Gateway 7210 User Manual

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7210 Server

System Manual

Contents

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v

Conventions used in this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Getting additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi

1 System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Standard features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Interior of system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 System board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Hot-plug backplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Front panel board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

2 System Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Setting up the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Installing the outriggers and castors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Starting the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Understanding the Power-On Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Setting up the operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Turning off the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Resetting the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

3 Case Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Preventing static electricity discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Opening the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Opening the bezel door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Removing the front bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Removing the side panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Closing the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Replacing the side panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Replacing the front bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Closing the bezel door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

4 Replacing and Adding Internal Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Preparing to replace or add a drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Drive cabling information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Replacing the diskette drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

i

Replacing the optional boot drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Replacing a hot-plug drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Adding a hot-plug drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Replacing the CD drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Adding additional 5.25-inch devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Replacing memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Adding memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Replacing a processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Adding a processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Replacing the battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Expansion cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Replacing an expansion card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Adding an expansion card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Power supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Replacing a redundant power supply module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Replacing the redundant power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Replacing the PS/2 power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Replacing the back panel and hot-plug cage fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Replacing the control panel board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Replacing the hot-plug backplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Replacing the system board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78

5 Using the BIOS Setup Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83

About the BIOS Setup utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Updating the BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Setting the system board jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 The CMOS Clear jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Password Clear jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Recovery Boot jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 BIOS Boot Block Write Enable jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 BMC Boot Block Write Enable jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 FRB Enable jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 Intrusion Detection Enable jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 BMC Firmware Update jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 WOL Enable jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91

6 Managing the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93

Avoiding power source problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Surge suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Line conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Uninterruptible power supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94

ii

Maintain and manage your hard drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Hard drive maintenance utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Hard drive management practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Protecting the server against viruses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 System administration and control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Intel Server Control (ISC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 ManageX Event Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Direct Platform Control (DPC) Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 System security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 System recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Creating a startup diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Using your Server Companion CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

7 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Troubleshooting checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Verifying your configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Troubleshooting guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 CD problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Hard drive problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Memory and processor problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Modem problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Peripheral/Adapter problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Printer problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 System problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Video problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

A Safety, Regulatory, and Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

B System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 System I/O addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Memory map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 DMA usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

iii

iv

Preface

Conventions used in this manual

Throughout this manual, you will see the following conventions:

Convention

Description

ENTER

Keyboard key names are printed in small capitals.

 

 

 

CTRL+ALT+DEL

A plus sign means to press the keys at the same time.

 

 

 

Setup

Commands to be entered, options to select, and messages that

 

appear on your monitor are printed in bold.

 

 

 

User’s Guide

Names of publications are printed in italic.

 

 

 

Viewpoint

All references to front, rear, left, or right on the computer are based

 

on the computer being in a normal, upright position, as viewed from

 

the front.

 

 

 

Important

 

A note labeled important informs you of special

 

 

 

circumstances.

Caution

 

A caution warns you of possible damage to equipment or

 

 

loss of data.

Warning

 

A warning indicates the possibility of personal injury.

 

 

 

Conventions used in this manual

v

Getting additional information

Log on to the Gateway technical support at www.gateway.com/support to find information about your system or other Gateway products. Some types of information you can access are:

Hardware driver and program updates

Technical tips

Service agreement information

Technical documents and component information

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

Documentation for peripherals or optional components

Online technical support

vi Preface

System

1

Features

Standard features

As many as two Intel® Pentium III processors with 100 MHz Front Side Bus (FSB) in Slot 1 processor sockets

Four Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM) sockets, that support up to 2.0 GB of PC100 Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM).

Intel 440GX chipset

Integrated Intel 82559 network controller providing 10/100 LAN support

Integrated Super Vector Graphics Array (SVGA) video support with 2 MB of Synchronous Graphics RAM (SGRAM)

Six PCI slots and one ISA slot for expansion cards

ATX form factor system board and convertible tower/rack-mount chassis

One 3.5 inch 1.44 MB diskette drive, one CD drive, and at least one hard drive

Integrated voltage regulator modules (VRMs) for both processors

Integrated Adaptec AIC 7896 dual function controller providing both low-voltage differential (LVD) Ultra2 small computer systems interface (SCSI) and Ultra Wide single-ended (SE) SCSI support

Six drive hot-plug cage

Keyboard port (PS/2), mouse port (PS/2), two serial ports, parallel port, video port, RJ-45 LAN port, and two Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports

Standard features

1

Front panel

Chassis lock

Power LED

Disk activity LED

Reserved LED

PS 1 status LED

PS 2 status LED

Reset button

Power button

Reserved

Hot-plug drive lock

Outriggers

Castors

5.25” drive bay

5.25” drive bay

5.25” drive bay

CD drive

Diskette drive

Power supply alarm speaker reset Hot-plug drive activity LED

Hot-plug drive bay

Front panel door

Chassis lock that prevents unauthorized access to both the front panel controls and to the interior of the system by locking the front bezel onto the chassis.

Power LED that glows green whenever the system is turned on. The LED also flashes when the system is in sleep mode.

Disk activity LED that glows green whenever any of the hard disks is actively reading or writing data.

Reserved LED this LED is reserved for future use.

2 System Features

PS1 status LED that glows green when the first power supply module in the redundant power supply is installed and working correctly. It flashes green if the power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds. If the power supply module is not installed, this LED is off. The LED is only active on systems using the Redundant N+1 power supply.

PS2 status LED that glows green when the second power supply module in the redundant power supply is installed and working correctly. It flashes green if the power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds. If the power supply module is not installed, this LED is off. The LED is only active on systems using the Redundant N+1 power supply.

System reset button is a recessed button that lets you reset the server if it has become nonresponsive.

Power button turns the server on and off. In an ACPI-enabled operating system like Windows 2000, you can set the power button to enter sleep mode rather than turning the system off.

Reserved LEDs these LEDs are reserved for future use.

Hot-plug drive lock secures the drive in place to prevent unauthorized or accidental removal.

The outriggers provide support for the castors.

Castors let you roll the server around for ease of service.

5.25-inch drive bays (3) to let you install additional 5.25-inch devices such as tape drives or an additional CD drive.

CD drive plays data or audio CDs

Diskette drive writes to and reads from 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskettes.

Power alarm speaker reset disables the power supply alarm speaker. The alarm is not cleared and the appropriate LED continues to flash until the failed power supply module is replaced. The alarm is only active on systems using the N+1 redundant power supply.

Hot-plug drive activity LED that indicates when the hot-plug drive immediately below it is reading or writing data.

Hot-plug drives up to six hot-swappable hot-plug drives connected to a hot-plug backplane.

Front panel door covers the front panel controls to prevent unauthorized or accidental access.

Front panel

3

Back panel

Power supply module

Power supply module LED

Module power switch

Power supply module

Power connector

 

Power supply

 

cable clamp

Redundant power

Module power

supply

switch

 

Keyboard port Mouse port Serial port A

Parallel port

Serial port B

Network port

USB ports

Video port

Expansion card slots

Expansion card retention clips

Kensington lock slot

Module power switches (2) provide independent power control for each redundant power supply module.

Power supply modules (2) provide redundant power and hot-swap capability to power the server with minimal downtime.

Redundant power supply provides two hot-swappable power supply modules that can independently support the server’s power requirements.

4 System Features

PS/2 power supply (not shown) provides sufficient power to run the server at a reduced cost.

Mouse port connects a PS/2-compatible mouse.

Parallel port connects a printer or other parallel device.

Network port lets you connect to a network. The adjacent indicator LEDs show LAN activity (yellow) and 100 Mbit speed (green).

Expansion card slots (7) allow you to install up to four 32-bit, 33 MHz PCI expansion cards, two 32-bit, 66 MHz PCI expansion cards, and one ISA expansion card.

Expansion card retention clips (7) allow screwless retention of the expansion cards for ease of maintenance and installation.

Kensington lock slot lets you install a security cable and lock.

Video port connects the first (or only) monitor interface cable. The video controller is integrated in the system board.

USB ports connect external Plug-and-Play devices, such as printers and pointing devices, that are automatically configured when they are plugged into the computer through one of these ports. USB keyboards and mice are not supported.

Serial ports (2) connect to serial devices.

Keyboard port connects a PS/2-compatible keyboard.

Power supply cable clamp secures the power supply cords so that they are not accidentally pulled from the power supply.

Power connector connects the computer power cord. The other end of the power cord plugs into an AC outlet or power strip.

Back panel

5

Interior of system

Power supply

Power supply fans

5.25-inch drive bays

3.25-inch drive bays

Hot-plug bays (Hot-plug cage)

Outriggers

Castors

Back

System

System

Hot-plug

Hot-plug

panel fan

board

board

cage fan

backplane

 

 

tray

 

 

Power supply provides power to the system components. The redundant power supply provides hot-swap capability and fault tolerance.

Power supply fans (only available with redundant power supply) provide cooling for the redundant power supply modules.

5.25-inch drive bays provide space for up to four 5.25-inch drives. A CD drive comes standard with the system and occupies one of the 5.25-inch drive bays.

3.25-inch drive bays support up to two 3.25-inch drives. A diskette drive comes standard with the system and occupies one 3.25-inch drive bay. A hard drive is typically installed in the second drive bay.

Hot-plug bays support up to six 1-inch high 3.25-inch SCA SCSI hard drives. Empty drive bays contain empty carriers to control airflow and EMC characteristics.

Outriggers provide support for the castors.

Castors let you move the unit easily for maintenance and servicing.

6 System Features

Hot-plug backplane provides the control for the hot-plug drives.

Hot-plug cage fan provides cooling for the hot-plug drives and other internal components.

System board tray supports the system board and makes it easier to remove and install.

System board see “System board” on page 8.

Back panel fan provides cooling for system board components and additional cooling for the power supply.

Interior of system

7

System board

B D F H

A

C

E

G

 

AL

 

 

 

 

AK

 

 

 

 

AJ

 

 

J

L

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I

K

AI

 

 

 

 

AH

AG

M

 

AF

 

AE

N

 

O

AD

 

 

P

 

AC

 

 

 

 

Q

R

AB

S

T

AA

Y

W

U

Z

 

X

V

ASecondary processor fan connector

BSecondary processor connector

CPrimary processor fan connector

DPrimary processor connector

EDIMM slots (4)

FMain power connector, 24-pin

8 System Features

GAuxiliary power connector, 10-pin (not used)

HATX auxiliary power connector, 6-pin

IFan connector (not used)

JDiskette drive connector

KPrimary IDE connector

LSecondary IDE connector

MATX front panel connector

NFront panel connector, 16-pin

OBattery

PIsolated server management (ISOL) intelligent management bus (IMB) connector (not used)

QJumper J4J2 (BMC boot block write enable)

RJumper block (jumper J3J1)

SJumper block (jumper J2J1)

TFan connector (hot-plug drive bay fan)

UServer monitor module (SMM) feature connector

VUltra wide SCSI connector

WUltra2 SCSI connector

XHard drive LED connector

YISA connector

ZIntelligent chassis management bus (ICMB) connector (not used)

AAChassis intrusion connector (not used, chassis intrusion is communicated through the front panel connector)

AB PCI 32-bit, 33 MHz connectors

AC Fan connector (back panel fan)

AD PCI 32-bit, 66 MHz connectors

AE Wake on LAN jumper

System board

9

AF Video connector

AG Dual USB connectors

AH RJ-45 Ethernet LAN connector and LEDs

AI Serial Port A

AJ Parallel port

AK Serial port B

AL Stacked keyboard and mouse ports

10 System Features

Hot-plug backplane

Back of the hot-plug backplane board

JP5: Delay start jumper

Power connector

SCSI connector

JP6: Termination jumper

JP5: Delay start jumper controls the spin-up sequence of the drives attached to the backplane. If you enable delay start, the drives spin up one at a time in order of their SCSI ID. If you disable delay start, all drives spin up simultaneously. Set the jumper according to the table below.

Position

Description

 

 

On (default)

Enables delay start

 

 

Off

Disables delay start

 

 

Hot-plug backplane

11

JP6: Termination jumper enables or disables termination for the backplane. The backplane is designed to occupy one end of the bus and is usually terminated. If you configure the SCSI bus so the backplane is not at the end of the bus, disable termination. Set the jumper according to the table below.

Position

Description

 

 

On

Termination is disabled

 

 

Off (default)

Termination is enabled

 

 

SCSI connector provides the point of connection for the SCSI cable from the RAID controller.

Power connector provides the point of connection for the power cable from the power supply.

Front of the hot-plug backplane board

Reserved LED (6) Drive activity LED (6)

SCA SCSI drive connector (6)

 

SCSI ID 2

 

 

SCSI ID 5

 

SCSI ID 1

 

 

SCSI ID 4

 

 

SCSI ID 0

SCSI ID 3

Reserved LED (6) reserved for future use.

Drive activity LED (6) glows green when the drive is actively reading or writing data.

SCA SCSI drive connector (6) provides the single point of connection for the six SCA SCSI drives.

12 System Features

Front panel board

The front panel board supports the LEDs and buttons accessible from the front panel. The buttons and LEDs on the front panel board are shown and described below.

Power LED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disk activity LED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved LED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NMI button

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS 1 status LED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS 2 status LED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chassis intrusion detection switch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Front panel connector

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reset button

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power supply alarm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

speaker reset button

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power button

Power LED that glows green whenever the system is turned on. The LED also flashes when the system is in sleep mode.

Disk activity LED that glows green whenever any of the hard disks is actively reading or writing data.

Reserved LED this LED is reserved for future use.

PS1 fault LED that flashes green whenever the first power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds.

PS2 fault LED that flashes green whenever the second power supply module fails or one of its power levels goes out of bounds.

Reset button lets you reset the server if it has become nonresponsive.

Front panel board

13

Power button turns the server on and off. In an ACPI-enabled operating system like Windows 2000, you can set the power button to enter sleep mode rather than turning the system off.

Power supply alarm speaker reset button disables the power supply alarm speaker. The alarm is not cleared and the appropriate LED continues to glow until the failed power supply module is replaced. The alarm is only active on systems using the N+1 redundant power supply.

NMI button allows a technician servicing the server to generate a non-maskable interrupt (NMI) to help debug server errors.

Chassis intrusion detection switch sends a message to the system management hardware logging an event when the front bezel is removed.

Front panel connector connects the controls on the front panel with the system board.

14 System Features

System Setup

2

Setting up the server

Use the instructions on the quick guide poster that came with the server to assemble the server.

You can prepare a safer working environment before assembling the server by following these guidelines:

Use a clean, flat, and stable surface for the server. Allow at least 12 inches at the rear of the computer for cabling and air circulation.

Obtain an adequately rated uninterruptible power supply (UPS). A UPS protects against AC line spikes, power interruptions, and other power fluctuations that may damage the server.

Protect the server from extreme temperature and humidity. Do not expose it to direct sunlight, heater ducts, or other heat-generating objects.

Keep the computer away from equipment that generates magnetic fields, such as unshielded stereo speakers. Even a telephone placed too close to the computer may cause interference.

Plug the computer into a wall outlet, power strip, or uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Make sure the power cords are secured in the power supply cable clamp on the back panel.

Important Keep the boxes and packing material. If you need to send the computer to Gateway for repairs, you must use the original packaging or your warranty may be voided.

Setting up the server

15

Installing the outriggers and castors

The tower chassis is shipped with small rubber feet to prevent it from slipping and to minimize vibrations when the chassis is placed on a desktop. However, if you intend to place the chassis on the floor, you may find it easier to maintain the system if it has castors and can be rolled out for easier access.

To install the outriggers and castors:

1Gently turn the chassis upside down, placing it on the top panel.

2Align the outriggers and castors with the slots on the bottom panel of the chassis.

16 System Setup

3Place the tabs on the outriggers into the corresponding slots on the bottom panel and slide the outriggers toward the ends of the chassis.

4Carefully return the chassis to the upright position.

Starting the server

Before you start the server for the first time:

The redundant power supply is autosensing. It automatically determines the voltage of the incoming power source and compensates accordingly. The optional PS/2 power supply has a voltage selector switch. Make sure that the voltage selector switch on the PS/2 power supply is set to the correct voltage for your area.

Make sure all cables are firmly connected to the proper ports on the back panel of the computer.

Caution Electricity can flow from connected peripherals into the system causing a shock. Make sure the server and peripherals are turned off and unplugged from the power outlet when you connect peripherals to the computer.

Make sure that both power supply modules in the redundant power supply are turned on. (The PS/2 power supply does not need to be turned on separately.)

Make sure the computer and monitor are plugged into an AC outlet, power strip, or UPS and that the power strip or UPS is turned on.

To start the system:

1If you have connected the system components to a power strip or UPS, make sure all the system components are turned off, then turn on the power strip or UPS.

2Turn on the monitor.

3Turn on the computer. Make sure the individual power buttons on the power supply modules are turned on. The light-emitting diodes (LED) in the power button and on each power supply module are on when the power is on.

Starting the server

17

4Turn on any other components connected to the computer, such as speakers, a printer, or a scanner.

If nothing happens when you turn on the system:

Make sure that the power cables are securely plugged in and that the power strip or UPS (if you are using one) is plugged in and turned on.

Make sure the monitor is connected to the computer, plugged into the power strip, AC outlet, or UPS, and turned on. You may also need to adjust the brightness and contrast controls on the monitor.

Understanding the Power-On Self-Test

When you turn on your computer, the power-on self-test (POST) routine checks the system memory and components. To see this information on the screen, press ESC during POST. Press SPACEBAR to bypass the remaining memory count.

The system displays an error message if POST finds any problems. Write down any error messages that you see. If you continue to have problems, these error messages may help you or Gateway technical support diagnose the cause.

Setting up the operating system

The first time you start the server, the operating system takes a few minutes to set up.

Refer to your operating system documentation for specific questions regarding the operating system.

To complete the operating system setup:

1After the computer starts, the start-up wizard opens. Continue by clicking

Next.

2Type the requested information in the appropriate text boxes. When you have finished typing the information, continue by clicking Next.

3Continue following the instructions and selecting options in the start-up wizard dialog boxes, clicking Next to move through the dialog boxes, until the wizard tells you to restart your computer.

18 System Setup

4If you need to return to the previous dialog box to change any of your entries, click Back.

5Restart the server. The setup is complete.

Important For other operating systems, such as Windows® 2000 or Novell® Netware, refer to the appropriate operating system software manual.

Turning off the server

Every time you turn off the server, shut down the operating system first. You may lose data if you do not follow the proper procedure.

To turn off the server in Windows NT:

1Click Start, then select Shut down the computer?, then Shut Down.

2Click OK. The operating system shuts down. When you see a message saying It is now safe to turn off your computer, turn off the computer by pressing the power button.

3Turn off the monitor and peripherals.

Important For other operating systems, such as Windows 2000 or Novell Netware, refer to the appropriate operating system software manual.

Warning When you turn the computer off, some electric current still flows through it. Before opening the computer case or connecting or removing any peripherals, turn off the computer, then unplug the power cord.

Turning off the server

19

Resetting the server

If your computer does not respond to keyboard or mouse input, you may have to close programs that are not responding. If closing unresponsive programs does not restore your computer to normal operation, you may have to reset the system.

To close unresponsive programs and reset the server in Windows NT:

1Press CTRL+ALT+DEL. A window opens that lets you close a program that is not responding.

2Click Task Manager, then select the program that is not responding.

3Close the program by clicking End Task.

4If the computer does not respond, press the reset button to restart the computer.

As a part of the regular startup process, a program to check the disk status runs automatically. When the checks are finished, Windows starts.

Important For other operating systems, such as Windows 2000 or Novell Netware, refer to the appropriate operating system software manual.

20 System Setup

Case Access

3

The Gateway 7210 Server is designed as a toolless chassis. None of the normal user-serviceable parts require a tool of any kind to remove, install, or replace. In some cases, where the pieces fit very tightly, a tool may make the job easier.

The various clips, tabs, thumbscrews, and other devices that allow toolless construction are color-coded in green to show you where they are. Most of these devices are either self-explanatory or very easy to figure out.

When in doubt, the steps and illustrations provided in this manual show you the way to remove any device you may need to replace.

21

Preventing static electricity discharge

Before opening the computer case, follow these precautions to prevent damage from static electricity. When opening your computer case, always perform the following procedure.

Caution Static electricity can permanently damage electronic components in your computer. Prevent electrostatic damage to your computer by following static electricity precautions every time you open your computer case.

To prevent static electricity discharge:

1Turn off the computer power.

2Touch a bare metal surface on the back of the computer.

3Unplug all power cords from AC outlets and disconnect the modem cable (if installed).

Also follow these static electricity precautions:

Avoid static-causing surfaces such as plastic and packing foam in your work area.

Remove the parts from their antistatic bags or containers only when you are ready to use them. Do not lay parts on the outside of an antistatic bag or container because only the inside provides antistatic protection.

Always hold cards by their edges and their metal mounting brackets. Avoid touching components on the cards and the edge connectors that connect to expansion slots. Never slide cards or other parts over any surface.

22 Case Access

Opening the case

Important All references to front, back, left, or right on the computer are based on the computer being in a normal, upright position, as viewed from the front.

The only components that are accessible from outside of the chassis are the front panel indicator lights. To access any of the removable media drives, the hot-plug drives, or the power and reset switches you must open the bezel door. To work on the internal components of the computer, you must open the chassis, which has two removable parts:

A bezel that covers the front of the chassis

A side panel that permits access to the interior of the case

Because the components inside the computer are extremely sensitive to static electricity, make sure you follow the precautions at the beginning of this chapter to avoid static electricity damage.

Only qualified personnel should open the system for maintenance. If you are qualified to maintain the system yourself, make sure you are properly grounded before opening the system chassis.

Warning Avoid exposure to dangerous electrical voltages and moving parts by turning off your computer and unplugging the power cord and modem cable (if installed) before removing the chassis cover.

Opening the case

23

Opening the bezel door

The bezel door covers the removable media drives, the hot-plug drives, and the front panel controls. To access these components, you must open the bezel door.

To open the bezel door:

1If the bezel door is locked, unlock it.

2Grip the bezel door handle next to the front panel indicator lights and pull the door open.

Chassis lock

Front panel

door

 

24 Case Access

Removing the front bezel

The locking front bezel provides secure access to the system components. You must unlock and remove the front bezel before you can remove the side panel and access the interior of the system.

To remove the front bezel:

1Power down, turn off, and disconnect all power to the server.

2Observe all safety and static electricity precautions, see “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.

3Unlock the front bezel, if it is not already unlocked.

4Press the tabs at the sides of the bezel and pull the top of the bezel away from the server.

5 Lift the bezel away from the chassis.

Opening the case

25

Removing the side panel

The side panel cannot be removed unless the front bezel has already been removed. The side panel provides access to all of the internal components of the server.

To remove the side panel:

1Turn off the computer and disconnect all power cords.

2Observe all safety and static electricity precautions, see “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.

3Remove the front bezel as described in “Removing the front bezel” on page 25.

4Loosen the three thumbscrews from the left side of the front panel.

Thumbscrew

Thumbscrew

Thumbscrew

5Slide the side panel to the front, disengaging the retaining tabs on the top edge of the panel from the top of the chassis.

6Lift the panel out and away from the chassis.

26 Case Access

Closing the case

Close the chassis as soon as you finish installing or removing components so that dust and dirt do not collect inside the computer.

Replacing the side panel

Closing the side panel covers the internal components. You must close the side panel and replace the front bezel before you can operate the server. If you do not, a system intrusion event is logged by the system management hardware. Be careful not to pinch any cables in the panel as you replace it.

To replace the side panel:

1Hold the side panel at an angle to the chassis and 3/4-inch forward. Engage the retaining tabs on the bottom edge of the panel with the slots at the bottom edge of the chassis.

2Swing the top of the panel toward the chassis, engaging the retaining tabs on the top edge of the side panel with the slots on the chassis.

3Slide the panel toward the back of the chassis 3/4-inch, securing it in place.

Closing the case

27

4 Tighten the thumbscrews.

28 Case Access

Replacing the front bezel

Once the side panel is in place, you must replace the bezel to operate the server. If the server is run without the bezel installed, a chassis intrusion event is logged by the system management hardware.

To replace the front bezel:

1Holding the bezel at an angle to the front of the chassis, place the hinge slot on the bottom of the bezel over the flange on the bottom edge of the chassis.

2Swing the top of the bezel toward the chassis until the retaining tabs snap into place.

3 Lock the front panel lock, if necessary.

Closing the case

29

Closing the bezel door

Close the bezel door to prevent accidental or unauthorized access to the server controls, hot-plug drives, and removable media drives.

To close the bezel door:

1 Swing the bezel door to the left and press it firmly into place.

2 Lock it if necessary.

30 Case Access

Replacing and

Adding Internal 4

Devices

The Gateway 7210 Server is designed as a toolless chassis. None of the normal user-serviceable parts require a tool of any kind to remove, install, or replace. In some cases, where the pieces fit very tightly, a tool may make the job easier.

The various clips, tabs, thumbscrews, and other devices that allow toolless construction are color-coded in green to show you where they are. Most of these devices are either self-explanatory or very easy to figure out.

When in doubt, the steps and illustrations provided in this manual show you the way to remove any device you may need to replace.

31

Drives

There are several types of drives and similar devices that can be installed in the server. All drives are easy to install and require no tools to replace.

Preparing to replace or add a drive

One 3.5-inch diskette drive, one 3.5-inch hot-plug hard drive, and one CD drive are included with the computer. You can add additional drives of the following types:

1-inch high, 3.5-inch hot-plug drives.

Half-height 3.5-inch hard drives - The system board has two IDE connectors that support as many as two drives each. IDE drives include the IDE CD drive.

Half-height 5.25-inch devices.

As you prepare to install drives, keep the following in mind:

If you remove a drive, place it in an antistatic bag or container.

Before you install a drive, see the drive documentation for information on configuring the drive, setting any jumpers on the drive, and attaching cables to the drive.

If you are installing a drive that uses an add-in controller, install the expansion card before you install the drive.

IDE hard drives can be configured as single, master, or slave. IDE

CD drives can be configured as master or slave. Configure the drives by using the drive-select jumpers located on the drives.

If only one drive is attached to a controller cable, configure the drive as single if it is a hard drive or master if it is a CD-ROM drive. If two drives of any type are attached to the cable, configure one as master and one as slave.

You may need to configure the drives you install using the BIOS Setup utility. Select F2 at start up to open the BIOS Setup utility.

32 Replacing and Adding Internal Devices

Drive cabling information

The system includes five different types of drive cables. Each drive cable is clearly labeled, indicating the cable type and showing which end to connect to the appropriate connector on the system board and which end to connect to the drive.

Use the diskette drive connector cable to connect the diskette drive.

Use the standard IDE connector cable to connect IDE devices such as CD drives and standard IDE hard drives.

Use the IDE DMA-66 cable to connect DMA-66-compatible hard drives.

Use the SCSI SE cable to connect single-ended SCSI devices. This cable requires termination, either on the device or as a plug-in terminator on the cable.

Use the SCSI LVD cable to connect the hot-plug backplane to the integrated SCSI controller on the system board.

Replacing the diskette drive

The diskette drive is near the bottom of the stack of drive bays. If the diskette drive included with the system fails, replace the drive.

To replace the diskette drive:

1Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord and all other external peripheral devices.

2Open the case. (See “Opening the case” on page 23 and “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.)

3Locate the 3.5-inch diskette drive.

4Remove the power and data cables from the back of the drive, noting their locations and orientations. (You will reconnect these cables after you install the new drive.)

The 3.5-inch diskette drive is secured in the chassis by a set of removable rails. The rails let the drive slide into and out of the guides in the front bay.

Drives 33

5Disengage the rail locking tabs by pressing in on both front rail extensions, then move the drive slightly out of the bay by pushing on the back of the drive.

6Pull the drive out of the chassis.

7Remove the rails on both sides of the drive and snap them onto the new drive in the same positions. The rails are labeled. Make sure the front rail extensions are towards the front of the drive.

Important The rails on the 3.5-inch diskette drive are different from those on the hard drive and the CD drive. Make sure you install the correct rails on each drive.

8Align the rails with the appropriate open bay, then slide the drive into the bay until the locking tabs snap into place.

9Connect the power and data cables, making sure the cables are in their original positions. (See your drive documentation for proper drive jumper settings and cable orientation.)

10Close the case. (See “Closing the case” on page 27.)

11Reconnect the power cord and all other external peripheral devices, then turn on the system.

34 Replacing and Adding Internal Devices

Replacing the optional boot drive

An optional IDE hard drive can be shipped with the server. This drive is mounted at the bottom of the drive stack accessible from the front of the chassis.

To replace the optional boot drive:

1Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord and all other external peripheral devices.

2Open the case. (See “Opening the case” on page 23 and “Preventing static electricity discharge” on page 22.)

3Locate the 3.5-inch hard drive at the bottom of the drive stack.

4Remove the power and data cables from the hard drive.

5Grip the mounting rails firmly with thumb and index finger and pull the drive carefully straight out of the drive stack.

6Remove the mounting rails from the hard drive.

7Place the old drive in an antistatic bag or container, then place the new hard drive on a static-free surface with the top up and the connectors facing you.

Drives 35

8Install the two drive mounting rails to the new hard drive, making sure the front rail extensions are towards the front of the device. The rails are labeled.

9Align the rails with the open bay at the bottom of the drive stack, then slide the drive into the stack until the locking tabs snap into place (make sure that the data and power connectors on the drive face the inside of the server).

10Connect the power and data cables to the drive. (See the drive documentation for proper cable orientation.)

11Close the case. (See “Closing the case” on page 27.)

12Reconnect the power cord and all other external peripheral devices, then turn on the system.

36 Replacing and Adding Internal Devices

Replacing a hot-plug drive

The hot-plug drives are located at the bottom of the front panel. The hot-plug bay supports as many as six 1-inch high 3.5-inch SCA-II SCSI hard drives.

The hot-plug drives are assigned SCSI ID numbers by the hot-plug backplane with the drive at the far left side of the hot-plug bay assigned SCSI ID 0. The backplane assigns SCSI IDs to the other drives in order up to SCSI ID 5 at the far right side of the hot-plug bay.

Important Gateway tests and verifies the operation and compatibility of the drives we sell. Additional or replacement drives must conform to Gateway standards, especially in a RAID or mission-critical environment.

SCSI ID 0

SCSI ID 1

SCSI ID 2

SCSI ID 3

SCSI ID 4

SCSI ID 5

Install drive in the left-most drive bay first and in increasing order by SCSI ID number thereafter.

Drives 37

To replace a failed drive:

1Before you remove the failed drive, use the appropriate software and utilities installed on the system to stop all activity on the failed drive. Instructions for using the software are provided by the software manufacturer.

2Use the utilities to determine which drive needs to be replaced.

3If the drive carrier is locked, use the hex key to unlock the carrier. Locked drive carriers show a red flag in the slot on the carrier handle.

4Remove the drive from the drive bay by pressing down on the carrier handle and rotating the handle out and down from the front of the server.

38 Replacing and Adding Internal Devices

5 Continue pulling outward until the drive is entirely out of the system.

Drives 39

6Remove the four screws that secure the drive to the carrier, then remove the drive.

7Install the new drive in the carrier using the four screws you removed in Step 6.

8Align the drive rails with the slots at the top and bottom of the drive bay. Leave the handle in the down position.

9Push the drive all of the way into the drive bay until the handle starts to close because of contact with the front of the chassis. Make sure the hooks on the bottom of the handle latch over the edge of the drive bay and firmly close the handle.

10Lock the drive carrier with the hex key.

40 Replacing and Adding Internal Devices

11Run any necessary utilities to inform the system that the new drive is installed and ready for use. See the utility software documentation for details.

Adding a hot-plug drive

The hot-plug drives are located at the bottom of the front panel. The hot-plug bay supports up to six 1-inch high 3.5-inch SCA LVD SCSI hard drives.

The hot-plug drives are assigned SCSI ID numbers by the hot-plug backplane with the drive at the far left side of the hot-plug bay assigned SCSI ID 0. The backplane assigns SCSI IDs to the other drives in order up to SCSI ID 5 at the far right side of the hot-plug bay.

SCSI ID 0

SCSI ID 1

SCSI ID 2

SCSI ID 3

SCSI ID 4

SCSI ID 5

Install drive in the left-most drive bay first and in increasing order by SCSI ID number thereafter.

Drives 41

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