SMSC SMC6516TF, SMC6516TT, SMC6516FF User Manual

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TigerSwitch 16

Intelligent bandwidth acceleration for workgroups

Ethernet and Fast Ethernet Workgroup Switches

Three models, each with 16 10BASE-T ports plus:

Two 100BASE-TX ports

Two 100BASE-FX ports

One 100BASE-TX port and one 100BASE-FX port

Manageable in-band via SNMP, RMON and Telnet

User Guide

USER GUIDE

FOR SMC’S

TIGERSWITCH 16

FAMILY

July 1997

Pub. # 900.185 Rev. A

Standard Microsystems Corporation

80 Arkay Drive

Hauppauge, New York 11788

Information furnished by Standard Microsystems Corporation (SMC) is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by SMC for its use, nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties which may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent or patent rights of SMC. SMC reserves the right to change specifications at any time without notice.

Copyright © 1997 by

Standard Microsystems Corporation

Hauppauge, New York.

All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

Trademarks:

SMC and Standard Microsystems are registered trademarks; and EliteView, EtherEZ, EtherPower, EZ Hub, TigerStack and TigerSwitch are trademarks of Standard Microsystems Corporation. Other product and company names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.

Limited Warranty

HARDWARE: Standard Microsystems Corporation (“SMC”) warrants these TigerSwitch 16 units to be free from defects in workmanship and materials, under normal use and service, for the following length of time from the date of purchase from SMC or its Authorized Reseller:

TigerSwitch 16 Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Three Years

If a product does not operate as warranted during the applicable warranty period, SMC shall, at its option and expense, repair the defective product or part, deliver to Customer an equivalent product or part to replace the defective item, or refund to customer the purchase price paid for the defective product. All products that are replaced will become the property of SMC. Replacement products may be new or reconditioned. Any replaced or repaired product or part has a ninety (90) day warranty or the remainder of the initial warranty period, whichever is longer.

SMC shall not be responsible for any custom software or firmware, configuration information, or memory data of Customer contained in, stored on, or integrated with any products returned to SMC pursuant to any warranty.

SOFTWARE: SMC warrants that the software programs licensed from it will perform in substantial conformance to the program specifications for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase from SMC or its Authorized

Reseller. SMC warrants the magnetic media containing software against failure during the warranty period. No updates are provided. SMC’s sole obligation hereunder shall be (at SMC’s discretion) to refund the purchase price paid by Customer for any defective software products or to replace any defective media with software which substantially conforms to SMC’s applicable published specifications. Customer assumes responsibility for the selection of the appropriate applications program and associated reference materials. SMC makes no warranty that its software products will work in combination with any hardware or applications software products provided by third parties, that the operation of the software products will be uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the software products will be corrected. For any third party products listed in the SMC software product documentation or specifications as being compatible, SMC will make reasonable efforts to prove compatibility, except where the non-compatibility is caused by a “bug” or defect in the third party’s product.

STANDARD WARRANTY SERVICE: Standard warranty service for hardware products may be obtained by delivering the defective product, accompanied by a copy of the dated proof of purchase, to SMC’s Service Center or to an Authorized SMC Service Center during the applicable warranty period. Standard warranty service for software products may be obtained by telephoning SMC’s Service Center or an Authorized SMC Service Center, within the warranty period. Products returned to SMC’s Service Center must be pre-authorized by

LIMITED WARRANTY

SMC with a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number marked on the outside of the package, and sent prepaid, insured, and packaged appropriately for safe shipment. The repaired or replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at SMC’s expense, not later than thirty (30) days after receipt by SMC.

WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE: IF AN SMC PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER’S SOLE REMEDY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT SMC’S OPTION. THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. SMC NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.

SMC SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THE ALLEGED DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY CUSTOMER’S OR ANY THIRD PERSON’S MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR, OR ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE, OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR OTHER HAZARD.

LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: IN NO EVENT, WHETHER BASED IN CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE) SHALL SMC BE LIABLE FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE, LOSS OF BUSINESS, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, USE, PERFORMANCE, FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF SMC OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. NOTHING HEREIN SHALL HAVE THE EFFECT OF LIMITING OR EXCLUDING SMC’S LIABILITY FOR DEATH OR PERSONAL INJURY CAUSED BY NEGLIGENCE.

Some states do not allow the exclusion of implied warranties or the limitation of incidental or consequential damages for consumer products, so the above limitations and exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights which may vary from state to state. Nothing in this warranty shall be taken to affect your statutory rights.

Standard Microsystems Corporation

80 Arkay Drive

Hauppauge, NY 11788

516-273-3100

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Compliances ..........................................................

v

1

Quick Start......................................................

1-1

 

Introduction .........................................................................

1-2

 

Connecting the Switch.........................................................

1-3

 

Configuring the Switch for SNMP and Telnet

 

 

Management ....................................................................

1-5

2

About the Switches ........................................

2-1

 

Overview..............................................................................

2-3

 

Features and Benefits ..........................................................

2-12

 

Switch Architecture..............................................................

2-13

 

Switch Operation .................................................................

2-15

 

Management Options ..........................................................

2-16

3

Planning .........................................................

3-1

 

Benefits of Switching...........................................................

3-2

 

Segmenting the Network.....................................................

3-4

 

Full-Duplex Operation ........................................................

3-5

 

Sample Applications ............................................................

3-6

4

Installing ........................................................

4-1

 

Selecting a Site.....................................................................

4-2

 

Equipment Checklist............................................................

4-3

 

Mounting ..............................................................................

4-4

 

Connecting to the Console Port..........................................

4-6

 

Connecting to a Power Source ...........................................

4-7

 

Diagnostic Self-Tests............................................................

4-8

 

Making Network Connections ............................................

4-9

 

Default Settings....................................................................

4-13

i

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

5

Configuring and Monitoring ........................

5-1

 

The Console Interface .........................................................

5-3

 

Typical Configuration Operations ......................................

5-25

 

Typical Monitoring Operations ...........................................

5-32

 

Using Telnet .........................................................................

5-34

 

Using SLIP ............................................................................

5-35

6 Managing Via SNMP and RMON ....................

6-1

SNMP Protocol .....................................................................

6-2

Using RMON ........................................................................

6-3

MIB Objects .........................................................................

6-3

A

Cables .............................................................

A-1

 

Specifications .......................................................................

A-2

 

10BASE-T/100BASE-TX Pin Assignments ...........................

A-3

 

Serial Console Port Pin Assignments ..................................

A-5

B

Specifications.................................................

B-1

 

Specifications .......................................................................

B-2

C

Sample Configuration ...................................

C-1

 

Introduction .........................................................................

C-2

 

Windows Terminal...............................................................

C-3

D

Troubleshooting ............................................

D-1

 

Troubleshooting Chart.........................................................

D-2

ii

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

List of Figures

 

Figure 1-1.

Main Menu .......................................................

1-4

Figure 1-2.

Switch Configuration Menu ............................

1-5

Figure 1-3.

IP Configuration Menu....................................

1-6

Figure 1-4.

SNMP Configuration Menu..............................

1-7

Figure 2-1.

TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516TT with

 

two 100BASE-TX Ports.....................................................

2-3

Figure 2-2.

TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516FF with

 

two 100BASE-FX Ports .....................................................

2-3

Figure 2-3.

TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516TF with

 

one 100BASE-TX Port and one 100BASE-FX Port..........

2-3

Figure 2-4.

10BASE-T Ports................................................

2-5

Figure 2-5.

SMC6516FF with 100BASE-FX Ports ...............

2-6

Figure 2-6.

RJ-45 Integrated LEDs......................................

2-7

Figure 2-7.

Vertical LED Array and Port Select Button .....

2-8

Figure 2-8.

Console Port and Reset Button.......................

2-9

Figure 2-9.

Power Supply Receptacles ..............................

2-10

Figure 2-10. Power Supply LEDs ........................................

2-10

Figure 3-1.

Single-Segment LAN ........................................

3-6

Figure 3-2.

Microsegmented LAN ......................................

3-7

Figure 3-3.

Switched LAN ..................................................

3-8

Figure 3-4.

Sample Application with Model SMC6516TT.

3-9

Figure 3-5.

Sample Application with Model SMC6516TF .

3-10

Figure 3-6.

Sample Application with Model SMC6516FF .

3-11

Figure 4-1.

Attaching the Brackets ....................................

4-4

Figure 4-2.

Installing the Switch in a Rack........................

4-5

Figure 4-3.

Attaching the Adhesive Feet ...........................

4-5

Figure 4-4.

Console Port ....................................................

4-6

Figure 4-5.

Power Receptacles...........................................

4-7

Figure 4-6.

Diagnostics Display .........................................

4-8

iii

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Figure 4-7.

Connecting Fiber Cable...................................

4-12

Figure 5-1.

Main Menu .......................................................

5-4

Figure 5-2.

Switch Configuration Menu ............................

5-5

Figure 5-3.

Configuration Display Screen .........................

5-7

Figure 5-4.

IP Configuration Menu....................................

5-9

Figure 5-5.

SNMP Configuration Menu..............................

5-11

Figure 5-6.

Spanning Tree Configuration Menu ...............

5-12

Figure 5-7.

Address Aging Configuration Menu ...............

5-13

Figure 5-8.

Port Mirroring Configuration Menu ................

5-14

Figure 5-9.

Port Configuration Menu.................................

5-15

Figure 5-10

Port Summary Display Screen........................

5-16

Figure 5-11.

Port Summary Configuration Menu ..............

5-17

Figure 5-12.

Port [x] Configuration Menu..........................

5-18

Figure 5-13.

Statistics Menu ...............................................

5-19

Figure 5-14.

Utilities Menu.................................................

5-20

Figure 5-15.

Console Configuration Menu ........................

5-22

Figure 5-16.

Boot Menu .....................................................

5-23

Figure 5-17.

Telnet Menu ...................................................

5-24

Figure 5-18.

TFTP Loader Menu ........................................

5-30

Figure 5-19.

IP Configuration Menu ..................................

5-35

Figure A-1.

RJ-45 Connector Pin Numbers........................

A-3

iv

COMPLIANCES

FCC A

This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause interference to radio communications. It has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device pursuant to Subpart B of Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference, in which case the user, at his own expense, will be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference.

Canada Department of Communications - Class A

This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus as set out in the interference-causing equipment standard entitled "Digital Apparatus", ICES-003 of the Department of Communications.

Cet appareil numérique respecte les limites de bruits radioélectriques applicables aux appareils numériques de Classe A prescrites dans la norme sur le matériel brouilleur : "Appareils Numériques", NMB-003 édictée par le ministère des Communications.

EC Conformity

This information technology product was found to comply with EC General Directives 89/336/EEC and 73/23/EEC. An EC Declaration of Conformity was issued for this product by:

Standard Microsystems (Europe) Limited

1st Floor, Pyramid House, Easthampstead Road Bracknell, Berkshire RG12 1NS, United Kingdom

Japan VCCI Class 1

Australia AS/NZS 3548 (1995)

SMC contact for products in Australia is:

SMC Australia Pty. Ltd., ACN 069 351 613

LVL 66 MLC Center

Martin Place

Sydney NSW 2000

Phone: 61-2-9238-2206

Fax: 61-2-9238-2220

v

CHAPTER 1

QUICK START

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-2

Connecting the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3

Configuring the Switch for SNMP and Telnet Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5

1-1

QUICK START

Introduction

SMC’s TigerSwitch16 family consists of a set of three manageable Ethernet switches with Fast Ethernet connection capability. Each switch provides sixteen 10BASE-T ports for connection to Ethernet hubs, servers and workstations. Each switch also includes two ports for connection to Fast Ethernet devices. The switch, depending on the model chosen, will contain either two 100BASE-TX ports, two 100BASE-FX ports or one 100BASE-TX port and one 100BASE-FX port. The Fast Ethernet port types found on each model are listed below:

Model SMC6516TT

two 100BASE-TX ports with Auto-Negotiation

Model SMC6516FF

two 100BASE-FX ports

Model SMC6516TF

one 100BASE-TX port with Auto-Negotiation

one 100BASE-FX port

This chapter provides a set of instructions designed to help you get up and running quickly and without excessive details. The steps in each of the two sections refer to other locations in the manual where further information may be found.

The first section, “Connecting the Switch,” provides a list of instructions for powering up the switch and making network connections, and also for setting up a PC to configure and monitor the switch out-of-band.

The second section, “Configuring the Switch for SNMP and Telnet Management,” discusses the steps required to set up the switch for in-band management.

1-2

QUICK START

Connecting the Switch

1.Power up the PC to be used to configure and monitor the switch out-of-band. After loading this PC with communications software, set your terminal or communications program to the following parameters: 9600, n, 8, 1 (9600 baud, no parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit). (See Appendix C for the Windows Terminal program parameter settings.)

2.Plug the female end of a DB-9 standard null-modem cable into the Console connector on the front panel of the switch. Attach the other end of the cable to the serial connector on the PC (typically COM1 or COM2). (See “Connecting to the Console Port” in Chapter 4.)

3.Connect one end of the 3-pin AC power cord supplied with the switch to the power receptacle on the rear of the chassis, and the other end to a grounded power outlet. (See “Connecting to a Power Source” in Chapter 4.) Make note of the diagnostic test results that appear on the PC attached to the Console port.

4.If you have purchased a Redundant Power Unit (RPU), plug the 14-pin connector from the RPU cable into the mating connector on the rear panel of the switch. (See the guide supplied with the RPU.)

5.Connect the front-panel 10BASE-T ports to hubs, servers and power users. Once a valid connection has been made, the green LED above the port will light. (See “Making Network Connections” in Chapter 4.)

6.Connect each front-panel 100BASE-TX and 100BASE-FX port to a Fast Ethernet power user, server, workgroup or backbone. When a valid connection has been made, the green LED for that port will light. (See “Making Network Connections” in Chapter 4.)

1-3

QUICK START

7.Press the Esc key on the terminal or PC. The Main Menu will appear on the screen.

___________________________________________________

>>>> Main Menu <<<<

1.Switch Configuration Menu

2.Port Configuration Menu

3.Statistics Menu

4.Utilities Menu

5.Exit Menus (Password Protect)

Enter Selection:

___________________________________________________

Figure 1-1. Main Menu

You may now set a variety of configuration options, such as fullduplex mode on the 10BASE-T ports, a password for the Console interface, and Spanning Tree and Address Aging parameters. You may also select various options for monitoring the performance of the unit out-of-band. These are described in Chapter 5.

To set up the unit for in-band management via SNMP or Telnet, continue with Step 8.

1-4

QUICK START

Configuring the Switch for

SNMP and Telnet Management

8.To assign an IP address, or to have one assigned automatically, select “Switch Configuration Menu” from the Main Menu. The Switch Configuration Menu will appear.

___________________________________________________

>>>> Switch Configuration Menu

<<<<

1.Configuration Summary

2.IP Configuration

3.SNMP Configuration

4.Spanning Tree Configuration

5.Address Aging Configuration

6.Port Mirroring Configuration

<ESC> To Exit Menu

Enter Selection:

___________________________________________________

Figure 1-2. Switch Configuration Menu

9.DHCP is enabled by default. If you have a DHCP server, an IP address and Subnet Mask are assigned automatically. Make a note of the IP address and skip to Step 12. Otherwise, select “IP Configuration” from the menu. The IP Configuration Menu will appear (see Figure 1-3).

10.To manually enter the IP address of the switch, you must first disable DHCP. Then, select “Switch IP Address” from the menu and enter the address to be assigned to the switch. This should be an administratively assigned address. (See “Configuring the IP Address” in Chapter 5.)

11.Select “Subnet Mask” from the menu and enter the subnet mask for the IP address entered in Step 10. If applicable, also enter the Gateway IP address.

1-5

QUICK START

___________________________________________________

>>>> IP Configuration Menu

<<<<

1.Automatic Selection of IP Address (DHCP).. [ ON]

2.Switch IP Address.. ............. [ 170.129. 78. 28 ]

3.Default SNMP Manager IP Address.. [ 170.129. 78.208 ]

4.Default Gateway IP Address....... [ 170.129. 78. 1 ]

5.Subnet Mask...................... [ 255.255.255. 0 ]

6.

SLIP Enable

......................

[

 

Disabled ]

7.

SLIP IP Address..................

[

0.

0.

0.

0

]

8.

SLIP Subnet ..... ...........

Mask

[ 255.

0.

0.

0

]

<ESC> To Exit Menu

Enter Selection:

___________________________________________________

Figure 1-3. IP Configuration Menu

12.For Telnet Management: Connect to the IP address assigned in Step 10. Installation is complete.

13.For SNMP Management: Check to be sure the management console and the switch use the same SNMP read-only and write community names. For the switch, both names are factory-set to “public.” If the name “public” is also used for both management console names, connect to the IP address assigned in Step 10 and then skip to Step 15. Otherwise, continue with Step 14.

14.If the community names need to be changed, press the Esc key to return to the Switch Configuration Menu (see Figure 1-2). Then select “SNMP Configuration” to display the SNMP Configuration Menu (see Figure 1-4).

15.Select “SNMP Get Community Name” from the menu and enter the new read-only access community name (up to 10 alphanumeric characters). Then, select “SNMP Set Community Name” and enter the new write access commu-

1-6

QUICK START

nity name (up to 10 alphanumeric characters).

___________________________________________________

>>>> SNMP Configuration Menu

<<<<

 

 

 

1.

SNMP Get Community Name ( 10

characters max ).....

[

public ]

2.

SNMP Set Community Name ( 10

characters max ).....

[

public ]

3.

System Location ( 24 characters max )..

[

 

]

4.

System Name ( 24 characters max )......

[

 

]

5.

System Contact ( 24 characters max )...

[

 

]

<ESC> To Exit Menu

Enter Selection:

___________________________________________________

Figure 1-4. SNMP Configuration Menu

16.Compile the MIB file into the SNMP network management platform. This file, supplied with the switch on a 3.5 inch floppy diskette, provides access to the private MIB extensions for the switch. Installation is complete.

1-7

CHAPTER 2

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-3

Ports and Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-5

10BASE-T Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-5

100BASE-TX Port(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-5

100BASE-FX Port(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-6

Link and Select LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-7

Shared Vertical LED Array and

 

Port Select Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-8

Console Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-9

Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-9

Optional Redundant Power Unit . . . . . . . .

2-9

Power Supply Receptacles and Status LEDs

2-10

Features and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12

Switch Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13

Buffered Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13

Automatic Address Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13

Spanning Tree Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14

Switch Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15

Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15

Software Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15

2-1

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Non-volatile Parameter Storage . . . . . . . . . 2-15

Management Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16

Serial Console Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16

Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16

SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17

2-2

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Overview

SMC’s TigerSwitch 16 is a family of intelligent Ethernet workgroup switches that offers both an increase in network performance plus an economical solution for anyone planning to integrate Fast Ethernet into their Ethernet LAN. In addition to sixteen 10BASE-T ports, these switches provide two Fast Ethernet ports. Depending on the model chosen, the switch will include either two 100BASE-TX ports with Auto-Negotiation, two 100BASE-FX ports or one 100BASE-TX port with AutoNegotiation and one 100BASE-FX port.

The three TigerSwitch 16 models are shown below:

Figure 2-1. TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516TT with two 100BASE-TX Ports

Figure 2-2. TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516FF with two 100BASE-FX Ports

Figure 2-3. TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516TF with

one 100BASE-TX Port and one 100BASE-FX Port

2-3

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

The Fast Ethernet ports on each switch are contained in a single, dual-port replaceable module.* This modular design allows you the option of installing different types of Fast Ethernet ports, according to your changing network needs.

The available slide-in replacement modules are listed below:

Slide-in Fast Ethernet Modules

Model

 

Ports

 

 

 

 

 

100BASE-TX

 

100BASE-FX

 

 

 

 

SMC6016TT

2

 

0

 

 

 

 

SMC6016FF

0

 

2

 

 

 

 

SMC6016TF

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

All the switches employ a buffered “store-and-forward” architecture that performs error checking to prevent bad packets from being propagated throughout the network. Their non-blocking design allows simultaneous wire-speed transport of multiple packets at consistently low latency on all ports. And, they feature full-duplex operation to double the bandwidth of those desktop and switch connections.

In addition to “at-a-glance” LEDs, these switches feature an integrated scalable management set that includes out-of-band management via an RS-232 console port, in-band management via Telnet or any SNMP-based manager, support for 4-group RMON, and Port Mirroring for full RMON support with an external probe or for traffic analysis via any network lanalyzer. This enables you to choose the level of management that’s right for you.

The TigerSwitch 16 family also supports an optional Redundant Power Unit to minimize downtime in the event of an internal power supply or AC circuit failure.

*Note: The switch will not POST (Power On Self-Test) without a module installed.

2-4

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Ports and Status LEDs

10BASE-T Ports

The sixteen 10BASE-T ports are located on the front panel of each switch. These ports are labeled with an “x” to indicate that they have a built-in crossover.*

If a 10BASE-T port is connected directly to an Ethernet server, power user or another switch, it will provide the device with a dedicated bandwidth—20 Mbps in full-duplex mode or 10 Mbps in half-duplex mode. If the port is connected to an Ethernet hub, it will provide the hub with a 10 Mbps bandwidth that can be shared by multiple users.

Figure 2-4. 10BASE-T Ports

100BASE-TX Port(s)

Models SMC6516TT and SMC6516TF are equipped with at least one 100BASE-TX port (port 18). Port 17 on model SMC6516TT is another 100BASE-TX port.

Like the 10BASE-T ports, each 100BASE-TX port is labeled with an “x” to indicate that it has a built-in crossover.* In addition, the 100BASE-TX ports support Auto-Negotiation, so the optimum operating mode—half or full duplex and 10 or 100 Mbps—is selected automatically.

*Workstations and servers can be connected to these ports with straight-through cable. When connecting hubs and other switches to these ports, a crossover cable will probably be necessary. Please see Appendix A for cabling information.

2-5

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

When connected to a 10BASE-T device, the port will operate at 10 Mbps, providing each switch with an additional Ethernet port (two ports on the SMC6516TT). When connected to a 100BASETX device, the port will operate at the higher data rate, allowing for the easy integration of Fast Ethernet into an Ethernet LAN.

If a 100BASE-TX port is connected directly to a Fast Ethernet server, power user or another switch, it will provide the device with a dedicated bandwidth—200 Mbps in full-duplex mode or 100 Mbps in half-duplex mode. If the port is connected to a Fast Ethernet hub, it will provide the hub with a 100 Mbps bandwidth that can be shared by multiple users.

100BASE-FX Port(s)

Ports 17 and 18 on TigerSwitch 16 model SMC6516FF and port 17 on model SMC6516TF are 100BASE-FX ports with SC connectors. In full-duplex mode, these ports can be connected to a corporate backbone or central site with up to 2 km of fiber cable.

Figure 2-5. SMC6516FF with 100BASE-FX Ports

2-6

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Link and Select LEDs

Each of the RJ-45 connectors on the 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX ports has dual integrated LEDs. The left LED displays the port’s Link status. If this LED is lit (green), it indicates that the connection between the port and the attached device is good. The right LED, when lit (yellow), indicates that the full status of the port (Receive, Collision, Full Duplex and 100 Mbps data rate) is displayed by the shared vertical LED array (see “Shared Vertical LED Array and Port Select Button” on the next page).

Figure 2-6. RJ-45 Integrated LEDs

The 100BASE-FX ports have individual Link and Select LEDs that perform the same functions.

The Link and Select LEDs are described in the following table:

Link and Select LEDs

Function

Condition

Description

 

 

 

 

Link

Off

Port is not in use, attached device is

 

 

 

not powered on, or port has been

 

 

 

disabled via SNMP or Console port

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blinking*

Connection between port on switch

 

 

 

and attached device is bad

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green

Connection between port on switch

 

 

 

and attached device is good

 

 

 

 

Select

Yellow

Port is selected to drive the vertical

 

 

 

LED array

 

 

 

 

*Note: The Link LEDs on unconnected ports will blink approximately once every 5 seconds. This blinking reflects background diagnostics run automatically by the switch and is not indicative of any error.

2-7

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Shared Vertical LED Array and Port Select Button

At power-up, the shared vertical LED array displays the status of port 1. To display the status of port 2, press the Port Select button located to the right of the array. Repeated depressions of this button will cycle through all eighteen ports.

Figure 2-7. Vertical LED Array and Port Select Button

The vertical LED array is described in the following table:

Vertical LED Array

Function

Condition

Description

 

 

 

Receive

Green

Data is being received

 

 

 

Collision

Yellow

Two or more devices on the segment

 

 

are transmitting at the same time

 

 

 

Full

Yellow

Port configured for full-duplex

Duplex

 

operation (available on all ports)

 

 

 

100 Mbs

Yellow

Port is operating at 100 Mbps data rate

 

 

 

 

Off

Port is operating at 10 Mbps data rate

 

 

 

2-8

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Console Port

Each switch contains a Console port on the front panel. This is an RS-232 serial port with a DB-9 connector. When connected to a PC, this port can be used to configure the switch and to monitor the switch out-of-band and in-band via Telnet.

Figure 2-8. Console Port and Reset Button

Reset Button

The front panel of each switch contains a Reset button. This button is used to restart the switch. It has almost the same effect as powering the switch off and on again. The only difference is that the internal diagnostics which are initiated at power up are not executed on reset.

Optional Redundant Power Unit

SMC’s Redundant Power Units (RPUs) are separate devices and each has its own own power cord. These devices can supply power to the switch in the event of a failure of the internal power supply. Contact your reseller for advice regarding the appropriate RPU for your specific application.

2-9

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Power Supply Receptacles and Status LEDs

There are two power receptacles on the rear of each switch. The standard receptacle labeled “Power” is for the AC power cord. The 14-pin receptacle labeled “DC Input” is for the optional Redundant Power Unit (RPU).

Figure 2-9. Power Supply Receptacles

Power and RPU LEDs located on the front panel of each switch indicate the status of both the internal and redundant power supplies. These LEDs are described on the following page.

Figure 2-10. Power Supply LEDs

2-10

 

 

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

 

 

 

 

Power Supply Status LEDs

 

 

 

LED Condition

 

Power

Redundant

Status

 

Power

 

 

 

 

Off

Off

No AC power

 

 

 

Green

Off

Internal power supply is operating

 

 

properly; redundant power supply

 

 

is not present or has been

 

 

disconnected

 

 

 

Green

Green

Both internal and redundant power

 

 

supplies are operating properly

 

 

 

Red

Green

Internal power supply has failed;

 

 

device is being powered by

 

 

redundant power supply

 

 

 

Red

Off

Redundant power supply has

 

 

failed; device is being powered by

 

 

internal power supply

 

 

 

2-11

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Features and Benefits

IEEE 802.3 and 802.3u compliance ensures compatibility with standards-based hubs, adapters and switches from any vendor

Non-blocking architecture allows multiple simultaneous switching paths for increased throughput

Filters and forwards at line-rate speed on all ports for high performance

“Store-and-forward” switch design increases reliability of transmission by checking each packet for validity before forwarding it to its destination

Automatic address learning with user-defined aging eliminates need to configure addresses manually

8,192 entry address table can store addresses for moderate to large size networks

SNMP agent for management by SMC’s EliteViewor any other SNMP-based application

RS-232 Console port simplifies switch configuration and allows switch to be managed out-of-band

4-group RMON support - Event, Alarm, Statistics and History groups - for pro-active management

Port Mirroring for full RMON support with external probe or for traffic analysis with network lanalyzer

Spanning Tree Protocol adds fault tolerance by allowing redundant paths to be created between LAN segments

Software downloads to Flash ROM via TFTP or Console port

Optional Redundant Power Unit (attached to a separate circuit) minimizes downtime in the event of an internal power supply failure

Replaceable dual-port Fast Ethernet modules for added flexibility

2-12

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Switch Architecture

Buffered Switching

Each TigerSwitch 16 unit is a “store-and-forward” device. Every packet it receives is stored in a buffer so it can be checked for validity before being forwarded to another port. In addition, the switches feature a non-blocking design that allows simultaneous wire-speed transport of multiple packets at consistently low latency.

Automatic Address Learning

An aggregate address table that can hold 8,192 entries is provided for learning, filtering and forwarding. Addresses are automatically learned by each TigerSwitch 16 unit and maintained in the address table to enable the switch to perform filtering and forwarding at line-rate speeds. When a packet containing a destination address that does not appear in the table is encountered, the packet is broadcast to all segments.

Packets are filtered if their destination address is on the same segment as their source address. By confining network traffic to its respective collision domain, filtering reduces the overall traffic on the network.

2-13

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Spanning Tree Protocol

The TigerSwitch 16 family supports the IEEE 802.1d Spanning Tree Protocol. This protocol adds a level of fault tolerance by allowing two or more redundant connections to be created between a pair of LAN segments. When there are multiple physical paths between segments, the protocol can choose a single path at any given time and disable all others. This prevents network traffic from circulating in an endless loop. However, if the chosen path fails for any reason, an alternate path will be activated to maintain the connection.

The default factory setting for Spanning Tree Protocol is “enabled.” This protocol can be configured (enabled and disabled) out-of-band via the serial console interface or in-band via SNMP or Telnet.

2-14

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Switch Operation

Diagnostic Tests

Diagnostic tests are performed whenever the switch is powered up or reset. Upon power-up, the test results are displayed on the PC attached to the Console port. During the test sequence, the switch detects whether or not the software is loaded. If it is, the Main Menu is displayed. Otherwise, the Boot Loader Menu is displayed so that new software can be downloaded.

Note: Diagnostics are not displayed when the Reset Button is pressed.

Software Downloads

Software is downloaded into a single 256 KB Flash ROM on the switch. The software can be downloaded in-band via TFTP or out-of-band via the RS-232 Console port. (See “Downloading New Software” in Chapter 5.)

Non-volatile Parameter Storage

Important operating parameters, such as IP address, Spanning Tree configuration, and management security parameters, are stored in non-volatile Flash memory and retain their values during a power failure.

Note: Since RMON parameter settings and learned addresses are not stored in non-volatile RAM, these values are not retained during a power failure. They are cleared whenever the switch is reset.

2-15

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

Management Options

The TigerSwitch 16 family can be managed using any one of the following three methods:

out-of-band via the RS-232 console interface

in-band via Telnet

in-band via any SNMP-based network manager

Serial Console Interface

The switches can be managed out-of-band via the RS-232 console port. This requires a PC running a terminal application such as Windows Terminal. An RS-232 standard null-modem cable with a DB-9 connector is used to connect the device to the Console port on the switch. (See “Connecting to the Console Port” in Chapter 4 for detailed instructions.)

This interface operates at 9600 (default value) or 19,200 baud and can be password-protected. (See Chapter 5, “Configuring and Monitoring,” for information on out-of-band management.)

Telnet

The switches can also be managed in-band via a Telnet connection using TCP/IP protocol. The Telnet user interface is menudriven and the switch’s operating parameters can be passwordprotected. (See Chapter 5, “Configuring and Monitoring,” for information on in-band management via Telnet.)

2-16

ABOUT THE SWITCHES

SNMP

In addition, the switches can be managed in-band from a workstation using EliteView or any other SNMP-based manager.

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), the most popular management protocol in use today, defines the structure of information maintained on a device being managed, and the operations used to access the information. SNMP provides two levels of management security protection based on community names. The SNMP Get community name provides read-only access to the information, while the SNMP Set community name enables you to modify the information. See Chapter 6, “Managing Via SNMP” for information on in-band SNMP management.

2-17

CHAPTER 3

PLANNING

Benefits of Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2

Switched Ethernet — Multiple

Simultaneous Data Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2

Switched Fast Ethernet — High-Speed

Data Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3

Switching — an Evolutionary Step . . . . . . . 3-3

Segmenting the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4

Client/Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4

Backbone Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4

Full-Duplex Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5

Sample Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6

Shared Ethernet LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6

Segmented Ethernet LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7

Switched Ethernet LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8

Integrating Ethernet and Fast Ethernet . . . . 3-9

TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516TT . . . . . 3-9

TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516TF . . . . . 3-10

TigerSwitch 16 Model SMC6516FF . . . . . 3-11

3-1

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