Fisher 1266-X, 1266-XB User Manual

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1266-X & 1266-XB

Deep Search Metal Detector

Operating Manual

F I S H E R R E S E A R C H L A B O R A T O R Y

CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

.................................................................About Your 1266-X

pg. 1

 

Condensed Operating Instructions .....................................

pg. 2

 

Setting Up................................................................................

pg. 3

 

Control Housing .....................................................................

pg. 5

 

Discrimination Points .............................................................

pg. 6

 

Dual Discrimination ...............................................................

pg. 9

 

Searching ...............................................................................

pg. 10

 

Pinpointing..............................................................................

pg. 12

 

Target Recovery ....................................................................

pg. 13

 

Recovery Tools ......................................................................

pg. 14

 

Operating Tips ........................................................................

pg. 14

 

False Signals ...........................................................................

pg. 16

 

Battery Replacement ............................................................

pg. 18

 

Battery Recharging ...............................................................

pg. 18

 

Maintenance .........................................................................

pg. 20

 

Treasure Hunter’s Code of Ethics .........................................

pg. 20

 

Where to Hunt in the U.S........................................................

pg. 21

 

Specifications ........................................................................

pg. 22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT YOUR DETECTOR

The 1266-X was designed to excel in three ways: depth, discrimination and simplicity. It offers a better combination of these three characteristics than any other metal detector we’ve ever built. And we’ve been building metal detectors since 1931.

Depth. Engineered to go deep in mineralized soil at high levels of discrimination. If you’re an experienced detector operator, you’ll find yourself recovering good targets at depths you never reached before. And you’ll really appreciate the loud, clear audio response you get from those deep targets.

Discrimination. Detect all metals or ignore trash as you detect valuable targets. Twin discrimination modes allow you to switch instantly back and forth between any two levels of discrimination. If you’ve found target ID meters confusing or inaccurate, you’ll like this quick and simple way to help tell the cash from the trash.

Simplicity. This is the kind of uncomplicated detector you would expect from the company that pioneered automatic turn-on-and-go metal detectors. No meter, no tuner, no ground adjust. Just pick it up, set your controls once and start searching. It’s light, balanced, comfortable and the open center Spider coil makes pinpointing a snap.

Read this instruction manual from cover to cover and treat your 1266-X as you would any expensive, high quality precision instrument. Drop us a line if you have any questions, comments, or exciting 1266-X stories. In the meantime...

Happy Hunting!

Fisher Research Laboratory

1

CONDENSED OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

The 1266-X is basically a turn-on-and-go metal detector. It doesn’t take an engineer to operate it but you’ll have more fun and a better chance of making that BIG find if you have a complete understanding of what you’re doing. That’s why we strongly recommend that you read the entire manual. But if you just can’t wait any longer and you’ve already used a Fisher “X” detector, here’s some quick instructions to get you going.

1. Set the controls as follows:

DISC 1 = 4 (small nail discrimination) DISC 2 = 7 (Pull tab discrimination) SENSITIVITY = Pull and turn 3/4 clockwise OFF/VOL = Full clockwise1

2.As soon as you turn the detector on, it is automatically tuned and ground adjusted in the DISC 1 search mode.

3.DISC 1 and DISC 2 are motion modes. The search coil must be at least slightly in motion to detect a target.

4.When you locate a target, push and hold the TRIGGER SWITCH for further target identification in DISC 2. If your target still sounds good, dig it.

5.With practice, you should be able to pinpoint in either of the DISC modes by moving the coil slowly backwards and forwards and left to right and finally stopping over the area of the strongest target response. The target should be approximately centered beneath the search coil.

6.To use the Zero-Motion Pinpointing mode, simply place the coil on the ground (away from the target), pull and hold the trigger, lift the coil about a half inch and bring it back over the target area as you would in a DISC mode. The differences being that you don’t have to keep the coil in motion to get a response.

7.HAPPY HUNTING!

1.If you’re using headphones, reduce the volume of the headphones to a comfortable level when passing the search coil over a large,

shallow target.

2

SETTING UP

Your 1266-X is just about ready to use. The only adjustment required is the angle of the search coil and the length of the stem. Take a look at Figure 1 and familiarize yourself with the parts of the 1266-X before proceeding.

1.Unpack it carefully. You may want to save the carton and inserts for future storage or shipment.

2.Depress the spring lock on the lower stem and slip the lower stem into the upper stem. Connect the search coil cable to the control housing.

3.The stem length is adjusted by loosening the lock nut and allowing the spring lock to snap into one of the holes in the upper stem.

4.The search coil angle is adjusted by loosening the nylon wing nut on top of the search coil.

5.Adjust the stem length and the coil angle so the search coil rests flat on the ground about 6 inches in front of, and slightly to the right of your right foot (to the left of your left foot for left handers). Your arm should be straight and relaxed, the grip held loosely.

Search-Coil Cable Connector

Open-Center 8-inch Spider Coil

and Battery Recharge Jack on

 

 

Rear of Housing

 

 

Injection-Molded

 

Lower Stem

Control Housing

 

 

Foam Hand Grip

 

Padded Arm Rest

 

Wing Nut

 

 

Lower Lock Nut

 

 

Spring Lock

 

Search Coil Cable

 

Upper Lock Nut

 

Upper Stem

 

 

Battery Housing

 

Battery End Cap

Built-In Detector Stand

 

Figure 1. Fisher M-Scope 1266-X.

3

SETTING UP

REMEMBER • THE LONGER THE SHAFT, THE MORE YOU WILL HAVE TO BEND YOUR ELBOW AND THE SOONER YOUR ARM WILL GET TIRED. THE 1266-X IS BALANCED FOR COMFORTABLE SEARCHING IN A TIGHT SEMICIRCLE AROUND THE FRONT OF THE OPERATOR.

6.With the stem length properly adjusted, tighten the lock nut and search coil wing nut. CAUTION: Never use a pliers or anything other than your hand to tighten the lock nut or wing nut.

7.Disconnect the search coil cable from the control housing and wrap it around the stem. A loose cable near the search coil may cause false signals, but don’t wrap it so tight that it pulls against the housing or the coil. Reconnect the loop cable to the housing.

8.With the shaft length and coil angle properly adjusted, you should be able to move into your “search” position by leaning forward very slightly raising your arm (still straight) until the search coil is about 1 inch above the ground and 12 inches in front of your foot. The search coil should be parallel to the ground and may have to be

slightly readjusted at this point.

9.If the armrest is too wide or too narrow, you may bend it slightly inward or outward to meet your exact requirements.

Figure 2.

Search Position

4

CONTROL HOUSING

1.DISC 1: DISCRIMINATE 1 is the search mode. The 1266-X automatically operates in DISC 1 unless the TRIGGER-SWITCH is pushed and held or pulled and held. DISC 1 is a full range discrimination mode. All types of metal are detected at the zero level and most small pieces of trash are rejected at the maximum level of ten.

2.DISC 2: DISCRIMINATE 2 is similar to DISC 1 except that it operates only when the TRIGGER SWITCH is pushed and held. DISC 2 is used for target identification and/or pinpointing.

3.STEREO HEADPHONE JACK: Accepts most stereo and mono headphones with one-quarter inch diameter plugs. When used, the speaker is automatically disconnected. A headphone can be very helpful when hunting in noisy areas or detecting faint signals.

4.SENSITIVITY: This is a dual range, push-pull knob that controls sensitivity to targets and soil minerals. Pull and rotate clockwise for normal operation in mineralized soil. Push and rotate clockwise for even more sensitivity in non-mineralized, non-conductive soil. It should be noted that faint erratic circuit noise is audible at the full clockwise position.

5.BATTERY CHECK: Fully charged batteries will give a loud tone when this button is pushed. Weak batteries will give a weak signal and dead

1

6

2

3

5

4

5

CONROL HOUSING

or weak batteries will give no tone. Batteries do not have to be replaced as long as you can hear a tone. As a general rule, you’ll be able to operate your 1266-X for an hour or two after the tone goes silent.

6.OFF/VOL: Power on-off and volume control. This control turns the power off at the full counter clockwise position and adjusts volume to maximum at full clockwise.

7.TRIGGER SWITCH: This spring loaded trigger has three-positions:

1.Relaxed position: Maintains the 1266-X in the DISC 1 search mode.

2.Forward position: When pushed and held, the 1266-X automatically switches into the DISC

2mode.

3.Rear position: When pulled and held the 1266-X automatically switches into the ZeroMotion Pinpointing mode.

8.RECHARGE JACK: Located on the rear of the control housing, this jack is to be used only with the optional 1266-X recharge kit. Nicad batteries may be recharged from a 110-volt wall outlet or an auto cigarette lighter socket (12 volt, negative ground) without removing the batteries from the control housing.

DISCRIMINATION POINTS

By adjusting DISC 1 and DISC 2 you will be able to ignore (or “reject”) small pieces of metallic trash and ground minerals while detecting valuable targets. The lowest setting at which an object is rejected is referred to as the object’s “discrimination point”. Discrimination points are determined by such factors as size, shape, depth, type of metal and ground mineralization.

1. Scatter some sample targets such as coins, pulltabs and small pieces of foil on the ground 1 to 2 feet apart.

6

DISCRIMINATION POINTS

2.Pull the SENSITIVITY control out and turn full clockwise. (Back it off slightly if circuit noise is too loud or annoying in the full clockwise position.)

3.Turn the OFF/VOL control full clockwise. (If you’re wearing headphones reduce the volume to a comfortable level when the search coil is over a large target).

4.Set DISC 1 and DISC 2 at zero.

5.Hold the search coil about 2 inches above and parallel to the ground. Move it slowly over the samples and note the sharp loud response as you pass over each one. Keep in mind that DISC 1 and DISC 2 are motion modes and respond only when the search coil (or the target) is moving.

6.Increase DISC 1 to a setting of 3 and again pass over the targets. Repeat this process at settings of 4,5,6 and so on to 10. You will note that as you increase the level of discrimination, the 1266-X will reject some targets and continue to respond to

Figure 3. Typical 1266-X audio responses over 1 inch deep targets with search coil sweeping 1 to 2 inches above ground.

7

DISCRIMINATION POINTS

others. You have now determined the approximate discrimination points for the rejected objects.

For example, the small nail discrimination point may be 4 and the pull-tab discrimination point 6.

7.Push and hold the TRIGGER-SWITCH. The 1266-X is now operating in the DISC 2 mode.

8.Repeat steps 5 and 6 and you will note that the DISC 2 discrimination points are about the same as DISC 1 discrimination points.

9.The actual discrimination points for different targets may vary slightly from DISC 1 to DISC 2 and from detector to detector. However, discrimination points are determined mainly by such factors as target size, shape, depth, type of metal and ground mineralization.

10.Some objects such as shallow bottle caps, bent pull tabs or trash less than 2 inches from the coil may be difficult to reject. The 1266-X will instead respond with a strong broken signal, which will, usually disappear if the search coil is raised slightly. (The strong signal of a good target will just get weaker when the coil is raised).

11.The 1266-X will remain silent when some objects are rejected however other objects may “snap, crackle and pop” as they are rejected. This is a perfectly normal response indicating that the powerful discrimination circuitry is doing its job.

12.Large pieces of trash such as beer cans or jar lids may sound like good targets no matter what you do. With a little practice however, you will be able to tell the difference between a large target and a small coin sized object.

13.The chart on page 7 shows some of the different target responses you may expect at different levels of discrimination. Note that as you increase the discrimination level, you progressively eliminate more targets including some good ones, such as nickels and gold rings.

8

DUAL DISCRIMINATION

1

2

3

4

Figure 4. Search coil detection pattern and the effects of sweep spread, discrimination and ground mineralization. Motion Mode.

1.Minimum Depth

a.Very slow or fast sweep speed.

b.Discrimination set at “10.”

2.Good Depth

a.Moderate sweep speed.

b.Discrimination set at “5.”

3.Maximum Depth

a.Moderate sweep speed.

b.Discrimination set at “0.”

4.Missed Target

Many targets within the range of your 1225-X will not be

detected unless you closely overlap your swings.

Take a look at the illustration above and note how the discrimination level (as well as sweep speed and ground mineralization) affects the search coil detection pattern. Not only is depth reduced at high discrimination levels but also the width of the pattern is reduced. This change in width has a very important implication: if you’re searching at a high level of discrimination you’ll have to sweep almost directly over a target to get a response. The higher the degree of ground mineralization, the more pronounced this effect.

This is where the 1266-X dual discrimination system comes in. Set DISC 1 at a low level (like 2 or 3) and DISC 2 at a higher level (6 or 7). As you search in DISC 1 you’ll have a better chance of finding good targets. Of course, you’ll get more trash too, so when you do get a response, switch over to DISC 2. If you still get a good response, dig it, keeping in mind that had you been searching at a high level of discrimination you may well have missed this one. This is the preferred method of searching in relatively non-trashy soil.

In very trashy soil however it is generally easier to search with DISC 1 at a high level of discrimination (at the pull-tab discrimination point for example) and DISC 2 at a lower level of discrimination (3 for example). In this manner a good target

9

DUAL DISRCRIMINATION

may be detected in DISC 1 and pinpointed in DISC 2. (Lower levels of discrimination produce stronger signals on deep or small targets and it may be difficult to use the pinpoint mode if there’s a lot of nearby trash.)

SEARCHING

Good search techniques are every bit as important as having a good metal detector.

1. Adjust your SENSITIVITY control. Only experience will tell you how to set it in every situation but start out in the ‘pull” position, turned fully clockwise. As a general rule, turn your sensitivity down to reduce excessive false signals caused by mineralized ground “hot rocks” or

When the stem is properly adjusted, the 1266-X is balanced for sweeping in a tight semicircle. Wide to the right for right-handers. Wide to the left for left-handers. Always overlap your sweeps.

Figure 5. Search pattern.

electrical interference caused by radio/TV stations, power lines, etc. Turn your sensitivity up if you want those deepest, smallest targets and you’re willing to put up with some background noise and more false signals. The maximum sensitivity position is with the knob pushed in and rotated full clockwise.

2.Decide how much discrimination you want to use (see “DUAL DISCRIMINATION”).

3.Search slowly and systematically, sweeping in a tight semicircle.

4.KEEP THE COIL PARALLEL TO, AND AS CLOSE TO THE GROUND AS PRACTICAL (See Figeure 6). This is

10

SEARCHING

important for maximum coverage and depth. 4. If you’re hunting on a lawn you can set the coil right on the grass and search.

5.Take your time and overlap your sweeps by at least 50%.

6.Search in a methodical manner. Pay close attention to where you’re going and where you’ve been.

7.Keep the search coil moving at a comfortable rate. Remember that the 1266-X is a motion detector and responds only when the search coil (or the target) is moving while in the DISC modes.

8.TAKE YOUR TIME. Also very important. If you walk too fast you can’t overlap your sweeps and you’ll miss a lot of ground. If you sweep too fast, you’ll lose sensitivity and miss the deepest targets.

9.The diagram on page 9 shows the search coil detection pattern and how it is affected by sweep speed, discrimination level and ground mineralization while searching in DISC 1 or DISC 2. Note that any one of the three, improper sweeps speed, high discrimination or ground mineralization will reduce your depth. All three factors occurring at the same time will cost you all but the shallowest of targets.

Figure 6. Keep the search coil parallel

and as close to the ground at all times.

11

PINPOINTING

ZERO MOTION PINPOINTING MODE

Target location is a snap using the Zero-Motion Pinpointing mode. You do not have to keep the coil moving to get a response in this mode.

1.Once the presence of a buried target is indicated by the “beep-beep” of the 1266-X, simply place the coil LIGHTLY on the ground, away from the target area. Pull the TRIGGERSWITCH and hold. (At maximum sensitivity you may hear a faint tone, which will disappear as soon as the coil is raised. If the tone doesn’t disappear, lower the sensitivity slightly.)

2.Raise the coil 1/2 half inch or so and move it side to side across the target area a few times.

3.Stop the search coil over the center of the response area.

4.Now move the coil slowly forward and back a couple of times, again stopping in the center of the response area.

5.Repeat one more time, moving the coil side to side. Your target should be directly below the open center of the search coil.

6.For quick and accurate pinpointing of strong signals, place the coil on the ground very close to the approximate target area and pull and hold the trigger switch. You have now “tuned-out” most of the target so you will only receive a response directly over or very nearly over the target.

PINPOINTING IN THE MOTION DISK MODES

Pinpointing in either DISC 1 or DISC 2 will take a little practice but you may find that for most targets, it’s even quicker than the Zero-Motion Pinpointing mode. Simply use the same procedure as in steps 2 through 5 above. The only difference will be that when you stop the coil over the target, you will

12

PINPOINTING

lose the audio signal. You MUST keep the coil moving at least slightly to determine the location of the strongest signal before you stop it.

1.For very strong signals, you may improve your DISC mode pinpointing accuracy by, adding one or more of the following steps.

a.Lift the coil until the signal is just barely heard.

b.Reduce the sensitivity level.

c.Increase the discrimination level.

d.Rest the coil on the ground and move it back and forth very slowly.

2.For very weak signals try the following:

a.Move the coil closer to the ground.

b.Increase the sensitivity level.

c.Decrease the discrimination level.

d.Speed up the sweep rate slightly.

TARGET RECOVERY

Once you have pinpointed a target, your objective is to recover it quickly and neatly, leaving virtually no trace of your excavation. There are almost as many ways to do this, as there are Treasure Hunters. Whatever works for you is good enough as long as you don’t break any laws, damage vegetation, or leave your search area looking like a World War II battlefield.

Generally speaking, beachcombers do little if any damage to the environment while recovering targets. However, if you plan to use your 1266-X on lawns or in parks, your target recovery method can be very important. Two of the most successful methods are illustrated in a separate booklet enclosed with your 1266-X.

WHICHEVER TOOL OR METHOD YOU CHOOSE, REMEMBER THAT RESPONSIBLE TREASURE HUNTERS TAKE PRIDE IN THEIR ABILITY TO LEAVE SOIL AND VEGETATION INTACT AND UNDAMAGED.

13

RECOVERY TOOLS

1.A heavy duty, blunt screwdriver is commonly used by expert Treasure Hunters and the tool of choice for cut lawns.

2.A sturdy hunting knife with a 5-inch blade will do the job in most other soils. A high quality double-edged “survival” knife is even better (and more expensive) choice since it will be almost impossible to bend or break.

CAUTION: Using a jack knife without a locking blade is a good way to lose a finger!

3.A narrow garden trowel will work in loose or wet soil.

4.Several excellent digging tools are made just for the Treasure Hunter and especially designed sand scoops are available for beachcombing.

5.A thin, dull probe is the preferred tool for precise target location.

OPERATING TIPS

1.We’ve already said it but it bears repeating: TAKE YOUR TIME AND OVERLAP YOUR SWEEPS.

2.Keep your discrimination levels set low. You’ll dig more trash but you’ll find more good targets, too. If you continually run at the pull-tab discrimination level you’ll find coins and silver rings but very few gold rings for example.

3.Use a good headphone. You won’t miss faint targets, you won’t attract unwanted attention and you won’t bother others.

4.Practice pinpointing. There’s nothing sacred about the methods described in this manual. Many 1266-X users have developed their own pinpointing methods.

5.Always bury a coin when working in unfamiliar territory and check it at different discrimination and sensitivity levels. There is some sensitivity loss at higher levels of discrimination. The greater the

14

OPERATING TIPS

ground mineralization, the higher the sensitivity loss. For example, you may be able to detect a penny 6 inches deep at zero discrimination, but no deeper than 4 inches at the pull tab discrimination point. Also, ground mineralization can reduce a detector’s ability to discriminate accurately. In highly mineralized soil, some trash targets may not be rejected.

6.If a target gives a good strong response in the search mode but no response in the Zero-Motion Pinpoint mode, you may have “tuned-out” your target (and all others) by pulling the TRIGGERSWITCH over another piece of metal. If you suspect this may be the case, check the ground first in DISC 1 at zero discrimination to insure there’s no buried metal before placing your coil on the ground and pulling the TRIGGER-SWITCH to go into the pinpoint mode.

7.In trashy areas, to reduce the “masking” effects of trash on nearby good targets, use a shorter and slower sweep pattern. Also, the optional smaller 5-inch search coils will zero in on good targets closer to trash.

8.When in doubt about the possible identity of a target, dig it up.

9.The 1266-X is an easy detector to use but if you’re having trouble with any aspect of its operation (pinpointing, searching, false signals, etc.) go back and reread the part of this manual relating to your problem.

15

FALSE SIGNALS

Due to the extreme sensitivity of the 1266-X, you’re bound to get some “false signals” once in awhile. A false signal occurs when something that shouldn’t sounds like a good target. The 1266-X does a good job of rejecting junk but it is so sensitive that “hot” mineralized spots in the soil, large, can fool it pieces of junk, some kinds of bottle caps and pull tabs or trash less than 2 inches from the coil.

So what do you do about false signals? Well, 90 percent of them will sound suspicious to you after you’ve had some experience and you’ll just ignore them.

They may be very faint or very abrupt with static. Often when you go back over the same spot, a false signal will simply disappear. Other false signals may be very loud and sharp but most of these will also disappear if the coil is speeded up or raised slightly. Some shallow, large or irregular pieces of junk however, will sound off no matter what you do. You may reduce the number of false signals by increasing the discrimination level and/or reducing the sensitivity. Some other sources of false signals are:

1. ELECTRICAL INTERFERENCE: Caused by radio/TV stations, power lines, nearby detectors operating at the same frequency. SOLUTIONS: Move further away, lower the sensitivity, and reduce sweep speed.

2.HIGHLY MINERALIZED SOIL: Usually causes constant static or good target sounds. SOLUTIONS: Make sure you’re in the normal “Pull” sensitivity control position. Lower the sensitivity, increase the discrimination, raise the search coil until false signals disappear and sweep at that height.

3.WET SAND: Same as highly mineralized soil.

4.ELONGATED FERROUS OBJECTS: If you hear two beeps very close together and can’t find either one, you’re probably over a nail or some other long iron object. But a very shallow coin or a buried coin on edge may give the same response. In all cases, the target will be between

16

FALSE SIGNALS

the beeps or, if you sweep at right angles to your original direction, you’ll receive a single beep directly over the target (except for the very shallow coin). One way to tell the difference between a coin and a nail is to set your discrimination at about 5. Most small nails will be tuned out while most coins will respond with a good, smooth signal.

5.EXTREMELY TRASHY SOIL: May result in a constant chatter or “snap, crackle and pop” with assorted, hard to find “good signals”. The obvious solution is to increase the discrimination level to maximum. Slow down your sweep speed and shorten your sweep pattern. An even better solution is to try one of the optional 3-3/4" or 5" coils.

You’ll be able to zero in on good targets in the midst of junk.

6.DIGGING TOOL: If you’re carrying a metal sand scoop, digging knife, screwdriver or whatever, hold it behind your back or keep it above your waist. Your 1266-X is sensitive enough to sound off each time you sweep the coil beneath it.

False signals may also occur in the Zero-Motion Pinpointing mode. When in this mode, the 1266-X detects all metals so you may pinpoint a piece of nearby junk instead of your good target. The solution is simple: always recheck your target area after recovering any target to insure that you haven’t missed something. Or learn to pinpoint in the discrimination modes. You may also receive false pinpointing signals in highly mineralized soil. In this case, it is important to keep the coil parallel to the ground and at least an inch above it.

17

BATTERY REPLACEMENT

1.Two drop-in battery packs are located in the battery housing below the armrest. Each pack contains four 1.5 volt AA batteries.

2.Remove the battery end cap by partially unscrewing the knob on the battery end cap.

3.Remove the battery packs and replace the batteries. Make sure the batteries are oriented correctly as indicated by the polarity marks on the inside of the packs.

4.Reinstall the battery packs, connector end first. Note that the large split connector with the spring behind it is the negative terminal and the smaller terminal is the positive terminal. Both should match up with the polarity markings on the battery end cap. Another way to tell if the packs are in correctly is by checking the position of the rivets on the back end of the packs: the rivets should always be facing in towards the center of the battery housing.

5.Put the battery end cap back on and lock it in place by tightening the knob, finger tight only.

NOTE: If either or both of the battery packs are installed incorrectly, the 1266-X will simply not turn on. The instrument will not be damaged.

BATTERY RECHARGING

Rechargeable nicad batteries may take as many as 1,000 recharges, however they do have some limitations you should be aware of:

1.Nicads will last only about half as long as standard carbon-zinc batteries before recharging is required.

2.Nicads may develop a “memory” if you give them repeated “booster” charges. In other words, if you charge your batteries over and over again for only three hours at a time, the

18

BATTERY RECHARGING

batteries will eventually only hold a three-hour charge.

3. Nicads may reverse polarity if discharged too far and will not recharge.

Don’t leave your detector on and don’t continue to operate it more than an hour after the battery check tone goes silent.

The optional 1266-X recharge kit includes (2) battery packs, (8) nicad batteries, (1) 110v, 60 cycle home recharger and (1) 12v negativeground auto cigarette lighter recharger.

110-VOLT RECHARGER

1.Install the nicad batteries.

2.Plug the charger into the wall outlet and the small cable plug into the RECHARGE JACK on the rear of the control housing.

3.The batteries will begin charging immediately. A full charge will take from 16 to 24 hours.

4.Do not charge over 48 hours.

12 VOLT AUTO RECHARGER

(Use only with 12v negative ground system.)

1.Install the nicad batteries.

2.Plug the charger into your auto cigarette lighter socket and the small cable into the 1266-X RECHARGE JACK.

3.The batteries will begin charging immediately. An overnight charge with the engine off may give only 6-8 hours of battery life. A full charge may take as long as 48 hours (less with the engine running).

For this reason, the Auto Recharger may best be used for OCCASIONAL “Booster” charges (see Recharging, paragraph 2, above).

4.Do not charge over 48 hours.

19

MAINTENANCE

Your 1266-X doesn’t require a lot of care but there are a few things you should do to keep it in peak operating condition.

1.If you’re not going to be using it for a while, take the batteries out. Acid damage caused by leaking batteries can be severe.

2.Avoid extreme temperatures like the inside of a closed car sitting in the sun. Even worse, inside the trunk of a car.

3.If you “scrub” the search coil on the ground, you’ll eventually wear through the bottom. Replacement coils are expensive. Instead, invest in an in expensive coil cover.

4.Put a plastic bag over the control housing if you’re hunting in rain, fog or dust.

5.Keep your 1266-X dry and clean. Wipe off the lower stem before sliding into the upper stem and keep the lock nut free of sand and dirt.

TREASURE HUNTER’S CODE OF ETHICS

LETS PRESERVE OUR TREASURED SPORT!

Laws governing the use of metal detectors are becoming more and more common. In many countries, the use of metal detectors is illegal or severely restricted. Don’t let this happen in your area.

ALWAYS get permission to hunt on private property. ALWAYS leave a site cleaner than you found it. Take at least some trash with you or, if you can, take it all.

ALWAYS fill in your holes neatly whether you’re in a city park or remote wildernessness. Leave the land as it was before you disturbed it.

ALWAYS obey all laws relating to Treasure Hunting.

ALWAYS return valuable property if you can locate the original owner.

ALWAYS do whatever you can to give the hobby of Treasure Hunting the good image it needs and deserves.

20

Where To Use Your Metal Detector In The U.S.

National Forest and Federal Lands—Metal detecting is allowed only by special permit acquired from the federal government. Each area has a district office.

Corps of Engineers, Lakes, Shorelines and Lands—Permission has been granted only on predisturbed sites, such as beaches and attached swimming areas. New Corps lakes and lands must be okayed by the main office of the Army Corps of Engineers. Each area has a district office.

State Parks and Lands—Some state parks are open to metal detecting, but some are not. Always check with the park ranger before attempting to use your detector.

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Lands—Some areas are open for metal detecting, and some are not. Always check with the district office.

City or County Park Lands—Most are open to metal detecting unless notice is given by a sign or city ordinance. When in doubt, always check with the city’s Parks and Recreation Department.

Public School Grounds—Most are open to metal detecting unless notice is given by a sign, city ordinance, law enforcement official, or school employee. You should always check with the school office first.

Privately Owned Lands (Private Property)—Permission required. And it is always best to have the permission in writing. Historically Marked Lands or Sites—Metal detecting is not allowed. Don’t even think about it.

21

SPECIFICATIONS 1

 

 

 

 

 

.........................Length 2

................................................Extended

 

54”

 

Collapsed..............................................

 

43”

 

Carrying case...............

6 x 15 x 21 inches

Weight ..................................................................................

 

 

 

3.9 Pounds

Frequency .....................

VLF-Search ............

4.8KHz, Quartz Crystal

 

 

 

Controlled

 

Audio Target Response

................. 370 Hz

 

 

 

 

Unipolar 3

Operating Modes ........

DISC 1 4 ..........................

VLF-Slow Motion

 

 

 

Discrimination

 

DISC 2

4 .........................

 

VLF-Slow motion

 

 

 

Discrimination

 

Pinpoint

............VLF-All Metal, No Motion

Search Coil ....................

Type .....................

 

Concentric, Co-Planar

 

 

 

Spider Coil

 

Diameter ..................................................

 

8”

 

Sheilding ........................

100 percent ESI 5

 

Interchangable ....................................

 

Yes

 

Submersible............................................

 

Yes

Automatic Tuning ............................................................................

 

 

 

Yes

Automatic Ground Rejection .......................................................

 

 

Yes

Built-in Detector Stand ...................................................................

 

 

 

Yes

Built-in Recharge Circuitry.............................................................

 

 

Yes

Stereo Headphone Jack ...............................................................

 

 

Yes

Batteries 6 .........................................................................................

 

 

 

Yes

Battery Life 2 7 ...............

Carbon Zinc .............................

 

20-30 hours

 

Alkaline

.....................................

 

40-80 hours

22

SPECIFICATIONS

NOTES

1.Subject to modification or improvement without notice

2.Approximate

3.Pulsegate Unipolar Audio Processing-advanced Fisher circuitry that allows silent operation below the “Audio-Threshold Tone” with no sensitivity loss.

4.DISC 1 and DISC 2 are motion modes, i.e. the search coil must be moving at least slightly to detect a target.

5.Electro-Static-Insulated

6.Optional recharge kit includes eight Nicad rechargeable batteries; two battery packs; one 110-volt (negative ground only) auto ciggarette lighter recharger.

7.Use of headphones may improve battery life up to 100 percent.

Fisher Research Laboratory does not warrant suitability to specific use. Fisher Research Laboratory shall in no event be liable for any direct, incidental, consequential or indirect damages.

23

Q U A L I T Y

Fisher detectors are renowned for their quality. Each detector is hand crafted in the USA with pride

P E R F O R M A N C E

Treasure Hunters worldwide rely on Fisher.

Our detectors are durable, dependable, and search deeper..

R E P U T A T I O N

Fisher produced the first patented metal detector in 1931. For over 70 years, the Fisher logo has been a mark of excellence.

L I F E T I M E W A R R A N T Y

Fisher believes in the products we produce and backs this belief with a lifetime warranty, the best in the industry, on all of our consumer detectors. Warranty may vary outside of the United States. See your dealer for details

S E R V I C E

Fisher is committed to providing you, our valued customer, with superior service. Each and every instrument is rigidly tested and carefully inspected during assembly and before shipment.

Should you have any questions or problems, contact:

FISHER RESEARCH LABORATORY

200 West Willmott Road.,

Los Banos, California 93635

Tel 209.826.3292 Fax 209.826.0416 www.fisherlab.com email:info@fisherlab.com

EXPORT DEPARTMENT

P.O. Box 1896

New Haven, CT 06508 USA

Tel 203.288.1638 Fax 203.287.8099 email: mb@exportdept.com