.

Trademark Acknowledgments

1-800-GATEWAY, ActiveCPR, ALR, AnyKey, black-and-white spot design, CrystalScan, Destination, DestiVu, EZ Pad, EZ Point, Field Mouse, Gateway 2000, Gateway Country, gateway.net, Gateway stylized logo, Perfect Scholar, Solo, TelePath, Vivitron, stylized “G” design, and “You’ve got a friend in the business” slogan are registered trademarks and black-and-white spotted box logo, GATEWAY, Gateway Astro, Gateway@Work, Gateway Connected touch pad, Gateway Connected music player, Gateway Cyber:)Ware, Gateway Education:)Ware, Gateway Flex Case, Gateway Gaming:)Ware, Gateway GoBack, Gateway Gold, Gateway Learning:)Ware, Gateway Magazine, Gateway Micro Server, Gateway Money:)Ware, Gateway Music:)Ware, Gateway Networking Solutions, Gateway Online Network (O.N.) solution, Gateway Photo:)Ware, Gateway Professional PCs, Gateway Profile, Gateway Solo, green stylized GATEWAY, green stylized Gateway logo, Gateway Teacher:)Ware, Gateway Video:)Ware, HelpSpot, InforManager, Just click it!, Learn@Gateway, Kids BackPack, SERVE-TO-ORDER, Server Watchdog, SpotShop, Spotshop.com, and Your:)Ware are trademarks of Gateway, Inc. Intel, Intel Inside logo, and Pentium are registered trademarks and MMX is a trademark of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, MS, MS-DOS, and Windows are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. All other product names mentioned herein are used for identification purposes only, and may be the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.

Contents

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

Conventions used in this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii Getting additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii

1 System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Standard features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Interior of system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 System board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 SCSI backplane board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Back side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Front side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Front panel board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

2 System Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Setting up the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Installing the outriggers and castors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Starting the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Understanding the Power-On Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Setting up the operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Turning off the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Resetting the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

3 Case Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Preventing static electricity discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Opening the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Opening the bezel door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Removing the bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Removing the side cover panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Closing the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Replacing the side panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Replacing the bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

4 Replacing and Adding System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Preparing to replace or add a drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Drive cabling information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

iii

Replacing the diskette drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Replacing an optional drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Installing a 3.5-inch drive in a 5.25-inch drive bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Replacing a hot-plug drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Adding a hot-plug drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Replacing the CD drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Adding additional 5.25-inch devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Replacing or adding memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Replacing or adding a processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Replacing the battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Expansion cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Replacing an expansion card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Adding an expansion card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Power supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Replacing a redundant power supply module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Replacing the power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Replacing the back panel and drive cage fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Replacing the control panel board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Replacing the SCSI backplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Replacing the system board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80

5 Using the BIOS Setup Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85

About the BIOS Setup utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Updating the BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Setting the configuration switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 The Clear Password switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 The Clear CMOS switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89

6 Managing Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91

Protecting against power source problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Surge suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Line conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Uninterruptible power supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Maintaining and managing your hard drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Hard drive maintenance utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Hard drive management practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Protecting your server from viruses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 System administration and control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 ManageX Event Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Gateway® server management software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 System security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 System recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Creating a startup diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101

iv

Using your Server Companion CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

7 Cleaning the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

Cleaning the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Cleaning the keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Cleaning the monitor screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Cleaning the server and monitor cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

8 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Troubleshooting checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Verifying your configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Troubleshooting guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 CD drive problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Diskette drive problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Hard drive problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Memory and processor problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Modem problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Peripheral/adapter problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Printer problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 System problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Video problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

A Safety and Regulatory Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

B System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 System I/O addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Memory map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 DMA usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

v

vi

Preface

Conventions used in this manual

Throughout this manual, you will see the following conventions:

Convention

Description

ENTER

Keyboard key names are printed in small capitals.

 

 

 

CTRL+ALT+DEL

A plus sign means to press the keys at the same time.

 

 

 

Setup

Commands to be entered, options to select, and messages that

 

appear on your monitor are printed in bold.

 

 

 

User’s Guide

Names of publications are printed in italic.

 

 

 

Viewpoint

All references to front, rear, left, or right on the computer are based

 

on the computer being in a normal, upright position, as viewed from

 

the front.

 

 

 

Important

 

A note labeled important informs you of special

 

 

 

circumstances.

Caution

 

A caution warns you of possible damage to equipment or

 

 

loss of data.

Warning

 

A warning indicates the possibility of personal injury.

 

 

 

Conventions used in this manual

vii

Getting additional information

Log on to the Technical Support area at www.gatewayatwork.com to find information about your system or other Gateway products. Some types of information you can access are:

Hardware driver and program updates

Technical tips

Service agreement information

Technical documents and component information

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

Documentation for peripherals or optional components

Online Technical Support

viii Preface

System

1

Features

Standard features

As many as two Pentium® III (FC-PGA Socket 370) processors with 133 MHz Front Side Bus (FSB)

Four Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM) sockets, that support up to 2 GB of PC133 Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM)

RCC Champion LE 3.0 North Bridge (CNB30LE) chipset

Integrated Intel 82559 LAN

Integrated dual-channel Ultra3/U160 SCSI

Integrated ATI Rage-XL VGA controller with 4 MB of PC100 SDRAM

Seven PCI slots (two 64-bit/33 MHz slots and five 32-bit/33 MHz slots)

One 3.5 inch 1.44 MB diskette drive, one CD drive, and one hard drive

Integrated Voltage Regulator Modules (VRMs) for both processors

Keyboard port (PS/2®), mouse port (PS/2), two serial ports, parallel port, two Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports, one RJ-45 LAN connector, and one VGA port

Standard features

1

Front panel

Chassis lock

Power LED

Disk activity LED

System fault LED

PS 1 status LED

PS 2 status LED

System reset

button

Power button

Reserved

Hot-plug drive lock

Outriggers

Castors

5.25” drive bay

5.25” drive bay

5.25” drive bay

CD drive

Diskette drive

Power supply alarm speaker reset /system fault LED reset switch

Hot-plug drive activity LED

Hot-plug drive bay

Front panel door (shown open)

Chassis lock prevents unauthorized access to both the front panel controls and to the interior of the system by locking the front bezel to the chassis.

Power LED glows green whenever the system is turned on. The LED also flashes when the system is in sleep mode.

Disk activity LED glows green whenever a drive is actively reading or writing data.

System fault LED (yellow) indicates ECC (Error Checking and Correcting) memory system fault (steady indicates an uncorrectable ECC fault and blinking indicates a correctable ECC fault).

2 System Features

PS 1 status LED glows green when the first power supply module in the redundant power supply is installed and working correctly. It flashes green if the power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds. If the power supply module is not installed, this LED is off.

PS 2 status LED glows green when the second power supply module in the redundant power supply is installed and working correctly. It flashes green if the power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds. If the power supply module is not installed, this LED is off.

System reset button is a recessed button that lets you reset the server if it becomes nonresponsive.

Power button turns the server on and off. In an ACPI-enabled operating system like Windows 2000, you can set the power button to enter sleep mode rather than turning the system off.

Hot-plug drive lock secures the drive in place to prevent unauthorized or accidental removal.

Outriggers provide support for the castors.

Castors let you roll the server around for ease of service.

5.25-inch drive bays (3) have room for additional 5.25-inch devices such as tape drives or an additional CD drive.

CD drive plays data or audio CDs.

Diskette drive writes to and reads from 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskettes.

Power supply alarm speaker reset/System fault LED reset switch disables the power supply alarm speaker, if it’s sounding, or resets the system fault LED, if it’s flashing. Even though the switch resets the speaker, the power supply alarm is not cleared and the appropriate LED continues to flash until the failed power supply module is replaced.

Hot-plug drive activity LED indicates when the hot-plug drive immediately below it is reading or writing data.

Hot-plug drive bay has room for up to six hot-plug drives connected to a hot-plug backplane. Drives have to be set up in appropriate RAID configuration to be hot-pluggable. Removing a drive when it is not properly configured will result in lost data and may corrupt the operating system.

Front panel door covers the front panel controls to prevent unauthorized or accidental access.

Front panel

3

Back panel

Power supply module

Power supply module LED

Module power switch

Power supply module

Power connector

 

Power supply

Redundant

cable clamp

 

power supply

Keyboard port

Mouse port

USB ports

RJ-45 LAN port

 

Serial port A

 

 

Parallel port

Serial port B

 

Video port

 

Expansion card slots

Expansion card retention clips

Kensington lock slot

Power supply modules (2) provide redundant power and hot-plug capability to power the server with minimal downtime.

Module power switches (2) provide independent power control for each redundant power supply module.

Power connector connects to the server power cord. The other end of the power cord plugs into an AC outlet or power strip.

4 System Features

Power supply cable clamp secures the power supply cords so that they are not accidentally pulled from the power supply.

Keyboard port connects to a PS/2-compatible keyboard.

USB ports connect to external Plug-and-Play devices, such as printers, that are automatically configured when they are plugged into the server through one of these ports. USB keyboards and mice are not supported.

Serial ports (2) connect to serial devices.

Video port connects to the monitor interface cable. The video controller is integrated in the system board.

Power supply module LED glows steady green when the power supply module is operating normally.

Redundant power supply provides two hot-pluggable power supply modules that can independently support the power requirements of the server.

Mouse port connects to a PS/2-compatible mouse.

RJ-45 LAN port connects to a network. The adjacent indicator LEDs show LAN activity (yellow) and 100 Mbit speed (green).

Parallel port connects to a printer or other parallel device.

Expansion card slots (7) have room for as many as seven PCI expansion cards.

Expansion card retention clips (7) allow screwless retention of the expansion cards for ease of maintenance and installation.

Kensington lock slot provides a place to install a security cable and lock.

Back panel

5

Interior of system

Power supply

Power supply fans

5.25-inch drive bays

N+1 power supply alarm board

3.25-inch drive bays

Hot-plug bays (Hot-plug cage)

Back

System

System

Drive

SCSI

panel fan

board

board tray

cage fan

backplane

Power supply provides power to the system components. The redundant power supply provides hot-plug capability and fault tolerance.

Power supply fans provide cooling for the redundant power supply modules.

5.25-inch drive bays provide space for as many as four 5.25-inch drives. A CD drive comes standard with the system and occupies one of the 5.25-inch drive bays.

N+1 power supply alarm board provides an audible alarm if a power supply module fails.

3.25-inch drive bays support as many as two 3.25-inch drives. A diskette drive comes standard with the system and occupies one 3.25-inch drive bay. A hard drive is typically installed in the second drive bay.

Hot-plug bays support as many as six 1-inch high 3.25-inch SCA SCSI hard drives. Drive bays without hard drives contain empty drive carriers to control airflow and EMC emissions.

6 System Features

SCSI backplane provides the control for the hot-plug drives.

Drive cage fan provides cooling for the hot-plug drives and other internal components.

System board tray supports the system board and makes it easier to remove and install.

System board (See “System board” on page 8.)

Back panel fan provides cooling for system board components and additional cooling for the power supply.

Interior of system

7

System board

 

 

 

A

C

E

F

B

D

 

 

AE

 

 

 

AD

 

 

G

AC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

H

AB

 

 

I

 

 

 

J

AA

 

 

K

 

 

 

Z

 

 

L

Y

 

 

 

X

 

 

M

 

 

 

W

 

 

N

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

P

V

 

 

 

U

 

 

 

 

S

 

Q

 

T

R

 

ARear chassis fan connector

BMain ATX power connector

CCPU 1 socket

DCPU 2 socket

ECPU 1 Fan connector

8 System Features

FDIMM sockets (3 to 0, right to left)

GFront chassis fan connector

HI2C SMB header

IFloppy drive connector

JPrimary IDE connector

KSecondary IDE connector

LCPU 2 fan connector

MSpeaker

NFront panel connector

OAuxiliary HDD activity LED connector

PU160 LVD SCSI Channel A connector

QU160 LVD SCSI Channel B connector

RConfiguration switch

SBattery

T(not used)

UPCI 32-bit/33 MHz slot

VPCI 64-bit/33 MHz slots (2)

W(not used)

X(not used)

YPCI 32-bit/33 MHz slots (4)

ZVideo port

AA Serial port B

AB Parallel port

AC Serial port A

AD RJ-45 Ethernet and USB ports 1 and 2

AE PS/2 Keyboard and mouse ports

System board

9

SCSI backplane board

Back side

JP5: Delay start jumper

Power connector

SCSI connector

JP6: Termination jumper

JP5: Delay start jumper controls the spin-up sequence of the drives attached to the backplane. If you leave the delay start jumper on (enabled - default), the drives spin up one at a time in order of their SCSI ID. If you remove the delay start jumper, all drives spin up simultaneously, which may cause an excessive drain on the system power supply.

JP6: Termination jumper - The backplane is designed to occupy one end of the bus and is terminated (jumper off - default).

SCSI connector provides the point of connection for the SCSI cable from the hot-plug controller.

Power connector provides the point of connection for the power cable from the power supply.

10 System Features

Front side

Reserved LED (6) Drive activity LED (6)

SCA SCSI drive connectors (6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCSI ID 2

 

 

SCSI ID 5

 

SCSI ID 1

 

 

SCSI ID 4

 

SCSI ID 0

SCSI ID 3

Reserved LED (6) reserved for future use.

Drive activity LED (6) flashes green when the drive is actively reading or writing data.

SCA SCSI drive connectors (6) provide points of connection for six SCA SCSI drives.

SCSI backplane board

11

Front panel board

The front panel board supports the LEDs and buttons accessible from the front panel. The buttons and LEDs on the front panel board are shown and described below.

Power LED

Disk activity LED

System fault LED

PS 1 status LED

PS 2 status LED

System reset button

NMI button

Chassis intrusion detection switch

Front panel connector

Power supply alarm speaker reset/System fault LED reset switch

Power button

Power LED glows green whenever the system is turned on. The LED also flashes when the system is in sleep mode.

Disk activity LED glows green whenever a hard drive is actively reading or writing data.

System fault LED (yellow) indicates ECC memory system fault (steady indicates an uncorrectable ECC fault and blinking indicates a correctable ECC fault).

PS 1 status LED glows green when the first power supply module in the redundant power supply is installed and working correctly. It flashes green if the power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds. If the power supply module is not installed, this LED is off.

12 System Features

PS 2 status LED glows green when the second power supply module in the redundant power supply is installed and working correctly. It flashes green if the power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds. If the power supply module is not installed, this LED is off.

System reset button lets you reset the server if it has become nonresponsive.

Power button turns the server on and off. In an ACPI-enabled operating system like Windows 2000, you can set the power button to enter sleep mode rather than turning the system off.

Power supply alarm speaker reset/System fault LED reset switch disables the power supply alarm speaker or resets the system fault LED. The alarm is not cleared and the appropriate LED continues to glow until the failed power supply module is replaced.

NMI (Non-Maskable Interrupt) button allows a technician to help debug server errors.

Chassis intrusion detection switch sends a message to the system management hardware, logging an event when the front bezel is removed.

Front panel connector connects the controls on the front panel with the system board.

Front panel board

13

14 System Features

System Setup

2

Setting up the server

Use the instructions on the quick guide poster that came with the server to assemble the server.

You can prepare a safer working environment before assembling the server by following these guidelines:

Use a clean, flat, and stable surface for the server. Allow at least 12 inches at the rear of the server for cabling and air circulation.

Obtain an adequately rated uninterruptible power supply (UPS). A UPS protects against AC line spikes, power interruptions, and other power fluctuations that may damage the server.

Protect the server from extreme temperature and humidity. Do not expose it to direct sunlight, heater ducts, or other heat-generating objects.

Keep the server away from equipment that generates magnetic fields, such as unshielded stereo speakers. Even a telephone placed too close to the server may cause interference.

Plug the server into a wall outlet, power strip, or uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Make sure the power cords are secured in the power supply cable clamp on the back panel.

Important Keep the boxes and packing material. If you need to send the server to Gateway for repairs, you must use the original packaging or your warranty may be voided.

Setting up the server

15

Installing the outriggers and castors

The tower chassis is shipped with small rubber feet to prevent it from slipping and to minimize vibrations when the chassis is placed on a desktop. However, if you intend to place the chassis on the floor, you may find it easier to maintain the system if you install the castors (included), which let you roll the server out for easier access.

To install the outriggers and castors:

1Gently turn the chassis upside down, resting it on the top panel.

2Align the outriggers and castors with the slots on the bottom panel of the chassis.

3Place the tabs on the outriggers into the corresponding slots on the bottom panel and slide the outriggers toward the ends of the chassis.

4Carefully return the chassis to the upright position.

16 System Setup

Starting the server

Before you start the server for the first time, make sure that:

The redundant power supply is autosensing. It automatically determines the voltage of the incoming power source and compensates accordingly.

All cables are firmly connected to the proper ports on the back panel of the server.

Caution Electricity can flow from connected peripherals into the system causing a shock. Make sure your server and peripherals are turned off and unplugged from the power outlet when you connect peripherals to the server.

Both power supply modules in the redundant power supply are turned on.

The server and monitor are plugged into an AC outlet, power strip, or UPS (uninterruptable power supply) and that the power strip or UPS is turned on.

To start the system:

1If you have connected the system components to a power strip or UPS, make sure all the system components are turned off, then turn on the power strip or UPS.

2Turn on the monitor.

3Turn on the server. Make sure that the individual power buttons on the power supply modules are turned on. The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the front panel and on each power supply module are lit when the power is on.

4Turn on any other components connected to the server, such as speakers, a printer, or a scanner. If nothing happens when you turn on the system:

Make sure that the power cables are securely plugged in and that the power strip or UPS is plugged in and turned on.

Make sure that the monitor is connected to the server, plugged into the power strip, AC outlet, or UPS, and turned on. You may also need to adjust the brightness and contrast controls on the monitor.

Starting the server

17

Understanding the Power-On Self-Test

When you turn on your server, the power-on self-test (POST) routine checks the system memory and components. To see this information on the screen, press TAB during POST.

The system displays an error message if POST finds any problems. Write down any error messages that you see. If you continue to have problems, these error messages may help Technical Support diagnose the cause.

Setting up the operating system

The first time you start your server, the operating system takes a few minutes to set up. Refer to your operating system documentation for specific questions regarding the operating system.

Important For other operating systems, such as Windows® 2000 or Novell® Netware, refer to the appropriate operating system software manual for setup instructions.

To complete the operating system setup for Windows NT:

1After the server starts, the start-up wizard opens. Continue by clicking

Next.

2Type the requested information in the appropriate text boxes. When you have finished typing the information, continue by clicking Next.

3Continue following the instructions and selecting options in the start-up wizard dialog boxes, clicking Next to move through the dialog boxes, until the wizard tells you to restart your server.

If you need to return to the previous dialog box to change any of your entries, click Back.

4Restart the server. The setup is complete.

18 System Setup

Turning off the server

Every time you turn off the server, shut down the operating system first. You may lose data if you do not follow the proper procedure.

Important For other operating systems, such as Windows 2000 or Novell Netware, refer to the appropriate operating system software manual for instructions.

To turn off the server in Windows NT:

1Click Start, then select Shut down the computer?, then Shut Down.

2Click OK. The operating system shuts down. If you see a message saying

It is now safe to turn off your computer, turn off the server by pressing the power button.

3Turn off the monitor and peripherals.

Warning

When you turn off the server by pressing the power button,

 

some electric current still flows through it. Before opening

 

the server case or connecting or removing any peripherals,

 

turn off the server, then unplug the power cord and modem

 

cord (if installed) or you may get an electric shock.

 

 

Turning off the server

19

Resetting the server

If your server does not respond to keyboard or mouse input, you may have to close programs that are not responding. If closing unresponsive programs does not restore your server to normal operation, you may have to reset the system.

Important For other operating systems, such as Windows 2000 or Novell Netware, refer to the appropriate operating system software manual for instructions.

To close unresponsive programs and reset the server in Windows NT:

1Press CTRL+ALT+DEL. A window opens that lets you close a program that is not responding.

2Click Task Manager, then select the program that is not responding.

3Close the program by clicking End Task.

4If the server does not respond, press the reset button to restart the server.

As a part of the regular startup process, a program to check the disk status runs automatically. When the checks are finished, Windows starts.

20 System Setup

Case Access

3

The Gateway 7400 Server is designed as a toolless chassis. None of the normal user-serviceable parts require a tool of any kind to remove, install, or replace. In some cases where the pieces fit very tightly, a tool may make the job easier.

The various clips, tabs, thumbscrews, and other devices that allow toolless construction are color-coded in green for easy identification.

21

Preventing static electricity discharge

Before opening the server case, follow these precautions to prevent damage from static electricity. When opening your server case, always perform the following procedure.

Caution Static electricity can permanently damage electronic components in your server. Prevent electrostatic damage to your server by following static electricity precautions every time you open your server case.

To prevent static electricity discharge:

1Turn off the server power.

2Touch a bare metal surface on the back of the server.

3Unplug all power cords from AC outlets and disconnect the modem cord (if installed).

Also follow these static electricity precautions:

Avoid static-causing surfaces such as plastic and packing foam in your work area.

Remove the parts from their antistatic bags or containers only when you are ready to use them. Do not lay parts on the outside of an antistatic bag or container because only the inside provides antistatic protection.

Always hold cards by their edges and their metal mounting brackets. Avoid touching components on the cards and the edge connectors that connect to expansion slots. Never slide cards or other parts over any surface.

22 Case Access

Opening the case

Important All references to front, back, left, or right on the server are based on the server being in a normal, upright position, as viewed from the front.

The only components that are accessible from outside of the chassis are the front panel indicator lights. To access any of the removable media drives, the hot-plug drives, or the power and reset switches you must open the bezel door. To work on the internal components of the server, you must open the chassis, which has two removable parts:

A bezel that covers the front of the chassis

A side cover panel that permits access to the interior of the case

Because the components inside the server are extremely sensitive to static electricity, make sure to follow the precautions at the beginning of this chapter for avoiding static electricity damage.

Only qualified personnel should open the system for maintenance. If you are qualified to maintain the system yourself, make sure you are properly grounded before opening the system chassis.

Warning Avoid exposure to dangerous electrical voltages and moving parts by turning off your server and unplugging the power cord and modem cord (if installed) before removing the side cover panel.

Opening the case

23

Opening the bezel door

The bezel door covers the removable media drives, the hot-plug drives, and the front panel controls. To access these components, you must open the bezel door.

To open the bezel door:

1If the bezel door is locked, unlock it.

2Grip the bezel door handle beside the front panel indicator lights, then pull the door open.

Chassis lock

Bezel door

24 Case Access

Removing the bezel

The locking bezel provides secure access to the system components. You must unlock and remove the bezel before you can remove the side cover panel and access the interior of the system.

To remove the bezel:

1Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord, modem cord (if installed), and all external peripheral devices.

2Observe all safety and static electricity precautions. (See “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.)

3Unlock the bezel, if it is not already unlocked.

4Press the tabs at the sides of the bezel and pull the top of the bezel away from the server.

5 Lift the bezel away from the chassis.

Opening the case

25

Removing the side cover panel

The side cover panel cannot be removed unless the front bezel has already been removed. The side panel provides access to all of the internal components of the server.

To remove the side cover panel:

1Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord, modem cord (if installed), and all external peripheral devices.

2Observe all safety and static electricity precautions. (See “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.)

3Remove the bezel. (See “Removing the bezel” on page 25.)

4Loosen the three thumbscrews from the left side of the front panel.

Thumbscrew

5Slide the side panel to the front, disengaging the retaining tabs on the top edge of the panel from the top of the chassis.

6Lift the panel out and away from the chassis.

26 Case Access

Closing the case

Close the chassis as soon as you finish installing or removing components so that dust and dirt do not collect inside the server.

Replacing the side panel

Closing the side panel covers the internal components. You must close the side panel and replace the front bezel before you can operate the server. If you do not, a system intrusion event is logged by the system management hardware. Be careful not to pinch any cables with the panel as you replace it.

To replace the side panel:

1Hold the side panel 3/4-inches forward of the chassis. Engage the retaining tabs on the bottom edge of the panel with the slots at the bottom edge of the chassis.

2Swing the top of the panel toward the chassis, engaging the retaining tabs on the top edge of the side panel with the slots on the chassis.

3Slide the panel toward the back of the chassis 3/4-inch, securing it in place, then tighten the thumbscrews.

Closing the case

27

Replacing the bezel

Once the side panel is in place, you must replace the bezel to operate the server. If the server is run without the bezel installed, a chassis intrusion event is logged by the system management hardware.

To replace the bezel:

1Holding the bezel at an angle to the front of the chassis, place the hinge slot on the bottom of the bezel over the flange on the bottom edge of the chassis.

2Swing the top of the bezel toward the chassis until the retaining tabs snap into place.

3 Lock the bezel, if necessary.

28 Case Access

Replacing and

Adding System 4

Components

The Gateway 7400 Server is designed as a toolless chassis. None of the normal user-serviceable parts require a tool of any kind to remove, install, or replace. In some cases where the pieces fit very tightly, a tool may make the job easier.

The various clips, tabs, thumbscrews, and other devices that allow toolless construction are color-coded in green for easy identification.

29

Drives

You can install several types of drives and similar devices in the server. All drives are easy to install and require no tools to replace, unless you are installing a 3.5-inch drive in a 5.25-inch drive bay.

Preparing to replace or add a drive

One 3.5-inch diskette drive, one 3.5-inch hot-plug hard drive, and one CD drive are included with the server. You can add drives of the following types:

1-inch high, 3.5-inch hot-plug drives.

Half-height 3.5-inch hard drives - The system board has two IDE connectors that support as many as two drives each. IDE drives include the IDE CD drive.

Half-height 5.25-inch devices.

As you prepare to install drives, keep the following in mind:

If you remove a drive, place it in an antistatic bag or container.

Before you install a drive, see the drive’s documentation for information on configuring the drive, setting any jumpers on the drive, and attaching cables to the drive.

If you are installing a drive that uses an add-in controller card, install it before you install the drive.

IDE hard drives can be configured as single, master, or slave. IDE

CD drives can be configured as master or slave. Configure the drives by using the drive-select jumpers located on the drives.

If only one drive is attached to a controller cable, configure the drive as single if it is a hard drive or master if it is a CD-ROM drive. If two drives of any type are attached to the cable, configure one as master and one as slave.

You may need to configure the drives you install using the BIOS Setup utility. Select F1 at start up to open the BIOS Setup utility.

30 Replacing and Adding System Components

Drive cabling information

Your system includes three different types of drive cables and possibly one additional cable, if required for the options ordered. Each drive cable is clearly labeled, indicating the cable type and showing which end to connect to the appropriate connector on the system board and which end to connect to the drive.

Use the diskette drive connector cable to connect the diskette drive.

Use the standard IDE connector cable to connect IDE devices such as CD drives and standard IDE hard drives.

Use the SCSI LVD cable (2 connectors) to connect the hot-plug backplane to the integrated SCSI controller on the system board or to an add-on SCSI controller card.

Use the SCSI LVD cable (5 connectors with built-in terminator) to connect optional SCSI devices to the integrated SCSI controller on the system board or to an add-on SCSI controller card. (This cable is optional.)

Replacing the diskette drive

The diskette drive is near the bottom of the stack of drive bays.

To replace the diskette drive:

1Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord, modem cord (if installed), and all external peripheral devices.

2Observe all safety and static electricity precautions. (See “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.)

3Remove the bezel. (See “Removing the bezel” on page 25.)

4Remove the left side cover panel. (See “Removing the side cover panel” on page 26.)

5Locate the 3.5-inch diskette drive.

6Remove the power and data cables from the back of the drive, noting their locations and orientations. (You will reconnect these cables after you install the new drive.)

Drives 31

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