Intel Express 5800-120Ld User Manual

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EXPRESS5800/120Ld

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U s e r ’ s G u i d e

EXPRESS5800/120Ld

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U s e r ’ s G u i d e

Proprietary Notice and Liability Disclaimer

The information disclosed in this document, including all designs and related materials, is the valuable property of NEC Computers Inc. and/or its licensors. NEC Computers Inc. and/or its licensors, as appropriate, reserve all patent, copyright and other proprietary rights to this document, including all design, manufacturing, reproduction, use, and sales rights thereto, except to the extent said rights are expressly granted to others.

The NEC Computers Inc. product(s) discussed in this document are warranted in accordance with the terms of the Warranty Statement accompanying each product. However, actual performance of each such product is dependent upon factors such as system configuration, customer data, and operator control. Since implementation by customers of each product may vary, the suitability of specific product configurations and applications must be determined by the customer and is not warranted by NEC Computers Inc.

To allow for design and specification improvements, the information in this document is subject to change at any time, without notice. Reproduction of this document or portions thereof without prior written approval of NEC Computers Inc. is prohibited.

Trademarks

Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.

MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.

All other trademarks belong to their respective owners.

PN: 456-01530-001

Copyright 1999, 2000

NEC Computers Inc.

15 Business Park Way

Sacramento, CA 95828

All Rights Reserved

Contents

Proprietary Notice

Using This Guide .......................................................................................................................

vii

Text Conventions................................................................................................................

viii

Related Documents...............................................................................................................

ix

Safety Notices........................................................................................................................

x

Safety Notices for Users Outside of the U.S.A. and Canada...........................................

xi

Care and Handling...............................................................................................................

xii

System Overview ......................................................................................................................

1-1

Overview ............................................................................................................................

1-2

System Chassis ...................................................................................................................

1-5

Power Supply......................................................................................................................

1-6

Peripheral Bays...................................................................................................................

1-6

SAF-TE Logic ....................................................................................................................

1-6

System Board Features .......................................................................................................

1-7

Pentium III Processor ....................................................................................................

1-8

System Memory ............................................................................................................

1-8

I/O Expansion Slots.......................................................................................................

1-9

Real-Time Clock/Calendar..........................................................................................

1-11

BIOS............................................................................................................................

1-11

IDE Controller.............................................................................................................

1-12

Keyboard and Mouse Controller .................................................................................

1-12

The keyboard and mouse controller is PS/2 compatible. ............................................

1-12

Network Controller......................................................................................................

1-12

SCSI Controller ...........................................................................................................

1-13

Video Controller..........................................................................................................

1-13

Peripheral Controller ...................................................................................................

1-13

Serial Ports...........................................................................................................

1-13

Parallel Port .........................................................................................................

1-13

External Device Connectors........................................................................................

1-13

System Board Management Controller (BMC)...........................................................

1-14

ACPI............................................................................................................................

1-15

AC Link Mode..................................................................................................................

1-15

Remote Power-On (Wake On LAN) Function .................................................................

1-16

System Security ................................................................................................................

1-16

Security with Mechanical Locks and Monitoring .......................................................

1-16

Software Locks via the System Setup Utility..............................................................

1-16

Setting Up the System ..............................................................................................................

2-1

Overview ............................................................................................................................

2-2

Selecting a Site ...................................................................................................................

2-2

Unpacking the System........................................................................................................

2-3

Rack-Mount Subsystem Assembly.....................................................................................

2-4

Before You Begin..........................................................................................................

2-4

Static Precautions ..........................................................................................................

2-4

Assembly.......................................................................................................................

2-5

Getting Familiar with the System.......................................................................................

2-8

Front View with Front Door Closed..............................................................................

2-8

Contents iii

Opening the Front Door................................................................................................

2-9

Front View..................................................................................................................

2-10

Rear View ...................................................................................................................

2-11

Status LED Indicator Descriptions .............................................................................

2-12

Making Connections ........................................................................................................

2-13

Setting the Line Voltage ..................................................................................................

2-14

Connecting the Power Cord .............................................................................................

2-15

Powering On Your System ..............................................................................................

2-16

Configuring Your System .......................................................................................................

3-1

Configuring Your System ..................................................................................................

3-2

BIOS Setup Utility.............................................................................................................

3-3

Using the BIOS Setup Utility .......................................................................................

3-3

BIOS Setup Configuration Settings..............................................................................

3-4

Main Menu....................................................................................................................

3-5

Advanced Menu............................................................................................................

3-6

Advanced Submenu ..............................................................................................

3-7

Memory Reconfiguration Submenu......................................................................

3-7

CPU Reconfiguration Submenu............................................................................

3-7

Peripheral Configuration Submenu.......................................................................

3-8

Monitoring Configuration Submenu.....................................................................

3-9

PCI Device Submenu............................................................................................

3-9

Option ROM Submenu .........................................................................................

3-9

ISA Device Submenu..........................................................................................

3-10

Numlock Submenu..............................................................................................

3-11

Security Menu.............................................................................................................

3-12

System Hardware Menu .............................................................................................

3-13

Thermal Sensor Submenu ...................................................................................

3-13

Wake On Event Submenu...................................................................................

3-13

Console Redirection Submenu............................................................................

3-14

Boot Menu ..................................................................................................................

3-14

Boot Device Priority Submenu ...........................................................................

3-14

Exit Menu ...................................................................................................................

3-15

Adaptec SCSI Utility .......................................................................................................

3-16

Running the SCSI Utility............................................................................................

3-16

Adaptec SCSI Utility Configuration Settings.............................................................

3-17

Exiting Adaptec SCSI Utility .....................................................................................

3-18

Configuring the RAID Controller....................................................................................

3-19

Configuring System Board Jumpers ................................................................................

3-21

Before You Begin .......................................................................................................

3-21

Moving System Board Jumpers..................................................................................

3-22

Clearing and Changing the Passwords........................................................................

3-23

Upgrading Your System..........................................................................................................

4-1

General Information...........................................................................................................

4-2

Static Precautions...............................................................................................................

4-2

Preparing Your System for Upgrade..................................................................................

4-3

Equipment Log...................................................................................................................

4-3

Opening and Removing the Front Door.............................................................................

4-3

Removing Side Panels .......................................................................................................

4-5

Installing Side Panels.........................................................................................................

4-6

Modifying the System Board .............................................................................................

4-7

Replacing the Real-time Clock Battery ........................................................................

4-7

iv Contents

Removing and Installing a Pentium III Processor.........................................................

4-9

DIMMs ........................................................................................................................

4-11

Option Boards...................................................................................................................

4-14

Installation Considerations ..........................................................................................

4-14

Installing an Option Board ..........................................................................................

4-14

Removing an Option Board.........................................................................................

4-16

Installing a RAID Controller Board .................................................................................

4-17

Hard Disk Drives..............................................................................................................

4-18

Installing or Swapping a Hard Disk Drive in a Hot-swap Bay ...................................

4-18

Installing or Swapping a Hard Disk Drive in a Standard SCSI Disk Drive Bay.........

4-23

Removable Media Devices...............................................................................................

4-26

Removing the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive Mounting Assembly......................................

4-27

Installing a 5.25-Inch Media Device ...........................................................................

4-28

Removing a 5.25-Inch Device.....................................................................................

4-32

Problem Solving........................................................................................................................

5-1

Problem Solving .................................................................................................................

5-2

Static Precautions ...............................................................................................................

5-2

Troubleshooting Checklists ................................................................................................

5-3

Initial System Startup ....................................................................................................

5-3

Running New Application Software .............................................................................

5-4

After System Has Been Running Correctly...................................................................

5-5

Diagnostic Testing..............................................................................................................

5-6

Error Checking ..............................................................................................................

5-6

Troubleshooting Guide..................................................................................................

5-6

Preparing the System for Diagnostic Testing ........................................................

5-6

Monitoring POST ..................................................................................................

5-7

Verifying Proper Operation of Key System Indicators .........................................

5-8

Confirming Loading of the Operating System ......................................................

5-8

Specific Problems and Corrective Actions.........................................................................

5-9

Power LED Does Not Light ..........................................................................................

5-9

Incorrect or No Beep Code..........................................................................................

5-10

No Characters Appear on Screen ................................................................................

5-10

Characters are Distorted or Incorrect ..........................................................................

5-11

System Cooling Fans Do Not Rotate ..........................................................................

5-11

Diskette Drive Activity LED Does Not Light.............................................................

5-11

CD-ROM Drive Activity Light Does Not Light .........................................................

5-12

Problems with Application Software ..........................................................................

5-12

Bootable CD-ROM Is Not Detected ...........................................................................

5-12

Problems with the Network ..............................................................................................

5-13

Plug and Play Installation Tips.........................................................................................

5-14

BIOS User’s Information..................................................................................................

5-14

POST Error Codes and Messages ...............................................................................

5-14

How to Identify BIOS and BMC Revision Levels ...........................................................

5-18

BIOS Revision Level Identification ............................................................................

5-18

BMC Revision Level Identification ............................................................................

5-18

System Cabling ........................................................................................................................

A-1

System Cabling..................................................................................................................

A-2

Before You Begin..............................................................................................................

A-2

Static Precautions ..............................................................................................................

A-2

Standard Configuration......................................................................................................

A-3

RAID Configuration..........................................................................................................

A-5

Contents v

Management Workstation Application .................................................................................

B-1

Overview............................................................................................................................

B-2

Remote Console............................................................................................................

B-3

Remote Drive................................................................................................................

B-3

MWA System Requirements .............................................................................................

B-3

Installing MWA .................................................................................................................

B-4

Creating a Server System Generation Diskette (SG)....................................................

B-4

Configuring Server BIOS Setup ...................................................................................

B-6

Installing MWA on the Management PC .....................................................................

B-6

Registering SG Information on MWA..........................................................................

B-6

MWA Main Window .........................................................................................................

B-7

Toolbar..........................................................................................................................

B-7

Main Menu....................................................................................................................

B-8

Pop-Up Menus ............................................................................................................

B-11

Using MWA.....................................................................................................................

B-12

Opening a Server Window..........................................................................................

B-12

Connecting and Disconnecting the Server..................................................................

B-12

Using a Remote Drive ................................................................................................

B-13

Setting and Clearing Server Pause..............................................................................

B-13

Recovering from an SOS ............................................................................................

B-14

Alerting ESMPROTM ................................................................................................

B-15

Dialog Boxes....................................................................................................................

B-15

Select a Server Dialog Box.........................................................................................

B-15

Server Properties Dialog Box .....................................................................................

B-15

Default Server Properties Dialog Box ........................................................................

B-16

Create/Copy FD Image File Dialog Box ....................................................................

B-17

Server Summary Dialog Box......................................................................................

B-17

Delete Logged Messages Dialog Box.........................................................................

B-17

Data Dialog Box .........................................................................................................

B-18

Temporary Change to Remote Drive Dialog Box ......................................................

B-18

SOS Receive Dialog Box............................................................................................

B-19

Troubleshooting ...............................................................................................................

B-20

System Status Hardware Support Information ...................................................................

C-1

System Status Hardware Support Information...................................................................

C-2

Glossary

Equipment Log

Index

vi Contents

Using This Guide

The EXPRESS5800/120Ld User’s Guide provides a quick reference to information about your system. Its goal is to familiarize you with your system and the tasks necessary for system configuring and upgrading.

This guide contains the following information:

!Chapter 1, System Overview” provides an overview of your system and describes your system’s major system components. See this chapter to familiarize yourself with your system.

!Chapter 2, “Setting Up Your System” tells you how to select a site, unpack the system, assemble the rack-mount subsystem, make cable connections, and power on your system.

!Chapter 3, “Configuring Your System” tells you how to configure the system and provides instructions for running the BIOS Setup Utility and the Adaptec Configuration Utility, which is used to configure SCSI devices in your system. This chapter also provides information on system board jumper settings.

!Chapter 4, “Upgrades and Options” provides you with instructions for upgrading your system with an additional processor, optional memory, options cards, peripheral devices, and redundant power supply.

!Chapter 5, “Problem Solving” contains helpful information for solving problems that might occur with your system.

!Appendix A, “System Cabling” includes cabling information for the two onboard SCSI controllers, the onboard IDE controller, and the optional RAID controllers.

!Appendix B, "Management Workstation Application (MWA)" provides you with information on using MWA for managing your server remotely in a network environment.

!Appendix C, “System Status Hardware Support Information” helps you identify a system status hardware item indicated by a software monitoring component.

!“Glossary” defines the standard acronyms and technical terms used in this manual.

!“Equipment Log” provides you with a sample equipment log for documenting the system configuration and future updates you may make to your system.

Using This Guide vii

Text Conventions

This guide uses the following text conventions.

Warnings, cautions, and notes have the following meanings:

! WARNING

Warnings alert you to situations that could result in serious personal injury or loss of life.

! CAUTION

Cautions indicate situations that can damage the system hardware or software.

Note: Notes give important information about the material being described.

!Names of keyboard keys are printed as they appear on the keyboard. For example, Ctrl,

Alt, or Enter.

!Text or keystrokes that you enter appear as boldface type. For example, type abc123 and press ENTER.

!File names are printed in uppercase letters. For example, AUTOEXEC.BAT.

viii Using This Guide

Related Documents

In addition to this guide, the following system documentation is included with your server either as electronic files on EXPRESSBUILDER or as paper copy shipped with your server.

!System Release Notes

Release Notes provide you with the latest information about your system. This information was not available to be included in your user's guide at the time it was developed and released.

!Getting Started Sheet

The Getting Started Sheet provides several easy-to-follow steps to become familiar with your server documentation and to complete your installation successfully.

!Network Operating System Configuration Guide

This guide contains supplemental instructions needed to install and configure your server Windows NT 4.0 plus Service Pack 6, Novell NetWare v5.0, Santa Cruz Operation (SCO) OpenServer Release 5.05, and UNIXWare 7.1 Network Operating Systems. This document is intended to complement the more detailed procedural documents available from the vendor of the network operating system.

Using This Guide ix

Safety Notices

!

!Caution: To reduce the risk of electric shock which could cause personal injury, follow all safety notices. The symbols shown are used in your documentation and on your equipment to indicate safety hazards.

!Warning: Lithium batteries can be dangerous. Improper handling of lithium batteries may result in an explosion. Dispose of lithium batteries as required by local ordinance or as normal waste if no local ordinance exists.

!Warning: The detachable power supply cord is intended to serve as the disconnect device.

!Warning: This equipment has a 3-wire, grounded power cord. To prevent electrical hazards, do not remove or defeat the ground prong on the power cord. Replace the power cord if it gets damaged. Contact your dealer for an exact replacement.

!Warning: The DC push-button on/off switch on the front panel does not turn off the system AC power. Also, +5vdc is present on the system board whenever the AC power cord is connected between the system and an AC outlet. Before doing the procedures in this manual, make sure that your system is powered off and unplug the AC power cord from the back of the chassis. Failure to disconnect power before opening your system can result in personal injury and equipment damage.

In the U.S.A. and Canada, the power cord must be a UL-listed detachable power cord (in Canada, CSA-certified), type ST or SJT, 16 AWG, 3-conductor, provided with a molded-on NEMA type 5-15 P plug cap at one end and a molded-on cord connector body at the other end. The cord length must not exceed 9 feet (2.7 meters).

Outside the U.S.A. and Canada, the plug must be rated for 250 VAC, 10 amp minimum, and must display an international agency approval marking. The cord must be suitable for use in the end-user country. Consult your dealer or the local electrical authorities if you are unsure of the type of power cord to use in your country. The voltage change occurs via a switch in the power supply.

!Warning: Under no circumstances should the user attempt to disassemble the power supply. The power supply has no user-replaceable parts. Inside the power supply are hazardous voltages that can cause serious personal injury. A defective power supply must be returned to your dealer.

x Using This Guide

Safety Notices for Users Outside of the U.S.A. and Canada

!PELV (Protected Extra-Low Voltage) Integrity: To ensure the extra-low voltage integrity of the equipment, connect only equipment with mains-protected electricallycompatible circuits to the external ports.

!Remote Earths: To prevent electrical shock, connect all local (individual office) computers and computer support equipment to the same electrical circuit of the building wiring. If you are unsure, check the building wiring to avoid remote earth conditions.

!Earth Bonding: For safe operation, only connect the equipment to a building supply that is in accordance with current wiring regulations in your country. In the U.K., those regulations are the IEE.

Using This Guide xi

Care and Handling

Use the following guidelines to properly handle and care for your system.

Protect the system from extremely low or high temperatures. Let the system warm (or cool) to room temperature before using it.

Keep the system away from magnetic forces.

Keep the system dry. Do not wash the system with a wet cloth or pour fluid into it.

Protect the system from being bumped or dropped.

Check the system for condensation. If condensation exists, allow it to evaporate before powering on the system.

Keep the system away from dust, sand, and dirt.

xii Using This Guide

1

System Overview

!Overview

!System Chassis

!Power Supply

!Peripheral Bays

!SAF-TE Logic

!System Board Features

!AC Link Mode

!Remote Power-On (Wake On LAN) Function

!System Security

Overview

This server is a modular, multiprocessing server based on the Intel Pentium® III microprocessor family. It is a solid performer and offers the latest technology. The combination of compute performance, memory capacity, and integrated I/O provides a high performance environment for many server market applications. These range from large corporations supporting remote offices to small companies looking to obtain basic connectivity capability such as file and print services, e -mail, web access, web site server, etc.

This server is conveniently housed and available as a tower-based system or as a rackmount system (fits into a standard EIA 19-inch rack assembly) as shown in Figures 1-1 and 1-2.

Figure 1-1. Tower-Based System Front View

Figure 1-2. Rack-Mount System Front View

1-2 System Overview

Your server may include standard non-hot-swap SCSI hard disk drive bays or hot-swap SCSI hard disk drive bays. See Figure 1-3. The standard SCSI hard disk drive bays support four 1-inch or four 1.6-inch SCSI hard disk drives. The hot-swap SCSI hard disk drive bays hold up to six 1.0-inch SCSI hard disk drives that can be swapped in or out of the system without powering it down, if RAID is configured in the system.

0

 

1

2

3

4

 

5

 

 

0

1

2

3

4

5

Standard Non-Hot-swap Hard Disk Drive Bays

Hot-swap Hard Disk Drive Bays

Figure 1-3. SCSI Hard Disk Drive Bays

As application requirements increase, you can expand your server with an additional processor, additional memory, add-in boards and peripheral devices: tape devices, CD-ROM, and hard disk drives.

Your server features the following major components:

!Single or dual high-performance Pentium III processors packaged in Single Edge Contact Cartridge Version 2 (SECC2).

!64 MB to 4 GB of memory, using up to four DIMMs.

!Seven PCI expansion slots for add-in boards (one slot shared with an ISA slot).

!One ISA expansion slot shared with a PCI slot for add-in board.

!Embedded PC-compatible support (serial, parallel, mouse, keyboard, diskette, USB, LAN, and video).

!Integrated onboard ATI RAGE IIC Super Video Graphics Array (SVGA) controller with 4 MB of video memory.

!Adaptec AIC7899 SCSI controller providing Wide Ultra2 and Ultra-160/M SCSI interfaces.

!Integrated onboard Network Interface Controller (NIC), an Intel 82559 PCI LAN controller for 10 or 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet networks with an RJ-45 Ethernet connector.

!Single Channel enhanced IDE controller.

!Three 5 ¼-inch removable media expansion bays with a CD-ROM drive installed in one bay and a 3 ½-inch half-height bay with a diskette drive installed.

System Overview 1-3

!Integrated dual Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports.

!Hardware monitors (temperature, fans, and voltage) and software monitors to indicate failures.

!Redundant cooling fans.

!A 300 watt switch-selectable power supply.

!Keylocked front cover, including an intrusion switch (tower system only) and an interlock switch on the side cover.

Hot-Swap SCSI Hard Drive Bays

!Six hot-swap 1.0-inch SCSI hard disk drive bays accessible from the front of the chassis which can be swapped in or out of the system without powering it down if RAID is configured in the system.

!High degree of SCSI disk fault tolerance and advanced disk array management features through the use of RAID technology, if an optional RAID controller is installed.

!SCSI backplane is Ultra-160/M ready.

1-4 System Overview

System Chassis

The system chassis (Figure 1-4) is an easy-to-expand, fabricated metal structure. The major system components are shown in the following illustrations.

H I J

G

A

F

B

ED C

A.Removable Media Bay

B.SCSI Hard Disk Drive Bays

C.SCSI Hard Disk Drive Bay Fan

D.Front Input Fan

E.System Board

F.Rear Exhaust Fan

G.System Power Supply

H.Pentium III Processors (2nd Processor is optional)

IMemory

JDiskette Drive

Figure 1-4. System Chassis

System Overview 1-5

Power Supply

The ATX300 watt power supply is switch-selectable for 115 or 230 Vac at an operating frequency of 50/60 Hz. It is designed to comply with existing emission standards and provides sufficient power for a fully loaded system configuration. The power supply voltage selection switch is factory set to 115Vac for systems used in the United States; it is set to 230Vac for systems used in Europe.

Peripheral Bays

The system supports a variety of standard PC AT-compatible peripheral devices. The chassis includes these peripheral bays:

!A 3.5-inch front panel bay for mounting the standard 3.5" diskette drive (supports 720 KB and 1.44 MB diskette media)

!Three 5.25-inch removable media front panel bays for mounting half-height 5.25-inch peripheral devices: standard CD-ROM drive and optional tape drives, etc.

!Your system includes either four standard SCSI hard disk drive bays for mounting up to four drives or six hot-swap drive bays for mounting up to six drives in easily removable drive carriers.

Note: The hot-swap SCSI hard disk drive bays contain a hotswap back plane that require an 80-pin single connector attachment (SCA) connector on the drives that you install.

SAF-TE Logic

Note: SAF-TE Logic is in systems that include the hot-swap SCSI disk drive cage. SAF-TE Logic is not available in systems that include the standard SCSI disk drive cage.

The SCSI backplane includes SAF-TE (SCSI Accessed Fault Tolerant Enclosure) logic that provides an interface to the disk subsystem that supports status signals, hot swapping drives, and enclosure monitoring.

The transport mechanism for the standardized alert detection and status reporting is the SCSI bus. Disk drives, power supplies, cooling fans, and temperature are continually monitored and the conditions then reported over the SCSI bus to the system. When used with RAID management software the user can be alerted of impending or imminent disk conditions requiring attention. This allows the user to react to conditions that could normally go unnoticed until data loss.

1-6 System Overview

System Board Features

The system board (Figure 1-5) offers a “flat” design with the processor and memory subsystems residing on the board. This figure shows the major components on the system board. The following subsections describe the system board major components.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.

Primary processor connector

R

 

Internal SCSI HDD bay connector

B.

Not used

S.

 

Not used

C.

Secondary processor connector

T.

 

Jumper block

D.

Memory DIMM slots

U.

 

Lithium backup battery

E.

Secondary VRM

V.

 

64 bit, 66MHz PCI slots for add-in boards

F.

Front panel LEDs connector

W.

 

64 bit, 33MHz PCI slots for add-in boards

G.

Power switch and Interlock switch connector

X.

 

32 bit, 33MHz PCI slots for add-in boards

H.

Not used

Y.

 

PCI/ISA shared slot for add-in board

I.

Management interface connector

Z.

 

Fan connectors (Fan1, Fan2)

J.

Main power connector

AA

 

LAN RJ-45 network controller connector

K.

Reset switch connector

BB

 

SVGA monitor port connector

L.

Speaker connector

CC

 

Parallel port connector

M.

Diskette drive connector

DD

 

Mouse PS/2 compatible connector

N.

IDE connector

EE

 

Keyboard PS/2 compatible connector

O.

Fan3 connector

FF

 

Dump button (Reserved for debug only)

P.

External SCSI and media bays connector

GG

 

Serial port connectors (top COM 1, bottom COM2)

Q.

Fan4 connector

HH

 

USB connectors (top USB 1, bottom USB 2)

Figure 1-5. System Board

System Overview 1-7

Pentium III Processor

Depending on system configuration, each system includes one or two Pentium III processors. Each Pentium III processor is packaged in a Single Edge Contact Cartridge Version 2 (SECC2). The cartridge includes the processor core with an integrated 16 KB primary (L1) cache, a secondary (L2) cache, and a back cover. The processor implements the MMXtechnology and the processor’s numeric coprocessor significantly increases the speed of floating-point operations.

The processor external interface operates at a maximum of 133 MHz. The second-level cache is located on the substrate of the processor cartridge. The cache includes burst pipelined synchronous static RAM (BSRAM).

System Memory

The system board contains four 168-pin DIMM sockets. Memory is partitioned as four banks of SDRAM registered DIMMs (PC133 compatible), each providing 72 bits of noninterleaved memory (64-bit main memory plus ECC). Your system may include from 64 MB to 4 GB of memory, using up to four DIMMs.

System memory begins at address 0 and is continuous (flat addressing) up to the maximum amount of DRAM installed (exception: system memory is noncontiguous in the ranges defined as memory holes using configuration registers). The system supports both base (conventional) and extended memory.

1-8 System Overview

I/O Expansion Slots

The server's expansion capabilities meet the needs of file and application servers for high performance I/O by providing a combination of PCI and ISA expansion slots.

The system board has two 66 MHz PCI connector slots (Figure 1-6, A) that can accommodate either a 32 or 64 bit PCI card and one 33 MHz PCI connector slot (Figure 1-6, B) that can accommodate either a 32 or 64 bit PCI card. The top two PCI connector slots (PCI 1 and PCI 2) support bus speeds up to 66 MHz. The third connector slot (PCI 3) supports a bus speed of up to 33 MHz.

Note: The bus speed for the two 66 MHz PCI connector slots (PCI 1 or PCI 2) is decreased to 33 MHz if a PCI card is installed into connector slot PCI 3 or if a 33 MHz PCI card is installed into any one of the two 66 MHz PCI connector slots.

PCI features:

!Bus speed up to 66 MHz (PCI 1 and PCI 2)

!Bus speed up to 33 Mhz (PCI 3)

!32-bit memory addressing

!5 V/3.3 V signaling environment

!Burst transfers up to a peak of 264 MB/s (64 bit, 33 MHz PCI) and 528 MB/s (64 bit, 66 MHz PCI)

!8-, 16-, 32-, or 64-bit data transfers

!Plug and Play ready

!Parity enabled.

A

B

Figure 1-6. 64 Bit PCI Connector Slots

System Overview 1-9

The system board has four 33 MHz, 32 bit, PCI connector slots

(Figure 1-7, A), as shown in the following figure. The bottom PCI connector (PCI 7) shares a chassis connector slot with an ISA connector (ISA 1).

PCI features:

!Bus speed up to 33 MHz

!32-bit memory addressing

!5 V signaling environment

!Burst transfers up to a peak of 132 MB/s

!8-, 16-, or 32-bit data transfers

!Plug and Play ready

!Parity enabled.

Note: If a 33 MHz PCI card is installed into one of the 66 MHz PCI slots, the bus speed for the 66 MHz PCI slots is decreased to 33 MHz.

Figure 1-7. 32 Bit PCI Connector Slots

1-10 System Overview

The system board has one ISA connector (Figure 1-8, A), as shown in the following figure. The ISA connector (ISA 1) shares a chassis connector slot with a PCI connector (PCI 7).

ISA features:

!Bus speed up to 8.33 MHz

!16-bit memory addressing

!8- or 16-bit data transfers

!Plug and Play ready.

Figure 1-8. Shared ISA/PCI Connector Slot

Real-Time Clock/Calendar

The real-time clock provides system clock/calendar information stored in a non-volatile memory (NVRAM). The real-time clock battery provides power backup for the realtime clock.

BIOS

A BIOS and Setup Utility are located in the Flash EPROM on the system board and include support for system setup and Legacy device configuration. A number of security, reliability, and management features also have been incorporated to meet vital server needs.

System Overview 1-11

IDE Controller

The system includes a single channel enhanced IDE 32 bit interface controller for intelligent disk drives with disk controller electronics onboard. The controller has a connector located on the system board that supports a master and a slave device. The IDE controller provides support for the internally mounted CD-ROM.

The device controls:

!PIO and DMA transfer modes

!Mode 4 timings

!Transfer rates up to 33 MB/s

!Buffering for PCI/IDE burst transfers

!Master/slave IDE mode

!Up to two devices.

Keyboard and Mouse Controller

The keyboard and mouse controller is PS/2 compatible.

Network Controller

The system board includes a 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX network controller based on the Intel 82559 Fast Ethernet PCI Bus Controller. As a PCI bus master, the controller can burst data at up to 132 MB/sec. The controller contains two receive and transmit FIFO buffers that prevent data overruns or underruns while waiting for access to the PCI bus. The controller has the following:

!32-bit PCI bus master interface (direct drive of bus), compatible with PCI Bus Specification, Revision 2.1

!Chained memory structure with improved dynamic transmit chaining for enhanced performance

!Programmable transmit threshold for improved bus utilization

!Early receive interrupt for concurrent processing of receive data

!On-chip counters for network management

!Autodetect and autoswitching for 10 or 100 Mbps network speeds

!Support for both 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps networks, capable of full or half duplex, with back-to-back transmit at 100 Mbps.

!Support for Wake On LAN.

The network status LEDs on the system board indicate:

!Transmit/receive activity on the LAN

!Valid link to the LAN

!10/100 Mbps transfer mode.

1-12 System Overview

SCSI Controller

The system board includes an embedded Adaptec AIC7899 dual function SCSI controller. The AIC7899 provides Ultra-160/M and Wide Ultra2 SCSI interfaces as two independent PCI functions. As implemented on the system board, interface A attaches to an Ultra-160/M SCSI backplane that supports up to six Ultra-160/M SCA drives. Controller B, the Wide Ultra 2 SCSI interface, may be used to support SCSI devices in the removable media bays.

Video Controller

The system has an integrated ATI Rage IIC 64 bit high-performance SVGA subsystem that supports the following:

!BIOS compatibility with VGA, EGA, CGA, Hercules Graphics, and MDA

!4 MB of 10 ns onboard Synchronous Graphics Memory (SGRAM)

!Pixel resolutions up to 1280 X 1024

!Analog VGA monitors (single and multiple frequency, interlaced and noninterlaced) with a maximum vertical retrace noninterlaced frequency of 100 Hz.

Peripheral Controller

The advanced integrated peripheral controller supports two serial ports, two universal serial ports, one parallel port, diskette drive, PS/2-compatible keyboard and mouse, and integrated Real Time Clock (RTC). The system provides the connector interface for each port.

Serial Ports

Both serial ports are relocatable. Each serial port can be set to one of four different addresses and can be enabled separately. When disabled, serial port interrupts are available to add-in boards.

Parallel Port

One IEEE 1284-compatible 25-pin bidirectional EPP (supporting levels 1.7 and 1.9) parallel port is provided. BIOS programming enables the parallel port and determines the port address and interrupt. ECP mode is supported with 2 possible DMA channels. When disabled, the interrupt is available to add-in boards.

External Device Connectors

The external I/O connectors provide support for a PS/2 compatible mouse and a keyboard, for a SVGA monitor, 2 serial port connectors, a parallel port connector, LAN port, and two USB connections for devices other than keyboard or mouse.

System Overview 1-13

System Board Management Controller (BMC)

Server management is concentrated in the System Board Management Controller (BMC). The BMC and associated circuitry are powered from a 5Vdc standby voltage, which remains active when system power is switched off, but the ac power source is still on and connected.

The BMC supports the Management Workstation Application (MWA), which allows remote server management via a modem or direct connection to a manager system. Events monitored by the manager system include over-temperature and over-voltage conditions, fan failure, or chassis intrusion.

Information on the Management Workstation Application (MWA) may be found in Appendix B of this User’s Guide.

One major function of the BMC is to autonomously monitor system management events, and log their occurrence in the nonvolatile System Event Log (SEL). The events being monitored include overtemperature and overvoltage conditions, fan failure, or chassis intrusion. To enable accurate monitoring, the BMC maintains the nonvolatile Sensor Data Record (SDR), from which sensor information can be retrieved. The BMC provides an ISA host interface to SDR sensor information, so that software running on the server can poll and retrieve the server's current status.

The BMC performs the following:

!Monitors server board temperature and voltage

!Monitors processor presence and controls Fault Resilient Boot (FRB)

!Detects and indicates baseboard fan failure

!Manages the SEL interface

!Manages the SDR Repository interface

!Monitors the SDR/SEL timestamp clock

!Monitors the system management watchdog timer

!Monitors the periodic SMI timer

!Monitors the event receiver

!Controls secure mode, including video blanking, diskette write-protect monitoring, and front panel lock/unlock initiation

!Controls Wake On LAN via Magic Packet support.

1-14 System Overview

ACPI

The Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) aware operating system can place the system into a state where the hard drives spin down, the system fans stop, and all processing is halted. However, in this state the power supply is still on and the processors are still dissipating some power such that the power supply fan and processor fans are still running.

Note: ACPI requires an operating system that supports its feature.

This server system BIOS supports sleep states s0, s1, s4, and s5. However, with future versions of Microsoft Windows 9X that support ACPI, the system BIOS only supports sleep states s0, s1, and s5. With future versions of Microsoft Windows NT that support ACPI, the system BIOS will only support sleep states s0, s1, s4, and s5.

! CAUTION

Only when the AC power is disconnected is the system completely off.

The sleep states are defined as follows:

!s0: Normal running state.

!s1: Processor sleep state.

No context will be lost in this state and the processor caches will maintain coherency.

!s4: Hibernate or Save to Disk.

The memory and machine state are saved to disk. Pressing the power button or other wakeup event restores the system state from the disk and resumes normal operation. This assumes that no hardware changes have been made to the system while it was off.

!s5: Soft off.

Only the RTC section of the chipset and the BMC are running in this state.

AC Link Mode

The AC link mode allows the system to monitor its AC input power so that when the AC input power is lost and then restored the system will return itself to one of three preselected settings, listed as follows:

!Power On

!Last State (Factory Default Setting)

!Stay Off.

The AC link mode settings can be changed by running the BIOS Setup Utility (F2). Refer to Chapter 3 "Configuring Your System."

System Overview 1-15

Remote Power-On (Wake ON LAN) Function

The remote power-on function turns on the system power by way of a network or modem. If the system power is set to OFF, it can be turned on remotely by sending a specific packet from the main computer to the remote system. This feature can be enabled or disabled using the BIOS Setup Utility. See Chapter 3.

System Security

To help prevent unauthorized entry or use of the system, the system includes a full lockable front panel and Server Management software that monitors the system intrusion switches.

Security with Mechanical Locks and Monitoring

The front panel of the tower-based system contains a mechanical lock and an intrusion switch to prevent access to the front of the computer chassis. The computer chassis includes an interlock switch on the side cover. When any these covers are opened, the switch transmits an alarm signal to the system board, where server management software processes the signal.

Software Locks via the System Setup Utility

The BIOS Setup Utility provides a number of security features to prevent unauthorized or accidental access to the system. Once the security measures are enabled, access to the system is allowed only after the user enters the correct password(s). For example:

!Enable the keyboard lockout timer so that the server requires a password to reactivate the keyboard and mouse after a specified time-out period 1 to 120minutes.

!Set and enable an administrative password.

!Set and enable a user password

!Set secure mode to prevent keyboard or mouse input and to prevent use of the front panel reset and power switches.

!Disable writing to the diskette drive when secure mode is set.

1-16 System Overview

2

Setting Up the System

!Overview

!Selecting a Site

!Unpacking the System

!Rack-Mount Subsystem Assembly

!Getting Familiar with the System

!Making Connections

!Setting the Line Voltage

!Connecting the Power Cord

!Powering On Your System

Overview

This chapter describes how to select a site, unpack the system, make cable connections, and power on the tower-based or rack-mount system units. Also, provided are the instructions for assembling the rack-mount system unit.

Selecting a Site

The system operates reliably in a typical office environment. Choose a site that is:

! Near grounded, three-pronged power outlets.

Note: For the United States and Canada, this means a NEMA 5-15R outlets for 100-120 VAC or NEMA 6-15R outlets for 200-240 VAC. For other international sites, this means three-pronged power outlets applicable for the electrical code of the region.

! WARNING

Be sure the power service connection is through a properly grounded outlet.

! CAUTION

When two power supplies are installed in the system the power plug from each of the power supplies must be plugged into the same common ground power outlets.

!Clean, dust-free, and well ventilated. Front and rear ventilating openings kept free of obstructions. Away from sources of heat, vibration or physical shock.

!Isolated from strong electromagnetic fields and electrical noise produced by electrical devices (such as air conditioners, large fans, large electric motors, radio and TV transmitters, and high-frequency security devices)

!Spacious enough to provide at least five inches (13 centimeters) behind the system and three inches (eight centimeters) on each side of the system for proper cooling, airflow, and cable clearance.

!Easily accessible for system maintenance and installation of system upgrades.

Unpacking the System

! WARNING

Your system weighs approximately 65 pounds (29.25 kg). If your system contains numerous optional boards and peripheral devices, it will weigh more. To avoid personal injury, make sure you have someone help you lift or move the system.

2-2 Setting Up the System

When you receive your system, inspect the shipping containers prior to unpacking. If the shipping boxes are damaged, note the damage, and if possible, photograph it for reference. After removing the contents of the containers, keep the cartons and the packing materials. If the contents appear damaged when you unpack the boxes, file a damage claim with the carrier immediately.

Rack-Mount Subsystem Assembly

This section provides the instructions for assembling the rack-mount server unit into a standard EIA 19-inch rack cabinet.

Before You Begin

Before you begin, please review the following cautions, warnings, and general guidelines.

! WARNING

Be sure that power to the system is turned off and unplugged. All voltage is removed only when the power cords are unplugged.

!Avoid excessive vibration and shock. Dropping an electronic component can cause serious damage.

!Do not disconnect or remove parts other than those specified in the procedure.

!Do not touch I/O connector pins.

!All screws are Phillips-head, unless otherwise specified.

!On completion of any assembly or reassembly, perform a power-on test. If a fault occurs, verify that the assembly or reassembly was performed correctly. If the problem persists, see "Problem Solving" in Chapter 5.

Static Precautions

An electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage disk drives, option boards, and other components. You can provide some ESD protection by wearing an antistatic wrist strap attached to chassis ground when handling system components.

Electronic devices can be easily damaged by static electricity. To prevent damage, keep them in their protective packaging when they are not installed in your system.

Setting Up the System 2-3

Assembly

This section describes how to assemble your rack-mount server unit into a standard EIA 19-inch rack cabinet.

! CAUTION

Ensure that the location of the rack-mount server unit does not create an unstable condition when installed in the rack cabinet.

Note: Refer to Figure 2-1 while Steps 2 and 3 of this procedure.

1.Select an appropriate location in your rack cabinet for the rack-mount server unit. To improve rack stability, mount heavier items towards the bottom of the rack cabinet.

Note: When planning your system configuration for the rack cabinet you should consider the length of the cables that interconnect system components.

2.Locate the two support brackets (D). Using four self tapping screws (E) supplied with the rack cabinet for each support bracket, attach the two support brackets to the vertical mounting rails (A and B) of the rack cabinet.

3.Install the four caged nuts (C) that secure the front of the rack-mount server unit to the rack cabinet. Position the caged nuts to align with the screw holes in the front bezel of the rack-mount server unit.

Note: The caged nuts are secured into the vertical mounting rails of the rack cabinet by inserting one side of the nut into the slot and squeezing while pressing the opposite side until it snaps into place.

2-4 Setting Up the System

A.Rear vertical mounting rail

B.Front vertical mounting rail

CFour caged nuts

DTwo support brackets

EEight self-tapping screws

Figure 2-1. Assembling the Support Brackets in the Rack Cabinet

Setting Up the System 2-5

4.Lift the rack-mount server unit Figure 2-2, C onto the two support brackets and slide it toward the rear of the rack cabinet.

! WARNING

It is strongly recommended that two people are present when lifting and assembling the rack-mount server unit into a rack cabinet.

5.Secure the front bezel to the rack cabinet's front vertical mounting rails (B) using the four screws (E) and plastic washers (D) provided. See Figure 2-2.

A.Rear vertical mounting rail

B.Front vertical mounting rail

CRack-mount server unit

DFour plastic washers

EFour screws

Figure 2-2. Installing the Rack-Mount Server Unit into the Rack Cabinet

2-6 Setting Up the System

Getting Familiar with the System

Before setting up your system, you should become familiar with the system’s features, such as the location of your system's front and rear panel switches, indicators and connectors, etc. Note that this section describes the tower-based system controls (switches and indicators) and connectors, which are identical for the rack-mount system.

Front View with Front Door Closed

Figure 2-3 shows the location of the front system features (tower-based system only).

A

B

A.

Keylock

When locked, secures the front door

 

 

not allowing access to the front system

 

 

controls.

B.

System indicators

Refer to Figures 2-5 and 2-6 in this

 

 

chapter.

Figure 2-3. Tower System Front Features

Setting Up the System 2-7

Opening the Front Door

Refer to the Figure 2-4 and open the front door of the cabinet as follows (towerbased system only).

1.If the front door is locked, unlock it.

2.Grasp the indentation located on the right edge of the front door and pull the door towards you to open it.

Figure 2-4. Opening the Front Door

2-8 Setting Up the System

Front View (Non-Hot-Swap SCSI Drive Bays)

Figure 2-5 shows the location of the front system controls and indicators on a system that includes the standard SCSI disk drive bays.

A

B

C D

E F G H I J

A.Eject button, 3 ½-inch diskette drive

B.Activity light, 3 ½-inch diskette drive

C.Activity light, CD-ROM reader

D.Load/eject button, CD-ROM reader

E.DC power ON/OFF Button

F.DC Power ON/OFF LED

Press to eject diskette.

When lit, diskette is in use.

When lit, CD-ROM reader is in use.

Press to load CD and eject CD.

Press to turn system DC power on or off.

When green, power is present in system. When off, power is turned off, power source is disrupted, or system is in the sleep mode. See Table 2-1 for a list and description of the system LEDs.

G.

Intrusion LED

When OFF, the system is OK. See Table 2-1 for

 

 

a list and description of the system LEDs.

H.

Disk Fault LED

Non-functional on systems that include the

 

 

standard SCSI disk drive bays.

I.

Sleep Status LED

When lit, system is in Sleep Mode. See Table

 

 

2-1 for a list and description of the system LEDs.

J.

Sleep Button

Press to enter power saving (sleep) mode. Press

 

 

again to enter normal mode of operation. This

 

 

function requires a corresponding operating

 

 

system.

Figure 2-6. Front System Features and Controls (Non-Hot-Swap Bays)

Setting Up the System 2-9

Front View (Hot-Swap SCSI Drive Bays)

Figure 2-6 shows the location of the front system controls and indicators on a system that includes the hot-swap SCSI disk drive bays.

A

B

C D

E F G

H I J K L M

A.Eject button, 3 ½-inch diskette drive

B.Activity light, 3 ½-inch diskette drive

C.Activity light, CD-ROM reader

D.Load/eject button, CD-ROM reader

E.Drive Present LED

F.Drive Activity LED

G.Drive Status LED

H.DC power ON/OFF Button

I.DC Power ON/OFF LED

J.Intrusion Indicator LED

K.Disk Fault LED

L.Sleep Status LED

M.Sleep Button

*Disk array configuration only.

Press to eject diskette.

When lit, diskette is in use.

When lit, CD-ROM reader is in use.

Press to load CD and eject CD.

When green, drive is present. See Table 2-2.

When green, Drive is active. See Table 2-2.

*Indicates drive failure. See Table 2-2.

Press to turn system DC power on or off.

When green, power is present in system. When off, power is turned off, power source is disrupted, or system is in the sleep mode. See Table 2-1 for a list and description of the system LEDs.

When OFF, the system is OK. See Table 2-1 for a list and description of the system LEDs.

When lit, a disk drive fault occurred. See Table 2-1 for a list and description of the system LEDs.

When lit, system is in Sleep Mode. See Table 2-1 for a list and description of the system LEDs.

Press to enter power saving (sleep) mode. Press again to enter normal mode of operation. This function requires a corresponding operating system.

Figure 2-6. Front System Features and Controls (Hot-Swap Bays)

2-10 Setting Up the System

Rear View

Figure 2-7 shows the location of the rear system features and controls.

A

B

K

C

D

 

E

 

 

G

 

 

 

F

 

H

 

P

 

 

I

 

 

J

 

 

 

 

L

 

 

M

 

 

N

 

 

O

A.

USB2 connector

Second USB connector (Black)

B.

USB1 connector

First USB connector (Black)

C.

Serial Port B

COM2 serial port 9-pin connector (Turquoise)

D.

Serial Port A

COM1 serial port 9-pin connector (Turquoise)

E.

Dump button

Reserved for debug

F.

Printer port (Burgundy)

Parallel port 25-pin connector (Burgundy)

G.

Keyboard port

PS/2-compatible 6-pin mini-DIN connector (Purple)

H.

Mouse port

PS/2-compatible 6-pin mini-DIN connector (Green)

I.

SVGA connector

SVGA monitor 15-pin connector (Blue)

J.

LAN connector

RJ-45 Ethernet connector

K.

AC input power connector

Supplies AC power to the power supply.

L.

66 MHz, 64-bit PCI Slots

Two 66 MHz, 64-bit PCI add-in board slot locations

M.

33 MHz, 64-bit PCI Slot

One 33 MHz, 64-bit PCI add-in board slot location

N.

33 MHz, 32-bit PCI Slots

Three 33 MHz, 32-bit PCI add-in board slot locations

O.

Combo PCI/ISA slot

One shared PCI or ISA add-in board slot location

P.

Wide Ultra 2 SCSI Connector

Connects to External SCSI Devices

Figure 2-7. Rear Features and Controls

Setting Up the System 2-11

Status LED Indicator Descriptions

Table 2-1 lists the system status LED indicators along with a description of each LED indicator. Table 2-2 lists the disk drive status LED panel indicators along with a description of each LED indicator. Refer to Figures 2-5 and 2-6 for the location of the LED indicators listed in Tables 2-1 and 2-2.

Table 2-1. System Status LED Indicators

LED

Status

Description

Response

 

 

 

 

DC Power

Off

Power OFF

None required (normal)

Status

Green

Power ON

None required (normal)

 

Intrusion

Off

No intrusion

None required (normal)

 

Flashing

Chassis Intrusion

Check condition

 

Amber

 

 

*Disk Fault

Off

No disk fault

None required (normal)

 

Amber

Internal disk drive

Check disk drive status LEDs

 

 

failure

 

Sleep Status

Off

System in Normal

None required (normal)

 

 

mode

 

 

Amber

**System power

Press Sleep button to return to

 

 

saving (sleep) mode.

Normal mode.

*Hot-swap chassis and disk array configuration only. **This function requires specific operating system support.

Table 2-2. *Disk Drive Status LED Panel Indicators

LED

Status

Description

Response

 

 

 

 

Disk Drive

Off

Disk drive not

None required (normal)

Present

 

present

 

 

Green

Disk drive present

None required (normal)

Disk Drive

Off

Not accessing disk

None required (normal)

Activity

 

drive

 

 

Green

Accessing disk drive

None required (normal)

**Disk Drive

Off

No alarms

None required (normal)

Status

Amber

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Steady

Disk drive failure

Replace disk drive

 

light)

Rebuilding data (in

None required (normal)

 

 

 

(Flashing

disk array

 

 

light)

configuration only)

 

* Hot-swap disk drive cage only. See Figure 2-6. ** Disk array configuration only

2-12 Setting Up the System

Making Connections

If your system normally operates without a video display or keyboard (for example, as a network server), you must install a video display and keyboard to configure the system. You may remove them after running the BIOS Setup Utility. For information on running the BIOS Setup Utility, refer to Chapter 3 "Configuring Your System" of this User’s Guide.

Refer to the previous figure (Rear Features and Controls) and connect your keyboard, monitor, and mouse. Connect any external peripheral devices such as a printer or modem by following the instructions included with these devices.

! CAUTION

Damage to the system may result if the keyboard/mouse cable is inserted or removed when power is applied to the system.

Inserting a telephone line connector into a LAN board RJ-45 port may result in personal injury and equipment damage.

Setting Up the System 2-13

Setting the Line Voltage

The system contains an ATX300 watt power supply that is switch-selectable for 115 or 230 VAC at an operating frequency of 50/60Hz. The power supply voltage selection switch is factory set to 115Vac for systems shipped to North America; it is set to 230Vac for systems shipped in Europe. Line source voltages between 200 and 240 VAC are acceptable when the power supply input voltage is set to 230 VAC.

! CAUTION

Before you plug the system power cord into an AC outlet, ensure the input line voltage setting for the power supply is correct.

To use the system with line source voltages between 200 and 240 VAC, the line voltage selector switch on the power supply must be set to 230. If you set the switch to the 115 VAC position, the power supply will be damaged when you plug in your system.

If you need to change the line voltage setting, perform the following steps.

Note: If you are setting up your system for the first time, the power cord will not be connected to the rear panel of your system.

1.Unplug the AC power cord from the back of the chassis.

2.Insert the tip of a small screwdriver or ballpoint pen into the depression on the line voltage selector. See Figure 2-8.

3.Slide the selector switch to 115 VAC or to 230 VAC (line source voltage range: 220 to 240 VAC).

2-14 Setting Up the System

B 230

or

A 115

A.Voltage selector switch set to 115 VAC

B.Voltage selector switch set to 230 VAC

Figure 2-8. Setting the Line Voltage

Connecting the Power Cord

Plug the female end of the AC power cord into the input receptacle on the rear of the power supply cage. Plug the male end of the power cord into

NEMA 5-15R outlet for 100-120 VAC or NEMA 6-15R outlet for 200-240 VAC.

If the power cord supplied with the system is not compatible with the AC wall outlet in your region, obtain a suitable power cord that meets the following criteria.

!The power cord must be rated for the available AC voltage and have a current rating that is at least 125% of the current rating of the system.

!The power cord connector that plugs into the wall outlet must be terminated in a grounding-type male plug designed for use in your region. It must have certification marks showing certification by an agency acceptable in your region.

!The power cord connector that plugs into the system must be an IECtype CEE-22 female connector.

!The power cord must be less than 1.8 meters (6.0 feet) long.

Setting Up the System 2-15

When connecting the power cord to a power control unit such as an UPS, confirm that the power control unit is powered OFF. Connecting the power cord while power is supplied to the power control unit may cause a failure.

! WARNING

Your system shipped with a power cord for the power supply. Do not attempt to modify or use the supplied AC power cord if it is not the exact type required.

Powering On Your System

Power on your system as follows.

1.Make sure all external devices, such as a video display, keyboard, and mouse (optional) have been connected, and the power cords are connected.

2.Power on the video display and any other external devices.

3.Open the front door and press the push-button power on/off switch on the front panel. Verify that the system power-on LED is lit. If it is not lit, ensure the ac power cord is connected to a functional ac power source.

After a few seconds your system begins the internal Power-On Self Tests (POST). POST automatically checks the system board, CPU module, memory, keyboard, and most installed peripheral devices.

! CAUTION

Always allow POST to complete before powering down your system.

! CAUTION

The server management logic on your system board monitors and logs system voltage changes. When powering down your system you may experience a 1–5 second delay from the time you press the push-button power on/off switch on the front panel and your system powering down. This is normal system operation and is required by the server management logic.

If you have problems powering on your system, refer to Problem Solving in Chapter 5 of this User’s Guide.

After you have successfully powered on your system, insert the ExpressBuilder CD-ROM into the CD-ROM device, reboot the system and follow the screen prompts to run ExpressBuilder.

2-16 Setting Up the System

3

Configuring Your System

!Configuring Your System

!BIOS Setup Utility

!Adaptec SCSI Utility

!Configuring the RAID Controller

!Configuring System Board Jumpers

Configuring Your System

Configuration and setup utilities are used to change your system configuration. You can configure your system, as well as option boards you may add to your system, using the BIOS Setup Utility. Several unique system parameters are configured using the BIOS Setup, which is stored in the system FLASH memory.

The Adaptec Configuration Utility detects the SCSI host adapters on the system board. Use this utility if you need to configure the two SCSI controllers in your system or to perform a SCSI disk format or verify disk operation on the SCSI disk drives. The Adaptec Configuration Utility is also used to configure any SCSI removable media devices installed in your system.

If your system has been factory configured, the BIOS Setup or Adaptec Configuration Utility do not need to be run unless you want to change the password or security features, add certain types of option boards or devices, or upgrade your system board.

This chapter also provides information on several system configuration parameters that are set by jumpers on the system board. However, these parameters do not usually require change.

Use the EXPRESSBUILDER CD-ROM to create the device driver diskettes.

3-2 Configuring Your System

BIOS Setup Utility

The BIOS Setup Utility is used to change system configuration parameters. The utility is resident in the system FLASH memory and does not require a diskette or an operating system present to run.

Using the BIOS Setup Utility

You access the BIOS Setup utility when you turn on or reboot your system. To run the BIOS Setup Utility, perform the following procedure:

1.Power-on or reboot the system. “Press <F2> to enter SETUP” displays.

2.Press F2. The BIOS Setup Utility starts and the Main Menu is displayed. The menu bar at the top of the Main Menu lists the following selections:

Menu

Use

 

 

Main

Use this menu for basic system configuration.

Advanced

Use this menu for setting the Advanced Features available on

 

your system.

Security

Use this menu to set User and Supervisor Passwords and the

 

Backup and Virus-Check reminders.

System Hardware

Use this menu for configuring unique Server features.

Boot

Use this menu to configure Boot Device priority.

Exit

Exits the current menu.

 

 

Use the arrow keys to select a menu or an item on a displayed menu. Press the value keys (listed in the table below) to cycle through the allowable values for the selected field. Use the Exit menu’s “Save Values” selection to save the current values on all the menus.

To display a submenu, position the cursor on a selection that has a submenu and press ENTER. An arrow precedes selections with submenus.

Refer to the following table for information on the keys that you use with BIOS Setup. These keys are also listed at the bottom of the Setup menu.

Configuring Your System 3-3

Key

Function in Setup Menu

 

 

F1 or Alt-H

Get Help about an item.

ESC

Exit the current menu and return to the previous menu.

Left or right arrow keys

Move between menus.

Up or down arrow keys

Move cursor up and down. The cursor moves only to the

 

settings that you can change.

HOME or END

Move cursor to top or bottom of window.

PAGE UP or PAGE DOWN

Move cursor to next or previous page.

F5 or -

Select the previous value for the field.

F6 or + or SPACE

Select the next value for the field.

F9

Load default configuration values for this menu.

F10

Save configuration values and exit.

ENTER

Execute command or Select submenu.

 

 

BIOS Setup Configuration Settings

The BIOS Setup Configurations tables show the default settings for the BIOS Setup Utility and provides a place for you to record any changes you make to these settings. Recommended values are bold in the following tables.

3-4 Configuring Your System

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