Gateway 7001 Series User Manual

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User Guide

Gateway 7001 Series Access Point

Contents

1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Overview of the Gateway 7001 Series of self-managed APs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Features and benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Default settings and supported administrator/client platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Administrator’s computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Wireless client computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Understanding dynamic and static IP addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 How does the access point obtain an IP address at startup? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Dynamic IP addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Static IP addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Recovering an IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

2 Quick Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Setting up the access point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Unpacking the access point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Connecting the access point to network and power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Setting up connections for a guest network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Turning on the access point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Running KickStart to find access points and assign IP addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Logging on to the administration Web pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Configuring basic settings and starting the wireless network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 What’s next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

3 Configuring Basic Network Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Navigating to basic settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reviewing and describing the access point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Providing administrator password and wireless network name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Setting configuration policy for new access points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Updating basic settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Understanding basic settings for a standalone access point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Understanding indicator icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

4 Managing Access Points and Clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Navigating to access points management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Understanding clustering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 What is a cluster? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 How many APs can a cluster support? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 What kinds of APs can cluster together? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Which settings are shared in the cluster configuration and which are not? . . . . . . . . 43

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Cluster mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Standalone mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Cluster formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Cluster size and membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Intra-cluster security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Auto-Synch of Cluster Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Cluster recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Understanding access point settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Working with access points in a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Modifying the location description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Removing an access point from the cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Adding an access point to a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Navigating to information for a specific AP and managing standalone APs . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Navigating to an AP by using its IP address in a URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

5 Managing User Accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Navigating to user management for clustered access points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Viewing and changing user accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Viewing user accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Adding a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Editing a user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

6 Session Monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Navigating to session monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Understanding session monitoring information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Viewing session information for access points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Sorting session information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Refreshing session information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

7 Advanced Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67

Configuring an Ethernet (wired) interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

68

Navigating to Ethernet (wired) settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

69

Setting the DNS name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

69

Enabling or Disabling Guest Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

70

Specifying a physical or virtual Guest network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

70

Configuring Internal interface Ethernet settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

71

Configuring Guest interface Ethernet settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

73

Configuring a wireless interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

Navigating to wireless settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

Configuring the radio interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

Configuring internal LAN wireless settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

Configuring guest network wireless settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

Enabling a network time protocol server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

78

Navigating to time protocol settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

78

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Enabling or disabling a network time protocol (NTP) server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Configuring network security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Understanding security issues on wireless networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 How do I know which security mode to use? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Navigating to security settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Configuring security settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Setting up Guest Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Understanding the guest interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Configuring the guest interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Using the guest network as a client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Deployment example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Configuring radio settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Understanding radio settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Navigating to radio settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Configuring radio settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Controlling access by MAC address filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Navigating to MAC filtering settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Using MAC address filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Configuring a Wireless Distribution System (WDS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Understanding the WDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Navigating to WDS settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Configuring WDS settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Configuring security settings on wireless clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121

Network infrastructure and choosing between built-in or external authentication server 122 Setting the administrator password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

Navigating to administrator password setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Setting the administrator password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

8 Maintenance and Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Ethernet (Wired) settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Wireless settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Event log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Transmit/receive statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Associated wireless clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Rebooting the access point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Resetting the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Upgrading the firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

9 Troubleshooting and Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

Known problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Telephone numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173

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A Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

B Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197

C Safety, Regulatory, and Legal Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209

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Chapter 1

Introduction

Features and benefits

Networking

Maintainability

Default settings and supported administrator/client platforms

1

Overview of the Gateway 7001 Series of self-managed APs

The Gateway 7001 Series of self-managed APs (access points) provide continuous, high-speed access between your wireless and Ethernet devices. They are advanced, turnkey solutions for wireless networking in small and medium-sized businesses. The Gateway 7001 Series enables zero-administration wireless local area network (WLAN) deployment while providing state-of-the-art wireless networking features.

The Gateway 7001 AP is available as a single band access point (Gateway 7001 802.11 G Wireless Access Point) and a dual band access point (Gateway 7001 802.11 A+G Wireless Access Point).

The single band access point can broadcast in either IEEE 802.11b or IEEE 802.11g mode.

The dual band access point is capable of broadcasting in two different IEEE 802.11 modes simultaneously.

Radio One can broadcast in IEEE 802.11b or IEEE 802.11g modes.

Radio Two can broadcast in IEEE 802.11a or IEEE 802.11a Turbo modes.

The Gateway 7001 AP software solution emphasizes security, ease-of-administration and industry standards—providing a standalone and fully secured wireless network without the need for additional management applications such as legacy authentication server software.

The following sections list features and benefits of the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs, and tell you what’s next when you’re ready to get started.

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Features and benefits

IEEE standards support and Wi-Fi compliance

Support for IEEE 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g wireless networking standards (depending on model)

Provides bandwidth of up to 54 Mbps for 802.11a or 802.11g (11 Mbps for 802.11b, 108 Mbps for 802.11a Turbo)

Wi-Fi certified

Wireless features

Auto channel selection at startup

Transmit power adjustment

Wireless Distribution System (WDS) for connecting multiple access points wirelessly. Extends your network with less cabling and provides a seamless experience for roaming clients.

Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) support

Under-the-hood support for multiple SSIDs (network names) and multiple BSSIDs (basic service set IDs) on the same access point

Security features

Inhibit SSID Broadcast

Ignore SSID Broadcast

Link integrity monitoring

Link integrity checking

Weak IV avoidance

Wireless Equivalent Privacy (WEP)

Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA)

Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

User-based access control with local authentication server

Local user database and user lifecycle management

MAC address filtering

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Out-of-the-Box guest interface

Unique network name (SSID) for the Guest interface

Captive portal to guide guests to customized, guest-only Web page

VLAN and dual Ethernet options

Clustering and auto-management

Automatic setup with Kickstart.

Provisioning and plug-and-play through automatic clustering and cluster rendezvous.

The administrator can specify how new access points should be configured before they are added to the network. When new access points are added, they can automatically rendezvous with the cluster, and securely download the correct configuration. The process does not require manual intervention, but is under the control of the administrator.

Single universal view of clustered access points and cluster configuration settings.

Configuration for all access points in a cluster can be managed from a single interface. Changes to common parameters are automatically reflected in all members of the cluster.

Self-managed access points with automatic configuration synchronization.

The access points in a cluster periodically check that the cluster configuration is consistent, and check for the presence and availability of the other members of the cluster. The administrator can monitor this information through the user interface.

Enhanced local authentication using 802.1x without additional IT setup.

A cluster can maintain a user authentication server and database stored on the access points. This eliminates the need to install, configure, and maintain a RADIUS infrastructure, and simplifies the administrative task of deploying a secure wireless network.

Hardware watchdog.

Networking

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) support for dynamically assigning network configuration information to systems on the LAN

Maintainability

Status, monitoring, and tracking views of the network including session monitoring, client associations, transmit/receive statistics, and event log

Reset configuration option

Firmware upgrade

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Default settings and supported administrator/client platforms

Before you plug in and boot a new access point, review the following sections for a quick check of required hardware components, software, client configurations, and compatibility issues. Make sure you have everything you need ready to go for a successful launch and test of your new (or extended) wireless network.

Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP

Administrator’s computer

Wireless client computers

Understanding of DHCP IP addressing for access points and wireless clients

Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP is a wireless communications hub for devices on your network. It provides continuous, high-speed access between your wireless and Ethernet devices in IEEE 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, or 802.11a Turbo modes (depending on the model).

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP offers an out-of-the-box Guest Interface feature that lets you configure access points for controlled guest access of the wireless network. This can be accomplished either by using Virtual LANs or by creating physically separate network connections on the same access point. To support physically separate network connections, the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP ships with an extra network port to be used for a dedicated guest network. (For more information on the guest interface, see “Advanced Configuration” on page 67, and “Setting up connections for a guest network” on page 19.)

Default settings for the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP

Option

Default Settings

Related Information

 

 

 

System Name

Gateway-AP

“Setting the DNS name”

 

 

on page 69

 

 

 

User Name

admin

 

 

The user name is read-only. It cannot be

 

 

modified.

 

 

 

 

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Option

Default Settings

Related Information

 

 

 

Password

admin

“Providing administrator

 

 

password and wireless

 

 

network name” on

 

 

page 32

 

 

“Configuring security

 

 

settings on wireless

 

 

clients” on page 121

 

 

 

Network Name (SSID)

“Gateway 7001 AP Network” for the

“Reviewing and

 

Internal interface

describing the access

 

“Gateway 7001 AP Guest Network” for the

point” on page 31

 

 

 

Guest interface

“Configuring internal

 

 

LAN wireless settings”

 

 

on page 76

 

 

“Configuring guest

 

 

network wireless

 

 

settings” on page 76

 

 

 

Network Time Protocol

None

“Enabling a network

(NTP)

 

time protocol server” on

 

 

page 78

 

 

 

IP Address

192.168.1.1

“Understanding

 

The default IP address is used if you do not

dynamic and static IP

 

addressing” on page 12

 

use a Dynamic Host Configuration

 

 

 

Protocol (DHCP) server. You can assign a

 

 

new static IP address through the

 

 

Administration Web pages.

 

 

If you have a DHCP server on the network,

 

 

then an IP address will be dynamically

 

 

assigned by the server at AP startup.

 

Connection Type

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

 

(DHCP)

 

If you do not have a DHCP server on the

 

Internal network and do not plan to use

 

one, the first thing you must do after

 

bringing up the access point is to change

 

the Connection Type from “DHCP” to

 

“Static IP”.

 

The Guest network must have a DHCP

 

server.

“Understanding dynamic and static IP addressing” on page 12

For information on how to re-configure the Connection Type, see “Configuring Internal interface Ethernet settings” on page 71.

Subnet Mask

255.255.255.0

 

 

 

 

Radio

On

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

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Option

Default Settings

Related Information

 

 

 

IEEE 802.11 Mode

802.11g pr 802.11a+g

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

802.11g Channel

Auto

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

Beacon Interval

100

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

DTIM Period

2

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

Fragmentation

2346

“Configuring radio

Threshold

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

ATS Threshold

2347

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

MAX Stations

2007

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

Transmit Power

100 Percent (of certified level)

“Configuring radio

 

 

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

Rate Sets Supported

IEEE 802.11a: 54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 9, 6

“Configuring radio

(Mbps)

IEEE 802.11g: 54, 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, 9, 6,

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

5.5, 2, 1

 

 

IEEE 802.11b: 11, 5.5, 2, 1

 

 

Atheros Turbo 5 GHz: 108, 96, 72, 48, 36,

 

 

24, 18, 12

 

 

 

 

Rate Sets

IEEE 802.11a: 24, 12, 6

“Configuring radio

(Basic/Advertised)

IEEE 802.11g: 11, 5.5, 2, 1

settings” on page 104

 

 

 

IEEE 802.11b: 2, 1

 

 

Atheros Turbo 5 GHz: 48, 24, 12

 

 

 

 

Broadcast SSID

Allow

“Broadcast SSID and

 

 

Security Mode” on

 

 

page 88

 

 

 

Security Mode

None (plain text)

“Broadcast SSID and

 

 

Security Mode” on

 

 

page 88

 

 

 

Authentication Type

None

 

 

 

 

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Option

Default Settings

Related Information

 

 

 

MAC Filtering

Allow any station unless in list

“Controlling access by

 

 

MAC address filtering”

 

 

on page 110

 

 

 

Guest Login

Disabled

“Advanced

 

 

Configuration” on

 

 

page 67

 

 

 

Guest Welcome Screen

Thank you for using wireless Guest Access

“Advanced

Text

as provided by this Gateway 7001 Series

Configuration” on

 

wireless access point. When clicking

page 67

 

“Accept” below, you will gain access to a

 

 

wireless network which will allow you

 

 

complete access to the Internet but is

 

 

external to the corporate network. This

 

 

network is not configured to provide any

 

 

level of wireless security.

 

 

 

 

WDS Settings

None

“Configuring a Wireless

 

 

Distribution System

 

 

(WDS)” on page 112

 

 

 

What the access point does not provide

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP is not designed to function as a gateway to the Internet. To connect your LAN to other LANs or the Internet, you need a gateway device, such as a router or a switch.

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Administrator’s computer

Configuration and administration of the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP is accomplished with the KickStart utility (which you run from the CD) and through a Web-based user interface (UI). The following table describes the minimum requirements for the administrator’s computer.

Required Software or

Description

Component

 

 

 

Ethernet Connection to the

The computer used to configure the first access point with

First Access Point

KickStart must have an Ethernet network connection to the

 

access point.

 

 

Wireless Connection to the

After initial configuration and launch of the first access points on

Network

your new wireless network, you can make subsequent

 

configuration changes through the Administration Web pages

 

using a wireless connection to the “Internal” network. For wireless

 

connection to the access point, your administration device will

 

need Wi-Fi capability similar to that of any wireless client:

 

• Portable or built-in Wi-Fi client adapter that supports one or more

 

of the IEEE 802.11 modes in which you plan to run the access

 

point. (IEEE 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11a Turbo

 

modes are supported, depending on model.)

 

• Wireless client software such as Microsoft Windows XP or Funk

 

Odyssey wireless client configured to associate with the Gateway

 

7001 Series access point.

 

For more details on Wi-Fi client setup, see “Wireless client

 

computers” on page 11

 

 

Web Browser / Operating

Configuration and administration of the Gateway 7001 Series

System

self-managed AP is provided through a Web-based user interface

 

hosted on the access point. We recommend using one of the

 

following supported Web browsers to access the access point

 

Administration Web pages:

 

• Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.5 or 6.x (with up-to-date

 

patch level for either major version) on Microsoft Windows XP or

 

Microsoft Windows 2000

 

• Netscape Mozilla on Redhat Linux version 2.4

 

The administration Web browser must have JavaScript enabled

 

to support the interactive features of the administration interface.

 

It must also support HTTP uploads to use the firmware upgrade

 

feature.

 

 

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Required Software or

Description

Component

 

 

 

KickStart Wizard on

You can run the KickStart CD on any laptop or computer that is

CD

connected to the access point (through Wired or Wireless

connection). It detects Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs

 

 

on the network. The wizard steps you through initial configuration

 

of new access points, and provides a link to the Administration

 

Web pages where you finish up the basic setup process in a

 

step-by-step mode and launch the network.

 

For more about using KickStart, see “Running KickStart to find

 

access points and assign IP addresses” on page 20

 

 

CD Drive

The administrator’s computer must have a CD drive to run the

 

KickStart CD.

 

 

Security Settings

Make sure that security is disabled on the wireless client used to

 

initially configure the access point.

 

 

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Wireless client computers

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP provides wireless access to any client with a correctly configured Wi-Fi client adapter for the 802.11 mode in which the access point is running.

Multiple client operating systems are supported. Clients can be laptops or desktops, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or any other hand-held, portable or stationary device equipped with a Wi-Fi adapter and supporting drivers.

In order to connect to the access point, wireless clients need the following software and hardware.

Required Component

Description

 

 

Wi-Fi Client Adapter

Portable or built-in Wi-Fi client adapter that supports one or more

 

of the IEEE 802.11 modes in which you plan to run the access

 

point. (IEEE 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11a Turbo

 

modes are supported, depending on model.)

 

Wi-Fi client adapters vary considerably. The adapter can be a PC

 

card built in to the client device, a portable PCMCIA or PCI card

 

(types of NICs), or an external device such as a USB or Ethernet

 

adapter that you connect to the client by means of a cable.

 

The access point supports 802.11a/b/g modes (depending on

 

model), but you will probably make a decision during network

 

design phase as to which mode to use. The fundamental

 

requirement for clients is that they all have configured adapters

 

that match the 802.11 mode for which your access point(s) is

 

configured.

 

 

Wireless Client Software

Client software such as Microsoft Windows XP or Funk Odyssey

 

wireless client configured to associate with the Gateway 7001

 

Series access point.

 

 

Client Security Settings

Security should be disabled on the client used to do initial

 

configuration of the access point.

 

If the Security mode on the access point is set to anything other

 

than plain text, wireless clients will need to set a profile to the

 

authentication mode used by the access point and provide a valid

 

user name and password, certificate, or similar user identity proof.

 

Security modes are Static WEP, IEEE 802.1x, WPA with RADIUS

 

server, and WPA-PSK.

 

For information on configuring security on the access point, see

 

“Configuring network security” on page 80.

 

 

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Understanding dynamic and static IP addressing

Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs are built to auto-configure, with very little setup required for the first access point and no configuration required for additional access points subsequently joining a preconfigured cluster.

How does the access point obtain an IP address at startup?

When you deploy the access point, it looks for a network DHCP server and, if it finds one, obtains an IP Address from the DHCP server. If no DHCP server is found on the network, the AP will continue to use its default Static IP Address (192.168.1.1) until you re-assign it a new static IP address (and specify a static IP addressing policy) or until a DHCP server is brought online.

Important If you configure both an Internal and Guest network and plan to use a dynamic addressing policy for both, separate DHCP servers must be running on each network.

A DHCP server is a requirement for the Guest network.

When you run KickStart, it discovers the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs on the network and lists their IP addresses and MAC addresses. KickStart also provides a link to the administration Web pages of each access point using the IP address in the URL. (For more information about the KickStart utility, see “Running KickStart to find access points and assign IP addresses” on page 20.)

Dynamic IP addressing

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP generally expects that a DHCP server is running on the network where the AP is deployed. Most home and small business networks already have DHCP service provided either through a gateway device or a centralized server.

However, if no DHCP server is present on the Internal network, the AP will use the default Static IP Address for first time startup.

Similarly, wireless clients and other network devices (such as printers) will receive their IP addresses from the DHCP server, if there is one. If no DHCP server is present on the network, you must manually assign static IP addresses to your wireless clients and other network devices.

The Guest network must have a DHCP server.

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Static IP addressing

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP ships with a default Static IP Address of 192.168.1.1. (See the default settings for the AP in “Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP” on page 5.) If no DHCP server is found on the network, the AP retains this static IP address at first-time startup.

After AP startup, you have the option of specifying a static IP addressing policy on Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs and assigning static IP addresses to APs on the internal network through the access point Administration Web pages. (See information about the Connection Type box and related boxes in “Configuring Internal interface Ethernet settings” on page 71.)

Important If you do not have a DHCP server on the Internal network and do not plan to use one, the first thing you must do after adding the access point is change the Connection Type from DHCP to Static IP. You can either assign a new Static IP address to the AP or continue using the default address. We recommend assigning a new Static IP address so that if later you add another Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP on the same network, the IP address for each AP will be unique.

Recovering an IP Address

If you experience trouble communicating with the access point, you can recover a static IP address by resetting the AP configuration to the factory defaults (see “Resetting the configuration” on page 166), or you can get a dynamically assigned address by connecting the AP to a network that has DHCP.

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Chapter 2

Quick Setup

Unpacking the access point

Connecting the access point to network and power

Turning on the access point

Running KickStart to find access points and assign IP addresses

Configuring basic settings and starting the wireless network

15

Setting up the access point

Setting up and deploying one or more Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs is in effect creating and launching a wireless network. The KickStart Wizard and corresponding Basic Settings Administration Web page simplify this process. Here is a step-by-step guide to setting up your Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs and the resulting wireless network. Have the KickStart CD handy, and familiarize yourself with the “Default settings and supported administrator/client platforms” on page 5 if you have not already.

Unpacking the access point

Unpack the Access Point (AP) and familiarize yourself with its hardware ports, associated cables, and accessories.

Access point hardware and ports

The access point includes:

Ethernet ports for connection to the Local Area Network (LAN) through Ethernet network cable

Power over Ethernet (POE) and power adapter

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What’s inside the access point?

An access point is a single-purpose computer designed to function as a wireless hub. Inside the access point is a Wi-Fi radio system, a microprocessor, and sometimes a mini-PC card. The access point boots from FlashROM that contains firmware with the configurable, runtime features summarized in “Overview of the Gateway 7001 Series of self-managed APs” on page 2.

As new features and enhancements become available, you can upgrade the firmware to add new functionality and performance improvements to the access points that make up your wireless network. (See “Upgrading the firmware” on page 168.)

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Connecting the access point to network and power

The next step is to set up the network and power connections.

To set up the network and power connections:

1 Connect one end of an Ethernet cable to the network port on the access point and the other end to the same hub where your computer is connected.

Hub

Admin computer to hub

Hub to LAN

Administrator computer

AP to hub

LAN

Access point

OR -

Connect one end of an Ethernet cable to the network port on the access point and the other end of the cable to the Ethernet port on your computer.

Administrator computer

(This computer must have an IP address on

the same subnet as the access point.)

Access point

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Important If you use a hub, the device you use must permit broadcast signals from the access point to reach all other devices on the network. A standard hub should work fine. Some switches, however, do not allow directed or subnet broadcasts through. You may have to configure the switch to allow directed broadcasts.

If for initial configuration use a direct wired connection (using an Ethernet cable) between the access point and your computer, you will need to reconfigure the cabling for subsequent startup and deployment of the access point so that the access point is no longer connected directly to your computer but instead is connected to the LAN (either using a Hub or directly).

It is possible to detect access points on the network (using Kickstart) with a wireless connection. However, we strongly advise against using this method. In most environments you may have no way of knowing whether you are actually connecting to the intended AP and also because many of the initial configuration changes required will cause you to lose connectivity with the AP over a wireless connection.

2 Connect the power adapter to the power port on the back of the access point, then plug the other end of the power cord into a power outlet (preferably, using a surge protector).

Setting up connections for a guest network

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP offers an out-of-the-box Guest Interface that lets you configure an access point for controlled guest access to the network. The same access point can function as a bridge for two different wireless networks: A secure Internal LAN and a public Guest network. This can be done in one of two ways:

Physically, by connecting the two LAN ports on the access point to different networks with two different cables, one to the internal LAN and the other to the public Guest network.

Virtually, by defining two different Virtual LANs through the Administration UI.

Hardware connections for a guest VLAN

If you plan to configure a guest network using VLANs, do the following:

Connect eth0 to a VLAN-capable switch

Define VLANs on that switch

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Hardware connections for a physically separate guest network

If you plan to configure a physically separate guest network, you need to set up your network connections differently at this point. The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP ships with an extra network port to support configuration of a physically separate guest network. Use both network ports on the access point to create two physical connections to different networks:

Create a wired (Ethernet) connection from one of the network ports on the access point to your internal LAN.

Create a second wired (Ethernet) connection from the other network port on the access point to a separate network.

After you have the required physical connections set up, the rest of the configuration process is accomplished through the Administration UI. For information on configuring guest interface settings on the Administration UI, see “Advanced Configuration” on page 67.

Turning on the access point

Plug in the AC power adapter and plug the power adapter into the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP, then wait for its initialization process to complete.

Running KickStart to find access points and assign IP addresses

KickStart is an easy-to-use utility for discovering and identifying new Gateway access points. KickStart scans the network looking for Gateway access points, and displays ID details on those it finds.

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Important Keep in mind that KickStart (and the other Gateway administration tools) recognizes and configures only Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs. KickStart will not find or configure other kinds of access points or other devices.

Run Kickstart only in the subnet of the “Internal” network (SSID). Do not run Kickstart on the guest subnetwork.

Kickstart will find only those access points that have IP addresses. IP addresses are dynamically assigned to APs if you have a DHCP server running on the network. Keep in mind that if you deploy the AP on a network with no DHCP server, the default static IP address (192.168.1.1) will be used.

Use caution with non-DHCP enabled networks: Do not deploy more than one new AP on a non-DHCP network unless you change the IP address list in the first DHCP server, because they will use the same default static IP addresses and conflict with each other. (For more information, see “Understanding dynamic and static IP addressing” on page 12 and “How does the access point obtain an IP address at startup?” on page 12.)

Run the KickStart CD on a laptop or computer that is connected to the same network as your access points and use it to step through the discovery process.

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To run KickStart:

1 Insert the KickStart Wizard CD into the CD drive on your computer. If the KickStart window is not displayed automatically, navigate to the CD drive and double-click the Kickstart executable file to activate the KickStart utility on the CD. The KickStart Welcome screen is displayed.

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2 Click Next to search for access points. Wait for the search to complete, or until KickStart has found your new access points.

Important If no access points are found, Kickstart indicates this and presents some troubleshooting information about your LAN and power connections. After you have checked hardware power and Ethernet connections, you can click the Kickstart Back button to search again for access points.

3 Review the list of access points found.

KickStart will detect the IP addresses of Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs. Access points are listed with their locations, Media Access Control (MAC) addresses, and IP Addresses. If you are installing the first access point on a single-access-point network, only one entry will be displayed on this screen.

Verify the MAC addresses shown here against the hardware labels for each access point. This will be especially helpful later in providing or modifying the descriptive location name for each access point. Click Next to continue.

4 Go to the Access Point Administration Web pages by clicking the link provided on the KickStart page (see “Logging on to the administration Web pages” on page 24).

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Important KickStart provides a link to the Administration Web pages through the IP address of the first access point. The Administration Web pages are a centralized management tool that you can access through the IP address for any access point in a cluster. After your other access points are configured, you can also link to the Administration Web pages by using the IP address for any of the other Gateway access points in a URL (http://IPAddressOfAccessPoint).

Logging on to the administration Web pages

When you follow the link from KickStart to the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP administration Web pages, you are prompted for a user name and password.

The defaults for user name and password are as follows.

Field

Default Setting

 

 

User name

admin

 

 

Password

admin

 

The user name is read-only. It cannot be modified.

 

 

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Type the user name and password and click OK.

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Viewing basic settings for Gateway 7001 Series self-managed access points

When you log in, the Basic Settings page for Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP administration is displayed. These are global settings for all access points that are members of the cluster and, if automatic configuration is specified, for any new access points that are added later.

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Configuring basic settings and starting the wireless network

Provide a minimal set of configuration information by defining the basic settings for your wireless network. These settings are all available on the Basic Settings page of the Administration Web interface, and are categorized into steps 1-4 on the Web page.

To configure the basic settings:

1 Review the description of this access point and provide IP addressing information. For more information, see “Reviewing and describing the access point” on page 31.

2 Provide a new administrator password for clustered access points. For more information, see “Providing administrator password and wireless network name” on page 32.

3 Set configuration policy for new access points.

Choose to configure new access points automatically (as new members of the cluster) or ignore new access points.

If you set a configuration policy to configure new access points automatically, new access points added to this network will join the cluster and be configured automatically based on the settings you defined here. Updates to the network settings on any cluster member will be shared with all other access points in the group.

If you chose to ignore new access points, then as you add new access points they will run in standalone mode. In standalone mode, an access point does not share the cluster configuration with other access points. Instead it must be configured manually.

You can always update the settings on a standalone access point to have it join the cluster. You can also remove an access point from a cluster thereby switching it to run in standalone mode.

For more information, see “Setting configuration policy for new access points” on page 34.

4 Start wireless networking by clicking Update to activate the wireless network with these new settings. For more information, see “Updating basic settings” on page 36.

Default configuration

If you follow the steps above and accept all the defaults, the access point will have the default configuration described in “Default settings and supported administrator/client platforms” on page 5.

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What’s next?

Make sure the access point is connected to the LAN and access some wireless clients. After you have tested the basics of your wireless network, you can enable more security and fine-tune by modifying advanced configuration features.

Make sure the access point is connected to the LAN

If you configured the access point and administrator computer by connecting both into a network hub, then your access point is already connected to the LAN. The next step is to test some wireless clients.

To test wireless clients:

1 If you configured the access point using a direct wired connection with an Ethernet cable from your computer to the access point, disconnect the cable from your computer and the access point.

2 Connect a regular Ethernet cable from the access point to the LAN.

3 Connect your computer to the LAN either through Ethernet cable or wireless client card.

Test LAN connectivity with wireless clients

Test the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP by trying to detect it and associate with it from some wireless client devices. (See “Wireless client computers” on page 11 in the PreLaunch Checklist: Default Settings and Supported Administrator/Client Platforms for information on requirements for these clients.)

Secure and fine-tune the access point using advanced features

After you have the wireless network up and running and have tested against the access point with some wireless clients, you can add in more layers of security, add users, configure a guest interface, and fine-tune performance settings.

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Chapter 3

Configuring Basic Network

Settings

Navigating to basic settings

Reviewing and describing the access point

Setting configuration policy for new access points

Understanding basic settings for a standalone access point

Understanding indicator icons

29

Navigating to basic settings

To configure basic Network settings, click Network, then click Basic Settings.

If you use Kickstart to link to the Administration Web pages, the Basic Settings page is displayed by default.

Fill in the boxes on the Basic Settings page as described in the following section.

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Reviewing and describing the access point

Field

Action

 

 

IP Address

This box is not editable because the IP address is

 

already assigned (either through DHCP, or statically

 

through the Ethernet (Wired) settings as described in

 

“Configuring Guest interface Ethernet settings” on

 

page 73).

 

 

MAC Address

A MAC address is a permanent, unique hardware

 

address for any device that represents an interface to the

 

network. The MAC address is assigned by the

 

manufacturer.

 

You cannot change the MAC address. It is provided here

 

for informational purposes as a unique identifier for an

 

interface.

 

The address shown here is the MAC address for the

 

bridge (br0). This is the address by which the AP is

 

known externally to other networks.

 

To see MAC addresses for guest and internal interfaces

 

on the AP, see the Status > Interfaces tab.

 

 

Firmware

Version information about the firmware currently installed

Version

on the access point.

 

As new versions of the Gateway 7001 Series

 

self-managed AP firmware become available, you can

 

upgrade the firmware on your access points to take

 

advantages of new features and enhancements.

 

For instructions on how to upgrade the firmware, see

 

“Upgrading the firmware” on page 168.

 

 

Location

Specify a location description for this access point.

 

 

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Providing administrator password and wireless network name

Caution The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP is not designed for multiple, simultaneous configuration changes. If you have a network that includes multiple access points, and more than one administrator is logged on to the Administration Web pages and making changes to the configuration, all access points in the cluster will stay in synch but there is no guarantee that all configuration changes specified by multiple users will be applied.

Field

Action

 

 

Administrator

Type a new administrator password. The characters you

Password

enter will be displayed as “*” characters to prevent others

 

from seeing your password as you type.

 

The Administrator password must be an alphanumeric

 

strings of up to 32 characters. Do not use special

 

characters.

 

Note: As an immediate first step in securing your

 

wireless network, we recommend that you change the

 

administrator password from the default.

 

 

Administrator

Re-type the new administrator password to confirm that

Password (again)

you typed it as intended.

 

 

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Field

Action

 

 

Wireless

Type a name for the wireless network as a character

Network Name

string. This name will apply to all access points on this

(SSID)

network. As you add more access points, they will share

 

this SSID.

 

The Service Set Identifier (SSID) is an alphanumeric

 

string of up to 32 characters

 

Note: If you are connected as a wireless client to the

 

same AP that you are administering, resetting the SSID

 

will cause you to lose connectivity to the AP. You will need

 

to reconnect to the new SSID after you save this new

 

setting.

 

 

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Setting configuration policy for new access points

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Field

Action

 

 

New Access

Choose the policy you want to put in effect for adding

Points

New Access Points to the network.

 

• If you choose are configured automatically, then

 

when a new access points is added to the network it

 

automatically joins the existing cluster. The cluster

 

configuration is copied to the new access point, and no

 

manual configuration is required to deploy it.

 

• If you choose are ignored, new access points will not

 

join the cluster, but will be considered standalone. You

 

need to configure standalone access points manually

 

through KickStart and the Administration Web pages

 

residing on the standalone access points. (To get to the

 

Web page for a standalone access point, use its IP

 

address in a URL as follows:

 

http://IPAddressOfAccessPoint.).

 

Note: If you change the policy so that new access points

 

are ignored, then any new access points you add to the

 

network will not join the cluster. Existing clustered access

 

points will not be aware of these standalone APs.

 

Therefore, if you are viewing the Administration Web

 

pages through the IP address of a clustered access

 

point, the new standalone APs will not show up in the

 

list of access points on the Cluster > Access Points tab.

 

The only way to see a standalone AP is to browse to it

 

directly by using its IP address in the URL.

 

If you later change the policy back to the default so that

 

new access points “are configured automatically,” all

 

subsequent new APs will automatically join the cluster.

 

Standalone APs, however, will stay in standalone mode

 

until you explicitly add them to the cluster.

 

For information on how to add standalone APs to the

 

cluster, see “Adding an access point to a cluster” on

 

page 52.

 

 

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Updating basic settings

When you have reviewed the new configuration, click Update to apply the settings and deploy the access points as a wireless network.

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Understanding basic settings for a standalone access point

The Basic Settings tab for a standalone access point indicates only that the current mode is standalone and provides a button for adding the access point to a cluster (group). If you click on any of the Cluster tabs on the Administration pages for an access point in standalone mode, you will be re-directed to the Basic Settings page because Cluster settings do not apply to standalone APs.

For more information, see “Standalone mode” on page 44 and “Adding an access point to a cluster” on page 52.

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Understanding indicator icons

All the network settings tabs on the Administration Web pages include visual indicator icons showing current network activity

Icon

Description

 

 

 

The clustering icon indicates whether the current access

 

point is “Clustered” or “Not Clustered” (that is,

 

standalone).

 

 

 

The number of access points available for service on this

 

network is indicated by the “Access Points” icon.

 

 

 

Then number of client user accounts created and

 

enabled on this network is indicated by the “User

 

Accounts” icon.

 

 

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Chapter 4

Managing Access Points and

Clusters

Navigating to access points management

Understanding clustering and access points

Modifying the location description

Adding and removing an access point

Navigating to an AP by using its IP address in a URL

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Introduction

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs show current basic configuration settings for clustered access points (location, IP address, MAC address, status, and availability) and provide a way of navigating to the full configuration for specific APs if they are cluster members.

Standalone access points (those which are not members of the cluster) do not show up in this listing. To configure standalone access points, you must discover (through Kickstart) or know the IP address of the access point and by using its IP address in a URL (http://IPAddressOfAccessPoint).

Important The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs are not designed for multiple, simultaneous configuration changes. If you have a network that includes multiple access points, and more than one administrator is logged on to the Administration Web pages and making changes to the configuration, all access points in the cluster will stay in synch but there is no guarantee that all configuration changes specified by multiple users will be applied.

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Navigating to access points management

To view or edit information on access points in a cluster, click Cluster > Access Points on the Administration Web page. The Manage access points in the cluster screen opens.

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Understanding clustering

A key feature of the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP is the ability to form a dynamic, configuration-aware group (called a cluster) with other Gateway access points in a network in the same subnet.

Access points can participate in a peer-to-peer cluster which makes it easier for you to deploy, administer, and secure your wireless network. The cluster provides a single point of administration and lets you view the deployment of access points as a single wireless network rather than a series of separate wireless devices.

What is a cluster?

A cluster is a group of access points which are coordinated as a single group through Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP administration. You cannot create multiple clusters on a single wireless network (SSID).

Only one cluster per wireless network is supported.

How many APs can a cluster support?

The Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP can support up to eight access points in a cluster at any one time. If a new AP is added to a network with a cluster that is already at full capacity, the new AP is added in stand-alone mode. Note that when the cluster is full, extra APs are added in stand-alone mode regardless of the configuration policy in effect for new access points.

For related information, see “Cluster mode” on page 44, “Standalone mode” on page 44, and “Setting configuration policy for new access points” on page 34.

What kinds of APs can cluster together?

A Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP can form a cluster with itself (a “cluster of one”) and with other Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs that share some basic characteristics. In order to be members of the same cluster, access points must be Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs:

Of the same radio configuration (all dual-band APs or all single-band APs)

On the same LAN

A dual-band and a single-band AP cannot be members of the same cluster. Therefore, a Gateway 7001 802.11 A+G Wireless Access Point (dual-band) cannot cluster with a Gateway 7001 802.11 G Wireless Access Point (single-band). Also, Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs will not cluster with non Gateway APs.

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Having a mix of APs on the network does not adversely affect Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP clustering in any way, however it is helpful to understand the clustering behavior for administration purposes:

Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs of the same model will form a cluster. The dual-band APs will form one cluster and the single-band APs will form another cluster.

Non-Gateway APs will not join Gateway clusters. They should be administered as usual through their associated Administration tools.

Which settings are shared in the cluster configuration and which are not?

Most configuration settings defined through the Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP Administration Web pages will be propagated to cluster members as a part of the cluster configuration.

Settings shared in the cluster configuration

The cluster configuration includes:

Network name (SSID)

Administrator password

Configuration policy

User accounts and authentication

Wireless interface settings

Radio settings

QoS queue parameters

MAC address filtering.

Settings not shared by the cluster

The few exceptions (settings not shared among clustered access points) are the following most of which, by nature, must be unique:

IP addresses

MAC addresses

Location descriptions

WDS bridges

Security settings

Ethernet (Wired) Settings, including enabling or disabling Guest access

Guest interface configuration

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Settings that are not shared must be configured individually on the Administration pages for each access point. To get to the Administration pages for an access point that is a member of the current cluster, click on its IP Address link on the Cluster > Access Points page of the current AP.

Cluster mode

When an access point is a cluster member, it is considered to be in cluster mode. You define whether you want new access points to join the cluster or not through the configuration policy you set in Basic Settings. (See “Setting configuration policy for new access points” on page 34.) You can re-set an access point in cluster mode to standalone mode. (See “Removing an access point from the cluster” on page 51.)

Important When the cluster is full (eight APs is the limit), extra APs are added in stand-alone mode regardless of the configuration policy in effect for new access points. See “How many APs can a cluster support?” on page 42.

Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs of different models form separate clusters. See “What kinds of APs can cluster together?” on page 42.

Standalone mode

Gateway 7001 Series self-managed APs can be configured in standalone mode. In standalone mode, an access point is not a member of the cluster and does not share the cluster configuration, but rather requires manual configuration that is not shared with other access points. (See “Setting configuration policy for new access points” on page 34 and “Removing an access point from the cluster” on page 51.)

Standalone access points are not listed on the Cluster > Access Points tab in the Administration UI.

You need to know the IP address for a standalone access point in order to configure and manage it directly. (See “Navigating to an AP by using its IP address in a URL” on page 53.)

The Basic Settings tab for a standalone access point indicates only that the current mode is standalone and provides a button for adding the access point to a cluster (group). If you click on any of the Cluster tabs on the Administration pages for an access point in standalone mode, you will be redirected to the Basic Settings page because Cluster settings do not apply to stand-alone APs.

Important When the cluster is full (eight APs is the limit), extra APs are added in stand-alone mode regardless of the configuration policy in effect for new access points. See “How many APs can a cluster support?” on page 42.

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You can re-enable cluster mode on a standalone access point. (See “Adding an access point to a cluster” on page 52.)

Cluster formation

A cluster is formed when the first Gateway 7001 Series self-managed AP is configured. (See “Quick Setup” on page 15 and “Configuring Basic Network Settings” on page 29.)

If a cluster configuration policy is in place when a new access point is deployed, it attempts to rendezvous with an existing cluster.

If it is unable to locate a cluster, then it establishes a new cluster on its own.

If it locates a cluster but is rejected because the cluster is full, or the clustering policy is to ignore new access points, then the access point will deploy in standalone mode.

Cluster size and membership

The upper limit of a cluster is eight access points. The Network Web administration page provides a real-time, visual indicator of the number of access points in the current cluster and warns when the cluster has reached capacity. (See “Configuring basic settings and starting the wireless network” on page 27.)

If a cluster is present but is already full, new access points will deploy in standalone mode.

Intra-cluster security

To make sure that the security of the cluster as a whole is equivalent to the security of a single access point, communication of certain data between access points in a cluster is done using Secure Sockets Layer (typically referred to as SSL) with private key encryption.

Both the cluster configuration file and the user database are transmitted among access points using SSL.

Auto-Synch of Cluster Configuration

If you are making changes to the AP configuration that require a relatively large amount of processing (such as adding several new users), you may encounter a synchronization progress bar after clicking Update on any of the Administration pages. The progress bar indicates that the system is busy performing an auto-synch of the updated configuration to all APs in the cluster. The Administration Web pages are not editable during the auto-synch.

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