Gateway GM5457H User Manual

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GATEWAY COMPUTER

USERGUIDE

ORDINATEUR GATEWAY

MANUEL DE L’UTILISATEUR

®

Contents

Chapter 1: Getting Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Thank you for purchasing our computer! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Using the Gateway Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Using Help and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Searching for a topic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Getting help for Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Using online help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Chapter 2: Using Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Using the Windows desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Using the Start menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Adding icons to the desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Identifying window items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Working with files and folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Viewing drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Creating folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Copying and moving files and folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Deleting files and folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Searching for files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Using the Windows Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Browsing for files and folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Working with documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Creating a new document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Saving a document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Opening a document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Printing a document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Chapter 3: Using the Internet and Faxing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Learning about the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Setting up an Internet account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Accessing your Internet account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Using the World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Connecting to a Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Downloading files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Using e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Sending e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Checking your e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Using Windows Fax and Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Sending a fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Receiving and viewing a fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Chapter 4: Playing and Creating Media Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Playing music and movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Playing audio and video files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Playing optical discs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

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Creating audio files and music libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Creating music files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Building a music library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Editing track information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Creating music CDs and video DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Creating a music CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Creating a video DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Creating and copying data discs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Creating a data disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Using Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Starting Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Using the Media Center remote control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Chapter 5: Networking Your Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Introduction to Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Networking terms you should know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Ethernet networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Wired Ethernet networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Wireless Ethernet networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Establishing your Ethernet network connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Testing your network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Adding a printer to your network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Sharing resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Using the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Bluetooth networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Chapter 6: Protecting your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

Hardware security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Kensington lock slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Data security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Startup and hard drive password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Windows user accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Protecting your computer from viruses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Using McAfee SecurityCenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Using Windows Security Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Security updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Windows Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 BigFix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Chapter 7: Customizing Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

Changing screen settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Changing color depth and screen resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Changing the appearance of windows and backgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Selecting a screen saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Changing gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Setting up multiple monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Changing system sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

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Changing mouse settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Adding and modifying user accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Changing power-saving settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Changing the power plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Changing accessibility settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Using the Ease of Access Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Using voice recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Setting up parental controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Filtering Internet access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Scheduling computer and Internet use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Restricting game access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Restricting specific programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Creating activity reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

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Contents

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CHAPTER1

Getting Help

Using the Gateway Web site

Using Help and Support

Using online help

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CHAPTER 1: Getting Help

Thank you for purchasing our computer!

You have made an excellent decision choosing Gateway. We are sure that you will be pleased with the outstanding quality, reliability, and performance of your new computer. Each and every Gateway computer uses the latest technology and passes through the most stringent quality control tests to ensure that you are provided with the best product possible.

Please read this manual carefully to familiarize yourself with our range of services and support. We have highlighted some basic care and safety information to help you keep your computer in good operating condition.

Gateway stands behind our value proposition to our customers—to provide best-of-class service and support in addition to high-quality, brand-name components at affordable prices. If you ever have a problem, our knowledgeable, dedicated customer service department will provide you with fast, considerate service.

We sincerely hope that you will receive the utmost satisfaction and enjoyment from your new Gateway computer for years to come.

Thanks again, from all of us at Gateway.

Using the Gateway Web site

Gateway’s online support is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Visit the Gateway Support Web site at www.gateway.com.

Using Help and Support

Your computer includes Help and Support, an easily accessible collection of help information, troubleshooters, and automated support. Use Help and Support to answer questions about Windows and to help you quickly discover and use the many features of your Gateway computer.

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To start Help and Support:

Click (Start), then click Help and Support. Help and Support opens.

You can find help information by clicking a general topic under Find an answer, selecting an option under Ask someone, or picking a category from Information from Microsoft. You can also search for a topic.

Searching for a topic

To search for a topic in Help and Support, type a word or phrase (keyword) in the Search Help box located at the top of any Help and Support screen, then press ENTER.

For each search, you receive a list of suggested topics. To find the answer, click the result that most closely matches your question. Additional results may be available if the first list does not address your question.

Getting help for Windows Media Center

If your computer has Windows Vista Media Center Edition, you can access help for information on how to use it.

To access Media Center help:

1 Click (Start), then click Help and Support. Help and Support opens.

2In the Help and Support window, type Windows Media Center in the Search Help box, then press ENTER. The Media Center Help window opens.

-OR-

If you are connected to the Internet, you can click Windows Online Help, then type

Windows Media Center in the Search Help For box.

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CHAPTER 1: Getting Help

Using online help

If you are connected to the Internet, many programs provide information online so you can research a topic or learn how to perform a task while you are using the program. You can access most online help information by selecting a topic from a Help menu or by clicking the Help button on the menu bar and selecting Online Support from the list.

Available information depends on the particular Help site to which you are taken. Many provide FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions), a search feature, articles about their software, tutorials, and forums where problems and issues are discussed.

Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity

The Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity label found on the back or side of your computer includes the product key code for your operating system. If you ever reinstall Windows Vista from the installation DVD, you will need to enter these numbers to activate it.

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CHAPTER2

Using Windows

Using the Windows desktop

Working with files and folders

Searching for files

Working with documents

Shortcuts

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CHAPTER 2: Using Windows

Using the Windows desktop

After your computer starts, the first screen you see is the Windows desktop. The desktop is like the top of a real desk. Think of the desktop as your personalized work space where you open programs and perform other tasks.

.

Help

For more information about the Windows desktop, click Start, then click Help and Support.

Type the phrase Windows desktop in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Your desktop may be different from this example, depending on how your computer is set up. The desktop contains the taskbar, the Start button, and the Recycle Bin icon.

Desktop elements

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The taskbar is the bar at the bottom of the computer display containing the Start button on the left and a clock on the right. Other buttons on the taskbar represent programs that are running.

Click a program’s button on the taskbar to open the program’s window.

The Start button provides access to programs, files, help for Windows and other programs, and computer tools and utilities.

Click the Start button, then open a file or program by clicking an item on the menu that opens.

The Recycle Bin is where files, folders, and programs that you discarded are stored. You must empty the Recycle Bin to permanently delete them from your computer. For instructions on how to use the Recycle Bin, see “Deleting files and folders” on page 11.

The Windows Security Center icon may appear on the taskbar near the clock. The icon changes appearance to notify you when the security settings on your computer are set below the recommended value or when updates are available. Double-click this icon to open the Windows Security Center. For more information, see “Modifying security settings” on page 64.

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Using the Start menu

Help

For more information about the Windows Start menu, click Start, then click Help and

Support. Type Windows Start menu in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

You can start programs, open files, customize your system, get help, search for files and folders, and more using the Start menu.

To use the Start menu:

Shortcut

Start Ö All Programs Ö

1Click (Start) on the lower left of the Windows desktop. The Start menu opens, showing you the first level of menu items.

2Click All Programs to see all programs, files, and folders in the Start menu. If you click an item with a folder icon, the programs, files, and subfolders appear.

3Click a file or program to open it.

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CHAPTER 2: Using Windows

Adding icons to the desktop

Help

For more information about the desktop icons, click Start, then click Help and Support.

Type desktop icons in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

You may want to add an icon (shortcut) to the desktop for a program that you use frequently.

To add icons to the desktop:

Shortcut

Start Ö All Programs Ö right-click programÖ Send To Ö Desktop (create shortcut)

1Click (Start), then click All Programs.

2Right-click (press the right mouse button) the program that you want to add to the desktop.

3Click Send To, then click Desktop (create shortcut). A shortcut icon for that program appears on the desktop.

Identifying window items

Help

For more information about windows, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type window in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

When you double-click the icon for a drive, folder, file, or program, a window opens on the desktop. This example shows the Local Disk (C:) window, which opens after you double-click the Local Disk (C:) icon in the Computer window.

 

 

Search box

Title bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

Close

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximize

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menu bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimize

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every program window looks a little different because each has its own menus, icons, and controls. Most windows include these items:

Window item

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The title bar is the horizontal bar at the top of a window that shows the window title.

The Search box lets you search for a word or phrase in the current window.

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Window item

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clicking the minimize button

 

 

 

reduces the active window to a

 

 

 

button on the taskbar. Clicking the

 

 

 

program button in the taskbar

 

 

 

opens the window again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clicking the maximize button

 

 

 

 

 

 

expands the active window to fit

 

 

 

theentirecomputerdisplay.Clicking

 

 

 

the maximize button again restores

 

 

 

the window to its former size.

 

 

 

Clicking the close button closes the

 

 

 

active window or program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clicking an item on the menu bar starts an action such as Print or

Save.

Working with files and folders

You can organize your files and programs to suit your preferences much like you would store information in a file cabinet. You can store these files in folders and copy, move, and delete the information just as you would reorganize and throw away information in a file cabinet.

Viewing drives

Help

For more information about files and folders, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type files and folders in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Drives are like file cabinets because they hold files and folders. A computer almost always has more than one drive. Each drive has a letter, usually Local Disk (C:) for the hard drive. You may also have more drives such as a CD or DVD drive.

To view the drives, folders, and files on your computer:

1Click (Start), then click Computer.

Hard drives

Diskette drive

 

 

 

 

 

Disc drive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2Double-click the drive icon.

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CHAPTER 2: Using Windows

Creating folders

Folders are much like the folders in a file cabinet. They can contain files and other folders.

Files are much like paper documents—letters, spreadsheets, and pictures—that you keep on your computer. In fact, all information on a computer is stored in files.

Folders

Files

To create a folder:

Shortcut

Click File ÖNew ÖFolder Ötype name

1Click (Start), then click Computer on the Start menu.

2Double-click the drive where you want to put the new folder. Typically, Local Disk (C:) is your hard drive and 3½ Floppy (A:) is your diskette drive.

3If you want to create a new folder inside an existing folder, double-click the existing folder.

4Click Organize, then click New Folder. The new folder is created.

5Type a name for the folder, then press ENTER. The new folder name appears by the folder icon.

For information about renaming folders, see “Shortcuts” on page 16.

Copying and moving files and folders

Important

The clipboard stores whatever you cut or copy until you cut or copy again. Then the clipboard contains the new information only. Therefore, you can paste copies of a file or folder into more than one place, but as soon as you copy or cut a different file or folder, the original file or folder is deleted from the clipboard.

The skills you need to copy and move files are called copying, cutting, and pasting.

When you copy and paste a file or folder, you place a copy of the file or folder on the Windows clipboard, which temporarily stores it. Then, when you decide what folder you want the copy to go in (the destination folder), you paste it there.

When you cut and paste a file or folder, you remove the file or folder from its original location and place the file or folder on the Windows clipboard. When you decide where you want the file or folder to go, you paste it there.

To copy a file or folder to another folder:

1Locate the file or folder you want to copy. For more information, see “Viewing drives” on page 9 and “Searching for files” on page 12.

2Right-click (press the right mouse button) the file or folder that you want to copy. A pop-up menu opens on the desktop.

3Click Copy on the pop-up menu.

4Open the destination folder.

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5With the pointer inside the destination folder, right-click.

6Click Paste. A copy of the file or folder appears in the new location.

Help

For more information about copying files and folders or moving files or folders, click

Start, then click Help and Support. Type copying files and folders or moving files and folders in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

To move a file or folder to another folder:

1Locate the file or folder you want to move. For more information, see “Viewing drives” on page 9 and “Searching for files” on page 12.

2Right-click (press the right mouse button) the file or folder that you want to move. A pop-up menu opens on the desktop.

3Click Cut on the pop-up menu.

4Open the destination folder.

5With the pointer inside the destination folder, right-click.

6Click Paste. The file or folder you moved appears in its new location and is removed from its old location.

Deleting files and folders

When you throw away paper files and folders, you take them from the file cabinet and put them in a trash can. Eventually the trash can is emptied.

In Windows, you throw away files and folders by first moving them to the Windows trash can, called the Recycle Bin, where they remain until you decide to empty the bin.

You can recover any file in the Recycle Bin as long as the bin has not been emptied.

To delete files or folders:

1In the Computer or Windows Explorer window, click the files or folders that you want to delete. For instructions on how to select multiple files and folders, see “Shortcuts” on page 16.

If you cannot find the file you want to delete, see “Searching for files” on page 12.

2Click Organize, then click Delete. Windows moves the files and folders to the Recycle Bin.

To recover files or folders from the Recycle Bin:

1Double-click the Recycle Bin icon. The Recycle Bin window opens and lists the files and folders you have thrown away since you last emptied it.

2Click the files or folders that you want to restore. For instructions on how to select multiple files and folders, see “Shortcuts” on page 16.

3Click Restore. Windows returns the deleted files or folders to their original locations.

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CHAPTER 2: Using Windows

To empty the Recycle Bin:

Caution

Emptying the Recycle Bin permanently erases any files or folders in the bin. These files cannot be restored.

1Double-click the Recycle Bin icon on the desktop. The Recycle Bin window opens.

2Click Empty the Recycle Bin. Windows asks you if you are sure that you want to empty the bin.

3Click Yes. Windows permanently deletes all files in the Recycle Bin.

Help

For more information about emptying the Recycle Bin, click Start, then click

Help and Support. Type emptying the Recycle Bin in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Searching for files

If you are looking for a particular file or folder or a set of files or folders that have characteristics in common, but you do not remember where they are stored on your hard drive, you can use the Search utility. to search by:

Files and folders found using this utility can be opened, copied, cut, renamed, or deleted directly from the list in the results window.

Using the Windows Search
To find files and folders using the Search:

1Click (Start), then click Search. The Search Results window opens.

2If you want to search on your computer by file or folder name, type in all or part of the file or folder name in the Search box in the top right of the window.

If you type all of the name, Search will list all files and folders of that name.

If you type part of the name, Search will list all of the file and folder names containing the letters you typed.

3Open a file, folder, or program by double-clicking the name in the list.

Help

For more information about searching for files and folders, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type the keyword searching in the Search Help box, then click the magnifying glass.

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Usingadvancedsearchoptions

Search can find files meeting more criteria than file name. You can narrow your search by selecting the search options that you want. You can search by the:

Name or part of a name

Creation date

Modification date

File type

Tag

Author

Text contained in the file

Time period in which it was created or modified

You can also combine search criteria to refine searches.

Files and folders found using this utility can be opened, copied, cut, renamed, or deleted directly from the list in the results window.

Browsing for files and folders

A file or folder that you need is rarely right on top of your Windows desktop. It is usually on a drive inside a folder that may be inside yet another folder, and so on.

Windows drives, folders, and files are organized in the same way as a real file cabinet in that they may have many levels (usually many more levels than a file cabinet, in fact). So you usually will have to search through levels of folders to find the file or folder that you need. This is called browsing.

To browse for a file:

1Click (Start), then click Computer. The Computer window opens.

2Double-click the drive or folder that you think contains the file or folder that you want to find.

3Continue double-clicking folders and their subfolders until you find the file or folder you want.

Help

For more information about browsing for files and folders, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type files and folders in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Working with documents

Computer documents include word processing files, spreadsheet files, or other similar files. The basic methods of creating, saving, opening, and printing a document apply to most of these types of files.

The following examples show how to create, save, open, and print a document using Microsoft® WordPad. Similar procedures apply to other programs such as Corel® WordPerfect®, Microsoft Word, and Microsoft Excel.

For more information about using a program, click Help on its menu bar.

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CHAPTER 2: Using Windows

Creating a new document
To create a new document:

1Click (Start), All Programs, Accessories, then click WordPad. Microsoft WordPad starts and a blank document opens.

2Begin composing your document. Use the menus and toolbar buttons at the top of the window to format the document.

Saving a document

After you create a document, you need to save it if you want to use it later.

To save a document:

1Click File, then click Save. The Save As dialog box opens.

File name

2Click Browse Folders to open the Folders list, then click the folder where you want to save the file.

3Type a new file name in the File name box.

4Click Save.

5

Help

For more information about saving documents, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type saving in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Opening a document

To view, revise, or print an existing document, first you need to open it. Open the document in the program that it was created in.

To open a document:

1Start the program.

2Click File, then click Open.

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3Click Folders to open the Folders list, then click the folder you want to open.

4Double-click the document file name. The document opens.

Help

For more information about opening documents, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type opening files in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Printing a document

To print a document, you must have a printer connected to your computer or have access to a network printer. For more information about installing or using your printer, see the printer documentation.

To print a document:

1Make sure that the printer is turned on and loaded with paper.

2Start the program and open the document.

3Click File, then click Print. The Print dialog box opens.

4Set the print options, then click Print. The document prints.

Help

For more information about printing documents, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type printing in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

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CHAPTER 2: Using Windows

Shortcuts

Help

For more information about Windows keyboard shortcuts, click Start, then click Help and

Support. Type Windows keyboard shortcuts in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

The following table shows a few shortcuts that you can use in Windows and almost all programs that run in Windows. For more information about shortcuts, see your Windows or program documentation.

To...

Do this...

 

 

Copy a file, folder, text, or

Click the item, then press CTRL + C.

graphic

 

Paste a file, folder, text, or

Click inside the folder or window where you

graphic

want to paste the object, then press CTRL + V.

 

 

Select multiple items in a

Click the first item, press and hold down the

list or window

CTRL key, then click each of the remaining

 

items.

Select multiple adjacent

Click the first item in the list, press and hold

items in a list or window

down the SHIFT key, then click the last item in

 

the list.

 

 

Permanently delete a file

Click the file or folder, then press

or folder

SHIFT + DELETE. The file or folder is

 

permanently deleted. The file or folder is not

 

stored in the Recycle Bin.

Rename a file or folder

Click the file or folder, press F2, type the new

 

name, then press ENTER.

 

 

Close the active window

Press ALT + F4.

or program

 

Switch to a different file,

Press ALT + TAB.

folder, or running

 

program

 

 

 

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CHAPTER3

Using the Internet and Faxing

Learning about the Internet

Setting up an Internet account

Using the World Wide Web

Using e-mail

Using Windows Fax and Scan

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CHAPTER 3: Using the Internet and Faxing

Learning about the Internet

The Internet is a worldwide network of computers linked together to provide information to people everywhere. The two most popular services on the Internet are e-mail and the World Wide Web. You can access this network by connecting your computer to a telephone, DSL (Digital Subscriber Line), or cable television line and signing up with an Internet service provider (ISP).

Internet Servers

store information so other computers can access it from the Internet.

Your computer connects to the Internet through an ISP.

ISP Servers

let you connect to the Internet and access your e-mail messages.

Important

To determine if you have an Ethernet jack on your computer, see your computer’s hardware reference.

If you want to access the Internet you need:

A modem—a device that connects your computer to other computers or servers using a telephone, DSL, or cable television line. Your computer may have a built-in dial-up telephone modem. Cable and DSL modems connect to your computer through an Ethernet jack and provide a faster connection speed than a standard telephone modem.

An Internet service provider—a company that provides access to the Internet through an ISP server. When you connect to an ISP, the ISP server lets you access the Internet and your e-mail messages. Check your telephone book for a list of Internet service providers available locally.

A Web browser—a program that displays information from the World Wide Web. Microsoft Internet Explorer was included with your computer. For more information, see “Using the World Wide Web” on page 19.

An e-mail program—a program that lets you create, send, and receive e-mail messages over the Internet. Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express was included with your computer. For more information, see “Using e-mail” on page 21.

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Setting up an Internet account

Before you can view the information on the World Wide Web, you need to set up an Internet account with an Internet service provider (ISP). To set up an ISP service or to transfer an existing account to this computer, contact the ISP directly.

Dial-up Internet connections are those using a telephone system to connect to the Internet. This may include ordinary analog telephone lines, ISDN connections, and in some cases ADSL over PPP, or other technologies. Because dial-up connections are designed to be temporary connections to the Internet, dial-up charges (with both your telephone company and Internet service provider) often increase the longer you connect to the Internet. To minimize the cost for dial-up Internet users, we suggest that you only connect to the Internet during your e-mail and Web browsing session, then disconnect when you are finished. Your Internet service provider can provide instructions on how to connect to and disconnect from the Internet.

Cable and DSL modems, a connection known as broadband, use your cable television or special telephone lines to connect to your ISP and access the Internet. In many instances, broadband is considered an always-connected service. With this type of service, your cost is the same regardless of the amount of time you use your Internet connection.

Accessing your Internet account

Help

For general information about using Internet accounts, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type the ISP in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

The method you use to access your Internet account varies from ISP to ISP. Contact your ISP for the correct procedure.

Using the World Wide Web

The World Wide Web is a multimedia window to the Internet that gives you access to millions of information sources.

Information on the Web comes to you on Web pages, which are electronic documents that you view using a Web page display program called a browser. You can use any of the commercially available Web browsers, like Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator.

Web pages can contain text, animations, music, and other multimedia features. A group of related Web pages is called a Web site. You can access Web sites to shop, track investments, read the news, download programs, and much more.

You can explore a Web site or visit other Web sites by clicking areas on a Web page called links or hyperlinks. A link may be colored or underlined text, a picture, or an animated image. You can identify a link by moving the mouse pointer over it. If the pointer changes to a hand, the item is a link.

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To learn more about using the Web browser features, click Help in the menu bar.

Link

Web page

Linked Web page

Connecting to a Web site

After you set up an account with an Internet service provider (ISP), you can access the many information sources on the World Wide Web.

To connect to a Web site:

1Connect to your Internet account.

2Depending on the method you use to connect to your Internet account, you may need to

start your Web browser. Click (Start), then click Internet. Your default Web browser opens showing an opening page or welcome screen.

3To go to a different Web site, type the address (called a URL for “Universal Resource Locator”) in the browser address bar (for example www.gateway.com), then click GO on the browser address bar.

- OR -

On the current Web page, click a link to a Web site.

Help

For more information about connecting to a Web site, click Start, then click

Help and Support. Type connecting to a Web site in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

The Web browser locates the server computer on the Internet, downloads (transfers) data to your computer, and displays the page on the site that you requested.

Sometimes Web pages display slowly. The speed that a Web page displays on your screen depends on the complexity of the Web page and other Internet conditions. Additionally, the speed of your connection will determine how fast Web pages display.

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Downloading files

Caution

To protect your computer against viruses, make sure that you scan the files you download. For more information, see “Protecting your computer from viruses” on page 59.

Downloading is the process of transferring files from a computer on the Internet to your computer.

To download files or programs from a Web site:

1Connect to your Internet account.

2In the address bar, type the address of the Web site that contains the file or program you want to download, then press ENTER.

- OR -

Click a link on a Web page to navigate to the Web site containing the file that you want to download.

3Create or locate the folder where you want to store the file on your computer. For more information, see “Working with files and folders” on page 9.

4Click the link on the Web page for the file that you want to download.

5Follow the on-screen instructions for saving the file in the folder that you want. A copy of the file is downloaded to your computer. The time that it takes to transfer the file to your computer depends on file size and Internet conditions.

6Open the folder that you created.

7Install or view the downloaded file by double-clicking it. If applicable, follow the instructions provided on the Web site to run or install the program.

Help

For more information about downloading files, click Start, then click Help and

Support. Type the downloading files in the Search Help box, then click ENTER.

Using e-mail

E-mail (electronic mail) lets you send messages to anyone who has an Internet connection and e-mail address. E-mail is usually a free service of your Internet account.

The Internet never closes, so you can send e-mail messages at any time. Your e-mail messages arrive at most e-mail addresses in minutes.

An e-mail address consists of a user name, the @ symbol, and the Internet domain name of the Internet service provider (ISP) or company that “hosts” that user. Your e-mail address is assigned when you sign up for an account with an ISP. For example, a person with an account with Hotmail might have an e-mail address that is similar to this one:

jdoe@hotmail.com

User name

Internet domain name

Sending e-mail
To send e-mail using Windows Mail:

1Connect to your Internet service provider.

2Click (Start), then click E-mail. Your default e-mail program opens.

3 Click Create Mail.

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4Type the e-mail address of the recipient you want to send e-mail to in the To box.

5Type the subject of your e-mail in the Subject box.

6Type the e-mail message.

Tip

Most e-mail programs let you attach files, such as photographs, to your e-mail. For more information, see the help for your e-mail program.

7When finished, click Send. Your e-mail is sent over the Internet to the e-mail address you specified.

Checking your e-mail

Help

For general information about using e-mail, click Start, then click Help and

Support. Type the e-mail in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

To check your e-mail using Windows Mail:

1Connect to your Internet service provider.

2Click (Start), then click E-Mail. Your default e-mail program opens.

3Click Send/Receive.

4Double-click the message you want to read.

Tip

To protect your computer from viruses, check any e-mail attachments using McAfee SecurityCenter. For more information, see “Protecting your computer from viruses” on page 59.

For more information about managing and organizing your e-mail messages, see the online help in your e-mail program.

Using Windows Fax and Scan

Windows Fax and Scan comes pre-installed with Windows Vista Business, Enterprise, or Ultimate Editions. If your computer has a built-in fax modem, Windows automatically detects it during the setup process. You can connect your computer to one local fax modem, although you can connect to multiple fax servers or devices on a network. If you are not sure whether your computer has a built-in fax modem, check the hardware information that came with your computer. If you have an external fax modem, follow the manufacturer's instructions for attaching it to your computer. Make sure that the modem is turned on before proceeding.

Your fax cover page, on which you can include all required information, is set up when you prepare to send the first fax from this computer.

You cannot send or receive a fax using a cable or DSL modem by following these instructions. Many Internet services exist that let you send or receive faxes using a broadband connection.

Your dial-up modem cable must be installed before you can send and receive faxes. You cannot use your standard telephone modem to connect to the Internet while sending and receiving faxes.

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Sending a fax

Windows Fax and Scan lets you send and receive faxes using your dial-up modem.

To send a fax:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Fax and Scan. Windows Fax and Scan opens.

2If Windows Fax and Scan is in Scan view, click Fax in the lower left corner of the window.

3If you have never sent a fax on this computer before, click New Fax on the toolbar. The Fax Setup window opens.

4Click the type of connection you will be using (fax modem or fax server). The Choose a modem name screen opens.

5Type the name of the fax modem in the dialog box, then click Next. The Choose how to receive faxes screen opens.

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CHAPTER 3: Using the Internet and Faxing

6Click how you want to receive faxes, then click Unblock when the The Security Alert window opens. The New Fax window opens.

7Create your fax, then open the Cover Page menu by clicking the arrow and selecting a cover page from the list. The Sender Information dialog box opens.

8Type your information in the spaces provided, then click OK. The New Fax dialog box opens.

9To enter optional dialing rule information, click Dialing Rule and select a rule from the menu. If you have not set up a dialing rule, select New Rule from the menu. The Location Information dialog box opens.

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10 Type your location information, then click OK. The Dialing Rules dialog box opens.

11 Highlight your location, then click Edit. The Edit Location dialog box opens.

12Complete the location information, then click OK. You are returned to the Dialing Rules dialog box.

13Click OK. The New Fax dialog box opens.

14Enter, scan, or attach the fax information you want to send, then click Send.

Settingupyourcoverpagetemplate

You can create your own cover page template that you can use in place of the cover page templates that Windows Fax and Scan provides for you. To create a cover page template, you use the Fax Cover Page Editor. On this template, you insert information fields that automatically import values you enter in both the Send Fax Wizard and the Fax Configuration Wizard when you send your fax.

To set up your fax cover page template:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Fax and Scan. Windows Fax and Scan opens.

2If Windows Fax and Scan is in Scan view, click Fax in the lower left corner of the window.

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CHAPTER 3: Using the Internet and Faxing

3Click Tools, Cover Pages, then click New. The Fax Cover Page Editor opens.

If you want to include fields that are imported from the Send Fax Wizard or the Fax Configuration Wizard (such as To or From), add them to the page by using the Insert menu, then move them to the appropriate place on your template. You can also use the Insert menu to include information that is automatically calculated (such as number of pages or date and time sent).

If you want to include text that always appears on your cover page (such as a letterhead or address), draw a box using the text box tool, type your text inside of it, then move the box to the appropriate place on your template.

If you want to include a logo that appears on your cover page, copy it to the Windows clipboard, then paste it into the Cover Page Editor and move it to the appropriate place on your template.

4To save your cover page template, click File, then click Save. The Save As dialog box opens with your personal cover pages folder already in the Save in list.

5Type the new cover page template name, then click Save.

Faxingascanneddocumentorfromprograms

To fax a scanned document or directly from most programs:

1Scan the document using the program for your scanner, or open your document in the program it was created in.

2Click File, then click Print. The Print dialog box opens.

3Click the arrow button to open the Name list, then click the Fax printer.

4Click Print. The Send Fax Wizard opens.

5Complete the wizard by following the instructions in “Sending a fax” on page 23, or “Faxing a scanned document or from programs” on page 26.

Cancelingafax

You can cancel a fax that you have set up to send at a time in the future.

To cancel a fax that has not been sent:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Fax and Scan. Windows Fax and Scan opens.

2If Windows Fax and Scan is in Scan view, click Fax in the lower left corner of the window.

3Click Outbox, then right-click the fax you want to cancel.

4Click Delete to cancel the fax.

5Click Yes.

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Receiving and viewing a fax
To receive and view a fax:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Fax and Scan. Windows Fax and Scan opens.

2If Windows Fax and Scan is in Scan view, click Fax in the lower left corner of the window.

3To view a fax, click Inbox, then double-click the fax you want to view. The fax viewer opens, where you can view and print the fax.

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28

CHAPTER4

Playing and Creating

Media Files

Playing music and movies

Creating audio files and music libraries

Creating music CDs and video DVDs

Creating and copying data discs

Using Windows Media Center

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

Playing music and movies

Playing audio and video files

Windows Media Player can play several types of audio and video files, including WAV, MIDI, MP3, AU, AVI, and MPEG formats. For more information about using Windows Media Player, click Help.

To play a file using Windows Media Player:

Shortcut

Start Ö Computer Ö find the file Ö double-click the file

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Media Player. Windows Media Player opens.

2Click Library, then double-click the media file you want to play.

Playback controls

Media library

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3Click one of the following to control playback:

 

Repeat

Rewind

Fast forward

Volume

Shuffle

Stop

 

Pause/Play

Mute

Shuffle randomizes the playback order of the files in the playlist.

Repeat starts playing the list over again after it reaches the end.

Stop stops playback and rewinds the current file to the beginning.

Rewind quickly rewinds the current file (when you click and hold it) or skips to the previous file in the playlist (when you click it).

Pause/Play alternately pauses and resumes playback.

Fast forward quickly fast forwards the current file (when you click and hold it) or skips to the next file in the playlist (when you click it).

Volume adjusts the volume.

Playing optical discs

Optical discs are flat discs that use a laser to read and write data. CDs, DVDs, HD-DVDs, and Blu-ray Discs are all optical discs.

Important

Some music CDs have copy protection software. You may not be able to play these

CDs on your computer.

To watch a DVD you must have a DVD-compatible drive in your computer.

Help

For more information about playing optical discs, click Start, then click Help and

Support. Type playing discs in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Playinganoptical discusingWindowsMediaPlayer

Use Windows Media Player to listen to CDs or watch movies on DVDs, HD-DVDs, or Blu-ray Discs. For more information about using Windows Media Player, click Help.

To play an optical disc:

Shortcut

Insert disc Ö Windows Media Player automatically plays

1Make sure that the speakers are turned on or headphones are plugged in and that the volume is turned up.

2Insert an optical disc into the optical disc drive.

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

3If a dialog box opens and asks you what you want the computer to do with the disc, click Play. Windows Media Player opens and begins playing the disc.

If Windows Media Player does not open automatically, click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Media Player. Windows Media Player opens.

Playlist

Video screen

Playback controls

4 If the disc is not already playing, click(play).

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5Click one of the following to control playback:

 

Repeat

Rewind

Fast forward

Volume

Shuffle

Stop

 

Pause/Play

Mute

Shuffle randomizes the playback order of the files in the playlist.

Repeat starts playing the list over again after it reaches the end.

Stop stops playback and rewinds the current file to the beginning.

Rewind quickly rewinds the current file (when you click and hold it) or skips to the previous file in the playlist (when you click it).

Pause/Play alternately pauses and resumes playback.

Fast forward quickly fast forwards the current file (when you click and hold it) or skips to the next file in the playlist (when you click it).

Volume adjusts the volume.

Creating audio files and music libraries

Creating music files

Help

For more information about making or playing an audio recording, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type recording audio or ripping in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

You can create several types of audio files for your listening enjoyment, including WAV, MP3, and WMA files.

Recordingaudiofiles

Sound recorder is a simple Windows program that lets you record and play audio files. For information about playing audio files, see “Playing audio and video files” on page 30.

To record an audio file:

Shortcut

Start Ö All Programs Ö Accessories Ö Sound Recorder

1Plug a microphone into one of the microphone jacks on your computer. For the location of the microphone jacks, see your computer’s Reference Guide.

2Click (Start), All Programs, Accessories, then click Sound Recorder. The Sound Recorder opens.

3 Click Start Recording, then speak or make other sounds into the microphone.

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

4When you finish recording, click Stop Recording. The Save As dialog box opens.

5Type a name for the recording, specify the file type and location where you want to save the recording, then click Save. The recording is saved.

CreatingWMAandMP3musicfiles

Important

Some music CDs have copy protection software. You cannot copy tracks from copy-protected CDs.

Using Windows Media Player, you can copy the tracks from a music CD to your computer’s hard drive as WMA or MP3 files. WMA and MP3 are methods for digitally compressing high-fidelity music into compact files without noticeably sacrificing quality. WMA files end in the file extension WMA, and MP3 files end in the file extension MP3.

To create WMA or MP3 files:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Media Player. Windows Media Player opens.

2Insert a music CD into your optical disc drive.

3Click the Rip tab. The Rip screen opens.

4Click to clear the check box for any track you do not want to record, then click Start Rip. Windows Media Player records the tracks to your hard drive as WMA files. A progress bar appears next to each track as it is recorded.

Tip

For more information about ripping music from CDs, click the Rip tab, then click Help with Ripping.

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Building a music library

Use Windows Media Player to build a music library. You can organize your music tracks (individual MP3 or WMA audio files) by categories, find a track quickly by sorting, and add information to a music file.

You can add music tracks to your music library by:

Creating MP3 or WMA files—When you create MP3 or WMA files from the tracks on your music CD, Windows Media Player automatically adds these files to your music library.

Dragging and Dropping—Drag and drop files from Windows Explorer or your desktop to the music library.

Caution

During the download process, WMA and MP3 files may become corrupt. If you are having trouble playing a downloaded file, try downloading the file again.

Downloading files from the Internet—When you are connected to the Internet, WMA and MP3 files that you download are automatically added to your music library.

Editing track information

After you add a WMA or MP3 file to your music library, you can edit the track’s tags (informational fields).

To edit track information:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Media Player. Windows Media Player opens.

2Click the Library tab.

3Right-click the track or album you want to edit, then click Advanced Tag Editor. The

Advanced Tag Editor dialog box opens.

4Enter track information such as Title, Artist, Album, and Genre, then click OK. The new track information appears in the Windows Media Player library.

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

Creating music CDs and video DVDs

Creating a music CD

Important

We recommend that you do not use your computer for other tasks while creating CDs or DVDs.

If you record copyrighted material on a CD or DVD, you need permission from the copyright owner. Otherwise, you may be violating copyright law and be subject to payment of damages and other remedies. If you are uncertain about your rights, contact your legal advisor

CreatingamusicCDusingWindows MediaPlayer

To create a music CD using Windows Media Player:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Media Player. Windows Media Player opens.

2Insert a blank, writable CD into your recordable disc drive.

3Click the Burn tab, then click and drag songs that you want to burn to CD from the Library to the Burn List.

Library

Burn List

4Click Start Burn. The music is recorded onto the blank CD.

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Creating a video DVD

CreatingavideoDVDusingWindowsDVDMaker

If your computer has Windows Vista Home Premium or Windows Vista Ultimate Edition, you can create video DVDs using Windows DVD Maker.

To create a video DVD using Windows DVD Maker:

Important

We recommend that you do not use your computer for other tasks while creating CDs or DVDs.

If you record copyrighted material on a CD or DVD, you need permission from the copyright owner. Otherwise, you may be violating copyright law and be subject to payment of damages and other remedies. If you are uncertain about your rights, contact your legal advisor.

1Insert a blank, writeable DVD into your recordable optical disc drive.

2Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows DVD Maker. The Windows DVD Maker introduction window opens.

3Click Choose Photos and Videos. The main screen opens.

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

4Click Add items. The Add Items to DVD dialog box opens.

5Find and select the videos you want to add to the video DVD, then click Add. The videos are added to the video list, and a graphic in the lower left corner of the window shows you how much disc capacity will be used.

6Click Next. The Ready to burn disc dialog box opens.

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7Click any of the following options to customize your video disc:

Preview shows how your DVD’s opening menu will look using the current settings.

Menu text changes the disc title, font, and button names.

Customize menu changes the menu fonts, background and foreground videos, audio track, and button styles.

Slide show creates a slide show from photo files.

8Click Burn. Your DVD is recorded.

Creating and copying data discs

You can burn two types of data discs:

Live File System writes files immediately to the recordable disc, making it a one-step process like copying files to a flash drive. Windows XP and later versions of Windows support this feature.

Mastered copies files to a temporary folder before you tell the computer to burn the files to the disc. Although this is a slower process than Live File System, the resulting disc is compatible with all operating systems.

The instructions below show you how to burn a disc using the Mastered format, which can be read by all personal computers, regardless of the operating system installed.

Help

For information about burning a disc using the Live File System format, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type live file system in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Creating a data disc
To create a data disc:

Important

Some CDs have copy protection software. You cannot create MP3 files from these CDs and you may not be able to listen to these CDs on your computer.

1Insert a blank, writable optical disc into your optical disc drive. The Autoplay dialog box opens.

2Click Burn files to disc. The Prepare this blank disc dialog box opens.

3Type the title of the disc, then click Show formatting options.

4Click Mastered, then click Next. An empty folder opens.

5Open the folder that contains the files you want to burn to disc, then click and drag the files to the empty disc folder.

6Click Burn to disc. The files are burned to the disc.

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

Using Windows Media Center

If your computer has Windows Vista Home Premium or Windows Vista Ultimate Edition, you can use Windows Media Center to watch TV, videos, and movies, listen to music, and view photos. Media Center is a simplified, streamlined interface that is ideally suited for playing and managing media files.

Because the remote control is an optional accessory, most instructions in this section assume you are using a mouse to navigate the Media Center menus.

Starting Windows Media Center
To start Windows Media Center:

1Click (Start), All Programs, then click Windows Media Center. - OR -

Press the Start button on the remote control.

The first time you start Windows Media Center, the Welcome screen opens.

2For the easiest setup, click Express setup, then click OK. The Windows Media Center’s main screen opens.

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www.gateway.com

3Use the remote control navigation buttons to select a Media Center menu option, then press OK.

TV + Movies lets you play TV programs you have recorded, play a DVD or Blu-ray movie, or set up your TV tuner card (if installed).

Online Media lets you play online games.

Tasks lets you set up your display and media types, shut down or restart your computer, burn an optical disc (CD or DVD), and synchronize with another digital media device (such as an MP3 player).

Pictures + Videos lets you view individual pictures, pictures in a slideshow, or select movies from your video library.

Music lets you select songs from your music library, set up and use your FM radio tuner card (if installed), and play music playlists.

4To exit Windows Media Center, click the X in the upper-right corner of the screen.

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CHAPTER 4: Playing and Creating Media Files

Using the Media Center remote control

With Media Center mode active, you can use the optional remote control to play all of your media files from across the room. (The remote control, if included with your computer, may look different from that shown below.)

Shortcut buttons

Start button

Power button

 

Transport buttons

Audio/Video (A/V) control buttons

Navigation buttons

Numeric keypad/data entry buttons

Button(s)

Functions

 

 

Shortcut buttons

Give you direct access to Media Center features.

 

 

Start button

Opens the Media Center’s main menu.

 

 

Audio/Video (A/V) control

Lets you control volume levels, volume mute, channel selections, and

buttons

the movie menu.

 

 

Numeric keypad/data entry

Lets you enter numbers and characters from the remote control.

buttons

 

 

 

Power button

Puts the Media Center computer in Sleep mode (reduced power).

 

 

Transport buttons

Let you control the playback of media files and optical discs.

 

 

Navigation buttons

Let you move the cursor around the Guide and menus, make selections,

 

navigate back to the previous screen, change the screen display aspect

 

ratio, and get more information. Press the OK button to make a

 

selection.

 

 

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CHAPTER5

Networking Your Computer

Introduction to Networking

Ethernet networking

Bluetooth networking

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CHAPTER 5: Networking Your Computer

Introduction to Networking

Networking terms you should know

DHCP—Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) lets a router temporarily assign an IP address to a computer on the network.

IP address—Internet Protocol (IP) address is a number that uniquely identifies a computer on the network.

LAN—A local area network (LAN) is a computer network covering a local area, like a home or office. Wired and wireless Ethernet are common methods of creating a LAN.

PAN—A personal area network (PAN) is a computer network used for communication among computer devices (including cellular telephones, personal digital assistants, and printers) close to one person. A wireless personal area network (WPAN) is made possible with Bluetooth. The primary purpose of a WPAN is to replace USB or Firewire cables.

Subnet mask—Subnet mask is a number that identifies what subnetwork the computer is located on. This number will be the same on all computers on a home network.

WAN—A wide area network (WAN) is a computer network that covers a broad geographical area. The largest and most well-known example of a WAN is the Internet.

Ethernet networking

Wired Ethernet networking

An wired Ethernet network consists of two or more computers connected together through an Ethernet cable. This connection type is commonly used in offices around the world and can be used to build computer networks in the home.

Ethernet,FastEthernet,orGigabitEthernet

Important

Check local code requirements before installing Ethernet cable or other wiring in your home or office. Your municipality may require you to obtain a permit and hire a licensed installer.

Ethernet is available at three different speeds. Standard Ethernet runs at 10 Mbps, Fast Ethernet runs at 100 Mbps, and Gigabit Ethernet runs at 1000 Mbps. Most home networks are built using Standard or Fast Ethernet components. Business networks are typically built using Fast or Gigabit Ethernet components.

To create a wired Ethernet network, you or your electrician must install special Ethernet cables in your home or office.

Usingarouter

The most common way to set up a wired Ethernet network is Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) using a router. A DHCP network configuration uses a router to automatically assign IP addresses to each computer or network device. For information on setting up a router, see the router’s documentation.

Example router-based Ethernet network

The following is an example of a wired Ethernet network. The network is made up of a router, a cable or DSL modem, your computers, and cables connecting each of these components. The router is the central control point for the network.

Tip

To add the ability to access a wireless Ethernet network to your wired Ethernet network, connect an access point to the router or use a router that has a built-in access point.

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