IBM THINKCENTER 8188, THINKCENTER 8185, THINKCENTER 8187, THINKCENTER 8186, THINKCENTER 8193, THINKCENTER 8197, THINKCENTER 8194, THINKCENTER 8189, THINKCENTER 8191, THINKCENTER 8192, THINKCENTER 8195, THINKCENTER 8196, THINKCENTER 8128, THINKCENTER 8190 User Manual

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Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8128, 8185, 8186, 8187, 8188, 8189, Types 8190, 8192, 8193, 8194, 8195, 8196, Types 8197, 8413, 8414, 8415, 8430, 8431 Types 8432, 8433

ThinkCentre

 

Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8128, 8185, 8186, 8187, 8188, 8189, Types 8190, 8192, 8193, 8194, 8195, 8196, Types 8197, 8413, 8414, 8415, 8430, 8431 Types 8432, 8433

Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information under “Notices” on page 281.

Ninth Edition (February 2005)

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION AS ISWITHOUT ANY WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE LIMITED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some jurisdictions do not allow disclaimers or express or implied warranties in certain transactions; therefore, this statement may not apply to you.

This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements or changes in the products or the programs described in this publication at any time.

Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM Authorized Dealer or your IBM Marketing Representative.

© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2005. All rights reserved.

US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

Contents

Chapter 1. About this manual . . . .

.

1

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 34

Important Safety Information . . . . . . . .

.

1

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

.

35

 

 

 

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

36

Chapter 2. General information . . . .

.

3

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

.

37

Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

3

Identifying parts on the system board (all machine

 

 

types) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

38

Physical specifications . . . . . . . . . .

.

5

Replacing memory (all machine types) . . . .

. 38

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . . .

.

6

Replacing adapters . . . . . . . . . . .

.

39

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 . .

. 7

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 39

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

8

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

.

41

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . . .

.

9

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

42

 

 

 

Chapter 3. General Checkout . . . . .

11

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

.

42

Replacing internal drives . . . . . . . . .

.

43

 

 

 

Chapter 4. IBM Enhanced Diagnostics

15

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 43

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

.

45

Diagnostics program download. . . . . . .

. 15

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

48

Navigating through the diagnostics programs . .

. 15

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

. 51

Running diagnostics tests. . . . . . . . .

.

15

Connecting the drive . . . . . . . . . .

.

54

Test selection . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

16

Parallel ATA hard disk drive. . . . . . .

.

54

Test results . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

16

Serial ATA hard disk drive . . . . . . .

.

55

Fixed disk advanced test (FDAT) . . . . .

. 16

CD drive, DVD drive, CD/RW drive, or

 

 

Quick and Full erase - hard drive . . . . .

. 18

DVD/CD/RW combo drive . . . . . . .

. 55

Viewing the test log . . . . . . . . . .

.

18

Diskette drive . . . . . . . . . . .

.

55

 

 

 

Replacing the battery (all machine types) . . .

.

56

Chapter 5. IBM Setup Utility program

19

Replacing the power supply . . . . . . . .

.

57

Starting the IBM Setup Utility program . . . .

. 19

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 57

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

. 57

Viewing and changing settings . . . . . . .

.

19

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8196, 8197, 8415,

 

 

Exiting from the IBM Setup Utility program . .

. 20

 

 

8432, and 8433 . . . . . . . . . . .

.

58

Using passwords . . . . . . . . . . .

.

20

Replacing a microprocessor (all machine types) .

. 59

User password . . . . . . . . . . .

.

20

Replacing the system board (all machine types) .

. 61

Administrator password . . . . . . . .

.

20

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables. . . 63

Setting, changing, and deleting a password . . . 20

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 63

Using Security Profile by Device . . . . . .

.

21

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

.

64

Using IDE Drives Setup . . . . . . . . .

.

21

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

65

Selecting a startup device. . . . . . . . .

.

22

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

.

66

Selecting a temporary startup device . . . .

.

22

 

 

 

Changing the startup device sequence . . .

. 22

Chapter 7. Symptom-to-FRU Index . .

. 69

 

 

 

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs . . . . . .

23

Hard disk drive boot error . . . . . . . .

.

69

Locating connectors on the front . . . . . .

.

23

Power Supply Errors . . . . . . . . . .

.

70

Diagnostic error codes . . . . . . . . . .

.

70

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 23

Beep symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

89

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

. 23

No-beep symptoms . . . . . . . . . . .

.

91

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

25

POST error codes . . . . . . . . . . .

.

92

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

.

25

Miscellaneous error messages . . . . . . .

.

107

Locating the connectors on the rear . . . . .

.

27

Undetermined problems. . . . . . . . .

.

109

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 27

Power supply connectors . . . . . . . .

.

110

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

. 27

Connector P1 . . . . . . . . . . .

.

110

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

29

Connector P2, P3, P4, and P7 . . . . . .

.

110

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

.

29

Connector P5 (Diskette drive) . . . . . .

.

110

Removing the cover . . . . . . . . . .

.

30

Connector P6 . . . . . . . . . . .

.

110

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430 . . .

. 30

Connector P8 (Serial ATA) . . . . . . .

.

110

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431 .

.

31

 

 

 

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

31

Chapter 8. Additional Service

 

 

Types 8196 and 8197 . . . . . . . . .

.

32

 

 

Locating components . . . . . . . . . .

.

34

Information . . . . . . . . . . . .

111

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

 

 

 

 

iii

Security features . . . . . . . . . . .

.

111

Type 8190 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

172

Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

111

Type 8192 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

178

Vital product data . . . . . . . . . .

.

112

Type 8193 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

180

BIOS levels . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

112

Type 8194 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

188

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing

 

 

Type 8195 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

202

CMOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

113

Type 8196 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

211

Flash update procedures. . . . . . . . .

.

113

Type 8197 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

215

Updating (flashing) BIOS from a diskette or

 

 

Type 8413 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

218

CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

113

Type 8414 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

223

Updating (flashing) BIOS from your operating

 

 

Type 8415 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

229

system. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

113

Type 8430 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

232

Recovering from a POST/BIOS update failure

 

114

Type 8431 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. 236

Power management . . . . . . . . . .

.

115

Type 8432 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

241

Automatic configuration and power interface

 

 

Type 8433 . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

244

(ACPI) BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

115

 

 

 

 

Advanced Power Management . . . . .

. 115

Chapter 10. Related service

 

 

 

Automatic Hardware Power Management

.

115

information . . . . . . . . . . .

.

247

features . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Safety information. . . . . . . . . .

.

.

247

Setting Automatic Hardware Power

 

 

 

 

General safety . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

247

Management features . . . . . . . . .

.

115

Electrical safety. . . . . . . . . .

.

.

248

Automatic Power-On features . . . . . .

. 116

Safety inspection guide . . . . . . .

.

.

249

Product Recovery Program . . . . . . . .

.

117

Handling electrostatic discharge-sensitive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 9. Parts listing . . . . . . .

119

devices . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

250

Grounding requirements . . . . . .

.

.

251

Type 8128 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

119

Safety notices (multi-lingual translations) .

.

.

251

Type 8185 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

121

Send us your comments! . . . . . . .

.

.

280

Type 8186 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

130

Problem determination tips. . . . . . .

.

.

281

Type 8187 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

134

Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

281

Type 8188 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

149

Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

282

Type 8189 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

158

 

 

 

 

iv Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 1. About this manual

This manual contains service and reference information for IBM® computer Types 8128, 8185, 8186, 8187, 8188, 8189, 8190, 8192 8193, 8194, 8195, 8196, 8197, 8413, 8414, 8415, 8430, 8431 8432, and 8433.

This manual is divided into product service sections and a related service section, as follows:

vThe product service sections include procedures for isolating problems to a FRU, a Symptom-to-FRU Index, additional service information and an illustrated parts catalog.

vThe related service section includes safety notices and safety information, and problem determination tips.

Note:

This manual is intended for trained servicers who are familiar with IBM Personal Computer products. Use this manual along with advanced diagnostic tests to troubleshoot problems effectively.

Before servicing an IBM product, be sure to review the “Safety information” on page 247.

Important Safety Information

Be sure to read all caution and danger statements in this book before performing any of the instructions.

Prenez connaissance de toutes les consignes de type Attention et Danger avant de procéder aux opérations décrites par les instructions.

Lesen Sie alle Sicherheitshinweise, bevor Sie eine Anweisung ausführen.

Accertarsi di leggere tutti gli avvisi di attenzione e di pericolo prima di effettuare qualsiasi operazione.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

1

Leia todas as instruções de cuidado e perigo antes de executar qualquer operação.

Lea atentamente todas las declaraciones de precaución y peligro ante de llevar a cabo cualquier operación.

2 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 2. General information

This IBM® computer incorporates many of the latest advances in computer technology.

Go to Access IBM for general information about the use, operation, and maintenance of the computer. Access IBM also contains information to help solve problems and get repair service or other technical assistance.

Features

This section provides an overview of the computer features and preinstalled software.

Microprocessor (varies by model type)

vIntel® Celeron(some models)

vIntel Pentium® 4 (some models)

vIntel Pentium 4 with HyperThreading (some models)

vInternal cache (size varies by model type)

Memory

vSupport for four dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

v512 KB flash memory for system programs

Internal drives

v3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskette drive

vInternal hard disk drive

vEIDE CD-ROM drive or DVD-ROM drive (some models)

Video subsystem

vAn integrated graphics controller for a Video Graphics Array (VGA) monitor

vAccelerated graphics port (AGP) video adapter slot on the system board

Audio subsystem

vAC’97 with ADI 1981B Audio Codec

vLine in, line out, and microphone connectors on the rear panel

Connectivity

v10/100/1000 Mbps integrated Intel Ethernet controller that supports the Wake on LAN® feature (some models)

vSoft modem V.90/V.44 (some models)

System management features

vRemote Program Load (RPL) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

vWake on LAN

vWake on Ring (in the IBM Setup Utility program, this feature is called Serial Port Ring Detect for an external modem)

vRemote Administration

vAutomatic power-on startup

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

3

vSystem Management (SM) BIOS and SM software

vAbility to store POST hardware test results

Input/output features

v25-pin, Extended Capabilities Port (ECP)/Extended Parallel Port (EPP)

v9-pin serial connector

vEight 4-pin, USB connectors (two on front panel and six on rear panel)

vPS/2® mouse connector

vPS/2 keyboard connector

vEthernet connector

vVGA monitor connector

vThree audio connectors (line in, line out, and microphone)

Expansion

vEmpty drive bays (some models)

vThree 32-bit peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapter slots (supports low-profile adapters only)

vOne accelerated graphics port (AGP) expansion slot (supports low-profile adapters only)

Power

v200 - 230 W power supply with manual voltage selection switch (depending on type)

vAutomatic 50/60 Hz input frequency switching

vAdvanced Power Management support

vAdvanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) support

Security features

vUser and administrator passwords

vSupport for the addition of a rope clip and lockable cable

vSupport for the addition of an integrated cable lock

vStartup sequence control

vStartup without diskette drive, keyboard, or mouse

vUnattended start mode

vDiskette and hard disk I/O control

vSerial and parallel port I/O control

vSecurity profile by device

IBM preinstalled software

The computer might come with preinstalled software. If it does, an operating system, device drivers to support built-in features, and other support programs are included.

Operating systems (preinstalled) (varies by model type)

Note: Not all countries or regions will have these operating systems.

vMicrosoft® Windows® XP Home

vMicrosoft Windows XP Professional

vMicrosoft Windows 2000

4 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Operating systems (tested for compatibility)1

vMicrosoft Windows NT® Workstation Version 4.0

vMicrosoft Windows 98 Second Edition

Physical specifications

This section details the physical specifications for each computer Type.

1.The operating systems listed here are being tested for compatibility at the time this publication goes to press. Additional operating systems might be identified by IBM as compatible with the computer following the publication of this booklet. Corrections and additions to this list are subject to change. To determine if an operating system has been tested for compatibility, check the Web site of the operating system vendor.

Chapter 2. General information 5

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

This section lists the physical specifications for the computer.

Dimensions

Height: 104 mm (4.1 in.)

Width: 360 mm (14.2 in.)

Depth: 412 mm (16.2 in.)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 8.1 kg (18 lb)

Maximum configuration: 9.1 kg (20 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 90 V ac

Maximum: 180 V ac

Input frequency range: 47–53 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 137 V ac

Maximum: 265 V ac

Input frequency range: 57–63 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.25 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 683 Btu/hr (200 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.45 cubic meters per minute (16 cubic feet per minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

For microprocessors less than 2.8 GHz:

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 28 dBA

Operating: 30 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 27 dBA

Operating: 29 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.2 bels

Operating: 4.3 bels

For microprocessors greater than or equal to 2.8 GHz:

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 29 dBA

Operating: 31 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 28 dBA

Operating: 29 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.3 bels

Operating: 4.4 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296. Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

6 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431

This section lists the physical specifications for the computer.

Dimensions

Height: 140 mm (5.5 in.)

Width: 425 mm (16.7 in.)

Depth: 425 mm (16.7 in)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 10.0 kg (22 lb)

Maximum configuration: 11.4 kg (25.0 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 90 V ac

Maximum: 180 V ac

Input frequency range: 47–53 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 137 V ac

Maximum: 265 V ac

Input frequency range: 57–63 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.3 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 785 Btu/hr (230 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.51 cubic meters per minute (18 cubic feet per minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 30 dBA

Operating: 32 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 26 dBA

Operating: 30 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.0 bels

Operating: 4.3 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296.

Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

Chapter 2. General information 7

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

This section lists the physical specifications for the computer.

Dimensions

Height: 413 mm (16.25 in.)

Width: 191 mm (7.5 in.)

Depth: 406 mm (16 in.)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 9.1 kg (20 lb)

Maximum configuration: 10.2 kg (22.5 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 90 V ac

Maximum: 180 V ac

Input frequency range: 47–53 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 137 V ac

Maximum: 265 V ac

Input frequency range: 57–63 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.3 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 785 Btu/hr (230 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.68 cubic meters per minute (24 cubic feet per minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 28 dBA

Operating: 30 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 26 dBA

Operating: 29 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.1 bels

Operating: 4.3 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296.

Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

8 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8196 and 8197

This section lists the physical specifications for the computer.

Dimensions

Height: 398 mm (15.67 in.)

Width: 180 mm (7.08 in.)

Depth: 402 mm (15.82 in.)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 7.6 kg (16.8 lb)

Maximum configuration: 9.97 kg (22 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 90 V ac

Maximum: 180 V ac

Input frequency range: 47–53 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 137 V ac

Maximum: 265 V ac

Input frequency range: 57–63 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.30 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 785 Btu/hr (230 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.68 cubic meters every minute (24 cubic feet every minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

For microprocessors less than 2.8 GHz:

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 28 dBA

Operating: 35 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 25 dBA

Operating: 33 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.0 bels

Operating: 4.7 bels

For microprocessors greater than or equal to 2.8 GHz:

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 33 dBA

Operating: 35 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 30 dBA

Operating: 33 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.4 bels

Operating: 4.7 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296. Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

Chapter 2. General information 9

10 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 3. General Checkout

Note: The fans in this system may turn off under normal operation. This is a noise-level reduction feature, and should not be taken to mean there is something wrong with the system.

The following tools are available to help identify and resolve hardware-related problems.

vIBM Setup Utility program

vPower-On Self-Test (POST)

POST Beep Codes

Error Code Format

vIBM Enhanced Diagnostics program

vProduct recovery utility

Factory Contents

Partial recovery

vRepair utility

Attention:

The drives in the computer you are servicing might have been rearranged or the drive startup sequence changed. Be extremely careful during write operations such as copying, saving or formatting. Data or programs can be overwritten if you select an incorrect drive.

Diagnostic error messages appear when a test program finds a problem with a hardware option. For the test programs to properly determine if a test Passed, Failed or Aborted, the test programs check the error-return code at test completion. See Chapter 4, “IBM Enhanced Diagnostics,” on page 15.

General error messages appear if a problem or conflict is found by an application program, the operating system, or both. For an explanation of these messages, refer to the information supplied with that software package.

Notes:

vBy default, the computer starts up quiet (no beep and no memory count and checkpoint code display) when no errors are detected by POST.

vTo enable beep and memory count and checkpoint code display when a successful POST occurs, do the following:

1.Select Start Options in the IBM Setup Utility program (see Chapter 5, “IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 19).

2.Set Power-On Self-Test to Enhanced.

vBefore replacing any FRUs, ensure that the latest level of BIOS is installed on the system. A down-level BIOS might cause false errors and unnecessary replacement of the system board. For more information on how to determine and obtain the latest level BIOS, see “BIOS levels” on page 112..

vIf multiple error codes are displayed, diagnose the first error code displayed.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

11

001

1.Power-off the computer and all external devices.

2.Make sure that all external cables and power cords are properly connected.

3.Remove the cover and make sure that all cables to the system board are seated properly.

4.Set all monitor controls to the middle position.

5.Power-on all external devices.

6.Power-on the computer.

7.Check the power-on indicator and listen for the fan(s).

DID THE COMPUTER POWER-ON AND STAY ON?

YES, continue to 002 .

NO, go to “Undetermined problems” on page 109.

002

DID YOU HEAR ANY BEEPS WHEN POWERING ON?

YES, go to “Beep symptoms” on page 89.

NO, continue to 003 .

003

IS ANYTHING DISPLAYED ON THE MONITOR SCREEN?

YES, continue to 004 .

NO, make sure that the monitor is working properly. Most monitors have some sort of diagnostic self test. Refer to the manual for your monitor.

If you determine that the monitor is working properly, make sure it is properly connected to the computer. Otherwise, go to “Undetermined problems” on page 109.

004

DID YOU RECEIVE THE EXPECTED RESPONSE?

YES, continue to 005 .

NO, proceed to 006 .

005

Run the Diagnostic programs. If necessary, refer to Chapter 4, “IBM Enhanced Diagnostics,” on page 15.

vIf you receive an error, replace the part that the diagnostic program calls out or go to Chapter 7, “Symptom-to-FRU Index,” on page 69.

vIf an installed device is not recognized by the diagnostics program, that device might be defective.

12 Hardware Maintenance Manual

v If the test stops and you cannot continue, replace the last device tested.

006

IS A POST ERROR CODE DISPLAYED?

If YES, go to “POST error codes” on page 92.

If NO, continue to 007 .

007

1.Power-off the computer.

2.Press and hold the F1 key and power-on the computer to start the IBM Setup Utility program (see Chapter 5, “IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 19). Release the F1 key when you hear beeps.

3.Select Exit, Load Default Settings, and Save and exit the Setup Utility.

4.If the problem persists, continue to 008 .

008

Run the Diagnostic programs. If necessary, refer to Chapter 4, “IBM Enhanced Diagnostics,” on page 15.

vIf you receive an error, replace the part that the diagnostic program calls out or go to Chapter 7, “Symptom-to-FRU Index,” on page 69.

vIf the test stops and you cannot continue, replace the last device tested.

Chapter 3. General Checkout 13

14 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 4. IBM Enhanced Diagnostics

The IBM Enhanced Diagnostics program uses a full range of diagnostic utilities to determine the operating condition of the computer’s hardware components.

For a complete list of error codes and messages, see Chapter 7, “Symptom-to-FRU Index,” on page 69.

Diagnostics program download

To download the Diagnostics program, do the following:

vGo to http://www.ibm.com/.

vSelect Support & downloads.

vSelect Personal computing from the Get product support forlist.

vEnter your the machine type in the Quick Pathbox.

vFollow the links to find the IBM Enhance Diagnostics.

Note: You can download either a diskette image or a startable CD-ROM image (.iso file) of the diagnostics.

Navigating through the diagnostics programs

Use the cursor movement keys to navigate within the menus.

vThe Enter key is used to select a menu item.

vThe Esc key is used to back up to the previous menu.

vFor online help press F1.

Running diagnostics tests

There are four ways to run the diagnostic tests.

1.Using the cursor movement keys, highlight Run Normal Test or Run Quick Test from the Diagnostics menu and then press Enter.

This will automatically run a pre-defined group of tests from each test category. Run Normal Test runs a more extensive set of tests than does Run Quick Test and takes longer to execute.

2.Press F5 to automatically run all selected tests in all categories. See “Test selection” on page 16.

3.From within a test category, press Ctrl-Enter to automatically run only the selected tests in that category. See “Test selection” on page 16.

4.Using the cursor movement keys, highlight a single test within a test category, then press Enter. This will run only that test.

Press Esc at any time to stop the testing process.

Test results, (N/A, PASSED, FAILED, ABORTED), are displayed in the field beside the test description and in the test log. See “Viewing the test log” on page 18.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

15

Test selection

To select one or more tests, use the following procedure.

1.Open the corresponding test category.

2.Using the cursor movement keys, highlight the desired test.

3.Press the space bar.

A selected test is marked by >>. Pressing the space bar again de-selects a test and removes the chevron.

4.Repeat steps 2 and 3 above to select all desired tests.

Test results

Diagnostics test results will produce the following error code format:

Function

Failure Type DeviceID

Date

ChkDigits

Text

Code

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vFunction Code:

Represents the feature or function within the PC.

vFailure Type:

Represents the type of error encountered.

vDeviceID:

Contains the component’s unit-ID which corresponds to either a fixed disk drive, removable media drive, serial or parallel port, processor, specific DIMM, or a device on the PCI bus.

vDate:

Contains the date on which the diagnostic test was run. The date is retrieved from CMOS and displayed using the YYYYMMDD format.

vChkDigits:

Contains a 2-digit check-digit value to ensure the following:

Diagnostics were run on the specified date.

Diagnostics were run on the specified IBM computer.

The diagnostic error code is recorded correctly.

vText:

Description of the error.

Note: See “Diagnostic error codes” on page 70 for error code listings.

Fixed disk advanced test (FDAT)

PC-Doctor’s (PCDR) Fixed-Disk Advanced Test module (FDAT) is a full-featured highly configurable fixed-disk test suite. The configurable capabilities of FDAT allow users to enable or disable specific tests, enable or disable testing features, control the test log detail, alter testing parameters, etc. FDAT will test for and report most commonly found errors on a fixed-disk drive and is able to test up to 128 SCSI and 4 IDE drives (up to 132 total drives). Drive information is gathered through FDAT’s enumeration of available devices and user specific configuration parameters located in the FDAT.INI. FDAT uses information supplied by these features to indicate specifically what devices are available for test, what tests are available for the device, device properties, etc. Modify the FDAT.INI file in PC Doctor for DOS to change testing parameters.

FDAT consists of the following subtests and features.

16 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Fixed-Disk Tests:

vSeek Tests - checks the physical operation of the drive head.

Linear Seek

Random Seek

Min-Max Seek

Butterfly Seek

vVerify Tests - checks the integrity of the data present on the media.

Linear Verify

Random Verify

vSurface Scan Tests - checks the drive media for defects.

Surface Scan (Linear)

Surface Scan (Aggressive) - this is disabled for normal customer use.

Surface Scan (Random)

vSMART - checks the SMART functionality for drives that support SMART.

Start SMART Self-Test

Get SMART test results

Other Test Features:

vWrite-Splice Repair - detects and corrects Error Correction Code errors during Verify tests.

vAuto Spin Down - a gradual spin down of the drive platters to avoid damaging the media.

vManufacturer Log - an in-depth manufacturer supported log of errors on the drive.

Multitasking:

To allow simultaneous testing of multiple hard drives whenever possible, the FDAT module is written as a set of multitasking functions. Each drive under test can run the same test or run a different test at the same time. Each subtest is written to handle a single test pass and all test variables are kept track of in a structure unique for each drive. However, when testing IDE drives, FDAT will not perform simultaneous testing of IDE drives that are attached to the same IDE cable. For example, if FDAT is testing four IDE drives on a PC, it will perform simultaneous testing on drives 1 and 3 first (master drives), then perform tests on 2 and 4 (slave drives). FDAT will also perform simultaneous testing on a master and slave that are on separate IDE cables, but will not perform simultaneous tests on a master and slave on the same IDE cable. This generally increases the amount of time needed to test multiple IDE drives.

Another limitation of FDAT’S multitasking capability is the use of Ultra DMA (UDMA). Only one drive at a time can access the UDMA channel and the UDMA channel buffer must be kept high in order to maintain a speed advantage over other data transfer modes. In order to use the UDMA channel during testing, users must disable the multitasking feature.

Destructive vs non-destructive testing:

Most of the tests found in FDAT are non-destructive. This means that PCDR will preserve any data that is present on the tested media prior to beginning any destructive operations (i.e. write operations). However, users can run certain tests

Chapter 4. IBM Enhanced Diagnostics 17

in destructive mode (i.e. surface scan tests). Destructive tests will speed up testing because FDAT does not preserve the data on the media prior to the test beginning. Unlike non-destructive tests, any data present on the media prior to the test beginning is lost. FDAT allows for enabling or disabling destructive tests, as well as specifying a range of destructive and non-destructive sectors on the tested drive. This is done through the configuration of the FDAT.INI. If destructive and non-destructive ranges somehow overlap, then the overlapped area is considered non-destructive. For example, if users specify both destructive and non-destructive ranges as the same, then the entire drive is tested as non-destructive.

Quick and Full erase - hard drive

The Diagnostics program offers two hard drive format utilities:

vQuick Erase Hard Drive

vFull Erase Hard Drive

The Quick Erase Hard Drive provides a DOS utility that performs the following steps.

vDestroys the Master Boot Record (MBR) on the hard drive.

vDestroys all copies of the FAT Table on all partitions (both the master and backup).

vDestroys the partition table.

vProvides messages that warn the user that this is a non-recoverable process.

The Full Erase Hard Drive provides a DOS utility that performs the following steps.

vPerforms all the steps in Quick Erase.

vProvides a DOS utility that writes random data to all sectors of the hard drive.

vProvide an estimate of time to completion along with a visual representation of completion status.

vProvides messages that warn the user about non-recoverable process.

Important: Make sure that all data is backed up before using the Quick or Full Erase functions.

To select the Quick Erase or Full Erase Hard Drive utility, use the following procedure.

1.Select the UTILITY option on the toolbar and press Enter.

2.Select either the QUICK ERASE or FULL ERASE HARD DISK option and follow the instructions.

Viewing the test log

Errors reported by the diagnostic test will be displayed by the program as a failed test.

To view details of a failure or to view a list of test results, use the following procedure from any test category screen.

vPress F3 to activate the log file.

vPress F3 again to save the file to diskette or F2 to print the file.

18 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 5. IBM Setup Utility program

Attention

A customized setup configuration (other than default settings) might exist on the computer you are servicing. Running the IBM Setup Utility program might alter those settings. Note the current configuration settings and verify that the settings are in place when service is complete.

The IBM Setup Utility program is stored in the electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) of the computer. The IBM Setup Utility program is used to view and change the configuration settings of the computer, regardless of which operating system you are using. However, the operating-system settings might override any similar settings in the IBM Setup Utility program.

This program includes settings for the following:

vSystem Summary

vProduct Data

vDevices and I/O Ports

vStart Options

vDate and Time

vSystem Security

vAdvanced Setup

vPower Management

Starting the IBM Setup Utility program

To start the IBM Setup Utility program, do the following:

1.Power-off the computer and wait for a few seconds until all in-use lights go off.

2.Power-on the computer.

3.When the IBM Setup Utility prompt appears on the screen during start-up, press F1. The IBM Setup Utility menu will appear.

4.Follow the instructions on the screen.

5.When finished, select System Summary to verify that any configuration changes have been accepted.

The IBM Setup Utility might start automatically when POST detects that hardware has been removed or new hardware has been installed in the computer.

Viewing and changing settings

The IBM Setup Utility program menu lists items that identify system configuration topics.

When working with the IBM Setup Utility program menu, you must use the keyboard. The keys used to perform various tasks are displayed at the bottom of each screen.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

19

Exiting from the IBM Setup Utility program

When you finish viewing or changing settings, press Esc to return to the IBM Setup Utility program menu (you might have to press Esc several times). If you want to save the new settings, select Save Settings or Save and exit the Setup Utility. Otherwise, your changes will not be saved.

Using passwords

The use of passwords provide security for the computer and data. There are two kinds of passwords: a user password and an administrator password. You do not have to set a password of either type to use the computer. However, if you decide to set either one, read the following sections.

User password

The user password feature deters unauthorized persons from gaining access to the computer.

Administrator password

Setting an administrator password deters unauthorized persons from changing configuration settings. If you are responsible for maintaining the settings of several computers, you might want to set an administrator password.

After you set an administrator password, a password prompt is displayed each time you try to access the IBM Setup Utility program. If you type the wrong password, you will see an error message. If you type the wrong password three times, you must turn the computer off and start again.

If both the user and administrator passwords are set, you can type either password. However, to change any configuration settings, you must use your administrator password.

Setting, changing, and deleting a password

To set, change, or delete a password, do the following:

Note: A password can be any combination of up to seven characters (A- Z, a-z, and 0-9).

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 19).

2.From the IBM Setup Utility program menu, select Security Set Passwords. Read the information displayed on the right side of the screen.

20 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Using Security Profile by Device

Security Profile by Device is used to enable or disable user access to the following devices:

IDE controller

When this feature is set to Disable, all devices connected to the

 

IDE controller (such as hard disk drives or the CD-ROM drive)

 

are disabled and will not be displayed in the system

 

configuration.

Diskette Drive Access

When this feature is set to Disable, the diskette drive cannot be

 

accessed.

Diskette Write Protect

When this feature is set to Enable, all diskettes are treated as if

 

they are write-protected.

To set Security Profile by Device, do the following:

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 19).

2.From the IBM Setup Utility program menu, select Security.

3.Select Security Profile by Device.

4.Select the desired devices and settings and press Enter.

5.Return to the IBM Setup Utility program menu and select Exit and then Save Settings or Save and exit the Setup Utility.

Note: If you do not want to save the settings, select Exit the Setup Utility without saving.

Using IDE Drives Setup

In addition to listing the different IDE devices, there are options for configuring the serial and parallel IDE controllers.

Parallel ATA

This setting allows the user to disable one or both of the parallel

 

IDE controllers.

Native Mode Operation This setting is only available when the serial ATA controller is enabled. This allows the user to specify whether the parallel and serial ATA controllers will operate in legacyor nativemode. By default, they will operate in native mode unless both parallel ATA controllers are populated and a serial ATA drive is present. Then the serial ATA drive will become nativemode. The user can select Automatic or the serial ATA controller to run in nativemode. However, running in nativemode might not work with older operating systems.

To configure IDE Drives Setup, do the following:

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 19).

2.From the IBM Setup Utility program menu, select Devices.

3.Select IDE Drives Setup.

4.Select the desired devices and settings and press Enter.

5.Return to the IBM Setup Utility program menu and select Exit and then Save Settings.

Chapter 5. IBM Setup Utility program 21

Selecting a startup device

If the computer does not start up (boot) from a device such as the CD-ROM, diskette, or hard disk as expected, use one of the following procedures to select a startup device.

Selecting a temporary startup device

Use this procedure to startup from any boot device.

Note: Not all CDs, hard disks, and diskettes are startable (bootable).

1.Turn off the computer.

2.Turn on the computer and look for the following prompt on the logo screen:

(To interrupt normal startup, press Enter)

3.Press the Enter key.

4.When the Startup Interrupt Menu displays, press F12.

5.Double click the desired startup device from the Alternate startup devices.

Note: Selecting a startup device from this list does not permanently change the startup sequence.

Changing the startup device sequence

To view or permanently change the configured startup device sequence, do the following:

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 19).

2.Select Startup.

3.Select Startup Sequence. See the information displayed on the right side of the screen.

4.Select the devices for the Primary Startup Sequence, the Automatic Startup Sequence, and the Error Startup Sequence.

5.Select Exit from the IBM Setup Utility menu and then Save Settings or Save and exit the Setup Utility.

If you have changed these settings and want to return to the default settings, select

Load Default Settings on the Exit menu.

22 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs

Important: Before you install or remove any option, read “Safety information” on page 247. These precautions and guidelines will help you work safely.

FRU replacements are to be done by trained service technicians only.

Note: Some FRUs are also CRUs (Customer Replaceable Units). For CRU information see Chapter 9, “Parts listing,” on page 119.

Locating connectors on the front

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the front of the computer.

1USB connector 2USB connector

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the front of the computer.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005

23

1USB connector 2USB connector

24 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the front of the computer.

Note: Not all computer models will have the following connectors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1IEEE 1394 connector

4USB connector

 

2Microphone connector

5USB connector

 

3Headphone connector

 

 

Types 8196 and 8197

The following illustration shows the locations of the USB connectors on the front of the computer.

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 25

1USB connector 2USB connector

26 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Locating the connectors on the rear

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the rear of the computer.

1Mouse connector 2Parallel connector 3USB connectors 4Ethernet connector 5Audio line in connector 6Power connector 7PCI adapter connectors

8AGP adapter connector 9Audio line out connector 10Microphone connector 11USB connectors 12VGA monitor connector 13Serial connector 14Keyboard connector

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on the computer.

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the rear of the computer.

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 27

1Power connector 2Mouse connector 3Parallel connector 4USB connectors 5Ethernet connector 6Audio line in connector 7PCI adapter connectors

8AGP adapter connector 9Audio line out connector 10Microphone connector 11USB connectors 12VGA monitor connector 13Serial connector 14Keyboard connector

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on the computer.

28 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the rear of the computer.

1Power connector 2Mouse connector 3Keyboard connector 4Serial connector 5Parallel connector 6VGA monitor connector 7USB connectors

8USB connectors 9Ethernet connector 10Microphone connector 11Audio line out connector 12Audio line in connector 13AGP adapter connector 14PCI adapter connectors

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on the computer.

Types 8196 and 8197

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the rear of the computer.

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 29

1Power connector 2Mouse connector 3Keyboard connector 4Serial connector 5Parallel connector 6VGA monitor connector 7USB connectors

8USB connectors 9Ethernet connector 10Microphone connector 11Audio line out connector 12Audio line in connector 13AGP adapter connector 14PCI adapter connectors

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on the computer.

Removing the cover

Important: Read“Safety information” on page 247 and“Handling electrostatic discharge-sensitive devices” on page 250 before removing the cover.

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Press the buttons on the sides of the computer and pivot the rear end of the cover up toward the front of the computer.

30 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Press the buttons on the sides of the computer and pivot the rear end of the cover up toward the front of the computer.

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Press the cover-release button on the left side cover and remove the cover.

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 31

Types 8196 and 8197

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Remove the two screws at the rear of the left side cover and slide the cover to the rear to remove.

32 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 33

Locating components

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in the computer.

1Power supply

2PCI adapter connector 3AGP adapter connector 4Support bar

5Memory connector 6Hard disk drive 7Optical drive 8Diskette drive

34 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in the computer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Optical drive

7 Memory connectors

2USB connector

8 Microprocessor and heat sink

3USB connector

9 AGP adapter connector

4Optional drive bay

10Battery

5Hard disk drive

11PCI adapter connectors

6Diskette drive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 35

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in the computer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Microprocessor and heat sink

 

4PCI adapter

2Memory connectors

 

5Power supply

3AGP adapter connector

 

 

36 Hardware Maintenance Manual

Types 8196 and 8197

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in the computer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Microprocessor and heat sink

 

4PCI adapter connectors

2Memory connectors

 

5PCI adapter

3AGP adapter connector

 

6Power supply

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 37

Identifying parts on the system board (all machine types)

1 Microprocessor

2 Fan sink connectors 3 Memory connector 1 4 Memory connector 2 5 Memory connector 3 6 Memory connector 4 7 Power connector

8 Diskette drive connector

9 PATA primary IDE connector 10PATA secondary IDE connector

11SATA 1 IDE connector 12SATA 2 IDE connector 13Security daughter card connector 14Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper 15Battery

16SCSI LED connector 17PCI slots

18Front panel audio connector 19CD-ROM audio connector 20AGP slot

Replacing memory (all machine types)

The computer has four connectors for installing dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) that provide up to a maximum of 4.0 GB of system memory.

When installing memory modules, the following rules apply:

vSystem memory is divided into two channels (channel A and B). memory connectors 1 and 2 are channel A, and memory connectors 3 and 4 are channel B.

vIf memory connectors 1 and 3 (or 2 and 4) are filled with the same technology and size of memory, the system operates in dual channel mode.

vUse 2.5 V, 184-pin, 333 MHz double data rate synchronous dynamic random access memory (DDR SDRAM).

vUse 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB or 1.0 GB (when available) memory modules in any combination.

vMemory modules are 25.4 mm (1.0 inches) in height.

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Note: Only DDR SDRAM memory modules can be used.

To replace a memory module:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 30.

2.To locate the memory connectors. See “Identifying parts on the system board (all machine types)” on page 38.

3.Remove the memory module being replaced by opening the retaining clips as shown.

4.Make sure the notches in the new memory module align with the tabs on the connector. Push or insert the memory module straight down into the connector until the retaining clips close.

5. Go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 63.

Replacing adapters

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

These type computers have three expansion slots for PCI adapters and one slot used for an AGP adapter. Adapters must be low profile. The computer supports adapters up to 168 mm (6.6 inches) long.

1. Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 30.

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2.Pivot one of the drive bay latch handles toward the front of the computer and then pivot the drive bay cage upward, as shown, until it is latched in the up position. Repeat this procedure for the remaining drive bay.

3. Remove the support bar by pulling it outward from the computer.

4. Remove the adapter-slot-cover latch.

5.Remove the adapter being replaced.

6.Remove the new adapter from its static-protective package.

7.Install the new adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

8.Install the adapter-slot-cover latch.

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9.Clear any cables that might impede the replacement of the drive bays.

10.Replace the support bar and pivot the two drive bays back to their original positions.

11.Go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 63.

Types 8128, 8187, 8188, 8193, 8414, and 8431

These type computers have three expansion slots for PCI adapters and one slot used for an AGP adapter. You can install an adapter up to 340 mm (13.4 inches) long.

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 30.

2.Remove the adapter-slot-cover latch.

3.Remove the adapter being replaced.

4.Remove the new adapter from its static-protective package.

5.Install the adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

6.Install the adapter-slot-cover latch.

7. Go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 63.

Chapter 6. Replacing FRUs 41

Types 8189, 8190, 8194, 8195, 8415, 8432, and 8433

These type computers have three expansion slots for PCI adapters and one slot used for an AGP adapter. You can install an adapter up to 228 mm (9 inches) long.

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 30.

2.Remove the adapter-slot-cover latch.

3.Remove the adapter being replaced.

4.Remove the new adapter from its static-protective package.

5.Install the adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

6.Install the adapter-slot-cover latch.

7. Go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 63.

Types 8196 and 8197

These type computers have three expansion slots for PCI adapters. You can install an adapter up to 228 mm (9 inches) long.

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 30.

2.Remove the screw securing the adapter in the slot.

3.Remove the adapter being replaced.

4.Remove the new adapter from its static-protective package.

5.Install the adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

6.Secure the adapter with the screw as shown.

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7. Go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 63.

Replacing internal drives

This section provides information and instructions for replacing internal drives.

vHard disk drives

vCD drives or DVD drives

vRemovable media drives

Note: These different drives are also referred to as integrated drive electronics (IDE) drives.

Internal drives are installed in bays. In this book, the bays are referred to as bay 1, bay 2, and so on.

When you install an internal drive, it is important to note what type and size of drive that you can install in each bay. Also, it is important to correctly connect the internal drive cables to the installed drive.

Types 8185, 8186, 8192, 8413, and 8430

Drive bay information

Any bay that does not have a drive installed has a static shield and bay panel installed.

The following illustration shows the locations of the drive bays.

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The following list describes some of the drives that you can install in each bay and their height requirements:

Bay 1 and Bay 3 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

Bay 2 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

Removing a drive

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 30.

2.Pivot the drive-bay latch handle toward the front of the computer and then pivot the drive-bay cages upward, as shown, until latched in the upright position.

3.Disconnect the signal cable and power supply cable from the drive being replaced.

Note: Take note of the location of any cables you disconnect. You might have to disconnect cables to other drives to gain access to the drive you are removing.

4.For the hard disk drive and the CD drive, you can lift the tray out of the computer.

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+ 240 hidden pages