IBM 81Y, 7RY, 71Y, 6RY, 61Y, 8RY User Manual

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Hardware Maintenance Manual

IBM

xSeries 250

Hardware Maintenance Manual

IBM

xSeries 250

Note:

Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information under “Notices” on page 215.

First Edition (March 2001)

The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law:

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.

This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time.

This publication was developed for products and services offered in the United States of America. IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries, and the information is subject to change without notice. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the products, services, and features available in your area.

Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.

© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1999. All rights reserved.

US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

About this manual

This manual contains diagnostic information, a Symptom-to-FRU index, service information, error codes, error messages, and configuration information for the IBM®

xSeries 250, Models 6RY, 7RY, 8RY, 61Y, 71Y, 81Y.

Important: This manual is intended for trained servicers who are familiar with IBM PC Server products.

Important safety information

Be sure to read all caution and danger statements in this book before performing any of the instructions.

Leia todas as instruções de cuidado e perigo antes de executar qualquer operação.

Prenez connaissance de toutes les consignes de type Attention et

Danger avant de procéder aux opérations décrites par les instructions.

Lesen Sie alle Sicherheitshinweise, bevor Sie eine Anweisung ausführen.

Accertarsi di leggere tutti gli avvisi di attenzione e di pericolo prima di effettuare qualsiasi operazione.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999

iii

Lea atentamente todas las declaraciones de precaución y peligro ante de llevar a cabo cualquier operación.

Online support

Use the World Wide Web (WWW) to download Diagnostic, BIOS Flash, and Device Driver files.

File download address is:

http://www.us.pc.ibm.com/files.html

IBM online addresses

The HMM manuals online address is:

http://www.us.pc.ibm.com/cdt/hmm.html

The IBM PC Company Support Page is:

http://www.us.pc.ibm.com/support/index.html

The IBM PC Company Home Page is:

http://www.pc.ibm.com

iv Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Contents

About this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

Important safety information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Online support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv IBM online addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

General checkout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

General information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Features and specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Server features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Reliability, availability, and serviceability . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Controls and indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Information LED panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Diagnostics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Diagnostic tools overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 POST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 POST beep codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 POST error messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Event/error logs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Small computer system interface messages . . . . . . . . . 14 Solving ServeRAID problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ServeRAID controller messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ServeRAID startup messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ServeRAID ISPR, BCS, and ECS POST error codes .

19

Rebuilding a defunct drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Steps for recovering from defunct drives . . . . . . 24 Rebuilding a hot-swap drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Recovering from an incomplete format of a physical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Recovering from a failure in a failover-environment 25 Replacing a non-hot-plug controller in a failover pair.

25

Diagnostic programs and error messages . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Text messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Starting the diagnostic programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Viewing the test log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Diagnostic error message tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Light path diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Power supply LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Diagnostic panel LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Light path diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Power checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Temperature checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Recovering BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Replacing the battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Diagnosing errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Troubleshooting the Ethernet controller. . . . . . . . . . 35 Network connection problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Ethernet controller troubleshooting chart. . . . . . 36 Ethernet controller messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare server ODI driver messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 NDIS 4.0 (Windows NT) driver messages . . . . . 40 UNIX messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Configuring the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

Using the Configuration/Setup Utility program . . . .

45

Starting the Configuration/Setup Utility program

45

Choices available from the Configuration/Setup main menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Using passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Power-on password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Administrator password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Using the SCSISelect utility program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Starting the SCSISelect utility program . . . . . . . . . . 51 Choices available from the SCSISelect menu . . . . . 51

Installing options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Major components of the xSeries 250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Component locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 I/O board component locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Processor board component locations. . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Processor board LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Processor board connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Processor board jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Memory board component locations . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Memory board connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Memory board LED locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Working inside the server with the power on . . . . . 59 Removing the server top cover and bezel . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Removing the top cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Removing the media-bay bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Removing the front trim bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Working with adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Adapter considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Installing a hot-plug adapter (slots 3 through 6) . . . 62 Installing a non-hot-plug PCI adapter (slots 1 and 2). .

64

Cabling example for the ServeRAID adapter . . . . . . . . 66 LVD SCSI backplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 LVD SCSI backplane removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 SCSI repeater card installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Installing internal drives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Internal drive bays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Installing a hot-swap hard disk drive . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Installing a 5.25-inch removable-media drive . . . . . 82 Installing memory-module kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Installing a microprocessor kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Installing a hot-swap power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Replacing a hot-swap fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Completing the installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Installing the front trim bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Installing the media-bay bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Installing the top cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Reconfiguring the server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Connecting external options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Input/output ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Parallel port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Viewing or changing the parallel-port assignments

94

Parallel port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Video port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Keyboard port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Auxiliary-device (pointing device) port . . . . . . . . . . 97 Ultra2 (LVD) SCSI ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

SCSI cabling requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Setting SCSI IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 SCSI connector pin-number assignments . . . . . . 98 Serial ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999

v

Viewing or changing the serial-port assignments 99 Serial-port connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Universal Serial Bus ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 USB cables and hubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 USB-port connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Ethernet port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Configuring the Ethernet controller. . . . . . . . . . 101 Failover for redundant Ethernet. . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Ethernet port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Advanced System Management ports . . . . . . . . . . 104 Cabling the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Installing the server in a rack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

FRU information (service only). . . . . . . . 107

Diagnostic switch card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Disconnecting the shuttle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Front LED card assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 I/O Legacy board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Memory card removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 PCI switch card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Power backplane assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Processor/PCI backplane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Removing the shuttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Using IBM ServeRAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Understanding RAID technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Stripe-unit size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Supported RAID levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Understanding RAID level-0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Understanding RAID Level-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Understanding RAID Level-1 Enhanced . . . . . 120 Understanding RAID Level-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Understanding RAID Level-5 Enhanced . . . . . 123 Selecting a RAID level and performance tuning 125 Drive state descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Physical drive state descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Logical drive state descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

Configuring controllers using the ServeRAID Manager program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

Using the ServeRAID Manager program interface 127 Using utility programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Using FlashMan, the IBM ServeRAID ROM Update program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Using the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program . . 130

Viewing the controller status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Viewing the configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Using the advanced configuration functions . . 132 Running the IPSSEND program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Using the IPSSEND program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Server roll-out functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Error-recovery functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Problem-isolation and debug commands . . . . . 136 RAID Configuration commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Starting the IPSMON program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Using the IPSMON program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Symptom-to-FRU index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Beep symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 No beep symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Diagnostic panel LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Diagnostic error codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Error symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Power supply LED errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 POST error codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 ServeRAID POST (ISPR) error codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161

ServeRAID POST (ISPR) error procedures. . . . . . . 162 ServeRAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 SCSI error codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Temperature error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Fan error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Power error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 System shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

Power related system shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Temperature related system shutdown. . . . . . . . . . 168 DASD checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Host Built-In Self Test (BIST) checkout. . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 I2C bus fault messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Undetermined problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

Parts listing (Type 8665) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173

Part A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Part B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Power cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

Related service information . . . . . . . . . . 179

Safety information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 General safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Electrical safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Safety inspection guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Handling electrostatic discharge-sensitive devices 183 Grounding requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Safety notices (multi-lingual translations) . . . . . . . 183

Send us your comments! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Problem determination tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216

vi Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

General checkout

The server diagnostic programs are stored in upgradable read-only memory (ROM) on the system board. These programs are the primary method of testing the major components of the server: The system board, Ethernet controller, video controller, RAM, keyboard, mouse (pointing device), diskette drive, serial ports, hard drives, and parallel port. You can also use them to test some external devices. See “Diagnostic programs and error messages” on page 25.

Also, if you cannot determine whether a problem is caused by the hardware or by the software, you can run the diagnostic programs to confirm that the hardware is working properly.

When you run the diagnostic programs, a single problem might cause several error messages. When this occurs, work to correct the cause of the first error message. After the cause of the first error message is corrected, the other error messages might not occur the next time you run the test.

A failed system might be part of a shared DASD cluster (two or more systems sharing the same external storage device(s)). Prior to running diagnostics, verify that the failing system is not part of a shared DASD cluster.

A system might be part of a cluster if:

The customer identifies the system as part of a cluster.

One or more external storage units are attached to the system and at least one of the attached storage units is additionally attached to another system or unidentifiable source.

One or more systems are located near the failing system.

If the failing system is suspected to be part of a shared DASD cluster, all diagnostic tests can be run except diagnostic tests which test the storage unit (DASD residing in the storage unit) or the storage adapter attached to the storage unit.

Notes:

1.For systems that are part of a shared DASD cluster, run one test at a time in looped mode. Do not run all tests in looped mode, as this could enable the DASD diagnostic tests.

2.If multiple error codes are displayed, diagnose the first error code displayed.

3.If the computer hangs with a POST error, go to the “Symptom-to-FRU index” on page 143.

4.If the computer hangs and no error is displayed, go to “Undetermined problems” on page 170.

5.Power supply problems, see “Symptom-to-FRU index” on page 143.

6.Safety information, see “Safety information” on page 180.

7.For intermittent problems, check the error log; see “POST error messages” on page 14.

1.IS THE SYSTEM PART OF A CLUSTER?

© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999

1

YES. Schedule maintenance with the customer. Shut down all systems related to the cluster. Run storage test.

NO. Go to step 2.

2.THE SYSTEM IS NOT PART OF A CLUSTER.

Power-off the computer and all external devices.

Check all cables and power cords.

Set all display controls to the middle position.

Power-on all external devices.

Power-on the computer.

Record any POST error messages displayed on the screen. If an error is displayed, look up the first error in the “POST error codes” on page 155.

Check the information LED panel System Error LED; if on, see “Diagnostic panel LEDs” on page 146.

Check the System Error Log. If an error was recorded by the system, see “Symptom-to-FRU index” on page 143.

Start the Diagnostic Programs. See “Diagnostic programs and error messages” on page 25.

Check for the following responses:

a.One beep.

b.Readable instructions or the Main Menu.

3.DID YOU RECEIVE BOTH OF THE CORRECT RESPONSES?

NO. Find the failure symptom in “Symptom-to-FRU index” on page 143.

YES. Run the Diagnostic Programs. If necessary, refer to “Diagnostic programs and error messages” on page 25.

If you receive an error, go to “Symptom-to-FRU index” on page 143.

If the diagnostics completed successfully and you still suspect a problem, see “Undetermined problems” on page 170.

2 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

General information

The IBM xSeries 250 server is a high-performance server with the capability of microprocessor upgrade to a symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) server. It is ideally suited for networking environments that require superior microprocessor performance, efficient memory management, flexibility, and large amounts of reliable data storage.

Performance, ease of use, reliability, and expansion capabilities were key considerations during the design of the server. These design features make it possible for you to customize the system hardware to meet your needs today, while providing flexible expansion capabilities for the future.

The xSeries 250 server comes with a three-year limited warranty and 90-Day IBM Start Up Support. If you have access to the World Wide Web, you can obtain up-to- date information about the server model and other IBM server products at the following World Wide Web address: http://www.ibm.com/eserver/xseries

Features and specifications

The following provides a summary of the features and specifications for the xSeries 250 server.

Microprocessor:

Intel® Pentium®III Xeon™

32 KB of level-1 cache

1 MB of Level-2 cache (min.)

Expandable to four microprocessors

Memory:

Maximum: 16GB

Type: ECC, SDRAM, Registered DIMMs

Slots: 4-way interleaved, 16 slots

Drives standard:

Diskette: 1.44 MB

CD-ROM: IDE

Expansion bays:

Hot-swap: 10 slim high

Non-hot-swap: Two 5.25-inch

LVD SCSI Backplane:

Ultra160 capable

Two SCSI channels, each with five connectors, in a split configuration

Supports a maximum of 10 slim-high hard disk drives

PCI expansion slots:

Four 33 MHz 64-bit hot-plug

Two 66 MHz 64-bit non-hot-plug

Hot-swap power supplies:

250 W (115-230 V ac)

Minimum: Two

© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999

3

Maximum: Four

Three for redundancy

Redundant cooling:

Four hot-swap fan assemblies

Video:

S3 video controller

Compatible with SVGA and VGA

4 MB video memory

Size

Height: 356 mm (14 in.)

Depth: 650 mm (25.6 in.)

Width: 440 mm (17.3 in.)

Weight: 34.4 kg (76 lb.) to 61 kg (134 lb.) depending upon configuration

Integrated functions:

Advanced System Management processor

Dual Ultra-2 (LVD) SCSI controller, one external port, one internal port

One 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX AMD Ethernet controller

Two serial ports

One parallel port

Two Universal Serial Bus ports

Keyboard port

Mouse port

Video port

One management port

Two Advanced System Management Interconnect ports

Acoustical noise emissions:

Sound power, idling: 6.3 bel maximum

Sound power, operating: 6.3 bel maximum

Sound pressure, idle: 49 dBa maximum

Sound pressure, operating: 49 dBa maximum

Environment:

Air temperature:

Server on: 10º to 35º C (50º to 95º F). Altitude: 0 to 914 m (3000 ft.)

Server on: 10º to 32º C (50º to 89.6º F). Altitude: 914 m (3000 ft.) to 2133 m (7000 ft.)

Server off: 10º to 43º C (50º to 110º F). Maximum altitude: 2133 m (7000 ft.)

Humidity:

Server on: 8% to 80%

Server off: 8% to 80%

Heat output:

Approximate heat output in British Thermal Units (BTU) per hour:

Minimum configuration:1023.9 BTU

Maximum configuration: 2764.6 BTU

Electrical input:

Sine-wave input (50-60 Hz) required

Input voltage low range:

Minimum: 90 V ac

Maximum: 137 V ac

4 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Input voltage high range:

Minimum: 180 V ac

Maximum: 265 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) approximately:

Minimum: 0.08 kVA

Maximum: 0.52 kVA

Server features

The unique design of the server takes advantage of advancements in symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), data storage, and memory protection. The server combines:

Impressive performance using an innovative approach to SMP

The server supports up to four Pentium III Xeon microprocessors. The server comes with one microprocessor installed; you can install additional microprocessors to enhance performance and provide SMP capability.

Integrated disk-array subsystem (optional)

Although many operating systems provide software fault tolerance through mirroring, IBM provides hardware fault tolerance through the redundant array of independent disks (RAID) controller. The IBM ServeRAID™ controller is a standard feature. It provides three channels and supports RAID levels 0, 1, 1E, 5, and 5E.

Large data-storage and hot-swap capabilities

All models of the server support up to 10 slim-high disk drives. The hot-swap feature enables you to remove and replace hard disk drives without turning off the server.

Hot-plug PCI adapter capabilities

The server has four hot-plug slots for PCI adapters. With operating system support, you can replace failing hot-plug PCI adapters without turning off the server. If the hot-add feature is supported by the operating system and the PCI adapter, you can also add PCI adapters in these slots without turning off the server.

Redundant cooling and power capabilities

The redundant cooling and hot-swap capabilities of the fans in the server enable continued operation if one of the fans fails, because you can replace a failing fan without turning off the server.

The server comes standard with three 250-watt power supplies, which support redundancy for a typical configuration. You can install one additional power supply.

Large system memory

The memory bus in the server supports up to 16 GB of system memory. The memory controller provides error correcting code (ECC) support for up to 16 industry-standard, 3.3 V, 168-pin, 8-byte, registered, dual inline memory modules (DIMMs). The memory controller also provides Chipkill™ memory protection. Chipkill memory protection is a technology that protects the system from component failure on a DIMM.

System-management capabilities

The server comes with a Advanced System Management Processor. This processor enables you to manage the functions of the server locally and remotely. The Advanced System Management Processor also provides system monitoring, event recording, and dial-out alert capability.

General information 5

Note: The Advanced System Management Processor is sometimes referred to as the service processor.

Refer to “Advanced System Management ports” on page 104 for more information.

Integrated network environment support

The server comes with an Ethernet controller. This Ethernet controller has an interface for connecting to 10-Mbps or 100-Mbps networks. The server automatically selects between 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX. The controller provides full-duplex (FDX) capability, which enables simultaneous transmission and reception of data on the Ethernet local area network (LAN).

Redundant network-interface card

The addition of an optional, redundant network interface card (NIC) provides a failover capability to a redundant Ethernet connection. If a problem occurs with the primary Ethernet connection, all Ethernet traffic associated with this primary connection is automatically switched to the redundant NIC. This switching occurs without data loss and without user intervention.

IBM ServerGuide CDs

The ServerGuide CDs included with the server provide programs to help you set up the server and install the network operating system (NOS). The ServerGuide program detects the hardware options that are installed, and provides the correct configuration program and device drivers. In addition, the ServerGuide CDs include a variety of application programs for the server.

Reliability, availability, and serviceability

Three of the most important features in server design are reliability, availability, and serviceability (RAS). These factors help to ensure the integrity of the data stored on the server; that the server is available when you want to use it; and that should a failure occur, you can easily diagnose and repair the failure with minimal inconvenience.

The following is an abbreviated list of the RAS features that the server supports.

Active PCI (hot-plug) adapter slots

Alert on LAN™ capability

Ambient temperature monitoring

Automatic error retry/recovery

Automatic restart after a power failure

Backup basic input/output system (BIOS) switching under the control of the service processor

Built-in, menu-driven electronically erasable programmable ROM (EEPROM) based diagnostics

Built-in temperature/fan/voltages monitoring

Chipkill memory protection

Cooling fans with speed-sensing capability (hot-swap)

Error codes and messages

Error correcting code (ECC) L2 cache

ECC FSBs

ECC memory

Fast power-on self-test (POST)

Fault-resistant startup

45° C (113° F) normal operating temperature for hard disk drives

Hot-plug Universal Serial bus (USB) keyboard and mouse

Hot-swap drive bays

Hot-swap hard disk drives

6 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Information and diagnostic light-emitting diode (LED) panels

Integrated Advanced System Management processor subsystem provides control for remote system management

Light Path Diagnostics™ (LED panel)

Memory scrubbing and Predictive Failure Analysis™ (PFA) (background and real time)

Menu-driven setup, system configuration, SCSISelect configuration, and diagnostic programs

Microcode and diagnostic levels available

NIC failover support

Parity checking on the small computer system interface (SCSI) bus and PCI buses

Power and temperature monitoring

Power Managed - Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) level

Power-on self-test (POST)

Power-supply redundancy monitoring

Predictive Failure Analysis™ (PFA) alerts

Processor serial number access

Redundant Ethernet capabilities (with optional adapter)

Redundant hot-swap cooling

Redundant hot-swap power supplies

Remote Connect

Remote system problem-determination support

Standard cables present detection

Standby voltage for system management features and monitoring

System auto-configuring from a configuration menu

System error logging (POST and Advanced System Management processor)

System management monitoring via Intra-Integrated Circuit (I2C) bus

Upgradable flash read-only memory (ROM) resident code

Upgradable POST, basic input/output system (BIOS), diagnostics, and Advanced System Management processor microcode

Vital Product Data (VPD) on processors, processor board, I/O board, power supplies, hard disk drive backplane, power backplane, and voltage regulator modules (VRMs)

Wake on LAN™ capability

Wake on Ring capability

Windows NT failover support

xSeries Server Management

Controls and indicators

The following illustration shows the controls and indicators on the server.

General information 7

Information LED panel

Power-control button

Reset button

Diskette drive in-use light

Diskette-eject button

CD-ROM drive in-use light

CD-ROM eject/load button

 

 

 

Hard-disk drive

 

 

 

Hard-disk drive

 

activity light

status light

Hard-disk drive status light:

Each of the hot-swap drives has a status light. When this amber light is on continuously, the drive has failed. When the light flashes slowly (one flash per second), the drive is being rebuilt. When the light flashes rapidly (three flashes per second) the controller is identifying the drive.

Hard-disk activity light:

Each of the hot-swap drives has a hard-disk activity light. When this green light is flashing, the drive is being accessed.

CD-ROM eject/load button:

Press this button to eject or retract the CD-ROM tray.

CD-ROM drive in-use light:

When this light is on, the CD-ROM drive is being accessed.

Diskette-eject button:

Press this button to eject a diskette from the drive.

Diskette drive in-use light:

When this light is on, the diskette drive is being accessed.

Reset button:

Press this button to reset the server and run the power-on self-test (POST).

Power control button:

Press this button to manually turn on or off the server.

CAUTION:

The power control button on the device and/or the power switch on the power supply do not turn off the electrical current supplied to the device. The device also might have more than one power cord. To remove all

8 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

electrical current from the device, ensure that all power cords are disconnected from the power source.

1 2 3

You can start the server in several ways:

You can turn on the server by pressing the Power Control button on the front of the server.

Note: After you plug the power cords of your server into electrical outlets, wait 20 seconds before pressing the Power Control button. During this time the system-management processor is initializing and the Power Control button does not respond.

If the server is turned on, a power failure occurs, and unattendedstart mode is enabled in the Configuration/Setup utility program, the server will start automatically when power is restored.

If AC power is present, the server is off, and the wake-up feature is enabled in the Configuration/Setup utility program, the wake-up feature will turn on the server at the set time.

If AC power is present, the server is off, and ring signal detect is enabled in the Configuration/Setup utility program, you can turn on the server by telephone input.

The Advanced System Management Processor also can turn on the server. You can turn off the server in several ways:

You can turn off the server by pressing the Power Control button on the front of the server. Pressing the Power Control button starts an orderly shutdown of the operating system, if this feature is supported by your operating system, and places the server in standby mode.

Note: After turning off the server, wait at least 5 seconds before pressing the Power Control button to power the server on again.

You can press and hold the Power Control button for more than 4 seconds to cause an immediate shutdown of the server and place the server in standby mode. You can use this feature if the operating system stalls.

You can disconnect the server power cords from the electrical outlets to shut off all power to the server.

Note: Wait about 15 seconds after disconnecting the power cords for your system to stop running. Watch for the System Power light on the operator information panel to stop blinking.

Information LED panel:

The lights on this panel give status information for the server. See “Information LED panel” on page 10.

General information 9

Information LED panel

The following illustration shows the status lights on the Information LED panel.

POST-complete

System power

 

OK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

System error

Hard disk drive

1

2

3

4

100

LINK

TX

activity

 

 

 

 

MB

OK

RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information

 

Processor

 

Ethernet speed

Ethernet-link

Ethernet

 

activity

 

 

 

status

 

transmit/receive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

activity

System power light:

When this green light is on, power is present in the server. When this light flashes, the server is in standby mode (the system power supply is turned off and ac current is present). When this light is off, the power subsystem, the ac power, or a light has failed.

Attention: If the system power light is off, it does not mean there is no electrical current present in the server. The light might be burned out. To remove all electrical current from the server, you must unplug the server power cords from the electrical outlets or from the uninterruptible power device.

POST-complete light:

This green light is on when the power-on self-test (POST) completes without any errors.

Hard disk drive activity light:

This green light flickers when there is activity on a hard disk drive.

Information light:

When this amber light is on, the server power supplies are nonredundant or some other noncritical event has occurred. The event is recorded in the Event log. See “Choices available from the Configuration/Setup main menu” on page 46. A light on the diagnostic panel may also be on; see “Diagnostic panel LEDs” on page 29.

System error light:

This amber light is on when a system error occurs. A light on the diagnostics LED panel will also be on to further isolate the error. (For more information, see “Diagnostic panel LEDs” on page 29.)

Ethernet transmit/receive activity light:

When this green light is on, there is activity between the server from the network.

Ethernet-link status light:

When this green light is on, there is an active connection on the Ethernet port.

10 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Ethernet speed 100 Mbps:

When this green light is on, the Ethernet speed is 100 Mbps. When the light is off, the Ethernet speed is 10 Mbps.

Processor activity light:

One or more of these green lights are on when there is microprocessor activity. The number of lights that are on indicates the number of microprocessors with activity.

General information 11

12 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Diagnostics

Diagnostic tools overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 POST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 POST beep codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 POST error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Event/error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Small computer system interface messages . . . . . 14 Solving ServeRAID problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ServeRAID controller messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ServeRAID startup messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ServeRAID ISPR, BCS, and ECS POST error codes . 19

Rebuilding a defunct drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Steps for recovering from defunct drives . . . . . . . 24 Rebuilding a hot-swap drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Recovering from an incomplete format of a physical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Recovering from a failure in a failover-environment 25

Replacing a non-hot-plug controller in a failover pair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Diagnostic programs and error messages . . . . . . . 25

Text messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Starting the diagnostic programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Viewing the test log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Diagnostic error message tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Light path diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Power supply LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Diagnostic panel LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Light path diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Power checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Temperature checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Recovering BIOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Replacing the battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Diagnosing errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Troubleshooting the Ethernet controller . . . . . . . . 35 Network connection problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Ethernet controller troubleshooting chart. . . . . . . 36 Ethernet controller messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare server ODI driver messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 NDIS 4.0 (Windows NT) driver messages . . . . . . 40 UNIX messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

This section provides basic troubleshooting information to help you resolve some common problems that might occur with the server.

If you cannot locate and correct the problem using the information in this section, refer to “Symptom-to-FRU index” on page 143 for more information.

Diagnostic tools overview

The following tools are available to help you identify and resolve hardware-related problems:

POST beep codes, error messages, and error logs

The power-on self-test (POST) generates beep codes and messages to indicate successful test completion or the detection of a problem. See “POST” on page 14 for more information.

Diagnostic programs and error messages

The server diagnostic programs are stored in upgradable read-only memory (ROM) on the system board. These programs are the primary method of testing the major components of the server. See “Diagnostic programs and error messages” on page 25 for more information.

Light path diagnostics

Your server has light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to help you identify problems with server components. These LEDs are part of the light-path diagnostics that are built into the server. By following the path of lights, you can quickly identify the type of system error that occurred. See “Light path diagnostics” on page 28 for more information.

Error symptoms

© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999

13

These charts list problem symptoms, along with suggested steps to correct the problems. See the “Diagnosing errors” on page 35 for more information.

POST

When you turn on the server, it performs a series of tests to check the operation of server components and some of the options installed in the server. This series of tests is called the power-on self-test or POST.

If POST finishes without detecting any problems, a single beep sounds, the first screen of the operating system or application program appears, and the System POST Complete (OK) light is illuminated on the operator information panel.

If POST detects a problem, more than one beep sounds and an error message appears on the screen. See “POST beep codes” and “POST error messages” for more information.

Notes:

1.If you have a power-on password or administrator password set, you must type the password and press Enter, when prompted, before POST will continue.

2.A single problem might cause several error messages. When this occurs, work to correct the cause of the first error message. After you correct the cause of the first error message, the other error messages usually will not occur the next time you run the test.

POST beep codes

POST generates beep codes to indicate successful completion or the detection of a problem.

One beep indicates the successful completion of POST.

More than one beep indicates that POST detected a problem. For more information, see “Beep symptoms” on page 143.

POST error messages

POST error messages occur during startup when POST finds a problem with the hardware or detects a change in the hardware configuration. For a list of POST errors, see “POST error codes” on page 155.

Event/error logs

The POST error log contains the three most recent error codes and messages that the system generated during POST. The System Event/Error Log contains all error messages issued during POST and all system status messages from the Advanced System Management Processor.

To view the contents of the error logs, start the Configuration/Setup Utility program; then, select Event/Error Logs from the main menu.

Small computer system interface messages

If you receive a SCSI error message, see “SCSI error codes” on page 165.

Note: If the server does not have a hard disk drive, ignore any message that indicates that the BIOS is not installed.

14 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

You will get these messages only when running the SCSISelect Utility.

Solving ServeRAID problems

This section describes the ServeRAID text and numeric messages that might appear during startup. This section also includes some basic information about rebuilding a defunct drive.

In addition to the information provided in this section, you might want to use the ServeRAID IPSSEND program to help isolate ServeRAID problems.

ServeRAID controller messages

This section lists the ServeRAID messages that might appear during system startup.

The ServeRAID controllers provide a Device Event Log that collects statistics on the number and types of events that occur on a selected physical drive. After correcting a problem with the array, clear the log so that you can identify any subsequent errors quickly. For information about clearing the event log, see "eraseevent" on page 137.

All physical drives contain unique identifiers, such as the drive serial number and manufacturer. During configuration, the ServeRAID controller stores this information.

ServeRAID startup messages

During power-on self-test (POST), the ServeRAID controller compares the stored configuration information to the configuration that is actually present. If a discrepancy exists, one or more status messages appear after POST completes, but before the operating system loads.

Notes:

1.When the ServeRAID controller requires your input, a list of function keys will appear below the message.

2.Where the Action information tells you to start the IBM ServeRAID configuration program, insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive; then, restart the server. The Action column also provides general information about the message.

3.Where SID or ch appears in these messages, sid is the SCSI ID for the device, and ch is the channel to which the device is attached.

4.Where m or n appears in these messages, a number will appear in the actual message.

Following are messages associated with the ServeRAID subsystem in alphabetical order.

A new drive was installed.

Explanation: When the ServeRAID controller detects a new drive that is not part of the current configuration, the following message appears:

x new ready drives found

where x is the number of ready drives found.

Action: This is an information message. No action is required.

Diagnostics 15

Auto rearrange.

Explanation: Auto rearrange is enabled or disabled.

Action: This is an information message. No action is required.

Battery-Backup Write Cache Not Responding

Explanation: BIOS code detected a bad or failed battery-backup write cache.

Action: Press F9 to remove the battery-backup write cache from the configuration, or press F10 to exit without change.

Battery-Backup Write Cache Replacement

Explanation: The ServeRAID controller detects that the battery-backup write cache is defective.

Action: Press F8 if you replaced the battery-backup write cache, or press F10 if you have not replaced the battery-backup write cache.

Configured drives are missing.

Explanation: When the ServeRAID controller detects that a previously configured drive is missing, the following message appears:

x online drives not responding

where x is the number of drives not responding. Example of a possible message: Online Drive on Channel 3 SCSI ID 3 is not responding.

Action: Press one of the following keys:

F2 – Detailed description. Press this key for a detailed description of the problem, such as the example message above.

F4 – Retry. Press this key after correcting a problem. For example, press F4 after you turn on the external storage enclosure that contains the physical drive.

F5 – Change the configuration and set the drives to defunct. Press this key to accept the new state that the ServeRAID controller will assign to the drive. For example, the ServeRAID controller will assign the drive a state of defunct or empty. You can also press F5 when you must remove a drive. RAID level-1 and RAID level-5 logical drives are present, and performance in a degraded mode is acceptable. The ServeRAID controller will assign the drive a state of defunct, but the server can complete startup. However, the array will remain in critical mode and the potential for data loss will exist until you replace and rebuild the defunct drive. To prevent the loss of data, replace and rebuild the defunct drive in a timely manner.

Note: A physical drive in the defunct state does not necessarily mean that you need to replace the drive. Before you replace the drive, ensure that:

1.All cables are connected properly to the backplane and to the physical drive. Also, ensure that all cables inside the server are connected properly.

2.The hot-swap drive trays are seated properly in the drive bay.

3.Try rebuilding the drive if you have not already done so. See “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 23 for more information.

After you perform these steps, if the physical drive does not function properly, replace the drive.

F10 – Continue booting without changing the configuration. Press this key to continue without change to the configuration.

16 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Configured drives are not in the configured location.

Explanation: When the ServeRAID controller detects that a previously configured drive is present, but the drive is in a new location, the following message appears:

x online drive has been rearranged

where x is the number of drives that have been rearranged. Examples of possible messages are:

Online Drive on Channel 3 SCSI ID 4 moved to Channel 3 SCSI ID 3 Online Drive on Channel 3 SCSI ID 3 moved to Channel 3 SCSI ID 4

Action: Press one of the following keys:

F2 – Detailed description. Press this key for a detailed description of the problem, such as the example messages above.

F4 – Retry. Press this key after correcting a problem. For example, press F4 after you move the physical drive to its previously assigned location.

F5 – Change the configuration and set the drive to defunct. Press this key to accept the new state that the ServeRAID controller will assign to the drive. For example, the ServeRAID controller will assign the drive a state of defunct or empty.

Note: A physical drive in the defunct state does not necessarily mean that you need to replace the drive. Before you replace the drive, ensure that:

1.All cables are connected properly to the backplane and to the physical drive. Also, ensure that all cables inside the server are connected properly.

2.The hot-swap drive trays are seated properly in the drive bay.

3.If you have not already attempted to rebuild the drive, try rebuilding it. See “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 23 for more information.

After you perform these steps, if the physical drive does not function properly, replace the drive.

F6 – Change the configuration and accept the rearrangement. Press this key to modify the configuration to match the current drive location. You might remove the hot-swap drives from the server for security or maintenance reasons. If you replace the drives but install them in different drive bays, you can press F6 to accept the new locations, and the ServeRAID controller will update the configuration.

F10 – Continue startup without changing the configuration. Press this key to continue without change to the configuration.

Controller is not responding to commands. No logical drives are installed.

Explanation: The ServeRAID controller is not operational.

Action: Run the IBM ServeRAID Support CD and reseat the adapter. If the problem persists, replace the adapter.

Error: Cannot disable this controller BIOS.

Explanation: The ServeRAID controller was unable to prevent an extra copy of its BIOS code from being stored on the server. This condition occurs when the server contains multiple ServeRAID controllers.

Action: This is an information message. No action is required.

Installation stopped.

Explanation: The server cannot access the ServeRAID controller.

Action: This is a follow-on message to a preceding message. Follow the Action instructions for the preceding message to resolve the problem.

Diagnostics 17

New controller installed in a configured server or drives are imported.

Explanation: When the ServeRAID controller detects that the identifiers of the drives do not match the controller configuration information, the following message appears: x online drive(s) found with mismatch configuration Examples of possible messages: Configuration mismatch Channel 1 SCSI ID 0 with Host ID

Configuration mismatch Channel 2 SCSI ID 0 with Host ID

Action: Press one of the following keys:

F2 – Detailed description. Press this key for a detailed description of the problem, such as the example messages above.

F4 – Retry. Press this key after correcting the problem. For example, press F4 after you move the physical drive to its previously assigned location, or after you install the original physical drives back in the server.

F5 – Change the configuration and set the drive to defunct. Press this key to accept the new state that the ServeRAID controller will assign to the drive. For example, the ServeRAID controller will assign the drive a state of defunct or empty.

Note: A physical drive in the defunct state does not necessarily mean that you need to replace the drive. Before you replace the drive, ensure that:

1.All cables are connected properly to the backplane or processor or I/O board, and to the physical drive. Also, ensure that all cables inside the server are connected properly.

2.The hot-swap drive trays are seated properly in the drive bay.

3.If you have not already attempted to rebuild the drive, try rebuilding it. See “Rebuilding a defunct drive” on page 23 for more information.

After you perform these steps, if the physical drive does not function properly, replace the drive.

F7 – Import configuration information from drive. Press this key to restart the server. Press this key to import the configuration information from the drive and to update the configuration information for the ServeRAID controller. This choice is useful when you replace the ServeRAID controller in an existing ServeRAID subsystem. You also might press F7 if you replace a whole set of drives with drives that were configured in another server with a ServeRAID controller. When you install drives in a server that has no logical drives defined, the F7 choice will not appear. The ServeRAID controller does not contain any logical drives in its factory configuration. Therefore, F7 will not appear. In this case, do the following:

1.Restart the server and press Ctrl+I to enter the Mini-Configuration program (see “Using the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration program” on page 130).

2.Select Advanced Functions.

3.Select Copy the Configuration from Drives to the Controller and follow the instructions on the screen.

Recoverable configuration error.

Explanation: The configuration data stored in NVRAM does not match the configuration data stored in the EEPROM.

Action:

1.Press Ctrl+I to access the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration menu.

2.Select Advanced Functions from the Main Menu.

3.Select Copy the Configuration from Drives to the Controller.

18 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Unrecoverable configuration error.

Explanation: The configuration data stored in NVRAM does not match the configuration data stored in the EEPROM.

Action:

1.Press Ctrl+I to access the ServeRAID Mini-Configuration menu.

2.Select Advanced Functions from the Main Menu.

3.Select Restore to the Factory Default Settings.

WARNING: n logical drives are critical; n logical drives are offline.

Explanation: One or more physical drives have failed.

Action: Replace the defunct drives as soon as possible to prevent data loss.

Your server has an error due to a Blocked Logical Drive.

Explanation: One or more logical drives are blocked. A blocked logical drive cannot be accessed.

Action: Press F4 to unblock the logical drive, or press F5 to continue without unblocking.

ServeRAID ISPR, BCS, and ECS POST error codes

After the ServeRAID POST completes, register information appears on the screen in hexadecimal format, as follows:

Hardware: ISPR=aaaa BCS=bb ECS=cc

ISPR displays the four-digit Interrupt Status Report Register code, BCS displays the Basic Configuration Status Register code, and ECS displays the Extended Configuration Status Register code.

For example:

Controller 1 Slot 5, Status:Not responding properly - Error Code=0B0 Controller 2 Slot 4, Logical Drive=0, Other=0, Firmware=2.88.10, Status=Ok Controller 3 Slot 3, Logical Drive=0, Other=0, Firmware=3.60.13, Status=Ok Controller 4 Slot 2, Logical Drive=1, Other=1, Firmware=1.00.09, Status=Ok

If no errors occur:

ISPR (aaaa) = EF10

BCS (bb) = 0F or 09

ECS (cc) = 00

If an error occurs, refer to: “ServeRAID POST (ISPR) error codes” on page 161 for the ISPR error codes and “Basic and Extended Configuration Status Register Codes” on page 20 for the BCS and ECS error codes.

Diagnostics 19

Basic and Extended Configuration Status Register Codes:

BCS

ECS

Explanation and possible recovery action

 

 

 

Code not in

Code not

Explanation: The ServeRAID controller is not functioning

table

in table

properly.

 

 

Action: Replace the adapter or the I/O board with integrated

 

 

controller.

 

 

 

00

01

Explanation: Invalid flash configuration.

 

 

Action: Start the IBM ServeRAID Support CD and follow the

 

 

instructions that appear on the screen.

 

 

 

00

02

Explanation: Invalid NVRAM configuration.

 

 

Action: Start the IBM ServeRAID Support CD and follow the

 

 

instructions that appear on the screen.

 

 

 

00

03

Explanation: Invalid flash and NVRAM configuration.

 

 

Action: Start the IBM ServeRAID Support CD and follow the

 

 

instructions that appear on the screen.

 

 

 

01

08

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

01

18

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild and hot-spare/standby hot-spare drives are not

 

 

responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

01

28

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

01

38

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild, hot-spare/standby hot-spare, and

 

 

ready/standby drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

01

48

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild drives are not responding and unidentified drives

 

 

were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

01

58

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild and hot-spare/standby hot-spare drives are not

 

 

responding and unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

01

68

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are not responding

 

 

and unidentified drives were found.

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

20 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

BCS

ECS

Explanation and possible recovery action

 

 

 

01

78

Explanation: No configuration was found in drives, or

 

 

online/rebuild, hot-spare/standby hot-spare, and

 

 

ready/standby drives are not responding and unidentified

 

 

drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

88

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild drives are not

 

 

responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

98

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild and hot

 

 

spare/standby hot-spare drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

A8

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild and ready/standby

 

 

drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

B8

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild, hot-spare/standby

 

 

hot-spare, and ready/standby drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

C8

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild drives are not

 

 

responding and unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

D8

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild and hot-

 

 

spare/standby hot-spare drives are not responding and

 

 

unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

E8

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild and ready/standby

 

 

drives are not responding and unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

 

 

 

03

F8

Explanation: A drive was imported from another system and it

 

 

has valid configuration, and online/rebuild, hot-spare/standby

 

 

hot-spare, and ready/standby drives are not responding and

 

 

unidentified drives were found.

Action: Press F4, F5, F7, or F10.

07

08

Explanation: Online/rebuild drives are not responding.

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

Diagnostics 21

BCS

ECS

Explanation and possible recovery action

 

 

 

07

0C

Explanation: Online/rebuild drives are not responding, and a

 

 

drive was found at the incorrect SCSI ID.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

18

Explanation: Online/rebuild and hot-spare/standby hot-spare

 

 

drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

07

1C

Explanation: Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hot-spare

 

 

drives are not responding, and a drive was found at the incorrect

 

 

SCSI ID.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

28

Explanation: Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are not

 

 

responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

07

2C

Explanation: Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are not

 

 

responding, and a drive was found at the incorrect SCSI ID.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

38

Explanation: Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot-

 

 

spare/standby hot-spare drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

07

3C

Explanation: Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot-

 

 

spare/standby hot-spare drives are not responding, and a drive

 

 

was found at the incorrect SCSI ID.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

48

Explanation: Online/rebuild drives are not responding, and

 

 

unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

07

4C

Explanation: Online/rebuild drives are not responding, and a

 

 

drive was found at the incorrect SCSI ID, and unidentified drives

 

 

were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

58

Explanation: Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hot-spare

 

 

drives are not responding, and unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

07

5C

Explanation: Online/rebuild and hot spare/standby hot-spare

 

 

drives are not responding, a drive was found at the incorrect

 

 

SCSI ID, and unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

68

Explanation: Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are not

 

 

responding, and unidentified drives were found.

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

22 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

BCS

ECS

Explanation and possible recovery action

 

 

 

07

6C

Explanation: Online/rebuild and ready/standby drives are not

 

 

responding, a drive was found at the incorrect SCSI ID, and

 

 

unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

07

78

Explanation: Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot-

 

 

spare/standby hot-spare drives are not responding, and

 

 

unidentified drives were found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

07

7C

Explanation: Online/rebuild, ready/standby, and hot-

 

 

spare/standby hot-spare drives are not responding, a drive was

 

 

found at the incorrect SCSI ID, and unidentified drives were

 

 

found.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, F6, or F10.

 

 

 

09

00

Explanation: No error occurred.

 

 

Action: No action is required.

 

 

 

09

10

Explanation: Hot-spare/standby hot-spare drives are not

 

 

responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

09

20

Explanation: Ready/standby drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

09

30

Explanation: Hot-spare/standby hot-spare and ready/standby

 

 

drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

0F

00

Explanation: No error occurred.

 

 

Action: No action is required.

 

 

 

0F

10

Explanation: Hot-spare/standby hot-spare drives are not

 

 

responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

0F

20

Explanation: Ready/standby drives are not responding.

 

 

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

 

 

 

0F

30

Explanation: Hot-spare/standby hot-spare and ready/standby

 

 

drives are not responding.

Action: Press F4, F5, or F10.

Rebuilding a defunct drive

A physical drive is defunct when there is a loss of communication between the controller and the physical drive. This can be caused by any of the following:

An improperly connected cable, physical drive, or controller

A loss of power to a drive

A defective cable, backplane, physical drive or controller

Diagnostics 23

In each case, the communication problem needs to be resolved, and then a rebuild operation is required to reconstruct the data for the device in its disk array. The ServeRAID controllers can reconstruct RAID level-1 and RAID level-5 logical drives, but they cannot reconstruct data stored in RAID level-0 logical drives.

To prevent data-integrity problems, the ServeRAID controllers sets the RAID level-0 logical drives to blocked during a rebuild operation. After the rebuild operation completes, you can unblock the RAID level-0 logical drives, and access them once again. Remember, however, that the logical drive might contain damaged data.

Steps for recovering from defunct drives

If the defunct drives are part of an array, do the following:

If more than one physical drive in an array is defunct, replace DDD drives and restore from backup.

If a rebuild operation is in progress, wait until the rebuild is complete.

If a rebuild is not in progress and only one physical drive in the array is defunct, replace the drive.

Rebuilding a hot-swap drive

A hot-swap rebuild refers to a rebuild operation that is started by the ServeRAID controller when it detects that a drive that is part of a RAID-I or RAID-J array and in the defunct state has been removed and reinserted on the SCSI backplane. The reinsertion of the physical drive, whether it is the same drive or a new drive, will trigger the ServeRAID controller to start the rebuild operation. During the rebuild operation, the drive being rebuilt is in the rebuild state, and the logical drive remains critical until the rebuild operation has been successfully completed.

On IBM servers, when a hot-spare drive is available, the rebuild operation will begin automatically without the requirement to replace the failed drive.

To start a hot-swap rebuild, do the following:

1.Without removing the drive completely, gently remove the physical drive from the server, using the handle of the hot-swap tray. If necessary, refer to the documentation that comes with your server on removing a physical drive.

2.Wait 20 seconds to allow the physical drive to completely spin down.

Note: When power is removed from a hot-swap drive, the drive immediately parks the heads, locks the actuator in the "landing zone", and begins spinning down. However, the spinning down of the disk might require up to 20 seconds after power is removed. Do not move the drive while it is spinning down. Moving the drive while it is spinning down may damage the drive.

3.Gently replace into the server the physical drive that you removed. Make sure the drive is completely installed in the backplane connector.

Recovering from an incomplete format of a physical drive

During formatting of a physical drive, if the format process is stopped by a system reset, system shut down, power outage, or by some other means, the physical drive becomes inoperable.

To enable the physical drive to communicate with the ServeRAID controller again, do the following:

24 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

1.Note the channel of the ServeRAID controller to which the physical drive is connected.

2.Note the SCSI ID of the physical drive.

3.Use ipssend format to restart the format of the physical drive. The syntax is:

ipssend format controller channel sid where:

controller is the ServeRAID controller number (1–12)

channel is the channel number for the device (1, 2, or 3)

sid is the SCSI ID for the device (0–15)

After the format is complete, the ServeRAID controller will be able to recognize the drive again.

Recovering from a failure in a failover-environment

In a failover environment, when the ServeRAID device driver is unable to send a command to the primary controller and the primary controller does not respond to a reset command, the device driver attempts to failover to the secondary controller.

Note: Loose cables or defective physical drives will not cause a failover to occur.

Replacing a non-hot-plug controller in a failover pair

If a failed controller is not in a hot-plug PCI slot, do the following to replace it:

1.Shutdown the server.

2.Replace the failed controller.

3.Reconfigure the new controller.

Notes:

1.Be sure the firmware level of the new controller is the same as the controller you are replacing. Be sure to use the same controller name, partner name, and SCSI initiator ID for the controller you are replacing.

2.For detailed instructions, refer to the Hardware Maintenance Manual for the ServeRAID controller being serviced.

If the failed controller is in a hot-plug slot, refer to the documentation that comes with the server for instructions for replacing the controller.

Diagnostic programs and error messages

The server diagnostic programs are stored in upgradable read-only memory (ROM) on the system board. These programs are the primary method of testing the major components of the server.

Diagnostic error messages indicate that a problem exists; they are not intended to be used to identify a failing part. Troubleshooting and servicing of complex problems that are indicated by error messages should be performed by trained service personnel.

Sometimes the first error to occur causes additional errors. In this case, the server displays more than one error message. Always follow the suggested action instructions for the first error message that appears.

The following sections contain the error codes that might appear in the detailed test log and summary log when running the diagnostic programs.

Diagnostics 25

The error code format is as follows:

fff-ttt-iii-date-cc-text message

where:

fffis the three-digit function code that indicates the function being tested when the error occurred. For example, function code 089 is for the microprocessor.

tttis the three-digit failure code that indicates the exact test failure that was encountered.

iii

is the three-digit device ID.

date

is the date that the diagnostic test was run and the error recorded.

cc

is the check digit that is used to verify the validity of the information.

text message

is the diagnostic message that indicates the reason for the problem.

Text messages

The diagnostic text message format is as follows:

Function Name: Result (test specific string)

where:

Function Name

is the name of the function being tested when the error occurred. This corresponds to the function code (fff) given in the previous list.

Result can be one of the following:

Passed This result occurs when the diagnostic test completes without any errors.

Failed This result occurs when the diagnostic test discovers an error.

User Aborted

This result occurs when you stop the diagnostic test before it is complete.

Not Applicable

This result occurs when you specify a diagnostic test for a device that is not present.

Aborted This result occurs when the test could not proceed because of the system configuration.

Warning This result occurs when a possible problem is reported during the diagnostic test, such as when a device that is to be tested is not installed.

Test Specific String

This is additional information that you can use to analyze the problem.

Starting the diagnostic programs

You can press F1 while running the diagnostic programs to obtain Help information. You also can press F1 from within a help screen to obtain online documentation from which you can select different categories. To exit Help and return to where you left off, press Esc.

To start the diagnostic programs:

26 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

1.Turn on the server and watch the screen.

Note: To run the diagnostic programs, you must start the server with the highest level password that is set. That is, if an administrator password is set, you must enter the administrator password, not the power-on password, to run the diagnostic programs.

2.When the message F2 for Diagnostics appears, press F2.

3.Type in the appropriate password when prompted; then, press Enter.

4.Select either Extended or Basic from the top of the screen.

5.When the Diagnostic Programs screen appears, select the test you want to run from the list that appears; then, follow the instructions on the screen.

Notes:

a.If the server stops during testing and you cannot continue, restart the server and try running the diagnostic programs again. If the problem persists, flash server with the latest diagnostics code and run the test again.

b.The keyboard and mouse (pointing device) tests assume that a keyboard and mouse are attached to the server.

c.If you run the diagnostic programs with no mouse attached to the server, you will not be able to navigate between test categories using the Next Cat and Prev Catbuttons. All other functions provided by mouse-selectable buttons are also available using the function keys.

d.You can run the USB interface test and the USB external loopback test only if there are no USB devices attached.

e.You can view server configuration information (such as system configuration, memory contents, interrupt request (IRQ) use, direct memory access (DMA) use, device drivers, and so on) by selecting Hardware Info from the top of the screen.

When the tests have completed, you can view the Test Log by selecting Utility from the top of the screen.

If the hardware checks out OK but the problem persists during normal server operations, a software error might be the cause. If you suspect a software problem, refer to the information that comes with the software package.

Viewing the test log

The test log will not contain any information until after the diagnostic program has run.

Note: If you already are running the diagnostic programs, begin with step 3..

To view the test log:

1.Turn on the server and watch the screen.

If the server is on, shut down the operating system and restart the server.

2.When the message F2 for Diagnostics appears, press F2.

If a power-on password or administrator password is set, the server prompts you for it. Type in the appropriate password; then, press Enter.

3.When the Diagnostic Programs screen appears, select Utility from the top of the screen.

4.Select View Test Log from the list that appears; then, follow the instructions on the screen.

Diagnostics 27

The system maintains the test-log data while the server is powered on. When you turn off the power to the server, the test log is cleared.

Diagnostic error message tables

For descriptions of the error messages that might appear when you run the diagnostic programs, see “Diagnostic error codes” on page 148. If diagnostic error messages appear that are not listed in those tables, make sure that the server has the latest levels of BIOS, Advanced System Management Processor, ServeRAID, and diagnostics microcode installed.

Light path diagnostics

The server has LEDs to help you identify problems with some server components. These LEDs are part of the light path diagnostics built into the server. By following the path of lights you can quickly identify the type of system error that occurred.

Power supply LEDs

The AC and DC power LEDs on the power supply provide status information about the power supply. See “Installing a hot-swap power supply” on page 88 for the location of these LEDs. See “Power checkout” on page 32 for more information on power problems.

Handle

Filler panel

DC power light

AC power light

The following table describes the AC and DC power LEDs.

AC power

DC power

 

LED

LED

Description and action

 

 

 

On

On

The power supply is on and operating correctly.

 

 

 

28 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

AC power

DC power

 

 

LED

LED

 

Description and action

 

 

 

On

Off

There is a dc power problem.

 

 

Possible causes:

 

 

1.

The server is not turned on (the power LED is blinking on

 

 

 

the front of the server).

 

 

 

Action: Press the power-control button to start the server.

 

 

2.

The power supply has failed.

 

 

 

Action: Replace the power supply.

 

 

 

Off

Off

There is an ac power problem.

 

 

Possible causes:

 

 

1.

There is no ac power to the power supply.

 

 

 

Actions: Verify that:

 

 

 

• The electrical cord is properly connected to

 

 

 

the server.

 

 

 

• The electrical outlet functions properly.

 

 

2.

The power supply has failed.

 

 

 

Action: Replace the power supply.

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic panel LEDs

The following illustration shows the LEDs on the diagnostics panel inside the server. See Table 1 on page 31 for information on identifying problems using these LEDs.

SMI

NMI

SP

PCIA

PCIB

PCIC

DASD1

MEM

CPU

VRM

FAN

TEMP

NON

OVER

PS1

PS2

PS3

PS4

RED

SPEC

 

 

 

 

Light path diagnostics

You can use the light path diagnostics built into the server to quickly identify the type of system error that occurred. The server is designed so that LEDs remain illuminated when the server shuts down, as long as the power supplies are operating properly.

This feature helps you to isolate the problem if an error causes the server to shut down.

If the system error LED (on the information LED panel) is not lit and no diagnostics panel LEDs are lit, it means that the light path diagnostics have not detected a system error.

Diagnostics 29

If the system error LED (on the information LED panel) is lit, it means that a system error was detected. Check to see which of the LEDs on the diagnostics panel inside the server are lit and refer to the following table:

30 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

LED

 

Cause

 

Action

 

 

 

None

The system error log is 75% or more full; a PFA alert

Check the system error log and correct any problems. See “Choices

 

was logged; or a failure occurred on the I2C bus.

available from the Configuration/Setup main menu” on page 46 for

 

 

 

information about clearing the error log. Disconnecting the server from

 

 

 

all power sources for at least 20 seconds will turn off the system error

 

 

 

LED.

 

 

 

 

SMI

A systems management event occurred.

Restart the server.

 

 

 

 

NMI

A nonmaskable interrupt occurred. The PCIA, PCIB,

1.

If the PCIA, PCIB, or PCIC LED is not on, restart the server.

 

or PCIC LED will probably also be on.

 

 

 

 

 

If the problem persists, try to determine the failing adapter by removing

 

 

 

one adapter at a time and restarting the server after each adapter is

 

 

 

removed.

 

 

 

 

SP

The service processor has failed.

1.

Run service processor diagnostics.

 

 

 

2.

Replace Legacy I/O board.

 

 

 

 

PCIA

An error occurred on PCI bus A. An adapter in PCI

1.

Check the error log for additional information.

 

slot 1 or 2, or the processor board caused the error.

2.

If you cannot correct the problem from the information in the error

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

log, try to determine the failing adapter by removing one adapter

 

 

 

 

at a time from PCI bus A (PCI slots 1–2) and restarting the server

 

 

 

 

after each adapter is removed.

 

 

 

 

PCIB

An error occurred on PCI bus B. An adapter in PCI slot

1.

Check the error log for additional information.

 

3, 4, 5, or 6 or the processor board caused the error.

2.

If you cannot correct the problem from the information in the error

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

log, try to determine the failing adapter by removing one adapter

 

 

 

 

at a time from PCI bus B (PCI slots 3–6) and restarting the server

 

 

 

 

after each adapter is removed.

 

 

 

PCIC

An error occurred on PCI bus C. An error on the

Check the error log for additional information. If the error log indicates

 

processor or I/O board caused the problem.

a problem with the integrated SCSI controller, the Ethernet controller or

 

 

 

video controller, see “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26.

 

 

 

 

DASD

A hot-swap hard disk drive has failed on SCSI channel

1.

If the TEMP LED is also on, take the actions listed for that LED.

 

B.

 

2.

If the amber status LED on one of the hot-swap hard disk drives is

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

on, replace the drive.

 

 

 

 

MEM

A memory error occurred.

1.

Check the DIMM error LEDs on the memory board.

 

 

 

2.

Replace the DIMM indicated by the lit DIMM error LEDs.

 

 

 

 

CPU

One of the microprocessors has failed or a

1.

Check the microprocessor error LEDs on the memory board. If a

 

microprocessor is installed in the wrong connector.

 

microprocessor error LED is on for a microprocessor connector that

 

 

 

 

has a terminator card installed instead of a microprocessor, the

 

 

 

 

microprocessors are not installed in the correct order. See

 

 

 

 

“Installing a microprocessor kit” on page 86 for information about

 

 

 

 

the correct order for installing microprocessors and VRMs.

 

 

 

 

Otherwise, continue with the next step.

 

 

 

2.

Turn off the server, reseat the microprocessor indicated by the lit

 

 

 

 

microprocessor error LED, and restart the server.

 

 

 

3.

If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor.

 

 

 

 

VRM

One of the voltage regulator modules on the processor

1.

Check the VRM error LEDs on the processor board.

 

board has failed.

2.

Turn off the server, reseat the VRM indicated by the lit VRM error

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LED, and restart the server.

 

 

 

3.

If the problem persists, replace the VRM.

 

 

 

FAN

One of the fan assemblies has failed or is operating too

The LED on the failing fan assembly will be lit. Replace the fan

 

slowly.

 

assembly.

 

Note:

A failing fan can also cause the TEMP and

 

 

 

 

DASD LEDs to be on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1. Light path diagnostics.

Diagnostics 31

LED

Cause

 

Action

 

 

 

 

TEMP

The system temperature has exceeded the maximum

1.

Check to see if a fan has failed. If it has, replace the fan.

 

rating.

2.

Make sure the room temperature is not too high. (See “Features

 

 

 

 

 

and specifications” on page 3.)

 

 

If the problem persists, see “Temperature checkout”.

 

 

 

NON

Server drawing too much power to operate in a

System can continue to operate in a nonredundant power mode. To

RED

redundant power mode.

operate in a redundant mode, add a power supply or remove most

 

 

recently installed options.

 

 

 

OVER

The server is drawing more power than the power

Either add a power supply or remove a device from the server.

SPEC

supplies are rated for.

 

 

 

 

 

PS1

The first power supply has failed.

Replace the first power supply.

 

 

 

PS2

The second power supply has failed.

Replace the second power supply.

 

 

 

PS3

The third power supply has failed.

Replace the third power supply.

 

 

 

PS4

The fourth power supply has failed.

Replace the fourth power supply.

 

 

 

 

Table 1. Light path diagnostics.

Power checkout

Power problems can be difficult to troubleshoot. For instance, a short circuit can exist anywhere on any of the power distribution busses. Usually a short circuit will cause the power subsystem to shut down because of an overcurrent condition.

A general procedure for troubleshooting power problems is as follows:

1.Power off the system and disconnect the AC cord(s).

2.Check for loose cables in the power subsystem. Also check for short circuits, for instance if there is a loose screw causing a short circuit on a circuit board.

3.Remove adapters and disconnect the cables and power connectors to all internal and external devices until system is at minimum configuration required for power on (see "Minimum operating requirements" on page 154).

4.Reconnect the AC cord and power on the system. If the system powers up successfully, replace adapters and devices one at a time until the problem is isolated. If system does not power up from minimal configuration, replace FRUs of minimal configuration one at a time until the problem is isolated.

To use this method it is important to know the minimum configuration required for a system to power up (see page 154). For specific problems, see “Power error messages” on page 167.

Temperature checkout

Proper cooling of the system is important for proper operation and system reliability. For a typical server, you should make sure:

Each of the drive bays has either a drive or a filler panel installed

Each of the power supply bays has either a power supply or a filler panel installed

The top cover is in place during normal operation

There is at least 50 mm (2 inches) of ventilated space at the sides of the server and 100 mm (4 inches) at the rear of the server

32 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

The top cover is removed for no longer than 30 minutes while the server is operating

The processor housing cover covering the processor and memory area is removed for no longer that ten minutes while the server is operating

A removed hot-swap drive is replaced within two minutes of removal

Cables for optional adapters are routed according to the instructions provided with the adapters (ensure that cables are not restricting air flow)

The fans are operating correctly and the air flow is good

A failed fan is replaced within 48 hours

In addition, ensure that the environmental specifications for the system are met. See “Features and specifications” on page 3.

For more information on specific temperature error messages, see “Temperature error messages” on page 166.

Recovering BIOS

If the BIOS code in the server has become corrupted, such as from a power failure during a flash update, you can recover the BIOS using the recovery boot block and a BIOS flash diskette.

Note: You can obtain a BIOS flash diskette from one of the following sources:

Use the ServerGuide program to make a BIOS flash diskette.

Download a BIOS flash diskette from the World Wide Web. Go to http://www.pc.ibm.com/support/, select IBM Server Support, and make the selections for the server.

The flash memory of the server consists of a primary page and a backup page. The J56 jumper controls which page is used to start the server. If the BIOS in the primary page is corrupted, you can use the backup page to start the server; then boot the BIOS Flash Diskette to restore the BIOS to the primary page.

To recover the BIOS:

1.Turn off the server and peripheral devices and disconnect all external cables and power cords; then, remove the cover.

2.Locate jumper J56 on the processor board (see “Processor board jumpers” on page 57).

3.Move J56 to pins 1 and 2 to enable secondary boot block page.

4.Insert the BIOS flash diskette into the diskette drive.

5.Restart the server.

6.The system begins the power-on self-test (POST). Select 1 – Update POST/BIOS from the menu that contains various flash (update) options.

7.When you are asked if you would like to move the current POST/BIOS image to the backup ROM location, type N.

Attention: Typing Y will copy the corrupted BIOS into the secondary page.

8.When you are asked if you would like to save the current code to a diskette, select

N.

9.You will be asked to choose which language you wish to use. Select your language (0-7) and press Enter to accept your choice. You will be prompted to remove the diskette and press Enter to restart the system. Remove the flash diskette from the diskette drive.

Diagnostics 33

Attention: Do not press Enter to reboot the system at this time.

10.Power-off the server.

11.Move jumper J56 back to pins 2 and 3 to return to normal startup mode.

12.Restart the server. The system should start up normally.

Replacing the battery

IBM has designed this product with your safety in mind. The lithium battery must be handled correctly to avoid possible danger. If you replace the battery, you must adhere to the following instructions.

CAUTION:

When replacing the battery, use only IBM Part Number 33F8354 or an equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your system has a module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with the same module type made by the same manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.

Do not:

Throw or immerse into water

Heat to more than 100° C (212° F)

Repair or disassemble

Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.

Note: In the U.S., call 1-800-IBM-4333 for information about battery disposal.

If you replace the original lithium battery with a heavy-metal battery or a battery with heavy-metal components, be aware of the following environmental consideration. Batteries and accumulators that contain heavy metals must not be disposed of with normal domestic waste. They will be taken back free of charge by the manufacturer, distributor, or representative, to be recycled or disposed of in a proper manner.

Note: After you replace the battery, you must reconfigure your server and reset the system date and time.

To replace the battery:

1.Read the information in “Before you begin” on page 58.

2.Follow any special handling and installation instructions supplied with the battery.

3.Turn off the server and all attached devices and disconnect all external cables and power cords (see “Safety information” on page 180); then remove the top cover.

4.Locate the battery on the processor board (see “Processor board component locations” on page 55).

5.Remove adapters as necessary so you can access the battery. (See “Working with adapters” on page 61.)

6.Lift and remove the plastic dividers by pressing the latches on the top ends of the dividers toward the dividers and lifting the dividers from the server.

7.Remove the battery:

a.Use one finger to lift the battery clip over the battery.

b.Use one finger to slightly slide the battery toward the rear of the server. The spring mechanism behind the battery will push it out toward you as you slide it forward.

34 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

c.Use your thumb and index finger to pull the battery from under the battery clip.

d.Ensure that the battery clip is touching the base of the battery socket by pressing gently on the clip.

8.Insert the new battery:

a.Tilt the battery so that you can insert it into the front of the socket, under the battery clip.

b.As you slide it under the battery clip, press the battery down into the socket.

9.Reinstall any adapters that you removed.

10.Insert the plastic dividers into the divider guides.

11.Reinstall the top cover.

Note: You must wait approximately 20 seconds after you plug the power cord of your server into an electrical outlet before the power control button becomes active.

12.Start the Configuration/Setup Utility program and set configuration parameters as needed. Refer to “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility program” on page 45.

Diagnosing errors

To find solutions to problems that have definite symptoms, see “Error symptoms” on page 153.

If you cannot find the problem there, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to test the server.

If you have just added new software or a new option and the server is not working, do the following before using the error symptoms table:

Remove the software or device that you just added.

Run the diagnostic tests to determine if the server is running correctly.

Reinstall the new software or new device.

Troubleshooting the Ethernet controller

This section provides troubleshooting information for problems that might occur with the 10/100 Mbps Ethernet controller.

Diagnostics 35

Network connection problems

If the Ethernet controller cannot connect to the network, check the following:

Make sure that the cable is installed correctly.

The network cable must be securely attached at all connections. If the cable is attached but the problem persists, try a different cable.

If you set the Ethernet controller to operate at 100 Mbps, you must use Category 5 cabling.

If you directly connect two workstations (without a hub), or if you are not using a hub with X ports, use a crossover cable.

Note: To determine whether a hub has an X port, check the port label. If the label contains an X, the hub has an X port.

Determine if the hub supports auto-negotiation. If not, try configuring the integrated Ethernet controller manually to match the speed and duplex mode of the hub.

Check the Ethernet controller lights on the operator information panel.

These lights indicate whether a problem exists with the connector, cable, or hub.

The Ethernet Link Status light illuminates when the Ethernet controller receives a LINK pulse from the hub. If the light is off, there might be a defective connector or cable, or a problem with the hub.

The Ethernet Transmit/Receive Activity light illuminates when the Ethernet controller sends or receives data over the Ethernet Network. If the Ethernet Transmit/Receive Activity light is off, make sure that the hub and network are operating and that the correct device drivers are loaded.

The Ethernet Speed 100 Mbps light illuminates when the Ethernet controller LAN speed is 100 Mbps.

Make sure that you are using the correct device drivers, supplied with the server.

Check for operating system-specific causes for the problem.

Make sure that the device drivers on the client and server are using the same protocol.

Test the Ethernet controller.

How you test the Ethernet controller depends on which operating system you are using (see the Ethernet controller device driver README file).

Ethernet controller troubleshooting chart

You can use the following troubleshooting chart to find solutions to 10/100 Mbps Ethernet controller problems that have definite symptoms.

36 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Table 2. Ethernet troubleshooting chart.

Ethernet controller problem

Suggested Action

 

 

The server stops running

The PCI BIOS interrupt settings are incorrect.

when loading device drivers.

Check the following:

 

 

• Determine if the interrupt (IRQ) setting assigned to the Ethernet controller is also

 

assigned to another device in the Configuration/Setup Utility program.

 

Although interrupt sharing is allowed for PCI devices, some devices do not

 

function well when they share an interrupt with a dissimilar PCI device. Try

 

changing the IRQ assigned to the Ethernet controller or the other device. For

 

example, for NetWare Versions 3 and 4 it is recommended that disk controllers not

 

share interrupts with LAN controllers.

 

• Make sure that you are using the most recent device driver available from the

 

World Wide Web.

 

• Run the network diagnostic program.

 

 

Ethernet Link Status light

Check the following:

does not light.

• Make sure that the hub is turned on.

 

 

• Check all connections at the Ethernet controller and the hub.

 

• Check the cable. A crossover cable is required unless the hub has an X designation.

 

• Use another port on the hub.

 

• If the hub does not support auto-negotiation, manually configure the Ethernet

 

controller to match the hub.

 

• If you manually configured the duplex mode, make sure that you also manually

 

configure the speed.

 

• Run diagnostics on the LEDs.

 

 

The Ethernet Transmit/

Check the following:

Receive Activity light does

Note: The Ethernet Transmit/Receive Activity LED illuminates only when data is

not light.

sent to or by this Ethernet controller.

 

 

• Make sure that you have loaded the network device drivers.

 

• The network might be idle. Try sending data from this workstation.

 

• Run diagnostics on the LEDs.

 

• The function of this LED can be changed by device driver load parameters. If

 

necessary, remove any LED parameter settings when you load the device drivers.

 

 

Data is incorrect or sporadic.

Check the following:

 

• Make sure that you are using Category 5 cabling when operating the server at 100

 

Mbps.

 

• Make sure that the cables do not run close to noise-inducing sources like

 

fluorescent lights.

 

 

The Ethernet controller

Check the following:

stopped working when

• Make sure that the cable is connected to the Ethernet controller.

another adapter was added

• Make sure that the PCI system BIOS is current.

to the server.

 

• Reseat the adapter.

 

• Determine if the interrupt (IRQ) setting assigned to the Ethernet adapter is also

 

assigned to another device in the Configuration/Setup Utility program.

 

Although interrupt sharing is allowed for PCI devices, some devices do not

 

function well when they share an interrupt with a dissimilar PCI device. Try

 

changing the IRQ assigned to the Ethernet adapter or the other device.

 

 

Diagnostics 37

Table 2. Ethernet troubleshooting chart.

Ethernet controller problem

Suggested Action

 

 

The Ethernet controller

Check the following:

stopped working without

• Run diagnostics for the Ethernet controller.

apparent cause.

• Try a different connector on the hub.

 

 

• Reinstall the device drivers. Refer to the operating-system documentation and to

 

the ServerGuide information.

 

 

Ethernet controller messages

The integrated Ethernet controller might display messages from the following device drivers:

Novell™ NetWare™ or IntraNetWare Server ODI

NDIS Adapter for level 4.0 (Windows NT)

SCO™ UNIX LLI

Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare server ODI driver messages

This section provides explanations of the error messages for the Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare server ODI driver, and suggested actions to resolve each problem.

PCNTNW-NW- The MSM is unable to parse a required custom keyword. 026

Explanation: The user entered an incorrect parameter keyword. Action: Reload the driver using the correct keyword.

PCNTNW-NW- The adapter did not respond to the initialization command. 054

Explanation: The adapter did not respond when the driver tried to initialize it.

Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- The adapter did not respond to the initialization command. 058

Explanation: The interrupt request (IRQ) setting might not be valid or the EEPROM information might be incorrect.

Action: Make sure the IRQ settings are correct in the Configuration/Setup Utility program. for information on setting the interrupt requests. If the IRQ settings are correct, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- The cable might be disconnected from the adapter. 066

Explanation: The cable might be disconnected from the server Ethernet port.

Action: Verify that a cable is connected to the Ethernet port.

Table 3. Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare ODI driver messages for the Ethernet controller.

38 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

PCNTNW-NW- The matching virtual adapter could not be found. 071

Explanation: You tried to load another instance of the driver with a different I/O address. This new adapter could not be found.

Action: Verify that you installed an IBM 10/100 Fault Tolerant Adapter and make sure that the adapter is seated correctly. If the adapter is seated correctly, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- A resource tag is unavailable.

072

Explanation: The driver tried to allocate some resources that were not available.

Action: Add more memory, or free some memory resources in the server. Then, restart the server.

PCNTNW-NW- Unable to allocate memory 073

Explanation: The driver failed to allocate the memory needed for normal operation.

Action: Add more memory, or free some memory resources in the server. Then, restart the server.

PCNTNW-NW- The hardware interrupt cannot be set. 074

Explanation: An attempt was made to initialize a given hardware interrupt. The attempt was not successful.

Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

If you have an Ethernet adapter installed, make sure that the adapter does not share an IRQ with any other device.

PCNTNW-NW- The Multiple Link Interface Driver (MLID) cannot be registered with

075the Link Support Layer (LSL).

Explanation: An error occurred while the driver was trying to register with the LSL.

Action: Check the version of the NetWare or IntraNetWare Operating System. Make sure that this driver is correct for the version of NetWare or IntraNetWare that you are using. Restart the server.

PCNTNW-NW- The Multiple Link Interface Driver (MLID) did not initialize MSMTx 079 Free Count.

Explanation: The MSMTx Free Count is not initialized correctly. Action: Restart the server. If the problem persists, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- The driver parameter block is too small.

086

Explanation: The driver parameter block is too small.

Action: Restart the server. If the problem persists, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- The media parameter block is too small.

087

Explanation: The driver media parameter block is too small. Action: Restart the server. If the problem persists, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

Table 3. Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare ODI driver messages for the Ethernet controller.

Diagnostics 39

PCNTNW-NW- The hardware configuration conflicts.

091

Explanation: You tried to load a new frame type for the existing controller. The hardware assumptions made in doing so are incorrect. This error can also occur if you try to specify a mode (such as, redundancy) that conflicts with another specified mode.

Action: Make sure that your hardware configuration matches the software settings.

PCNTNW-NW- The group bit in the node address override was cleared.

126

Explanation: The IEEE address has a group bit that indicates that an address belongs to a group of stations. This bit is used only as a destination address; it cannot be used as a source address. You tried to enter a source address with this bit set. The driver cleared the group bit of the source address.

Action: None necessary, message is for information only.

PCNTNW-NW- The local bit in the node address override was set.

127

Explanation: The local bit in the IEEE address format indicates that the addresses are being managed locally. If you use the node address override capabilities of this driver to enter a new address, the local bit must be set. You entered an address without the local bit set. The driver has set the local bit.

Action: None necessary, message is for information only.

PCNTNW-NW- The device was not found.

164

Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet controller in the server. Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- The device was not found at IOADDRESS.

165

Explanation: The Ethernet controller cannot be found at the I/O address specified.

Action: The Ethernet controller does not require a parameter for the I/O address. Remove the I/O address parameter.

PCNTNW-NW- PCI scan specified, device not found.

167

Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet controller on the PCI bus.

Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the problem persists, go to “Starting the diagnostic programs” on page 26 to run the diagnostic programs.

PCNTNW-NW- The DMA parameter is not necessary for PCI device.

180

Explanation: The Ethernet controller does not require a DMA setting. Action: None necessary, message is for information only.

Table 3. Novell NetWare or IntraNetWare ODI driver messages for the Ethernet controller.

NDIS 4.0 (Windows NT) driver messages

This section contains the error messages for the NDIS 4.0 drivers. The explanation and recommended action are included with each message.

40 Hardware Maintenance Manual: xSeries 250

Table 4. NDIS (Windows NT) driver messages for the Ethernet controller.

PermaNetServer:

No Secondary Adapter Found. Grouping Mode is disabled.

 

Explanation: The failover option requires an adapter that is compatible with the device

 

driver of the Ethernet controller on the system board. No such adapter was found.

 

Action: Make sure the correct adapter is installed.

 

 

PermaNet Server:

Problem Occurs on the Primary Adapter. Switching over to the Secondary Adapter.

 

Explanation: The system detected a problem with the primary Ethernet connection and

 

has transferred all network traffic to the secondary Ethernet controller.

 

Action: identify the cause of the failure on the primary Ethernet connection. Restoring

 

the operational state of the primary connection will cause the network traffic to

 

automatically transfer to the primary Ethernet controller.

 

 

PermaNet Server:

Switching back to Primary Adapter.

 

Explanation: The primary Ethernet connection is now operating correctly. Network

 

traffic will automatically transfer to the primary Ethernet controller.

 

Action: None needed, message is for information only.

 

 

UNIX messages

This section provides descriptions of the Ethernet error messages for the SCO UNIX LLI driver, and suggested actions to resolve each problem.

Table 5. UNIX LLI driver messages for the Ethernet controller.

pnt0-2

PCI search specified, PCI device not found!

 

Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet controller on the PCI bus.

 

Action:

 

• Run the NETCONFIG program to search for another Ethernet controller

 

• Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, run the

 

diagnostic programs.

 

 

pnt0-6

Cannot allocate memory for the adapter during an interrupt. Please check the Streams

 

parameters.

 

Explanation: On a SunSoft Solaris system, this message indicates that the system is out of

 

Streams memory blocks.

 

Action: Use the CRASH utility to increase the number of Streams memory blocks. Modify the

 

interrupt request (IRQ) settings in the Configuration/Setup Utility program, or run the

 

NETCONFIG program to match the hardware settings.

 

 

pnt0-7

Cannot allocate memory for the adapter during reset. Please check the Streams parameters.

 

Explanation: The system is out of Streams memory blocks.

 

Action: Use the CRASH utility to increase the number of Streams memory blocks.

 

 

pnt0-11

Device not found!

 

Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet controller.

 

Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, run

 

the diagnostic programs.

 

 

Diagnostics 41

Table 5. UNIX LLI driver messages for the Ethernet controller.

pnt0-12

Device failed checksum test!

 

Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet controller.

 

Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, run

 

the diagnostic programs.

 

 

pnt0-13

add_intr_handler failed! Interrupts already enabled.

 

Explanation: The interrupt request (IRQ) that was specified, or the IRQ that was found, conflicts

 

with other devices in the server.

 

Action: Modify the hardware settings.

 

 

pnt0-14

Cannot locate hardware.

 

Explanation: The SunSoft Solaris driver cannot find any Ethernet controller.

 

Action: Verify that the Ethernet controller is enabled. If the Ethernet controller is enabled, run

 

the diagnostic programs.

 

 

pnt0-15

No more devices to open.

 

Explanation: The SunSoft Solaris driver cannot find any more Ethernet controllers. Action:

 

Verify that additional IBM 10/100 Fault Tolerant Adapters are present or replace the Ethernet

 

adapter that fails to respond. If the problem persists, run the diagnostic programs.

 

 

pnt0-17

Device fault...Reset initiated!

 

Explanation: The SunSoft Solaris driver has been reset due to a device fault.

 

Action: Verify that additional IBM 10/100 Fault Tolerant Adapters are present or replace the

 

Ethernet adapter that fails to respond. If the problem persists, run the diagnostic programs.

 

 

pnt0-19

IRQ found for PCnet hardware does not match space.c (or pnt.conf)!

 

Explanation: This is a warning message referring to the interrupt request (IRQ) that the SunSoft

 

Solaris driver found in the system.

 

Action: Ignore this message if you are sure that this is what you want to do. Otherwise, run the

 

NETCONFIG program to match the hardware settings

 

 

pnt0-20

add_intr_handler failed! Unknown interrupt type.

 

Explanation: The interrupt request (IRQ) that was specified, or the IRQ that was found, conflicts

 

with other devices in the server. Action:

 

Modify the hardware settings.

 

Run the NETCONFIG program to search for another Ethernet controller.

 

 

pnt0-21

add_intr_handler failed! Out of range interrupt number.

 

Explanation: The interrupt request (IRQ) that was specified, or the IRQ that was found, conflicts

 

with other devices in the server. Action:

 

• Modify the hardware settings.

 

• Run the NETCONFIG program to search for another Ethernet controller.

 

 

pnt0-22

add_intr_handler failed! Out of range IPL.

 

Explanation: The interrupt request (IRQ) that was specified, or the IRQ that was found, conflicts

 

with other devices in the server.

 

Action: Modify the hardware settings. Run the NETCONFIG program to search for another

 

Ethernet controller.

 

 

 

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