Kurzweil PC2KBD User Manual

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Kurzweil PC2

Musician’s Guide

©2000 All rights reserved. Kurzweil is a product line of Young Chang Co.; Kurzweil and PC2 are trademarks of Young Chang Co. All other products and brand names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Product features and specifications are subject to change without notice.

Part Number: 910345 Rev. A

CAUTION

RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK

DO NOT OPEN

CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE THE COVER

NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE

REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL

The lightning flash with the arrowhead symbol, within an equilateral triangle, is intended to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated "dangerous voltage" within the product's enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.

The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to alert the user to the presence of important operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the product.

IMPORTANT SAFETY & INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO THE RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK, OR INJURY TO PERSONS

WARNING: When using electric products, basic precautions should always be followed, including the following:

1.Read all of the Safety and Installation Instructions and Explanation of Graphic Symbols before using the product.

2.Do not use this product near water - for example, near a bathtub, washbowl, kitchen sink, in a wet basement, or near a swimming pool, or the like.

3.This product should be used only with a stand or cart that is recommended by the manufacturer.

4.This product, either alone or in combination with an amplifier and speakers or headphones, may be capable of producing sound levels that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do not operate for a long period of time at a high volume level or at a level that is uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the ears, you should consult an audiologist.

5.The product should be located so that its location or position does not interfere with its proper ventilation.

6.The product should be located away from heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, or other products that produce heat.

7.The product should be connected to a power supply only of the type described in the operating instructions or as marked on the product.

8.This product may be equipped with a polarized line plug (one blade wider than the other). This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact an electrician to replace your obsolete outlet. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the plug.

9.The power supply cord of the product should be unplugged from the outlet when left unused for a long period of time. When unplugging the power supply cord, do not pull on the cord, but grasp it by the plug.

10.Care should be taken so that objects do not fall and liquids are not spilled into the enclosure through openings.

11.The product should be serviced by qualified service personnel when:

A.The power supply cord or the plug has been damaged;

B.Objects have fallen, or liquid has been spilled into the product;

C.The product has been exposed to rain;

D.The product does not appear to be operating normally or exhibits a marked change in performance;

E.The product has been dropped, or the enclosure damaged.

12.Do not attempt to service the product beyond that described in the user maintenance instructions. All other servicing should be referred to qualified service personnel.

13.WARNING: Do not place objects on the product’s power supply cord, or place the product in a position where anyone could trip over, walk on, or roll anything over cords of any type. Do not allow the product to rest on or be installed over cords of any type. Improper installations of this type create the possibility of a fire hazard and/or personal injury.

RADIO AND TELEVISION INTERFERENCE

WARNING: Changes or modifications to this instrument not expressly approved by Young Chang could void your authority to operate the instrument.

IMPORTANT: When connecting this product to accessories and/or other equipment use only high quality shielded cables.

NOTE: This instrument has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the instrument is used in a commercial environment. This instrument generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this instrument in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his or her own expense.

Changes and modifications not expressly approved by the manufacturer

or registrant of this instrument an void the user’s authority to operate this instrument under Federal Communications Commission rules.

In order to maintain compliance with FCC regulations, shielded cables must be used with this instrument. Operation with unapproved equipment or unshielded cables is likely to result in harmful interference to radio and television reception.

NOTICE

This apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.

AVIS

Le present appareil numerique n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriques depassant les limites applicables aux appareils numeriques de la class A prescrites dans le Reglement sur le brouillage radioelectrique edicte par le ministere des Communications du Canada.

SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS

ii

Young Chang Distributors

Contact the nearest Young Chang office listed below to locate your local Young Chang/ Kurzweil representative.

Young Chang America, Inc.

P.O. Box 99995

Lakewood, WA 98499-0995

Tel: (253) 589-3200

Fax: (253) 984-0245

Young Chang Co.

178-55 Gajwa-Dong

Seo-Ku, Inchon, Korea 404-714

Tel: 011-82-32-570-1380

Fax: 011-82-32-570-1218

Young Chang Akki Europe GmbH

Industriering 45

D-41751 Viersen

Germany

Tel: 011-49-2162-4491

Fax: 011-49-2162-41744

Young Chang America, Inc. (Canadian Division)

3650 Victoria Park Ave. Suite 105

Toronto, Ontario Canada M2H 3P7

Tel: (416) 492-9899

Fax: (416) 492-9299

iii

Contents

Young Chang Distributors ............................................................................................................................................... iii

Chapter 1 Introduction

 

Basic PC2 Features ..........................................................................................................................................................

1-1

The Sound .................................................................................................................................................................

1-1

Keyboard and Controllers ......................................................................................................................................

1-1

Effects.........................................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Options .............................................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Sound ROM Cards...................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Polyphony Expansion Board..................................................................................................................................

1-2

Pedals.........................................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Ribbon Controller.....................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Music Rack ................................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Breath Controller......................................................................................................................................................

1-2

Unpacking your PC2 ......................................................................................................................................................

1-3

Chapter 2 Startup

 

Setup..................................................................................................................................................................................

2-1

Installing the Music Rack........................................................................................................................................

2-1

Basic Connections............................................................................................................................................................

2-2

Power .........................................................................................................................................................................

2-2

Audio .........................................................................................................................................................................

2-3

MIDI...........................................................................................................................................................................

2-4

Using the PC2 as a MIDI Master ....................................................................................................................

2-4

Using the PC2 as a MIDI Slave .......................................................................................................................

2-4

MIDI Out/Thru.................................................................................................................................................

2-4

Pedals.........................................................................................................................................................................

2-4

Breath .........................................................................................................................................................................

2-5

Ribbon........................................................................................................................................................................

2-5

Digital Output ..........................................................................................................................................................

2-6

Powering Up ....................................................................................................................................................................

2-6

Display (LCD)...........................................................................................................................................................

2-6

LEDs...........................................................................................................................................................................

2-6

Software Upgrades ..................................................................................................................................................

2-6

Playing the Demo Sequences .................................................................................................................................

2-6

Troubleshooting........................................................................................................................................................

2-7

No Text in Display ............................................................................................................................................

2-7

Low Battery........................................................................................................................................................

2-7

No Sound ...........................................................................................................................................................

2-7

Chapter 3 Performance Features

In This Chapter ................................................................................................................................................................

3-1

Overview ..........................................................................................................................................................................

3-1

Modes ........................................................................................................................................................................

3-1

Editors ................................................................................................................................................................

3-2

The Internal Setup....................................................................................................................................................

3-2

 

 

Kurzweil PC2 Musician’s Guide

Contents

 

Effects and EQ ..........................................................................................................................................................

3-2

Physical Controllers.................................................................................................................................................

3-3

The Front Panel................................................................................................................................................................

3-3

Common Features....................................................................................................................................................

3-4

Master Volume Slider .......................................................................................................................................

3-4

Data Entry ..........................................................................................................................................................

3-4

System.................................................................................................................................................................

3-4

Effects..................................................................................................................................................................

3-5

Functions............................................................................................................................................................

3-5

Sound Source.....................................................................................................................................................

3-5

Mode-Dependent Features .....................................................................................................................................

3-6

The Display (LCD)............................................................................................................................................

3-6

Cursor Buttons ..................................................................................................................................................

3-8

Sound Parameters.............................................................................................................................................

3-8

Zone Parameters ...............................................................................................................................................

3-8

Sound/Setup Select ..........................................................................................................................................

3-8

Zone Select and Assignable Controllers ........................................................................................................

3-9

Selecting Programs and Setups ...................................................................................................................................

3-13

Other Selection Methods.......................................................................................................................................

3-13

Internal Voices Mode and KB3 Mode ..........................................................................................................

3-13

MIDI Setups Mode..........................................................................................................................................

3-13

EQ ....................................................................................................................................................................................

3-14

Changing the EQ....................................................................................................................................................

3-14

Effects..............................................................................................................................................................................

3-14

Activating Effects ...................................................................................................................................................

3-14

Changing Effects ....................................................................................................................................................

3-15

Muting Effects.........................................................................................................................................................

3-15

Wet/Dry Mix ..........................................................................................................................................................

3-16

Layering and Splitting..................................................................................................................................................

3-17

Using AutoSplit for Quick Layers and Splits.....................................................................................................

3-17

How AutoSplit Works ...........................................................................................................................................

3-18

Saving Quick Layers and Splits ...........................................................................................................................

3-18

Changing the AutoSplit Key Without Editing...................................................................................................

3-19

Saving the AutoSplit Key......................................................................................................................................

3-19

Muting and Soloing ......................................................................................................................................................

3-19

Muting .....................................................................................................................................................................

3-20

Soloing .....................................................................................................................................................................

3-20

The AutoSplit Feature............................................................................................................................................

3-20

Saving the Internal Setup.............................................................................................................................................

3-21

Digital Audio Output ...................................................................................................................................................

3-21

Chapter 4 Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts ...................................................................................................................................................

4-1

Overview...................................................................................................................................................................

4-1

Beginning to Edit......................................................................................................................................................

4-1

Navigation .........................................................................................................................................................

4-1

Data Entry ..........................................................................................................................................................

4-2

Naming and Storing .........................................................................................................................................

4-2

Other Save-Dialog Functions .................................................................................................................................

4-3

Restoring Factory Effects .................................................................................................................................

4-3

Deleting Objects ................................................................................................................................................

4-3

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Kurzweil PC2 Musician’s Guide

 

Contents

Dumping Objects ..............................................................................................................................................

4-4

Intuitive Entry ..........................................................................................................................................................

4-5

Short Cuts for Data Entry ................................................................................................................................

4-5

Short Cuts for Navigation................................................................................................................................

4-6

Other Editing Functions..........................................................................................................................................

4-7

Comparing .........................................................................................................................................................

4-7

Copying and Pasting ........................................................................................................................................

4-8

More About SysEx Dumps .....................................................................................................................................

4-9

SysEx IDs............................................................................................................................................................

4-9

Dumping the Entire Memory..........................................................................................................................

4-9

The Program Editor ......................................................................................................................................................

4-10

Program Editing Basics .........................................................................................................................................

4-10

Entering the Program Editor.........................................................................................................................

4-10

The Current Layer............................................................................................................................................

4-11

Keymaps............................................................................................................................................................

4-11

Muting and Soloing Layers ............................................................................................................................

4-11

Storing Effects..................................................................................................................................................

4-12

Beyond the Basics...................................................................................................................................................

4-12

The Setup Editor............................................................................................................................................................

4-12

The Default Setup and the Clear Setup .......................................................................................................

4-13

Entering the Setup Editor .....................................................................................................................................

4-13

Creating Setups ......................................................................................................................................................

4-13

Setting Initial Volume Levels for Different Zones.............................................................................................

4-14

Assigning Sliders to Control Wet/Dry Mix in Different Zones ......................................................................

4-15

Assigning Entry Values.........................................................................................................................................

4-15

A Few Important Points About Entry Values .............................................................................................

4-16

Multiple Controller Function ...............................................................................................................................

4-17

Offset vs. Scale.................................................................................................................................................

4-18

Crossfades ...............................................................................................................................................................

4-18

Velocity Switching..................................................................................................................................................

4-19

Velocity Layering ...................................................................................................................................................

4-19

Switching Setups With a Pedal ............................................................................................................................

4-19

Transposing a Setup With a Button .....................................................................................................................

4-20

The KB3 Editor..............................................................................................................................................................

4-20

Editing the Percussion Parameters......................................................................................................................

4-20

The Effects Editor ..........................................................................................................................................................

4-21

Effects Change Mode.............................................................................................................................................

4-21

Setting the Effects Change Mode..................................................................................................................

4-21

Entering the Effects Editor....................................................................................................................................

4-22

Selecting Different Effects .....................................................................................................................................

4-22

Editing Effects Parameters....................................................................................................................................

4-23

KB3 Effects .......................................................................................................................................................

4-23

Saving Effects..........................................................................................................................................................

4-23

Other Effects-Editor Functions.............................................................................................................................

4-25

Common Editing Tasks ................................................................................................................................................

4-25

Making Effects Active at Program or Setup Selection ......................................................................................

4-25

Turning AutoSplit On and Off .............................................................................................................................

4-25

Controlling Vibrato and Tremolo with LFOs .....................................................................................................

4-26

Using Mono Audio Output ..................................................................................................................................

4-26

Changing Preset Drawbar Values........................................................................................................................

4-26

Making Drawbars Live ..................................................................................................................................

4-26

Changing the Values of Preset Drawbars....................................................................................................

4-26

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Kurzweil PC2 Musician’s Guide

Contents

 

Editing the Internal Setup.....................................................................................................................................

4-27

Using the Arpeggiator ..................................................................................................................................................

4-27

Using Pressure (Aftertouch) as an Arpeggiator Controller .............................................................................

4-29

Using the Arpeggiator with a Sequencer or External Controller....................................................................

4-29

Using the PC2 to Control External Slaves .................................................................................................................

4-30

Sending Bank-Select and Program-Change Messages .....................................................................................

4-30

Understanding Bank-Select Controllers .............................................................................................................

4-30

Sending Program Changes Only .........................................................................................................................

4-32

Preventing Program Changes on Slaves.............................................................................................................

4-33

Working With an External Sequencer ........................................................................................................................

4-33

Turn Local Control Off! .........................................................................................................................................

4-33

Global Method.................................................................................................................................................

4-33

Setup Method ..................................................................................................................................................

4-33

Recording to a Sequencer While in MIDI Setups Mode...................................................................................

4-34

Troubleshooting.............................................................................................................................................................

4-34

Chapter 5 Descriptions of Parameters

Program Editor Parameters ...........................................................................................................................................

5-1

The Timbre Menu.....................................................................................................................................................

5-1

The Envelope Menu.................................................................................................................................................

5-3

The LFO Menu..........................................................................................................................................................

5-3

The LFO Menu: Rotor Effects Parameters............................................................................................................

5-4

Setup Editor Parameters.................................................................................................................................................

5-5

The MIDI Xmit Menu ..............................................................................................................................................

5-5

The Program Menu..................................................................................................................................................

5-6

The Key Range Menu ..............................................................................................................................................

5-9

The Transpose Menu .............................................................................................................................................

5-10

The Velocity Menu .................................................................................................................................................

5-10

The Controllers Menu............................................................................................................................................

5-14

The Controllers Menu: Continuous Controller Parameters.............................................................................

5-15

The Controllers Menu: Ribbon Controller Parameters.....................................................................................

5-16

The Controllers Menu: Switch Controller Parameters .....................................................................................

5-17

Switch-Button Priority ...................................................................................................................................

5-18

The Arpeggiator Menu..........................................................................................................................................

5-19

Effects Editor Parameters.............................................................................................................................................

5-24

KB3 Editor Parameters .................................................................................................................................................

5-27

The Timbre Menu...................................................................................................................................................

5-27

The Envelope Menu...............................................................................................................................................

5-28

The Envelope Menu: Percussion Parameters.....................................................................................................

5-29

Envelope Menu: Percussion Pitch Parameters ..................................................................................................

5-30

The LFO Menu........................................................................................................................................................

5-30

System Parameters ........................................................................................................................................................

5-30

The Global Menu....................................................................................................................................................

5-30

The MIDI Recv Menu ............................................................................................................................................

5-36

Appendix A Maintenance and Upgrades

Replacing the Battery.....................................................................................................................................................

A-1

Before you Begin .....................................................................................................................................................

A-1

Opening your PC2 ..................................................................................................................................................

A-1

Installing the Battery ..............................................................................................................................................

A-1

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Kurzweil PC2 Musician’s Guide

 

Contents

Replacing the Option Panel...................................................................................................................................

A-3

Powering up.............................................................................................................................................................

A-3

Boot Block........................................................................................................................................................................

A-3

Starting the Boot Block ...........................................................................................................................................

A-3

About Software Upgrades .....................................................................................................................................

A-3

Setting Up For a Software Upgrade .....................................................................................................................

A-4

Installing an Operating System or Setups ...........................................................................................................

A-4

Installing a New Boot Block ..................................................................................................................................

A-4

Installing Sound ROM Options.............................................................................................................................

A-5

Resetting the PC2 ....................................................................................................................................................

A-5

Running the Diagnostics........................................................................................................................................

A-5

Appendix B Reference

Specifications ...................................................................................................................................................................

B-1

Physical Specifications.............................................................................................................................................

B-1

Electrical Specifications........................................................................................................................................

B-1

Voltage and Frequency Ranges.......................................................................................................................

B-1

Power Consumption.........................................................................................................................................

B-1

Environmental Specifications.................................................................................................................................

B-2

Audio Specifications .............................................................................................................................................

B-2

Line-Level Left and Right Analog Audio Outputs ......................................................................................

B-2

Digital Audio Output ...................................................................................................................................

B-2

Headphone Output ..........................................................................................................................................

B-2

Parameter Reference .......................................................................................................................................................

B-3

PC2 Audio Signal Routing .............................................................................................................................................

B-8

MIDI Controllers .............................................................................................................................................................

B-9

Special Controllers ..........................................................................................................................................................

B-9

KB3 Controllers .............................................................................................................................................................

B-10

PC2 Keymaps.................................................................................................................................................................

B-11

PC2 Effects and Effects Parameters ............................................................................................................................

B-12

Reverb......................................................................................................................................................................

B-12

Delay ........................................................................................................................................................................

B-13

Chorus......................................................................................................................................................................

B-13

Flange.......................................................................................................................................................................

B-14

Phase ........................................................................................................................................................................

B-14

Chorus + Delay.......................................................................................................................................................

B-14

Chorus + Reverb.....................................................................................................................................................

B-15

Chorus + Delay + Reverb......................................................................................................................................

B-15

Flange + Delay........................................................................................................................................................

B-15

Flange + Reverb......................................................................................................................................................

B-15

Flange + Delay + Reverb.......................................................................................................................................

B-16

Flange and Other....................................................................................................................................................

B-16

Filters .......................................................................................................................................................................

B-16

Laserverb.................................................................................................................................................................

B-16

Distortion.................................................................................................................................................................

B-17

Enhancer..................................................................................................................................................................

B-17

Compressor.............................................................................................................................................................

B-17

Simple Motion ........................................................................................................................................................

B-17

Spatial ......................................................................................................................................................................

B-17

Rotary Speaker .......................................................................................................................................................

B-18

MIDI Implementation Chart........................................................................................................................................

B-19

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Kurzweil PC2 Musician’s Guide

Contents

Appendix C PC2 Programs and Controller Assignments

Factory Controller Assignments

...................................................................................................................................C-1

Programs and Controllers..............................................................................................................................................

C-1

Index .....................................................................................................................................................................................

I-1

Index of Parameters.............................................................................................................................................

IP-1

x

Chapter 1

Introduction

Thanks for buying your PC2 MIDI performance controller! It combines 16 megabytes of renowned Kurzweil ROM sounds with an extensive set of flexible and easy-to-use performance and MIDI-control features—all in a portable keyboard that can help you sound like a pro on stage or in the studio. We hope you like it.

Basic PC2 Features

The Sound

The PC2 offers 64-voice polyphony that’s expandable to 128 voices. For maximum flexibility in connecting to sound systems and processing or recording equipment, the PC2 provides analog and digital audio outputs, which you can use simultaneously.

There are 128 factory programs, including Kurzweil’s new stereo triple-strike Grand Piano, Rhodes and Wurlitzer electric pianos, stereo strings, brass, and Take 6 vocal samples—as well as our critically-acclaimed keyboard, guitar, bass, drums, and percussion sounds. There’s also room for two Sound ROM Option cards, for up to 48 megabytes of ROM sounds.

Setups make the PC2 a versatile performance instrument and MIDI control keyboard. Each setup contains four zones that can cover any part of the keyboard, or overlap across the entire keyboard. You can program each zone independently—with different programs, physical controller assignments, and MIDI channels for each zone. Using the onboard arpeggiator, you can program setups with grooves that start automatically and evolve in countless variations as you play.

For serious Hammond organ fans we offer KB3 Mode, which uses tone-wheel synthesis to provide superb recreations of the classic B-3 sound—including real-time drawbar controls and multi-effects settings that include all of the essential features of a Hammond-Leslie setup— percussion, key click, chorus and vibrato, tube amp distortion, and rotary speakers with programmable speed control that ramps up and down like the real thing. You can play KB3 programs by themselves or with other programs in setups.

Keyboard and Controllers

There are two PC2 models. Both have the same features, with only one exception. The PC2X has a fully-weighted 88-key piano action, while the standard PC2 has a 76-key lightly-weighted action for the perfect combination of power and portability. Both models have mono pressure (aftertouch), and have programmable velocity sensitivity. (By the way, whenever we mention the PC2 by name, we’re referring to both models.)

You’ll find the usual array of physical controllers—Pitch Wheel, Mod Wheel, jacks for continuous and switch pedal jacks, and a breath-controller jack—as well as multi-function front-panel buttons and sliders, and a unique ribbon controller. They’re all fully programmable.

There’s an extensive list of programmable features for MIDI control—the PC2 isn’t just a greatsounding performance keyboard; it’s a serious tool for MIDI sequencing, and makes an excellent

Introduction

Options

centerpiece for sophisticated MIDI studios. The PC2 is also well-equipped to receive MIDI from other instruments or external MIDI sources like computer-based sequencers.

Effects

To complement the ROM sounds, there are over 150 multiple effects and 30 reverbs. You can apply the effects to programs or setups, and you can easily control the wet/dry mix in real time. You can also program the multi-effects and reverbs for even more control in performance and recording.

Options

Ask your Kurzweil dealer about the following PC2 options:

Sound ROM Cards

The PC2 has sockets for two ROM expansion cards that you can install yourself (the expansion kits come with complete instructions). Each expansion card adds 16 megabytes of ROM sounds to the 16 megabytes of onboard ROM.

Polyphony Expansion Board

There’s a kit for expanding your PC2’s polyphony from 64 voices to 128 voices. You can install this kit yourself as well.

Pedals

The PC2 has jacks for three switch pedals (for functions like sustain or program/setup changes) and two continuous pedals (for functions like volume control). Your Kurzweil dealer stocks the following optional pedals:

FS-1

Standard box-shaped switch pedal

KFP-1

Single piano-style switch pedal

KFP-2M

Double piano-style switch pedal unit

CC-1

Continuous pedal

Ribbon Controller

There’s a dedicated modular jack (like a telephone jack) on the rear panel for connecting this 600-mm (24-inch) ribbon controller. You can configure the PC2 to use the ribbon as a single large controller, or a three-section controller with independent settings for each section.

Music Rack

The sturdy acrylic music rack (model PC-MDS) fits into a bracket that you attach to the PC2’s rear panel. You’ll find installation instructions on page 2-1.

Breath Controller

You can plug a Yamaha (or equivalent) breath controller into the dedicated jack on the PC2’s rear panel (your Kurzweil dealer won’t necessarily have these in stock).

1-2

Introduction

Unpacking your PC2

Unpacking your PC2

Your PC2 carton should contain the following:

PC2 or PC2X Performance Controller

Power adapter

Piano-style switch pedal

Four adhesive-backed rubber feet

This manual

Warranty card

You might want to keep the PC2 carton and packing materials for easy shipping or transport.

1-3

Chapter 2

Startup

Setup

When setting up the PC2 for use it must be placed on a sturdy, level surface where both ends of the unit are supported. A conventional keyboard stand may be used if it is strong enough to support the unit’s weight (about 35 pounds for a PC2, 50 for a PC2X). If you are going to be using the unit on a table now or in the future, apply the four stick-on rubber feet to the bottom. Figure 2-1 shows the recommended locations marked with pairs of small guide holes. Remove the backing paper from each rubber foot and attach just forward of each set of guide holes. It is possible that these locations could interfere with some keyboard stand’s supports, so check how the PC2 fits on your stand before applying the rubber feet.

Attach feet here

Figure 2-1 Attaching rubber feet

Installing the Music Rack

You’ll need a Phillips screwdriver to install the optional music rack.

1.Remove the four screws on the rear panel of the PC2, as shown in Figure 2-2.

2.Use the screws to attach the music rack bracket, making sure that the rounded edge of the bracket is at the top.

3.Slide the music rack in from the top (as shown in the figure).

Startup

Basic Connections

Figure 2-2 Installing the music rack

Basic Connections

Power

The PC2 has an external transformer/power supply with a standard electrical plug on one end, and a keyed four-pin plug that connects with the PC2 (keyed means that there’s only one way to connect it). This is a specialized power supply, and is not interchangeable with other power supplies.

Caution: Use only the power supply that comes with your PC2, or a replacement purchased from an authorized Kurzweil dealer. Using a different power supply can seriously damage your PC2!

Before connecting the power supply, make sure your PC2 is off (push the side of the power switch that’s marked with a circle). Connect the keyed plug to the AC In connector. Figure 2-3 shows the correct orientation of the plug.

2-2

Startup

Basic Connections

Key

Flat side down!

Figure 2-3 Proper orientation of plug

Place the power supply somewhere where it will stay dry and out of the way. We recommend keeping it on the floor. Never cover the power supply with anything; it needs adequate ventilation to prevent overheating.

Connect the plug at the other end of the power-supply cable into a standard power outlet. If you plan to take your PC2 to a location that uses a different voltage level, you’ll need to get an additional power supply that’s compatible with the local voltage.

Audio

The PC2 features balanced left and right analog audio outputs with 1/4-inch jacks. For best results, use balanced cables to connect to balanced, line-level inputs on your mixer or sound system.

It’s important to use shielded, twisted-pair cables. The cables should each have 1/4-inch stereo (tip-ring-sleeve) plugs on one end to connect to the PC2. The other end of each cable should have either 1/4-inch stereo plugs or XLR plugs. Cables of this type provide balanced operation, which greatly reduces many types of noise. Unbalanced cables or sound-system inputs won’t give you quite the same audio quality.

For best performance, set the PC2’s Master Volume slider to its maximum when adjusting mixer or sound-system levels. Otherwise, if you adjust the PC2’s level by increasing the level of your sound system, you’ll increase the noise level.

If you’re using a monaural sound system or running the PC2’s audio into a single mixer channel, we recommend configuring the PC2 for mono output, in which case the PC2 sends the same one-channel signal to the left and right sides of both the analog and digital outputs. See page 4-26 for information about using mono audio output mode.

The PC2 has a headphone jack, which carries the same signal as the main outputs (that’s true whether you’re using stereo or mono output). The headphone jack accepts a standard 1/4-inch stereo plug, and is compatible with nearly all types of headphones. Plugging into the headphones jack does not mute the other audio outputs.

You can also use the headphone jack as an unbalanced stereo line-level output. Just connect a stereo cable from the headphone jack to a stereo input on your mixer or sound system. If you have only unbalanced inputs to your sound system, you’ll get better audio quality using the headphone jack.

There’s also an RCA digital audio jack, which you can use in addition to the analog outputs. See page 2-6 for more information.

2-3

Startup

Basic Connections

MIDI

The PC2 both transmits and accepts most standard (and several specialized) MIDI messages. In other words, it can serve as both a MIDI master and a MIDI slave.

Using the PC2 as a MIDI Master

Connect a MIDI cable from the MIDI Out port of the PC2 to the MIDI In port of the device you want to control—another MIDI musical instrument, or any device that accepts MIDI, such as a computer with a MIDI interface or an integrated MIDI In port. This makes the PC2 a MIDI control device, and you can use it to play other instruments, make recordings using sequencers, or send MIDI System Exclusive (SysEx) messages for storing programs, setups, and effects settings externally.

When the PC2 is the MIDI master, you can configure it to control only its slaves, or to play its own sounds in addition to controlling the slaves.

Using the PC2 as a MIDI Slave

Connect a MIDI cable from the MIDI Out port of the instrument or device that you’re using as the MIDI master to the MIDI In port of the PC2. This makes the PC2 a MIDI slave, enabling you to play its sounds from any MIDI instrument—keyboard, wind controller, drum pads, whatever—or to control it via MIDI devices like dedicated sequencers or computers running sequencing applications. The PC2 can receive 16 independent channels of MIDI information.

MIDI Out/Thru

This jack has two functions: it can be a MIDI Out port, enabling you to send directly to two different slaves, or it can be a MIDI Thru port, in which case it passes along whatever MIDI information that the PC2 receives at its MIDI In port (but not the MIDI information that the PC2 itself generates). This makes it easy to include the PC2 in a chain of multiple MIDI devices, which is a common configuration when you’re using a computer for sequencing.

There’s a small switch labeled Thru/Out on the PC2’s rear panel (as you face the rear panel, the switch is to the left of the MIDI In port). Use a small pointed object to set the switch to the position you want—a ball-point pen works nicely.

Pedals

Plug your switch or continuous pedals into the corresponding jacks on the PC2’s rear panel. We recommend using the Kurzweil pedals described on page 1-2, but you can use almost any switch or continuous pedal, as long as it adheres to the following specifications (as most pedals do):

Switch pedals

1/4-inch tip-sleeve plug

Continuous pedals

10-kOhm linear-taper potentiometer, 1/4-inch tip-ring-sleeve plug

If you use a third-party (non-Kurzweil) switch pedal, make sure it’s connected before you turn on your PC2. This ensures that the pedal will work properly (it might function backward—off when it’s down and on when it’s up—if you turn on your PC2 before plugging in the pedal).

Similarly, don’t press any of your switch pedals while powering up, because the PC2 verifies each pedal’s orientation during power up. If you’re pressing a pedal, you might cause it to work backward.

2-4

Startup

Basic Connections

The pedals are independently programmable within each zone of every setup. Here are the default settings for the five pedals you can use with the PC2:

Switch Pedal 1

Controller 64

(Sustain)

Switch Pedal 2

Controller 66

(Sostenuto)

Switch Pedal 3

Controller 67

(Soft)

Continuous Control Pedal 1

Controller 11 (Expression)

Continuous Control Pedal 2

Controller 4 (Foot Pedal)

Breath

The 3.5mm Breath jack labeled Breath accepts a standard breath controller, which sends standard MIDI Breath (MIDI 2) messages. The PC2’s preset programs and setups don’t respond to breath, but if you have other instruments that do respond to Breath, you can control them from the PC2 via MIDI.

You can also program the PC2 so that the breath controller sends a different MIDI message. This would enable you to use a breath controller to affect the PC2, but then other instruments receiving MIDI from the PC2 would no longer respond to the PC2’s breath controller (unless you also programmed them to receive the same MIDI Controller that the PC2’s breath controller is sending).

Ribbon

Connect the optional Kurzweil Ribbon Controller into the modular Ribbon jack on the rear panel. The ribbon controller itself should rest on a flat surface; it fits nicely between the keys and the buttons and sliders on the front panel.

The ribbon is a continuous controller. You can program the ribbon controller to send MIDI Controller messages 1–127, as well as several specialized messages. It generates values of 0–127 for whatever MIDI Controllers you assign it to send. Just press it, and slide your finger along the ribbon to change the value of the message it’s sending.

You can configure the ribbon to have one control section that runs its entire length, or to have three sections of equal length. It sends its highest values when you press it at the end where the cable connects. When you configure it to have three sections, each section sends its highest values at the end closest to the cable.

The ribbon controller comes with an adhesive-backed foam strip and Velcro® fastener pads. The foam strip will hold it in place under most circumstances, but you might find it more convenient to attach it more securely with the Velcro fasteners. In that case, we recommend sticking the hook side of each pad to the underside of the Ribbon and the loop (softer) side to the keyboard. This helps to prevent the hooks in the Velcro from collecting crud when you don’t have the ribbon attached.

Caution: The modular jack is designed for connection to the Kurzweil Ribbon Controller option only. Don’t plug any other modular plugs into the Ribbon jack.

2-5

Startup

Powering Up

Digital Output

With the PC2, you can take advantage of the growing number of digital recorders and mixers on the market. Connect a 75-Ohm coaxial cable from the PC2’s RCA Digital Out jack to the AES or S/PDIF input of the receiving device. You may need an RCA-to-XLR adapter to connect with the receiving device. If the receiving device receives only optical signals, you’ll need a converter as well.

Powering Up

When you’ve made all your connections, turn on the PC2 by pushing the side of the power switch marked with the vertical line. All of the lights on the front panel flash, and the liquidcrystal display (LCD) shows a series of messages. When the PC2 is ready to play, the display looks like this:

Bank:0||Internal||1A

000|Stereo|Grand|

Before playing, we recommend that you slide the volume control nearly to the bottom and gradually push the control up while playing the keyboard. This way you won’t cause any pain or damage if there’s too much gain in your sound system.

Display (LCD)

The PC2’s 40-character liquid-crystal display tells you what’s going on, whether you’re playing or editing. Depending on your viewing angle (and possibly the temperature), you may need to adjust the contrast for better visibility. There’s a small black knob on the rear panel, between the MIDI ports and the Digital Out jack. Use a screwdriver or your fingertips to turn the knob until you can read the display easily.

LEDs

Most of the buttons on the PC2’s front panel contain light-emitting diodes that indicate the status of the features that the buttons control. They should all flash red three times as the PC2 starts up.

Software Upgrades

The PC2 contains a type of reloadable computer memory called Flash ROM, which makes software upgrades fast and easy. You can learn about new features from your Kurzweil dealer, or from our website (www.youngchang.com/kurzweil). See Boot Block on page A-3 for softwareinstallation instructions.

Playing the Demo Sequences

1.Press Sound Select buttons 14 and 16 (Bass and Percussion) simultaneously to enter Demo mode. Sound Select buttons 14 blink (more than four of these buttons will blink if you’ve added one or both of the Sound ROM expansion cards). Each button starts a different demo sequence when you press it. If you want to stop the demo before it finishes, press 14 and 16 simultaneously again.

2.When the demo finishes (or when you stop it), buttons 14 start blinking again.

2-6

Startup

Powering Up

3.Select another demo, or press Cancel to exit Demo mode (alternatively, you can press 14 and 16 simultaneously).

Troubleshooting

No Text in Display

If no messages are displayed when you turn on the power on your PC2 and no LEDs flash, check the power adapter connections at the AC outlet and the PC2 Adapter In jack.

Low Battery

When you turn your PC2 off, a lithium battery protects the memory that the PC2 uses to store user-defined programs and setups, and other editing changes that you’ve saved. Every time you turn on your PC2, it automatically checks the battery voltage. If it’s getting low, you’ll see a message like this before the PC2 finishes starting up:

|Battery|voltage|is

||low|(2.7|volts)

When you see this message, you should replace your battery immediately, to avoid losing your data. See page A-1 for instructions.

No Sound

If no sound comes from the audio or headphones outputs of your PC2 when you play the keyboard, check the following:

The Volume slider might be set too low

There’s no current program or setup selected (the display shows Not|Found )

Continuous control pedal 1: check the connection, and check the position of the pedal

You might be in MIDI Setups mode with all zones muted (inactive): press any or all of the four buttons labeled Zone 1Zone 4, and the lights in the buttons will turn green

Local control might be off: press the Global button, then turn the large knob in the Data Entry region of the front panel one click to the right

The PC2 might be sending to MIDI only: press the MIDI Xmit button in the Zone Parameters region of the front panel, then press the right-arrow button under the display once, then turn the large knob in the Data Entry region until you see Local or Local+MIDI

2-7

Startup

Powering Up

No Sound from Receiving Instrument

If you are trying to control another instrument using MIDI and that instrument doesn’t respond to your PC2, check the following:

A working MIDI cable should connect the PC2’s Out or Thru/Out jack to the In jack of the other instrument

If you’re using the MIDI Thru/Out port, flip the switch near the MIDI In port to the out position (a ball-point pen works well for this)

Continuous control pedal 1: check the connection and pedal position

The other instrument should be receiving on the same MIDI channel that the PC2 is using to transmit MIDI information

All zones that you want to transmit must be active (the lights in the Zone 1Zone 4 buttons must be green)

The PC2 might be sending MIDI information only to itself: press the MIDI Xmit button in the Zone Parameters region of the front panel, then press the right-arrow button under the

display once, then turn the large knob in the Data Entry region until you see MIDI or

Local+MIDI

2-8

Chapter 3

Performance Features

In This Chapter

Chapter 3 shows you how to get the most out of your PC2 in performance settings. The overview introduces a few important features and concepts, while the following sections provide more detail.

• The Front Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3

• Selecting Programs and Setups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13

• EQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14

• Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14

• Layering and Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17

• Muting and Soloing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19

• Saving the Internal Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21

• Digital Audio Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21

Overview

Modes

The PC2 has three performance modes: Internal Voices, MIDI Setups, and KB3. Select the performance mode by pressing the corresponding button in the Sound/Setup Select region.

Internal Voices mode lets you play one internal voice, or program, at a time. A program consists of a single sound (like piano or strings), and the settings that affect that sound (like which part of the keyboard it uses). The PC2 starts in Internal Voices mode when you turn it on.

MIDI Setups mode is what makes the PC2 such a powerful MIDI controller. In this mode you can play one setup at a time. A setup divides the PC2’s keyboard into four zones, each of which can cover part or all of the keyboard. Each zone can use a different MIDI channel and play a different program. Each zone can also have its own controller assignments; for example, the Mod Wheel can do something different in each zone of a setup.

In KB3 mode, the PC2 uses a different synthesizer technique (tone wheel emulation) to reproduce the sound of classic tone-wheel organs (like the Hammond B-3). In most other respects, KB3 mode is like Internal Voices mode.

Performance Features

Overview

Objects

Throughout this manual, we’ll occasionally mention objects, which may sound a bit technical, so we’ll explain. Object is the collective term we use to refer to any chunk of information that the PC2 stores or processes. Many of these objects are invisible to you, but you’ll be working regularly with the highest-level object types: programs, setups, and effects. When you’re editing programs, there’s a good chance you’ll work with another important object type: keymaps. You might also use System Exclusive (SysEx) messages to store programs, setups or effects to an external device—or use a single SysEx message to store all the objects you’ve modified while editing.

Editors

In addition to the performance modes, there’s also a series of editing modes, where you can make changes that affect each of the performance modes (or the entire PC2). Turn to Chapter 4 for details about editing.

The Internal Setup

The three performance modes are quite different from a musician’s viewpoint. The most noticeable difference is the way the liquid-crystal display (LCD) looks in each mode, as you’ll learn on page 3-6.

Behind the scenes, however, the performance modes aren’t as different as they seem. In fact, they have quite a bit in common. For example, consider that familiar controller the Pitch Wheel. Push it up and you bend notes up; pull it down and you bend notes down. This works in all three performance modes.

The Pitch Wheel does what it does because the PC2 is programmed that way—but you could program it for other functions if you wanted. In a setup, the Pitch Wheel can do something different in each zone—and that’s true for all the assignable physical controllers: Mod Wheel, sliders, pedals, and more.

In a program (Internal Voices mode or KB3 mode), things are different. From the viewpoint of you the musician, programs don’t have zones, so each physical controller can do only one thing, but it’s up to you to decide what each physical controller does. That information gets stored in the internal setup, which has only one zone, but is otherwise exactly like a setup in MIDI Setups mode.

Every program in Internal Voices mode uses the internal setup to determine the assignments of the physical controllers—and many other characteristics. Programs in KB3 mode also use the internal setup (although some of the physical controllers in KB3 mode are programmed at the factory to override the settings of the internal setup).

Effects and EQ

Whichever mode you’re in, the PC2 can apply three-band equalization (EQ) to the programs you’re playing. You can also choose from a long list of digital effects, from reverb and chorus to rotary-speaker effects,

3-2

Performance Features

The Front Panel

Physical Controllers

The PC2 provides a wide variety of physical controllers for modifying your sound as you play. There are two basic types: switch and continuous. Switch controllers generate MIDI messages with one of two possible values: On (127) and Off (0). Continuous controllers generate MIDI messages with values from 0 to 127.

The PC2’s onboard switch controllers include five programmable buttons, labeled SW1SW5. You can make these buttons momentary (they stay on only when you press and hold them) or toggle (they alternate between on and off each time you press them). Each of these buttons has a red LED that lights up when the button is on. These buttons have preset functions in each performance mode, but you can reprogram them to do all sorts of things.

There are jacks on the rear panel for up to three switch pedals (the PC2 comes from the factory with one switch pedal). These pedals can also be programmed to be momentary or toggle, and can control a wide range of performance features.

The onboard continuous controllers include Pitch Wheel, Modulation Wheel, four sliders, and mono pressure (aftertouch). There are also four jacks on the rear panel for connecting two continuous controller pedals, a breath controller, and a ribbon controller. These continuous controllers are also fully programmable, with an extensive choice of options.

The Front Panel

The buttons, wheels, and sliders on the front panel control your PC2, both during performances, and when you’re editing. Figure 3-1 identifies everything.

Zone Select and Assignable Controllers Region

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone Buttons 1–4

Solo Button

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EQ Button

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone Select and

 

 

 

System

 

SW1–SW3

 

Assignable Controllers

Zone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region

 

 

 

Region

 

 

 

 

 

Parameters

Sound

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region

 

 

 

 

 

Parameters

 

 

 

 

Display (LCD)

 

 

 

 

 

Master

 

 

Region

Data Entry

 

 

and Cursor

 

 

 

Sliders A–D

 

Volume

 

 

 

Region

 

Buttons

 

Functions

 

 

Slider

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SW4 and SW5

Pitch Wheel

Sound/Setup

Sound

Effects

Source

Mod Wheel

Select Region

Region

Region

Figure 3-1

The PC2

 

 

3-3

Performance Features

The Front Panel

The buttons and sliders on the front panel are labeled in one of three colors, which correspond roughly to their functions in the three performance modes:

White

Internal Voices mode

Blue

MIDI Setups mode

Orange

KB3 mode

Naturally there are a few exceptions:

The buttons in the Data Entry region (including the Alpha Wheel), the Effects region, the Functions region, and the Sound Source region apply to all three modes

The Master Volume slider and the buttons in the System region control the entire PC2, regardless of the current mode

The buttons in the Sound Parameters region apply to Internal Voices mode and KB3 mode

Buttons 14 and 16 in the Sound/Setup Select region select the demo song in all three modes

Instrument names in the Sound/Setup Select region are relevant only in Internal Voices mode

The buttons under the display are relevant (and quite important) when editing any object: Internal-Voices programs, KB3 programs, or setups, but they don’t do anything when you’re just playing a setup

The buttons SW1SW5 are functional in all three modes, although they often do different things depending on the mode

As you can see, many of the front-panel features have functions that vary depending on your performance mode. For convenience, we’ll first describe the features that are common to all modes, then describe the features that are mode-dependent.

Common Features

The following front-panel features behave the same regardless of which mode you’re in.

Master Volume Slider

Adjust the overall volume of the PC2’s audio output with this slider. We recommend that you set this slider all the way down before you turn on your PC2 (at least the first time, anyway).

Data Entry

You’ll use the Data Entry region to select programs and setups, and to make changes when you’re programming (editing) the PC2. See Data Entry on page 4-2 for a complete description.

System

This region contains buttons that affect the entire PC2. The Global button brings up a menu of parameters controlling things like MIDI control and keyboard sensitivity. This menu also contains non-editable information about the PC2 (like available memory and whether you have any expansion sounds). There are also functions for resetting the PC2, saving programs and setups via MIDI, and MIDIScope, a MIDI analysis utility.

3-4

Performance Features

The Front Panel

The MIDI Recv button brings up a menu for configuring each MIDI channel when the PC2 is receiving MIDI from another instrument or a sequencer: program selection, pan and volume settings, and the wet/dry mix of the effects.

The Panic button sends an All Notes Off message to the PC2 and to the MIDI Out port. If you ever have stuck notes, this will shut them off. (Pressing the Panic button during startup enables you to load new software via MIDI, as well as a few other functions).

Effects

The buttons in the Effects region control the two blocks of onboard effects that you can apply to programs and setups. You can turn the effects on and off, select different effects or reverbs for each of the effect blocks, and control the wet/dry mix for each effect block. You can specify how the PC2 assigns effects when you change programs or setups. See Effects on page 3-14 for more information.

Functions

You’ll use the buttons in the Functions region when editing programs or setups. The Store button starts a dialog (the PC2 asks you a question that you answer, usually with Yes or No) for saving programs or setups. The Copy button lets you copy and paste whole zones within setups, or from one setup to another. Press the Compare button to hear the difference between your modified program or setup and the original. We’ll talk about these more when we discuss editing (see Copying and Pasting on page 4-8, and Comparing on page 4-7).

Sound Source

The buttons in this region select the bank of programs or setups that the PC2 uses. There are four buttons: Internal, User, Exp1, and Exp2. Each button represents a sound source, or bank, for each performance mode—that is, there are four easily-accessible banks for each mode. Each bank can contain up to 128 objects.

In any performance mode, press one of the Sound Source buttons to select a different bank. The mode you’re in determines what type of objects are stored in the various banks. (You can’t mix object types in the same bank.)

There are eight banks for programs, and four for setups. The banks for Internal Voices mode and MIDI setups mode are numbered from 0 to 3, and correspond to the Internal, User, Exp1, and Exp2 buttons—Internal is Bank 0, User is Bank 1, and so on. The banks for KB3 mode are numbered from 4 to 7, with the same correspondence to the Sound Source buttons.

Each Internal bank contains factory programs or setups. Each User bank stores the programs or setups that you create. Exp1 and Exp2 are empty until you fill them with programs or setups from expansion options that you can purchase from your Kurzweil dealer.

Selecting Banks and Programs on MIDI Slaves

When you’re controlling other instruments from the PC2, you need a way to select programs from the PC2. Often these programs are stored in banks with IDs higher than 07. The PC2 can send a MIDI message that selects any bank numbered from 0 to 16,383, followed by message that selects a program numbered from 0 to 127 within that bank. See Sending Bank-Select and Program-Change Messages on page 4-30 to learn how.

3-5

Performance Features

The Front Panel

Mode-Dependent Features

The following features behave differently depending on which mode you’re in.

The Display (LCD)

The display looks quite different in each mode, so we’ll show you examples of each.

Internal Voices Mode

When you turn on your PC2, the display should look like this:

Bank ID

 

Bank name

Bank entry (category and program)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bank:0||Internal||1A

000|Stereo|Grand|

Program ID and name

This is Internal Voices mode, where the PC2 always starts when you turn it on. The top line gives you information about the bank (sound source), while the bottom line shows the ID and name of the current program.

MIDI Setups Mode

Press the MIDI Setups button twice to enter MIDI Setups mode, and the display looks like this:

Setup ID

 

Setup name

 

 

 

 

 

 

S001|Dance|C7|

A01|1:Beat|Box|

Bank

Current

Program assigned to

entry

zone

current zone

The setup ID usually begins with S to indicate that you’re playing a setup—although in Setups that have the AutoSplit feature turned on, the S is replaced by a caret (^). Notice that the bank entry is a letter followed by a numeral, which is the opposite of the way the bank entry looks in Internal Voices mode.

3-6

Performance Features

The Front Panel

KB3 Mode

Press the KB3 Mode button twice to enter KB3 mode; the display changes to something like this:

Bank ID Program ID

Program name

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4:000|KB3|Template|

L:888888888|CV:Chor1

Drawbar

Drawbar values

Chorus/Vibrato setting

type

(one digit for

 

 

each harmonic

 

 

wavelength)

 

You’ll find KB3-mode programs in banks with IDs 4–7. Unlike Internal-Voices programs and setups, they don’t display a bank entry.

KB3 programs use tone-wheel synthesis to produce sound. When you select a KB3 program (or a setup that contains one), the tone wheels start up and run constantly while the program is in use. This requires quite a bit of processing, and consequently has an effect on the polyphony available for other programs. KB3 programs use 44 of the PC2’s 64 available voices, so when you use a KB3 program in a setup, you have 20 voices of polyphony available for the remaining programs in the setup.

Because of the special processing requirements of KB3 programs, you can play only one KB3 program at a time, whether in Internal Voices mode or in MIDI Setups mode. There’s a parameter in the Global menu called KB3 MIDI Chan, which specifies which MIDI channel is available for playing KB3 programs. You can’t play KB3 programs on any other channel. This is important to note if you’re playing the PC2 from an external sequencer. In this case, make sure that the sequencer selects KB3 programs only on the KB3 channel; otherwise, the KB3 program won’t play.

KB3 programs have nine adjustable drawbar settings, with harmonic wavelengths ranging from 1 to 16 feet. You can change the drawbar settings using the drawbar controls: Sliders AD and the Mod Wheel. Here’s how it works:

When the LED in the Drawbar Toggle button is off, Sliders AD represent drawbars 1–4 (the four longest—or lowest-pitched—harmonic wavelengths). Press the Drawbar Toggle button, and its LED lights. The sliders then represent drawbars 5–8 (shorter, higher-pitched wavelengths). The Mod Wheel always represents drawbar 9, the shortest wavelength, regardless of the status of the Drawbar Toggle button.

There are nine digits in the bottom line of the display that show the current drawbar values. From left to right, they correspond to drawbars 1–9. Moving one of the drawbars changes the corresponding drawbar values, and changes the nature of the organ sound.

Try it out. Make sure you’re in KB3 mode, then move one of the sliders. You’ll see one of the values on the bottom line change. Moving a slider all the way down is equivalent to pulling out the drawbar on a real organ. The corresponding value is 8. Conversely, pushing the slider up is equivalent to pushing the drawbar in, with a corresponding value of 0. For drawbar 9, pulling the Mod Wheel down (the off position) corresponds to pushing the drawbar in, and pushing it up corresponds to pulling the drawbar out.

To the left of the drawbar values, there’s a letter (either P or L) that indicates whether the program has preset or “live” drawbar values. A program with preset drawbars always starts with the same factory-set drawbar values when you select the program. Moving the drawbar controls changes their values temporarily, but the next time you select that program, the

3-7

Performance Features

The Front Panel

drawbars will once again be at their preset startup values. (You can edit the startup values for programs with preset drawbars; see Changing Preset Drawbar Values on page 4-26.)

A program with live drawbars starts with drawbar values that reflect the positions of the drawbar controls. Moving the drawbar controls changes their values further. Most of the KB3 programs have preset drawbars, although you can also edit them to have live drawbars.

Cursor Buttons

Under the display are two buttons labeled < and >. We call these the cursor buttons, because they control the cursor, which is a flashing bar that appears under one of the characters in the display. The following table shows what happens in each mode when you press one of the cursor buttons.

Mode

Function

 

 

Internal Voices

Selects bank ID parameter or program ID parameter

 

 

MIDI Setups

None

 

 

KB3

Selects bank ID parameter, program ID parameter, or chorus/vibrato setting parameter

 

 

You’ll also use the cursor buttons when editing, to select what you want to edit. See Basic Editing Concepts on page 4-1 for more about the cursor buttons.

Sound Parameters

This region contains buttons for editing programs in Internal Voices mode and KB3 mode (they don’t do anything when you’re in MIDI Setups mode). Each button represents a menu of parameters controlling one of three aspects of the program. See The Program Editor on page 4-10 for details.

Zone Parameters

The buttons in this region are primarily for editing setups. Each button represents a menu of parameters controlling various aspects of the setup. We’ll discuss the zone parameters in more detail in The Setup Editor on page 4-12.

Sound/Setup Select

Use the buttons in this region to select programs and setups while in any performance mode. The buttons are organized into three groups:

Mode selection

Internal Voices, MIDI Setups, KB3 Mode

Category/Group selection

Next Group, Previous Group

Sound/Setup selection

116 (also labeled with program categories for Internal Voices mode)

3-8

Performance Features

The Front Panel

The mode-selection buttons work the same regardless of your performance mode, but the other two groups of buttons are mode-dependent, as described below:

Internal Voices Mode

Each bank is organized in 16 categories of 8 programs, organized by

 

program category (pianos, organs, etc.). Each program has a bank

 

entry from 1A16H, as shown at the top right of the display. Press

 

116 to select a category. Press Next Group or Previous Group to

 

select a program within the current category. (In Internal Voices

 

mode, think of these buttons as Next Program and Previous

 

Program). In other words, the numbered buttons change the numeral

 

(the category) in the bank entry, and the Next Group and Previous

 

Group buttons change the group letter within the current category.

MIDI Setups mode

Each bank of 128 setups is organized in 8 groups of 16 setups. Each

 

setup has a bank entry from A01H16, as shown at the bottom left of

 

the display. Press Next Group or Previous Group to select a group of

 

setups. Press one of the buttons labeled 116 to select setups within

 

that group. In MIDI Setups mode, the numbered buttons change the

 

numeral in the bank entry, and the Next Group and Previous Group

 

buttons change the letter.

KB3 mode

The notion of a category is less meaningful when all the sounds in the

 

bank are organs, so KB3 programs don’t display bank entries

 

(although the bank ID does appear at the top left of the display). Even

 

so, each KB3 bank is organized the same way as in Internal Voices

 

mode—that is the 16 internal KB3 programs are accessible using

 

buttons 116. The Next Group and Previous Group buttons aren’t

 

relevant in the Internal bank of KB3 mode, since there’s only one KB3

 

program per “category.” If you press one of these buttons, either

 

nothing will happen, or the display will tell you that the program is

 

not found. In the User bank, the PC2 stores KB3 programs with

 

consecutively-numbered IDs., and the Next Group and Previous

 

Group buttons work the way they do in Internal Voices mode.

Zone Select and Assignable Controllers

The behavior of most of the buttons and sliders in this region depends on the performance mode.

Internal Voices Mode

In Internal Voices mode, the four zone buttons correspond to the white labeling: Main, Layer, Split, and Split Layer. Using these buttons, you can quickly create split programs (two programs playing on different parts of the keyboard) or layered programs (two sounds playing together across the entire key range of the internal setup). You can also create combinations of splits and layers. See Layering and Splitting on page 3-17 for details.

Keep in mind that if you create splits or layers (or combinations), you can’t save the resulting sound as a program, but you can save it as a setup. We’ll discuss this further in Layering and Splitting.

The Solo button is relevant only if you’ve created a split or layer, in which case you can use the Solo button to play just one of the sounds, and mute the other(s). See Layering and Splitting for details.

3-9

Performance Features

The Front Panel

The EQ button is the one feature in the Zone Select and Assignable Controllers region that does the same thing in all three performance modes. It turns the three-band equalization (EQ) on and off. The EQ settings affect the entire PC2. See page 3-14 to learn how to change the EQ settings.

Button SW1 (also labeled Octave Shift) is a convenient way to “transpose” the entire PC2 down one octave in Internal Voices mode. Press SW1 once to activate transposition, and the LED will light. This causes a “note shift” that for most programs lowers the pitch an octave. What’s actually happening is that the programs get shifted so that each key plays a different MIDI note number (for example, C 4 normally plays Note Number 60, but with octave shift on, it plays Note Number 48). We mention this because in most programs, it seems that you’re transposing down an octave. For non-pitched programs like drums and percussion, however, each sound gets moved an octave upward (so if you play C 4 to play a snare with octave shift off, you’ll play C5 to get the same snare when octave shift is on). Press SW1 again to remove the shift.

If you’ve used the AutoSplit feature to make quick layers and splits, the octave shift transposes the layers in the lower part of the keyboard (corresponding to the Zone 3 and Zone 4 buttons) up one octave, and transposes the layers in the upper part of the keyboard (corresponding to the Zone 1 and Zone 2 buttons) down one octave. This keeps the low notes from being too low, and the high notes from being too high.

Button SW2 (also labeled Chorus/Vib On/Off) activates or deactivates the chorus and vibrato effects built into many of the organ voices in Internal Voices mode.

Button SW2 (also labeled Rotary Fast/Slow) changes the speed of the rotary-speaker effect that’s built into many of the organ programs in Internal Voices mode. Press SW2 once to light its LED and apply a rapid rotary effect. Press it again to return to a slower effect. If a program doesn’t have a built-in rotary effect, or if you turn the effect off by pressing the FX-B button, this button doesn’t do anything. Button SW2 also has uses in some of the non-organ programs. Check out Program 96 and listen for the changes in the sound as you switch the button on and off.

Button SW3 (also labeled Chorus/Vib Depth) sends MIDI Controller 12 (EfxCt 1), which may or may not have an effect, depending on the current program. It sends a value of 127 when on, and 0 when off.

Although Buttons SW4 and SW5 aren’t in the same region as SW1SW3, they work in a similar manner (they’re located above the Pitch Wheel and Mod Wheel). By default, SW4 activates the arpeggiator when it’s on, and deactivates it when it’s off. The default setting for SW5 is to send MIDI Controller 29 with a value of 127 when it’s on; it sends MIDI Controller 29 with a value of 0 when it’s off.

The functions of SW1SW5 in Internal Voices mode are defined by the internal setup, but they’re programmable. If you want them to do something else, you can edit the internal setup and change the buttons’ assignments. Keep in mind, however, that this will affect all programs in Internal Voices mode.

The functions of Sliders AD depend not only on the performance mode, but also depend on whether the EQ button is on. When the EQ button is off, the sliders operate as follows:

Slider A controls the wet/dry mix for FX-A, the multi-effect block. You won’t notice any change in the effect level unless the FX-A button is on.

Slider B controls the wet/dry mix for FX-B, the reverb block. You won’t notice any change in the reverb level unless the FX-B button is on.

Slider C is usually a timbre control, although it can vary from program to program. Slider D has different functions depending on the current program.

3-10

Performance Features

The Front Panel

When the EQ button is on, Sliders AC control the values of the Low, Mid, and High parameters that you see in the display. Slider D doesn’t do anything in this case. If the EQ button is on, press it to turn it off and return to Internal Voices mode. When the EQ button is off, the sliders work as follows.

MIDI Setups Mode

In MIDI Setups mode, the four zone buttons activate and deactivate the zones in a setup. This differs from turning the zones on and off, which is done with the MIDI Channel parameter in the MIDI Xmit menu.

The tri-colored LED in each zone button indicates the zone’s status:

Off

Empty zone—that is, a zone that has its MIDI Channel parameter set to Off. When a

 

zone’s LED is off (unlit), the zone does not produce sound, even though it has a

 

program assigned to it.

Red

Soloed zone. Only one zone can be soloed at a time. When a zone is soloed, only that

 

zone plays notes and generates controller information. Other zones, if they’re not

 

empty, still generate program changes and entry/exit controller values.

Green

Active zone. As long as no other zone is soloed, an active zone plays notes— and

 

generates controller information, program changes, and entry/exit controller values.

 

If another zone is soloed, an active zone is “backgrounded”—its status LED remains

 

green, but it doesn’t play notes or generate controller information.

Orange

Muted zone. Muted zones don’t play notes or generate controller information, but

 

they do generate program changes and entry/exit controller values.

The following table shows how a zone’s status affects the data generated by the zone.

 

Zone

 

Data Generated by Zone

 

LED Color

 

 

 

 

Status

Notes

Controllers

Program

Entry and

 

 

 

Changes

Exit Values

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Soloed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green (no others are red)

Active

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green (another is red)

Backgrounded

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orange

Muted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Off)

Empty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you’re in MIDI Setups mode, the bottom line in the display indicates the current zone— that is, the one that will be affected by any editing you do to the setup. In the following example, Zone 1 is the current zone, as indicated by the numeral just to the left of the colon:

S002|Unison|Line|

A02|1:Big|Brass|

3-11

Performance Features

The Front Panel

Press any zone button once to make that zone the current zone. Assuming the zone is active (it’s active if the LED in its zone button is green), pressing its zone button once mutes the zone, turning its LED orange. Press its zone button again to reactivate the zone, turning its LED green.

Press the Solo button to solo the current zone. The LED in the Solo button lights up, and the soloed zone’s LED also turns red. The other zone’s LEDs don’t change color, but if they’re active (green LED), they stop generating note and Controller data, becoming backgrounded.

While the Solo button is on, you can press any zone button to solo the corresponding zone. You can solo a zone even if it’s muted. Press the Solo button again to turn its LED off, and any backgrounded zones become active again. Muted zones stay muted.

The EQ button works the same way as it does in Internal Voices mode, as described on page 3-14.

Buttons SW1SW5 are programmable in MIDI Setups mode. They can have different functions for each zone in every setup. In other words, you can change what one of these buttons does in Zone 1 of a setup, for example, and it won’t change what that button does in the other zones of that setup (or in any other setup).

Sliders AD are also programmable in MIDI Setups mode, and like the programmable buttons, they can do different things in each zone of each setup.

KB3 Mode

The zone buttons control the percussion in the attack of each note you play in KB3 mode. Press the Zone 1 button to light its LED and activate percussion. When percussion is on, the other three zone buttons control the percussion’s volume (loud or soft), its decay rate (fast or slow), and its pitch. Press the Zone 1 button again to turn off its LED and deactivate percussion.

When percussion is inactive, the percussion volume, decay, and pitch are also inactive.

You can change the characteristics of the percussion effect with a series of parameters in the Envelope menu. We’ll describe this in The KB3 Editor on page 4-20.

The Drawbar Toggle button determines which drawbars are controlled by Sliders AD. When the button is on, the sliders control drawbars 1–4 (corresponding to the first four digits from the left in the bottom line of the display). When the button is off, the sliders control drawbars 5–8 (the fifth through eighth digits). Drawbar 9 is always controlled by the Mod Wheel.

The EQ button works the same way as it does in Internal Voices mode, as described on page 3-14.

Buttons SW1SW3 control rotary-speaker effects, as well as chorus and vibrato. These buttons are active only when the FX-A button is on. (There’s no octave shift feature in KB3 mode.)

Button SW1 switches between a fast and slow rotary effect; on is fast, and off is slow. When you turn this button on, its LED lights, and the rotary effect ramps up from a preset low rate to a preset high rate (both of which are controlled by parameters in the LFO menu).

Button SW2 turns the chorus/vibrato on and off while SW3 cycles through six effects—three chorus settings, and three vibrato settings. When you turn SW2 on, its LED lights, and you can change the chorus or vibrato by pressing SW3 one or more times. The LED in SW3 does not light up.

The functions of Buttons SW4 and SW5 are determined by the internal setup, just as they are in Internal Voices mode.

Sliders AD control the drawbar settings. They correspond to drawbars 1–4 when the Drawbar Toggle button is off, and drawbars 5–8 when the Drawbar Toggle button is on.

3-12

Performance Features

Selecting Programs and Setups

Selecting Programs and Setups

1.Select a performance mode by pressing Internal Voices, MIDI Setups, or KB3 Mode in the Sound/Setup Select region (we call these mode-selection buttons). The mode you’re in affects how the other Sound/Setup Select buttons work. When you press one of these buttons, its LED flashes to prompt you to select a sound source.

2.Select a sound source by pressing Internal, User, Exp1, or Exp2. If you prefer, you can press a mode-selection button twice instead of pressing a mode-selection button then a sound-source button. This causes the PC2 to revert to whatever sound source and program or setup you were using the last time you were in that mode.

3.Select a program or setup. The easiest way is to use Sound/Setup Select buttons 116, but there are alternatives, as described below.

As an alternative, you can skip Step 2 above, and press one of the Sound/Setup Select buttons immediately after pressing a mode-selection button. This selects the corresponding program or setup in the same sound source you were using the last time you were in that mode.

Other Selection Methods

There are three other ways to select a program or setup:

Type its ID (number) on the alphanumeric buttonpad, then press Enter

Scroll through the list using the Alpha Wheel

Scroll through the list using the Plus or Minus button under the Alpha Wheel

Internal Voices Mode and KB3 Mode

When using the Alpha Wheel or the Plus or Minus button to scroll through programs, you can scroll through program categories, which you can’t do with the Next Group and Previous Group buttons. For example, if you’re playing the program at bank entry 1H, you can turn the Alpha Wheel one click to the right to scroll to bank entry 2A.

Using the Alpha Wheel or the Plus or Minus button also enables you to scroll through banks. You can scroll through all four banks within each performance mode, and you can scroll from the Internal Voices banks to the KB3 banks and back.

The Next Group and Previous Group buttons select programs sequentially by bank entry (and program ID) within the current category. When you select a category with one of the Sound Select buttons, the program you see is the program that was current the last time you were in that category. This enables you to select your favorite program in each category simply by pressing the Sound Select button for that category.

MIDI Setups Mode

Using the Alpha Wheel or the Plus or Minus button scrolls through all the occupied banks in MIDI Setups mode, but won’t scroll into either the Internal-Voice programs or the KB3 programs.

The Setup Select buttons select the 1st through 16th setup in a group of setups. The Next Group and Previous Group buttons select different groups of 16 setups. This is especially useful when you’re storing your own setups in the User bank, because you can store the setups in logical groupings of 16, which is extremely convenient for organizing setups to correspond to a play list. For example, you might put all the setups for your first set into the first group of User setups

3-13

Performance Features

EQ

(setup IDs 129144, with bank entries of A01A16), and setups for the next two sets in B01B16 and C01C16. Then you can select the group of setups corresponding to each set with the Next Group and Previous Group buttons, with a well-planned sequence of 16 setups for the set accessible with Sound Select buttons 116.

EQ

The PC2 comes with its own three-band equalization (EQ), or tone controls. The EQ is global which means that there is only one setting that is used all of the time regardless of which program or setup is selected. Its purpose is to adjust the PC2 for individual listening situations.

Changing the EQ

1. Press the EQ button to light its LED, and the EQ parameters appear in the display:

EQ:|Low|||Mid|||High

||||+0dB||+0dB||+0dB

Each band starts at 0 dB when you turn on your PC2 (this is called flat equalization).

2.Adjust the level of each frequency range using Sliders A, B, and C, which correspond to the low, middle, and high frequency range. You can go from -12 dB (lowering the volume) to 12 dB (raising the volume). You’ll hear the sound change as you adjust each level (depending on the sound, the change can be quite subtle).

You can also use the cursor buttons and Alpha Wheel to change the EQ settings.

3.Press EQ again to return to your previous performance mode (alternatively, you can press Cancel, or press one of the mode-selection buttons twice).

Effects

The PC2’s digital multi-effects consist two independent effects blocks called FX-A and FX-B. Each block always has an effect associated with it, depending on the current program or setup. The FX-A and FX-B buttons in the Effects region of the front panel enable the “sends” to each effect block. When these buttons’ LEDs are lit, the corresponding effect sends are enabled, and you’ll hear the corresponding effects. You’ll notice that as you select programs or setups, the FX-A and FX-B LEDs come on and go off according to the settings for each program or setup, indicating which effects blocks are active in the default settings for the program or setup.

There are over 150 effects available for FX-A, including reverbs, delays, choruses, flangers, phasers, tremolo, panners, envelope filters, distortions, rotary speakers, compressors, enhancers, waveform shapers, and multi-effect combinations. There are 30 reverbs available for FX-B (these reverbs are also available for FX-A).

Activating Effects

By default, most programs and setups have at least one effect send active. You can change the sound of a program or setup quickly by activating or deactivating the sends to the effect blocks.

To activate or deactivate the send to an effect block, press either FX-A or FX-B. Normally, the effect blocks are mutually exclusive—that is, turning on one send turns the other one off (we

3-14

Performance Features

Effects

assume that you won’t normally want more than one effect to be active). You can activate the sends to both blocks, however, by pressing FX-A and FX-B at the same time.

Activating or deactivating the sends to each effect block this way is a performance feature only; the sends return to their preset state as soon as you select another program or setup. If you want a send to be inactive (or inactive) when you select a program or setup, you’ll need to edit the effect settings for that program or setup, then store the changes. See Making Effects Active at Program or Setup Selection on page 4-25.

Note: In Internal Voices mode, Sliders A and B control the wet/dry mix of FX-A and FX-B. With the slider up, the corresponding effect is at full strength (100% wet); with the slider down, the effect is inaudible (0% wet). If you’re not sure you’re hearing an effect, try moving these sliders up and down a few times. See Wet/Dry Mix on page 3-16 for more information.

Changing Effects

Each effect block has a selection button (Select) next to its activation button (FX-A and FX-B). Use these buttons to start the process of changing effects. In the following example, we’ll select a different effect for FX-A. We’ll do this in Internal Voices mode, since this enables us to use Slider A to adjust the wet/dry mix. We’ll also use Program 000 Stereo Grand, since it has a distinctive effect assigned to FX-A.

1.Make sure that you can hear the effect you want to change; the send to FX-A must be active, and the wet/dry mix must be high enough for the effect to be audible. If necessary, press the FX-A button to light its LED and activate the send to FX-A. Move Slider A all the way up to set the wet/dry mix to 100%.

2.Press the Select button next to the FX-A button. Its LED lights to indicate that FX-A is the current effect block. The display should resemble this:

FXA|Select|:Voices

61|Classic|Chapel|

3.Use any data entry method to change the effect displayed on the bottom line (the Alpha Wheel is probably the easiest). You should hear a change almost immediately, although you might notice that the effect takes a second or so to reach its full level.

Changing effects actually puts the PC2 into the Effects Editor, where you can make other changes to the effect settings (we’ll discuss the Effects Editor further in Chapter 4). Unless you store your changes, the effect assignment reverts to its preset state as soon as you select another program or setup. See Saving Effects on page 4-23 to learn how to preserve your changes.

Muting Effects

Suppose you’re in the studio, and your recording engineers are using their own external effects, or maybe a global reverb setting for all channels. You want to silence all your effects and/or reverb temporarily, but you don’t want to make any lasting changes to the programs or setups you’re playing. You can quickly disable the PC2’s effects so that the PC2 is completely dry no matter what you’re playing. By the way, this doesn’t disable the sends; they’re still active. Effects muting is more like a bypass.

Just press the activation and selection button simultaneously for the effect block you want to mute. The display will briefly indicate that corresponding effect block is muted. To remove the

3-15

Performance Features

Effects

muting, press the two buttons simultaneously again. The display briefly indicates that the muting is turned off.

Wet/Dry Mix

When the send to FX-A is on and the send to FX-B is off (which is the case for the majority of the factory programs and setups), the audio signal comes from the PC2’s sound engine, and goes first through FX-A, then through FX-B, then to the audio out jacks. Consequently there are three wet/dry mix parameters:

AControls how much of FX-A’s effect gets applied to the dry signal coming from the sound engine

BControls how much of FX-B’s effect gets applied to the dry signal coming from the sound engine.

Global A>B Controls how much of the processed signal coming from FX-A goes to FX-B and gets FX-B’s effect applied to it.

In Internal Voices mode, the settings for these three parameters affect every layer in the program. In MIDI Setups mode, GlobalA>B affects every zone in the setup (and every MIDI channel, which is relevant when the PC2 is receiving MIDI information from an external source), but you can have different settings for A and B in each zone, and on each MIDI channel.

The specialized double-block KB3 effects use a different processing structure; only FX-A is available when you use these effects. Consequently, both B and Global A>B are inapplicable.

Note: You can use the KB3 effects for Internal-Voices programs and setups, not just for KB3 programs. If you use a KB3 effect in one of the zones in a setup (or on one of its MIDI channels), you might want to route the setup’s other zones (or channels) to FX-B. This bypasses the KB3 effect for those zones or channels, since the send to FX-B is inactive. It depends on whether you want the KB3 effect applied to all the programs in the setup.

When you press the Wet/Dry button in Internal Voices mode or MIDI Setups mode, the display looks similar to this:

Z:1||Global|A>B:22|%

A:|64|%|||B:(36|%)

The first character is L (layer) if you’re coming from Internal Voices mode, or Z (zone) if you’re coming from MIDI Setups mode. The numeral following the L or Z indicates the current layer or zone. Use the zone buttons to change the current zone or layer.

Note: Since the L indicates that you’re changing the wet/dry mix for a program, the zone buttons don’t do anything significant, since any change you make to any of the parameters affects every layer in the program, regardless of which layer is current. The only reason the L is there is to remind you that you’re adjusting a program and not a setup.

Note the parentheses around the value for B. This indicates that the send to FX-B is inactive. In this case, you can edit the value, but it won’t change the wet/dry mix for FX-B. (Additionally, in Internal Voices mode, Slider B won’t adjust the mix.) If you turned on the FX-B send, the parentheses would disappear.

3-16

Performance Features

Layering and Splitting

In Internal Voices mode, you can change the wet/dry mix for both FX-A and FX-B without going to the Wet/Dry parameters. When the send to an effect block is active, the corresponding slider (Slider A for FX-A and Slider B for FX-B) adjusts the wet/dry mix. This is a performance feature only; if you want to change the wet/dry mixes permanently, you’ll need to use the Wet/Dry parameters, then save either the resulting effect or the entire program.

There’s a diagram of the PC2’s audio signal routing on page B-8.

Layering and Splitting

In Internal Voices mode, you can play one program at a time, since Internal Voices mode is based on the internal setup, which contains a single zone (as described on page 3-2). If you wanted to create a multi-zone setup with different programs in each zone, you could go to MIDI Setups mode, then start programming (editing): assigning MIDI channels and programs to zones, assigning physical controllers, and so on. This gives you a great deal of control and flexibility, but it takes a bit of time.

If you’re on stage and you suddenly decide that your solo needs two sounds instead of one, you don’t want to take the time to edit a setup; you just want to add another sound as quickly as possible. Fortunately, the PC2 makes it easy to do this kind of thing without doing any actual editing.

Layering is playing two sounds on the same part of the keyboard. Splitting is playing two sounds on different parts of the keyboard. Using the PC2’s AutoSplit feature, you can create a layer or a split by pressing a single button. With a few more button presses, you can change the sounds in the layers or splits, and create combinations of layers and splits. We’ll show you how to do it, then we’ll explain what’s going on.

Using AutoSplit for Quick Layers and Splits

We’re going to start with piano, layer it with strings, add a split with bass, then layer the bass with drums—and we’ll do it with six button presses. If you’re not already in Internal Voices mode and playing Program 000 Classical Grand, press Internal Voices (in the sound/Setup Select region), then Internal (in the Sound Source region), then Sound Select Button 1 (Piano 1).

1.Press Layer (in the Zone Select and Assignable Controllers region—also labeled Zone 2).

2.Press Sound Select Button 9 (Strings). Now you have piano and strings layered across the entire keyboard.

3.Press Split (Zone 3).

4.Press Sound Select Button 14 (Bass). Now you have a plucked electric bass from the bottom of the keyboard up to G# 3, and layered piano and strings from A 3 up.

5.Press Split Layer (Zone 4).

6.Press Sound Select Button 15 (Drums). That’s it: bass layered with drums in the lower part of the keyboard, and piano layered with strings in the upper part.

3-17

Performance Features

Layering and Splitting

How AutoSplit Works

We’ll go through the same procedure again, explaining what’s going on with each step. If you want to follow along, start by pressing Internal Voices twice to return to Internal Voices mode. Program 000 Classical Grand should appear in the display. Notice the four zone buttons:

Zone 1 is active (the LED in the Zone 1 button is green), while Zones 2–4 are muted (orange LEDs).

1.Press Layer (Zone 2). The first thing to notice is that you’re in MIDI Setups mode. That’s because you now have two active zones, and as you know, you can’t have more than one zone in Internal Voices mode (because Internal Voices mode is based on the internal setup, which has only one zone.) Consequently the PC2 automatically switches to MIDI Setups mode so that it can activate Zone 2. Notice that the LED for Zone 2 is green, confirming that Zone 2 is active.

As soon as you press Layer, Zone 2 becomes active, and whatever program is assigned to Zone 2 gets layered with the piano. As it happens, the strings program is already selected for Zone 2. That’s because it’s the program most recently assigned to Zone 2 (the first time we went through this exercise). If you had selected a different setup before returning to Internal Voices mode, you’d most likely see a different program in Zone 2 now.

Zone 2 is also the current zone, which we know from the information in the top line of the display (whichever zone number you see is the current zone). Incidentally, the word auto means that the AutoSplit feature is on (if it weren’t, none of this would work).

2.Press Sound Select Button 9 (Strings). OK, you didn’t need to in this case, but pretend that you did. In Step 1 we created the layer by activating Zone 2; now we’ve assigned a program to it.

3.Press Split (Zone 3). The PC2 automatically splits the keyboard at a predetermined point (it’s called the AutoSplit Key, and by default it’s G# 3, although you can change it). Zones 1 and 2 play above the AutoSplit Key. Zone 3 becomes active (and becomes the current zone), and whatever program is assigned to Zone 3 plays below the AutoSplit Key.

4.Press Sound Select Button 14 (Bass). In Step 3 we created the split by activating Zone 3 below the AutoSplit Key; now we’ve assigned a program to it.

5.Press Split Layer (Zone 4).Zone 4 becomes active (and becomes the current zone), and whatever program is assigned to Zone 4 gets layered with the bass.

6.Press Sound Select Button 15 (Drums). In Step 5 we created the layer by activating Zone 4 and layering it with Zone 3; now we’ve assigned a program to it.

Saving Quick Layers and Splits

With practice, you can use AutoSplit to create layers and splits in seconds, which is a great performance feature. If you come up with something you like, you might as well save it for future use.

1.Press Store (in the Functions region of the front panel). The display looks something like this, prompting you to save the setup at the lowest-available ID in the User bank for setups:

Save|setup|129?

A01|Setup|129

3-18

Performance Features

Muting and Soloing

2.Press Yes. the display briefly shows Setup|NNN|saved! then returns to MIDI Setups mode.

When you save a setup this way, the PC2 turns the AutoSplit feature off for that setup, and sets the low and high notes of each zone. See Muting and Soloing on page 3-19 to learn about how this affects playing setups. If you want, you can edit the setup and turn AutoSplit back on (there’s a good reason to do so, described in The AutoSplit Feature on page 3-20). See Turning AutoSplit On and Off on page 4-25 to learn how.

Changing the AutoSplit Key Without Editing

Every setup can have its own AutoSplit Key. The internal setup also has an AutoSplit Key that determines where the split point goes when you make a setup out of a program by adding a layer or split.

You can change the AutoSplit Key without leaving Internal Voices Mode or MIDI Setups mode (you can’t layer or split in KB3 mode, so you can’t change the AutoSplit Key there either).

1. Press Zone 3 and Zone 4 simultaneously. The display looks like this (the top line is blank):

AutoSplit|Key:|G#3

2.Use the Alpha Wheel to change the value. You can put it anywhere from C -1 to G 9, but in most cases, you’ll want it somewhere within the central range of your keyboard.

Instead of using the Alpha Wheel, you can press and hold Enter, and hit the key that you want to be the split point. This is called Intuitive Entry; see page 4-5 for a full description.

3.Press Zone 3 and Zone 4 simultaneously to return to your previous performance mode.

Changing the AutoSplit Key this way is a performance feature only; as soon as you leave your current performance mode, the change is lost. You can save it, however. Read on.

Saving the AutoSplit Key

If you’re in MIDI Setups mode, just save the setup, as described in Saving Quick Layers and Splits above. If you want to save the AutoSplit Key to the internal setup, follow the procedure described in Saving the Internal Setup on page 3-21.

Muting and Soloing

Setups can give you a nice thick sound, with a different program in each of the four setup zones (you can arrange the zones so that they all play on different parts of the keyboard, or you can have them all overlap). You can make your setups even more versatile by muting or soloing zones, changing the sound by pressing a single button.

On page 3-11 we described how the colors of the LEDs in the zone buttons indicate whether zones are muted or soloed. There are several other things to keep in mind.

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Performance Features

Muting and Soloing

Muting

You can mute any or all zones in a setup. Muting one zone has no effect on the other zones. To mute (or unmute) a zone, it must be the current zone (the bottom line of the display shows the number of the current zone, followed by the name of the program assigned to that zone). When a zone is current, each press of its zone button toggles between muting and unmuting. If a zone is not the current zone, press its zone button twice to mute or unmute the zone (the first press makes the zone current, then each subsequent press toggles between muting and unmuting).

Soloing

Not surprisingly, you can solo only one zone at a time, and that’s the only zone you’ll hear, regardless of the status of the other zones. When you press the Solo button, whatever zone was current at the time becomes the soloed zone (the LED in its zone button turns red). Once the Solo button is on, pressing any zone button once solos that zone.

The AutoSplit Feature

Muting and soloing are slightly different depending on whether the AutoSplit feature is on. When it’s on, a soloed zone expands to cover the entire keyboard—it doesn’t matter what the settings are for the AutoSplit key or for the zones low and high notes (key range). Similarly, if you mute both of the zones above the AutoSplit key, the zones below the AutoSplit key expand to cover the entire keyboard. And vice versa. This is great for performance situations, because you can use the whole keyboard no matter which zone(s) you’re using.

When AutoSplit is off, soloed zones remain within the limits defined by the setup. Likewise, unmuted zones stay within their limits if you mute both of the zones on the other side of the split point. This silences part of the keyboard, which isn’t as useful as it could be.

By default, AutoSplit is on in the internal setup, enabling you to make quick layers and splits at any time when you’re in Internal Voices mode (we recommend that you leave it this way). All of the factory setups have AutoSplit turned off, and when you save a quick layer or split, the resulting setup also has AutoSplit turned off. You can turn it back on for any setup, however, as described on page 4-25.

There’s one more thing to remember about AutoSplit. When you make a quick layer or split, you’re in a kind of transition between Internal Voices mode and MIDI Setups mode. You start off in Internal Voices mode, but as soon as you press one of the zone buttons, the MIDI Setups button lights up and the Internal Voices button becomes unlit. As long as you stay in this quick- layer-and-split semi-mode, you can mute and unmute each zone with a single button press; you don’t have to make the zone current first. It’s a nice performance feature. (By the way, soloing works the way it usually does.)

Once you save your quick layer or split, it becomes a regular setup, with AutoSplit turned off. Even if you turn it back on (to make soloed and unmuted zones expand across the entire keyboard), you’re no longer in the special quick-layer-and-split mode when you’re playing the setup—you’re in regular MIDI Setups mode. Consequently, you have to make a zone current before you can mute or unmute it.

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Performance Features

Saving the Internal Setup

Saving the Internal Setup

If you’ve made a change to the AutoSplit Key, physical controller assignments, or other parameters, and you want to preserve those changes to affect every program in Internal Voices mode, you can save the PC2’s current settings to the internal setup. There’s more about editing and saving the internal setup on page 4-27.

1.Press Store (in the Functions region of the front panel). The display looks something like this:

Save|setup|133?

A05|Setup|133

2. Press Internal Voices (in the Sound/Setup Select region). The display looks like this:

||||||Save|to

||Internal Voices?

3.Press Yes. The display briefly shows Internal|setup|saved! then prompts you to select a setup. You can either select a setup by pressing one of the Setup Select buttons, or change to a different performance mode by pressing a mode-selection button twice.

Digital Audio Output

You can use the analog and digital audio outputs at the same time. There are five parameters in the Global menu that control the digital output configuration. You may want to edit some of these parameters, depending on how you’re using the PC2’s digital output. In many (perhaps most) cases, however, the default values provide the best performance. For more information, see the descriptions of the digital audio output parameters, beginning on page 5-34.

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Chapter 4

Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts

So far we’ve explained the PC2 primarily from a performance standpoint, covering the fundamentals of selecting programs and setups, and applying real-time controls and effects. There’s much more to the PC2, however—you can modify existing programs, setups, and effects in countless ways, or create completely new ones. We call this editing, and there are a few concepts that apply to editing in general, whether you’re working on programs, setups, or effects.

Overview

Editing consists of changing the value of one or more parameters. A parameter defines one particular component of a program or setup (or the PC2 itself). These parameters are organized into menus—groups of related parameters. There are separate menus for programs, setups, effects, and more. There’s also a set of global parameters affecting the entire PC2.

For example, in every MIDI setup, each zone has a parameter called MIDI Channel. This parameter’s value determines the channel on which the PC2 sends MIDI information. Every parameter has a default value set at the factory.

Beginning to Edit

If you want to change the value of any parameter, there are three basic steps:

Navigation

Data entry

Naming and storing (saving)

Navigation

The first step is to find the parameter you want to edit. This procedure works for editing any parameter (there’s a short cut for editing controller assignments, which we’ll discuss later).

1.Press one of the parameter buttons to select a menu (group of parameters). The parameter buttons are labeled in groups: Zone, Sound, and System.

2.Press either of the cursor buttons (the buttons labeled < and > under the display) to scroll through the current menu. In most cases, this displays a different parameter and its value, usually on the bottom line of the display. In this case, pressing the cursor buttons is like turning pages in a book. Sometimes, however, there’s more than one parameter on a “page.” In this case, pressing the cursor buttons will move a cursor (a small flashing underscore) from one parameter’s value to another without otherwise changing the appearance of the page.

Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts

Data Entry

When you see the parameter you want to edit (or when the cursor is highlighting its value), use one of the data entry methods to change the value. As with selecting programs and setups, there are three ways to do this:

Alpha Wheel

The large dial in the Data Entry region of the PC2’s front panel.

 

You can turn it in either direction without limit.

Minus and Plus buttons

Directly under the Alpha Wheel, these buttons (labeled and +)

 

decrease or increase the parameter’s value by one increment.

 

Hold the button to repeat.

Alphanumeric buttonpad

Enter the value by pressing the corresponding numbered

 

buttons, then press Enter. For example, 3 6 Enter changes the

 

value to 36. +/– 3 6 Enter changes the value to -36 (not the Plus or

 

Minus button, but the button under the 7). You can change a

 

value to negative or positive by pressing +/– any time before

 

pressing Enter.

When using the buttonpad, you can change the value again before pressing Enter. Press Clear to reset the value to 0, or press Cancel to return to the previous value.

There are several short cuts for data entry that are easy to learn and much faster than the three methods we’ve described here. We call these methods intuitive entry, because they take a very common-sense approach to entering data. Turn to page 4-5 for a full description.

Naming and Storing

Storing (saving) is optional, of course. If you don’t want to store any of your changes, press Cancel one or more times to return to the mode you were in before you started editing. Although naming is obviously optional as well, we’ll assume you’re going to name the object you’re editing before storing it.

This procedure describes storing a setup, so it assumes that you’re in MIDI Setups mode. The process is similar for naming and storing other objects.

1. Press Store (in the Functions group of buttons). The display will show either

Save|Setup|NNN? or Replace|Setup|NNN? where NNN is the setup ID.

If you’re in the Internal bank of setups, the display will show Save|setup|NNN? where NNN is the first available setup ID in the User bank of setups.

If you’re in the User bank, the display will show Replace|setup|NNN? where NNN is the ID of the current setup. Use any data entry method to change the ID if you want to save a new setup instead of replacing the current one.

2.Press > to display Rename|setup|NNN?

3.Press Yes (Enter). The display shows the name of the current setup, if any. The cursor highlights the character that’s selected for editing.

4.Use any data entry method to change the current character. The alphanumeric buttonpad is the quickest way. Press the corresponding button one or more times for the desired character—for example, press 1 three times for C. Use the UPPER/lower button to change the case of the current character. Press 0 one or more times to enter numerals. Press the

4-2

Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts

cursor buttons to move the cursor to a different character. Press Clear to create a space without moving the cursor.

Buttons SW1SW3 have special functions when naming things. SW1 inserts a blank space at the location of the cursor, moving everything after the cursor one space to the right. SW2 deletes the character at the location of the cursor, and moves everything after the cursor one space to the left. SW3 moves the cursor to the last character in the name.

5.Press Yes. The display again shows either Save|Setup|NNN? or Replace|Setup|NNN?, depending on where you were when you started storing.

6.Press Yes (or press No if you don’t want to store the setup after all). The display briefly shows Setup|NNN|saved! then returns to MIDI Setups mode.

Special Characters For Naming Setups

Following is a list of all of characters available for setup names, in the order in which they are found. The easiest way to get to them is to press one of the alphanumeric buttons to select a character close to the one you want, then scroll to it with the alpha wheel. Here’s the whole list:

! “ # $ % & ‘ ( ) * + , - . / 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

: ; < = > ? @ A through Z

[ \ ] ^ _ ‘ a through z (space)

Other Save-Dialog Functions

Restoring Factory Effects

If you’ve changed the effect settings associated with a program, you can quickly restore the factory settings. In the Save dialogs for the Program, KB3, and Effects Editors, there are options for restoring the effects for either the current program, or for all programs (both Internal-Voice programs and KB3 programs).

1.Enter the Save dialog by pressing Store. Depending on the editor you’re in, you’ll see either a prompt to replace the current effect, or to save or replace the current program (voice).

2.Press < repeatedly until you see either Restore|Current|Factory|Effects? or

Restore|All|Factory|Effects?

3. Press Yes (Enter) to restore, or No (Cancel) to cancel.

If you choose to restore the current effect, the PC2 resets only the current program to its factory effect settings. If you choose to restore all effects, the PC2 resets all programs (both InternalVoice programs and KB3 programs) to their factory effect settings.

Deleting Objects

You can delete an Internal-Voice program, KB3 program, setup, or effect by entering the Save dialog for the Program, Setup, KB3, or Effects Editor.

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Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts

When you enter the Save dialog, you’ll see a prompt asking you whether you want to save or replace an object (the object type depends on which editor you’re in). The prompt for dumping the object is at another location in the dialog, as you’ll see.

1.Enter the Save dialog by pressing Store. Depending on the editor you’re in, you’ll see either a prompt to replace the current effect, or to save or replace the current program (voice) or setup.

2.Press > repeatedly until you see a prompt asking you to delete the object.

3.Press Yes. The display will show another prompt asking you if you’re sure.

4.Press Yes again. The display will show Deleted! briefly, then return to the performance mode you were in before entering the editor. You’ll also see --Not|Found-- in the display, indicating that the object is gone.

At any of these prompts, you can press No to cancel the operation.

Dumping Objects

If you’ve created a lot of programs, setups, and effects settings, you may want to store them externally, using a MIDI System Exclusive (SysEx) dump). This has several benefits: you can load the objects into other instruments that accept SysEx; you can preserve them in a more permanent backup archive (in case anything happens to the PC2’s battery-backed memory), and you can create libraries of objects customized for particular performance or recording situation.

You can dump objects to any MIDI recording device that accepts SysEx messages; most MIDI sequencers manufactured today accept SysEx. A SysEx dump can consist of a single object of any type, or all objects of a given type—it can also include all user-defined objects. You can initiate most of these dumps from the Save dialogs of the Program, Setup, KB3, or Effects Editor. Each object you dump is a separate SysEx message.

When you enter one of these dialogs, the first thing you see is a prompt asking you whether you want to save or replace an object (the object type depends on which editor you’re in). The prompt for dumping the object is at another location in the dialog, as you’ll see.

You should prepare your MIDI recording device before initiating the dump. For example, if you’re dumping to a sequencer application, open the file to which you want to dump, and get the application ready to record. Make sure you have a MIDI cable connected from the MIDI Out port of the PC2 to the MIDI In port of the recording device. Don’t start recording just yet, however.

1.Enter the Save dialog by pressing Store. Depending on the editor you’re in, you’ll see either a prompt to replace the current effect, or to save or replace the current program (voice) or setup.

2.Press > repeatedly until you see a prompt asking you if you want to dump a single object, or to dump all objects of the current type (the current type is determined by the performance mode you were in when you entered the editor).

3.Start recording with the MIDI recording device, then press Yes on the PC2’s front panel.

4.The PC2 dumps the object or objects to the MIDI recording device as a normal file. The display indicates when the dump is finished.

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Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts

Reloading a Dump

1.Connect a MIDI cable from the MIDI Out port of the external device to the PC2’s MIDI In port.

2.Initiate the dump or playback of the object file from your external device.

You don’t have to put the PC2 in any special mode to receive the dump. When a dump is sent back to the PC2, the information goes to the memory location for the corresponding object types. It does not update the edit buffer. Consequently you won’t have access to the objects until you select them in one of the performance modes.

For example, suppose you recently dumped an object (we’ll assume it’s Setup 129), but by coincidence you were editing Setup 129 just before you reloaded it. You might expect to be able to play and edit the reloaded version as soon as you’ve finished reloading, but in fact, you would be playing the copy of the setup that’s in the edit buffer. To play the reloaded setup, return to MIDI Setups mode and select Setup 129. Only then will you be able to play the reloaded version.

If you plan to make frequent use of SysEx dumps, you should run at least one test cycle of dumping and reloading before you put a lot of effort into editing. You don’t want any surprises, for example, when you have to dump your entire memory to protect it because your PC2’s battery is running low.

For example, you might dump a setup, then make a simple change to the version on your PC2 (like renaming it). Reload it, then select it, and check whether the name has reverted to its original. If it hasn’t, you haven’t reloaded successfully.

Turn to page 4-9 for more information about SysEx dumps.

Intuitive Entry

A significant amount of your editing efforts go toward navigation and data entry: sometimes it’s difficult to remember which menu contains a particular parameter, and entering new values for some parameters involves scrolling through long lists of values. Intuitive entry can help with both of these tasks.

Short Cuts for Data Entry

You can use any continuous physical controller—sliders, wheels, or pedals—to change the value of the current parameter very quickly. You can also use the keyboard in some cases. Here are three quick examples.

Transposition

1.Press Transpose (from any performance mode).

2.Press and hold Enter, and move one of the sliders to set the value.

You can also use the keyboard when transposing with intuitive entry. While holding Enter, strike any key. The resulting value is equal to the number of semitones up or down from C 4 (Middle C).

4-5

Programming Your PC2

Basic Editing Concepts

Setting the Key Range of a Zone

1.Press Key Range.

2.Press and hold Enter, and strike a key. This sets the low key, since the Low parameter is current when you press Key Range.

3.Press > to select the Hi parameter.

4.Press and hold Enter, and strike a key.

Negotiating Long Lists of Values

This is especially useful when assigning values for physical controllers, since for each controller there are well over a hundred available values.

1.Press Controllers.

2.Press > to select the Ctrl Num parameter for Wheel 1 Up.

3.Press and hold Enter, and move one of the sliders.

In this case, you may want to use intuitive entry to move quickly from one end of the list to the other, then release the Enter button and use a standard data entry method to scroll through the list more precisely.

Short Cuts for Navigation

When you’re changing the assignments for physical controllers, you can spend a lot of time finding the right parameter, since the Controllers menu contains over a hundred parameters. This is where you can use intuitive entry to its fullest.

Controllers Menu: Instant Parameter Selection

This technique works for all the physical controllers, including mono pressure.

1.Press and hold Controllers (from any performance mode).

2.Press any switch controller, move any continuous controller, or strike a key and press it as if you were applying aftertouch. This immediately selects the Ctrl Num parameter for the corresponding controller.

Once you’ve selected the parameter, you can press and hold Enter, and move any continuous controller to set its value.

Controllers Menu: Parallel Parameter Selection

You’ll recall that every physical controller shares a common set of basic parameters, like

Ctrl Num in the previous example. Whatever the current parameter is, you can jump directly to the corresponding parameter for each controller by pressing the cursor buttons simultaneously. Although you can’t jump backward in the list, you can always press Controllers to return to the top of the list.

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