Intermec 6710 User Manual

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6710 Access Point

USER’S GUIDE

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

P/N 961-047-081

Revision C

July 1998

" NOTICE

This publication contains information proprietary to Intermec Technologies Corpo-

 

ration. It is being supplied to you with the express understanding that the infor-

 

mation contained herein is for the benefit of the contracting party only, and may

 

not be copied, distributed, or displayed to third parties without the express writ-

 

ten consent of Intermec Technologies Corporation, and shall be returned to Inter-

 

mec Technologies Corporation upon written request. If a purchase, license, or

 

nondisclosure agreement has been executed, the terms of that agreement shall

 

govern this document.

 

This publication is furnished for information only, and the information in it is

 

subject to change without notice. Although every effort has been made to provide

 

complete and accurate information, Intermec Technologies Corporation assumes

 

no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this

 

document.

 

We welcome your comments concerning this publication. Although every effort

 

has been made to keep it free of errors, some may occur. When reporting a specific

 

problem, please describe it briefly and include the book title and part number, as

 

well as the paragraph or figure number and the page number.

 

Send your comments to:

 

Intermec Technologies Corporation

 

Publications Department

 

550 Second Street SE

 

Cedar Rapids, IA 52401

 

INTERMEC, NORAND, PEN*KEY, and TRAKKER are registered trademarks

 

and ANTARES and JANUS are trademarks of Intermec Technologies Corporation.

Ó

1996 Intermec Technologies Corporation. All rights reserved.

 

This publication printed on recycled paper.

 

Acknowledgments

 

Portions of this product contain software which is licensed from and is copyrighted

 

by Epilogue Technology Corporation, 1988--1995, all rights reserved.

 

DECnet and VT are registered trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.

 

Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corporation.

 

Hewlett-Packard and HP are registered trademarks and HP OpenView is a

 

trademark of Hewlett-Packard Company.

 

Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

 

Netscape Navigator is a trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation.

 

Novell and NetWare are registered trademarks and IPX and SPX are trademarks

 

of Novell, Inc.

 

PC AT is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.

 

PROCOMM and PROCOMM PLUS are registered trademarks of DataStorm

 

Technologies, Inc.

 

Proxim and RangeLAN are trademarks of Proxim, Inc.

 

FCC Computer Compliance

" NOTICE

This equipment meets Class B digital device limits per Part 15 of FCC Rules.

 

These limits protect against interference in a residential area. It emits, uses, and

 

can radiate radio frequency energy. If you do not install and use the equipment

 

according to its instructions, it may interfere with radio signals. However, there is

 

no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation.

 

If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception,

 

which can be determined by turning our equipment off and on, the user is encour-

 

aged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

 

"

Reorient or relocate the radio or television receiving antenna.

 

"

Increase the separation between the computer equipment and receiver.

 

"

Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to

 

 

which the radio or television receiver is connected.

 

"

Consult the dealer or an experienced radio or television technician for

 

 

help.

 

FCC Spread Spectrum Radio Certification

" NOTICE

This device is certified to operate under Part 15, Subpart C, Section 15.247 of the

 

FCC rules for Intentional Radiation Products. This certification includes Docket

 

87-389 covering rules effective June 1994. It may not cause interference to

 

authorized radio communication devices, and must accept any interference caused

 

by those devices.

 

Antenna Requirements

" NOTICE

FCC rules section 15.203 and Canada’s RSS-210 require that this device be oper-

 

ated using an antenna furnished by Intermec Technologies Corporation. The an-

 

tenna coupling on this product has been designed to accept only antennas

 

manufactured by us. Use of an antenna other than that furnished with the equip-

 

ment is prohibited by FCC and Industry Canada rules.

Canadian Computer Compliance

This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian

Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.

Cet appareil numerique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Reglement sur le material boilleur du Canada.

 

Canadian Spread Spectrum Radio Certification

" NOTICE

This device complies with RSS-210 of Industry Canada. Operation is subject to

 

the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause interference, and (2)

 

this device must accept any interference, including interference that may cause

 

undesired operation of the device.

 

Canadian 2.4 GHz Radio License

" NOTICE

This device requires a radio license, unless it is installed totally inside a building.

 

(Users must obtain this license)

 

Une licence radio est requise pour ces dispositifs, sauf pour ceux installés tout à

 

fait à l’intérieur d’un bâtiment. (Il faut que l’utilisateur obtienne cette licence.)

Telephone Installation Warning Notices

The following notices apply to equipment that may be connected to telephone lines or systems. For your personal safety, and to protect this equipment from potential electrical or physical damage, do NOT connect equipment to telephone lines or data communication equipment unless the following warnings have been read, understood, and complied with.

" Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

" Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.

" Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.

" Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

" Avoid using telephone (other than cordless type) during an electrical storm. There may be a remote risk of electric shock from lightning.

" Do not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the vicinity of the leak.

Installation du téléphone : avertissements

Les avertissements qui suivent s’appliquent à tout équipement qui peut être branché aux lignes ou systèmes téléphoniques. Pour votre sécurité personnelle et pour protéger l’équipement de tout dommage électrique ou physique potentiel, NE PAS brancher un ordinateur tablette électronique ou ses périphériques aux lignes téléphoniques ou équipements avant que les avertissements suivants aient été lus, compris et observés :

"Ne jamais installer de câblage téléphonique pendant un orage électrique.

"Ne jamais installer de prise téléphonique dans un endroit humide à moins que la prise ait été spécifiquement conçue pour être utilisée dans les endroits humides.

"Ne jamais toucher les fils de téléphone ou de l’équipement terminal non isolés à moins que la ligne téléphonique n’ait été débranchée de l’interface réseau.

"User de prudence lors de l’installation ou de la modification de lignes téléphoniques.

"Éviter d’utiliser un téléphone (autre qu’un appareil téléphonique sans fil) pendant un orage électrique. Il pourrait y avoir un faible risque d’é- lectrocution par la foudre.

"Ne pas utiliser le téléphone afin de signaler une fuite de gaz à proximité de la fuite.

B CAUTION:

Intermec Technologies Corporation suggests you buy cables from us

 

to connect with other devices. Our cables are safe, meet FCC rules,

 

and suit our products. Other cables may not be tested. They may

 

cause problems from electrostatic discharge or induced energy. Our

 

warranties do not cover loss, injury, or damage from other cables.

CONTENTS

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SECTION 1

 

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-1

Purpose of This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-1

Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-1

Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-3

Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-3

Wireless Station User’s Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-3

System Management Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4

Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4

SECTION 2

 

Features and Functional Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-1

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-1

Bridging Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-2

General Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-2

Access Point Bridging Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-4

Network Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-4

Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-5

Pending Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-5

Flooding Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-6

Proxy ARP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-7

Bridge Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-7

Ethernet Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-7

Ethernet Port Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-8

Radio Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-9

OWL/IP Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-10

6710 Access Point User’s Guide i

CONTENTS "

Configuration and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Diagnostics and Configuration Port . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Remote Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-12

TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-12

DHCP Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-12

Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-12

HTTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-13

Electronic Software Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-13

TFTP Client and Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-13

Scripting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-13

Network Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-14

Sample Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-14

Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-16

Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-19

Power Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-19

Industrial Locking Mounting Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-19

SECTION 3

 

Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-1

Checking the Default Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-1

Preparing for the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

Collecting the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

Ethernet LAN Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

10BASE2 Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-3

10BASE-T Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-3

10BASE5 Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-4

Communication Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-5

Local DIAG Port Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-5

Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-6

Web Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-6

Network Management Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-6

Finding the Best Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-7

Site Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-7

General Installation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-7

Mounting the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-8

Horizontal (Tabletop) Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-8

Vertical and Ceiling Mounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-9

ii 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

CONTENTS "

Connecting to Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-10

10BASE2 Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-11

End of Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-11

Middle of Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-12

10BASE5 Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-13

N-Series Transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-13

Vampire Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-13

10BASE-T Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-16

Installing PC Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-17

WLIF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-17

900 MHz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-18

S-UHF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-19

Applying Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-20

SECTION 4

 

Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-1

Creating a Local DIAG Port Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-2

Accessing the Configuration Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-4

Accessing the ROM Command Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-5

Creating a Telnet Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-6

Default and Site Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-7

TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-7

Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-8

Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-8

Configuring the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-12

Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-12

Using the View Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-14

TCP/IP Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-16

IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-16

IP Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-17

IP Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-18

IP Frame Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-19

DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-19

DHCP Server Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-20

Bootp Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-21

Networks With DHCP and Bootp Servers . . . . . . .

4-21

Handshaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-21

Infinite Leases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-21

Auto ARP Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-22

6710 Access Point User’s Guide

iii

CONTENTS "

Bridge Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-23

Serial Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-23

Lan ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-23

[Root] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-24

Root Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-24

Super Root Candidates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-24

Super Root Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-25

Super Root Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-25

[Global Radio] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-25

Set Globally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-27

Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-27

[Global Flooding] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-28

Inbound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-28

Outbound to Secondaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-29

Outbound to Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-30

Flooding Level Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-31

S-UHF Flooding Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-36

Flood Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-36

ARP Server Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-36

[Ports] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-38

Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-39

MAC Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-39

Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-40

Hello Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-40

Ethernet Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-41

OWL Frame Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-41

Cable Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-42

[Static Addresses] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-42

[Normal RX Filter] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-43

[Frame Types] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-44

[SubTypes 1] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-46

User-Defined Subtypes in [SubTypes 1]

 

and [SubTypes 2] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-46

Filtering Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-48

Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-49

Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-50

iv 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

CONTENTS "

[Advanced RX Filter] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-52

[Expressions] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-52

ExprSeq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-53

Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-54

Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-54

Op . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-54

Value Id . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-55

Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-55

[Values] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-56

[Bridging] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-57

Bridge Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-57

Designated Bridge Candidates . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-57

Designated Bridge Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-58

Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-58

Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-58

Flood Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-59

WLIF Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-60

Security Id . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-60

Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-61

[Master Parms] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-62

Channel and Subchannel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-62

Network With 15 or Fewer Access Points . . . .

4-63

Network With 16 or More Access Points . . . . .

4-63

Wireless Hops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-65

[Slave Parms] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-66

MAC Config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-68

[Manual MAC Parms] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-69

Hop Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-70

Beacon Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-70

Deferral Slot and Fairness Slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-70

Fragment Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-71

Transmit Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-72

Norm Ack Retry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-72

Frag Ack Retry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-73

Norm QFSK Retry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-73

Frag QFSK Retry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-73

900 MHz Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-74

File Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-74

Mode--Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-74

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S-UHF Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-76

File Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-76

Call Sign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-76

Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-77

Master Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-77

Attach Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-78

OWL/IP Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-79

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-79

OWL/IP Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-82

Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-82

[IP Addresses] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-83

Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-83

Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-84

[TX Filter] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-84

Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-86

Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-86

Service Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-86

Advanced Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-87

Combining Radio Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-87

Same LAN ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-87

Different LAN IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-88

Creating a Web Browser Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-88

Configuration Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-92

Planning Your Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-92

Using the Configuration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-92

SECTION 5

 

Software Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-1

File System Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-1

Boot Segments 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-1

Data Segments 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-1

Active and Inactive Segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-2

RAM Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-3

Segment Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-3

File Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-4

Downloading Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-4

File Menu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-4

Fb Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-5

Fd Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-6

Fdel Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-7

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Fe Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-8

TFTP Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-8

TFTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-9

Server Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-10

Server Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-10

Server Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-10

TFTP Client Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-10

Get . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-11

Put . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-12

Script Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-12

Creating Script Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-13

Sample Script File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-14

Script File Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-15

TFTP Client Command Retry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-16

Reboot Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-16

SDVars Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-17

ServerIpAddress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-18

ScriptFilename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-18

StartTime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-18

Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-19

CheckPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-19

Terminate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-20

SetActivePointers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-21

NextPowerUpTime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-21

ROM Command Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-22

Starting the Command Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-22

Viewing ROM Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-23

B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-23

FX s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-23

FD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-23

FR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-24

NPWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-24

SR z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-24

PWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-25

FD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-25

FE <s|all> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-25

FI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-26

FS s n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-26

FB s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-26

FFR f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-26

FPC f s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-26

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FPD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-26

FPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-27

FPX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-27

PN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-27

PQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-27

MI String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-28

RMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-28

X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-28

Exiting the ROM Command Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-29

Software Download Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-29

Upgrading Through DIAG Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-29

Starting the TFTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-31

Upgrading TFTP Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-31

SECTION 6

 

Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-1

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-1

ETHERNET Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-2

STATUS Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-2

STATUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-3

MODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-4

NETWORK MODE Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-5

PCMCIA Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-6

Power-Up Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-7

APPENDIX A

 

Access Point Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-1

Product Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-1

Electrical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-1

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-2

Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-2

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APPENDIX B

 

WLIF Specifications and Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-1

RM180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-1

Radio Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-2

Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-2

Antenna Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-3

Whip Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-3

Remote Antenna Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-3

Medium Gain Patch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-3

Medium Gain Collinear Dipole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-4

High Gain Collinear Dipole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-4

High Gain Yagi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-5

Antenna Adapter Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-5

Model 2100 Antennas and Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-6

2.4 GHz Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-6

2.4 GHz Antenna Cables and Connectors . . . . . . . . . . .

B-6

APPENDIX C

 

900 MHz Specifications and Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-1

RM160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-1

Radio Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-2

Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-2

Antenna Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-2

Whip Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-2

Remote Antenna Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C-3

APPENDIX D

 

S-UHF Specifications and Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-1

RM111 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-1

Radio Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-2

Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-2

Wireless Hops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-3

Antenna Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-3

Whip Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-3

Site License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-4

Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-4

Transaction Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-4

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Installation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-5

Predicting Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-5

Installing a Single Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-6

Installing Multiple Access Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-6

Extending Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-6

Reusing the Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-7

Increasing System Throughput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-8

Option 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-9

Option 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-9

Frequency and Separation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . .

D-10

APPENDIX E

 

OWL/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-1

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-1

OWL/IP Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-2

Addressing Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-2

Installation Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-2

OWL/IP Safeguards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-3

Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-3

Addressing Limitations and Flooding Restrictions . . .

E-4

Permanent Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-4

Default Filter Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-6

Subnet Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-6

Password Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-7

Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-7

Tunnel Origination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-9

Building the Spanning Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-9

Establishing and Maintaining Tunnels . . . . . . . . .

E-10

Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-10

Frame Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-11

Outbound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-11

Inbound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-11

Station Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-12

Mobile IP Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-12

x 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

CONTENTS "

OWL/IP Configuration Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-13

Example 1: Class C IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-13

Step 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-15

Step 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-15

Step 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-15

Option A: Unicast Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-16

Option B: Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-16

Step 4: Set TX Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-17

Example 2: Class B IP Address Using Subnetting . .

E-19

Step 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-19

Step 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-19

Step 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-21

Option A: Unicast Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-21

Option B: Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-21

Option C: All Subnets Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . .

E-22

Step 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-23

APPENDIX F

 

Port and Cable Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F-1

DIAG Port Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F-1

AUI Port Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F-2

DIAG Port Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F-3

APPENDIX G

 

MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-1

Product Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-1

About This Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-1

Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-2

MIB-II Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-2

6710 Access Point MIB Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-3

Access to Management Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-4

MIB-II Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-6

MIB Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-6

6710 Access Point User’s Guide xi

CONTENTS "

MIB Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . G-8

Product OIDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-8

System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-9

Interface Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-12

SNMP Version 1 Configuration Group . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-17

Bridging Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-18

Control Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-22

MIB Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . G-23

GLOSSARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Glossary-1

INDEX . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Index-1

FIGURES

 

 

Figure 2-1

6710 Access Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 2-1

Figure 2-2

6710 Access Point Functions . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 2-2

Figure 2-3 Sample Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . .

. . 2-15

Figure 2-4 Access Point Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 2-16

Figure 2-5 PC Card Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 2-17

Figure 3-1

T-Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-3

Figure 3-2

Cable Terminator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-3

Figure 3-3 Cable With RJ45 Plugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-3

Figure 3-4

N-Series Transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-4

Figure 3-5 Vampire Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-5

Figure 3-6 Mounting Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-9

Figure 3-7 End of 10BASE2 Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-11

Figure 3-8 Middle of 10BASE2 Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-12

Figure 3-9

N-Series Transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-14

Figure 3-10 Vampire Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-15

Figure 3-11 10BASE-T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-16

Figure 3-12 WLIF PC Card Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-17

Figure 3-13 900 MHz PC Card Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-18

Figure 3-14 S-UHF PC Card Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-19

Figure 3-15 AC Power Input Connection . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 3-21

xii 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

CONTENTS "

Figure 4-1

Local Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-3

Figure 4-2

Telnet Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-6

Figure 4-3

Access Points Servicing IP Wireless

 

Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-49

Figure 4-4 Wireless Hopping Through WLIF Radios . . . .

4-65

Figure 4-5 OWL/IP Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-80

Figure 4-6 Web Browser Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-89

Figure 6-1

Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-1

Figure B-1 Antenna Adapter Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-5

Figure D-1 Extending Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-7

Figure D-2 Frequency Reuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-8

Figure D-3 Increased System Throughput . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-10

Figure E-1 Secondary LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-8

Figure E-2 OWL/IP Tunnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-8

Figure E-3 Example Class C Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-14

Figure E-4 Example Class B Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-20

TABLES

 

 

Table 4-1 Configuration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-92

Table 6-1 ETHERNET Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-2

Table 6-2 Error Mode Status Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-3

Table 6-3 MODE Indicator Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-5

Table 6-4 NETWORK MODE Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . .

6-5

Table 6-5 PCMCIA Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-6

Table 6-6 DIAG Port Baud Rates, ROM Mode . . . . . . . . . .

6-6

Table D-1 Coverage Prediction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D-5

Table E-1 Mobile IP Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E-13

Table G-1 MIB-II Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-3

Table G-2 MIB Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-4

Table G-3 MIB Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-7

Table G-4 products GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-8

Table G-5 hw GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-9

Table G-6 fsinfo GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G-10

 

6710 Access Point User’s Guide

xiii

CONTENTS "

Table G-7 segment GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-10 Table G-8 dir GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-11 Table G-9 criticalErrors GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-11 Table G-10 nifx GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-12 Table G-11 portState GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-13 Table G-12 portStats GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-14 Table G-13 ptxq GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-15 Table G-14 pmsg GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-16 Table G-15 community TABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-17 Table G-16 trapTarget TABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-17 Table G-17 rt GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-18 Table G-18 brg GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-19 Table G-19 addr GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-20 Table G-20 brgState GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-20 Table G-21 bridgeStats GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-22 Table G-22 powerUp GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-23 Table G-23 softwareDownLoad GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-23

xiv 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

Section 1

Preface

"" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

Purpose of This Guide

This user’s guide describes the installation, setup, and maintenance of the 6710 Access Point. This guide covers access point FLASH version 1.27 or greater and ROM version 1.12 or greater.

Norand Corporation is now part of Intermec Technologies Corporation. As part of our continuing efforts to offer the broadest range of system solutions in the industry, the 6710 Access Point and other open wireless local area network (LAN) components have been merged into the INTERMECR Integrated Network Communications Architecture (INCA). Where appropriate, we have continued to use the Norand name in references to the open wireless LAN to maintain continuity with existing product in the field.

Organization

This Preface describes the intended audience for this guide, lists related publications, and tells how to contact the Customer Response Center. Other sections do the following:

Section 2,

Describes the access point and how

“Features and

it operates on the open wireless

Functional

LAN. It also describes access point

Overview”

components.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 1-1

SECTION 1 " Preface

Section 3,

Helps you prepare your site before

“Installation”

you install the access point, and

 

shows how to connect the access

 

point to 10BASE-T, 10BASE2, and

 

10BASE5 Ethernet.

Section 4,

Describes how to create a

“Configuration”

communications session with the

 

access point, access FLASH and

 

ROM, and set up the access point

 

through its configuration menus.

Section 5,

Describes file system methodology

“Software Download”

and the functional characteristics

 

of the software download process.

Section 6,

Describes the access point’s

“Indicator Lights”

indicator lights and contains

 

troubleshooting tips.

Appendixes contain supplemental information:

Appendix A

Lists mechanical, electrical, and

 

environmental specifications for

 

the access point.

Appendix B

Lists specifications and antennas

 

for the WLIF radio.

Appendix C

Lists specifications and antennas

 

for the 900 MHz radio.

Appendix D

Lists specifications and antennas

 

for the synthesized UHF radio. It

 

also discusses UHF technology.

Appendix E

Describes OWL/IP (IP tunneling).

Appendix F

Shows port and cable pin-outs.

Appendix G

Describes the 6710 Management

 

Information Base (MIB).

The glossary at the end of this manual lists network terms.

1-2 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 1 " Preface

Intended Audience

This user’s guide is intended for these audiences:

"Network administrator who is familiar with various types and configurations of computer networks, how they work, and the terminology used when discussing them.

"Hardware installer who is responsible for performing the physical installation of the access point and any related hardware that might be required.

Related Publications

The following publications are available. They include information about hardware and software products related to or used with the access point and the network on which it operates.

Numbers in parentheses after the title indicate the publication’s part number. Contact your Sales Representative for ordering information.

Wireless Station User’s Guides

Wireless station user’s guides describe how to set up, operate, and maintain radio terminals in each series of terminal. Specific manuals are:

PEN*KEYR Model 6400 User’s Guide (961-047-093)

PEN*KEY Model 6500/6550 User’s Guide (961-047-099) RT1100 Radio Terminal User’s Guide (961-047-069) RT1700 Radio Terminal User’s Guide (961-047-068) RT5900 Radio Terminal User’s Guide (961-047-121)

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 1-3

SECTION 1 " Preface

System Management Publications

NORAND Open Wireless LAN with HP OpenView for

Windows User’s Guide (961-051-009)

This guide describes how to install and use the OpenView for Windows network management platform by Hewlett-Packard (HP).

OWLView for HP OpenView for UNIX User’s Guide

(961-051-011)

This guide describes how to install and use the OWLView for HP OpenView for UNIX network management platform.

OWLView for HP OpenView for Windows User’s Guide

(961-051-010)

This guide describes how to install and use the OWLView for HP OpenView for Windows network management platform.

Customer Support

The goal of Intermec Technologies Corporation is 100 percent customer satisfaction. If you would like more information about the access point or other open wireless LAN system components, contact us through the Customer Response Center.

In North America, call: 800-221-9236 or 319-369-3533

1-4 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

Section 2

Features and Functional Overview

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

This section describes the 6710 Access Point and how it operates on the open wireless LAN. This section also describes access point components.

Description

The 6710 Access Point provides transparent, wireless communications between a wired Ethernet LAN and wireless stations. Figure 2-1 shows current designs; information in this user’s guide applies to both designs.

Figure 2-1

6710 Access Points

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-1

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

The access point functions as a 4-port translating bridge. Functionality within the access point can be partitioned into two major functional blocks: bridging functionality and management functionality. Bridging functions pertain to the forwarding of data through the access point. Management functionality involves configuration, software upgrade, and network management.

Figure 2-2 is a simplified diagram showing the functions within the access point.

Management and Configuration

 

Bridging

 

 

MIB

 

Port 2

Port 3

 

 

 

 

SNMP

Forwarding

(NIC 2)

(NIC 1)

 

 

 

DHCP

Agent

Database

 

 

 

TCP/IP

 

 

Port 4

 

 

Bridging

(OWL/IP)

 

 

 

TFTP

HTTP Telnet

 

 

 

 

Proxy ARP

 

 

Network

 

File

Device

 

 

System

Configuration

Organization

Port 1

 

 

 

 

 

RS-232 Diagnostics Port

 

(Ethernet)

 

AUI 10BASE2

10BASE-T

 

 

 

Figure 2-2

6710 Access Point Functions

Bridging Functionality

General Concepts

Bridges are common components in wired LANs. Bridges are devices that join two or more LAN segments. This provides the appearance of a single LAN segment to the protocols and applications that operate within the LAN.

2-2 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Bridges operate at the Media Access Control (MAC) sublayer of the Data Link Layer (Layer 2) of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) protocol model. Operating at the MAC layer allows bridges to operate transparently to commonly used network protocols such as TCP/IP, Novell SPX/IPX, NetBEUI, and DECnet.

In wired LANs, bridges do the following:

"Segment traffic for better efficiency and performance.

"Extend the reach of LANs when cable length or node limits have been reached.

"Translate between different LAN types such as IEEE 802.3 Ethernet and 802.5 Token Ring.

A LAN environment normally consists of a collection of nodes or stations, each identified by a unique 48-bit physical address (also called an IEEE address or MAC address). Data is sent on the LAN as frames or packets that contain the source address of the station sending the frame, and the destination address of the recipient station.

A bridge has at least two ports, each connected to a different LAN segment. Bridges learn which source addresses are generating traffic on each of their ports. If the bridge receives a frame with a destination address corresponding to a source address it has seen on another port, it forwards the frame to the port. If it receives a frame where the source and destination addresses are on the same port, it ignores (drops) the frame, since the destination node receives the original transmission. Generally, if a bridge receives a frame for an unknown destination address on any one port, it floods the frame on all other ports.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-3

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Access Point Bridging Layer

The 6710 Access Point functions as a bridge with up to four ports:

"An Ethernet port.

"One or two radio ports.

"An Open Wireless LAN/Internet Protocol (OWL/IP) port.

The access point is a translating bridge because it forwards frames between Ethernet and wireless media that have unique physical and MAC protocol implementations. The access point implements the basic learning and forwarding functions of a simple wired LAN bridge. It also includes additional functionality to address unique problems in wireless LANs.

Significant functions supported at the bridging layer include network organization, support for roaming and power-managed stations, and programmable flooding levels.

Network Organization

Open wireless LAN networks may be complex, supporting:

"Small or large numbers of access points on a single wired LAN backbone.

"Stations that roam between coverage areas and employ power management to improve battery life.

More complex topologies include the following:

"Range extension through wireless access points, which are not connected to the wired LAN backbone.

"Secondary LANs (connection of wired LAN segments by wireless links).

"Mixed radio frequency (RF) media.

"Operation over multiple IP subnets.

"Multiple, independent wireless LANs on one wired LAN backbone.

2-4 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Access points automatically configure into a self-organized network using a spanning tree topology. They automatically reconfigure the network to maintain reliable operation as devices are added or removed, or in the event of some types of wired LAN failure. The spanning tree provides efficient, loop-free forwarding of frames through the network and rapid roaming of mobile stations within the network.

The spanning tree is initiated by the super root, an access point that coordinates the network and distributes common system parameters to other access points and stations. The super root is elected from a group of access points designated at the time of installation. The election process also occurs in the event of a super root failure, preventing a single point of failure.

Forwarding

The bridge maintains a forwarding database of all physical station addresses known to the access point, and the correct port for each address. This database makes efficient forwarding decisions in the bridging software.

The database is updated through monitoring addresses on each port, and by messages exchanged between access points when stations roam. The database also includes the power management status of each station, supporting the pending message feature of the network.

Pending Messages

Wireless stations may use power management to maintain battery life. These stations wake up periodically to receive messages that may have arrived while their radio was powered down. The bridging software provides a pending message delivery service, allowing frames to be held until the station is ready to receive them.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-5

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Flooding Configurations

Standard LAN bridges flood frames on all ports when the destination address is unknown. Additionally, many network protocols use multicast addressing for connection and status communications. A multicast frame is a special type of frame destined for more than one physical address. Standard bridges always flood multicast frames.

Most wireless media supported in the access point operate at lower media speeds than Ethernet. Indiscriminate flooding from a busy Ethernet backbone to a wireless medium can consume a substantial portion of the available wireless bandwidth. This reduces system performance even though flooded frames are frequently not intended for stations on a given wireless segment.

To allow performance tuning, the access point provides separate flooding control options for both unicast (single physical address) and multicast frames. Access points serving as designated bridges connecting wired LAN segments may be configured to use different flooding settings than access points serving only wireless stations.

Two of the wireless media supported in the access point — synthesized UHF (S-UHF) and 900 MHz — provide reliable attach mechanisms, which guarantee that wireless stations are always in the access point’s forwarding database. Unicast flooding is never required for these stations.

The Wireless LAN Interoperability Forum (WLIF) 2.4 GHz option also provides a reliable attach mechanism for stations using the NORANDR Network Layer (NNL) terminal emulation network protocol. Multicast flooding levels are set for individual networks based on the needs of wireless stations to receive multicast frames. For networks with IP wireless stations only, the Proxy ARP Server provides an option to enabling multicast flooding.

2-6 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Proxy ARP Server

The Proxy ARP Server is an advanced flooding control capability for stations using IP. An ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is a type of multicast message used to determine the physical (MAC) address of a station using a specific IP address. When Proxy ARP is enabled, the IP addresses of stations using IP are included in the forwarding database. If the destination IP address matches an entry in the forwarding database, the ARP is sent to the physical unicast address matching that IP address.

To allow customization of this capability to optimize performance, the server operates in one of the following modes:

"No flooding.

"Delayed flooding.

"Normal flooding.

Proxy ARP Server is discussed in more detail in Section 4, “Configuration.”

Bridge Ports

The access point has the following physical ports:

"An Ethernet port.

"Two PC card slots capable of accepting a variety of wireless Network Interface Cards (NICs).

The access point also has a logical OWL/IP port.

Ethernet Port

The Ethernet port can be configured to support 10BASE-T twisted pair, 10BASE2 thinnet, or an AUI connection. The AUI connection can support 10BASE5 thicknet or 10BASEF fiber optic connections with the appropriate media adapters.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-7

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

The physical connections are on the bottom panel of the access point. The desired Ethernet medium is selectable through the device configuration menus. Section 3, “Installation,” has more information about connecting the access point to Ethernet media. Section 4, “Configuration,” describes how to set the medium through the configuration menus.

Ethernet Port Filters

The Ethernet port can be configured to support a variety of preconfigured and custom input filters. Access points are commonly installed on LANs that carry traffic for wired and wireless devices. Setting filters prevents unnecessary traffic from the wired LAN from being forwarded onto the wireless medium. This is important because common wireless technologies operate at data rates below Ethernet speeds.

Normally, filters are set to pass traffic known to be (or likely to be) destined for wireless stations, and drop traffic not destined for stations requiring wireless connectivity. Filtering occurs in the Ethernet driver software that controls low level operation of the Ethernet ports, minimizing involvement of other functions when unnecessary frames are received. In most installations, the predefined filters are used. The default access point configuration sets no filters. Filter setup is discussed in more detail in Section 4, “Configuration.”

Filtering and flooding control (described on page 2-6) are complimentary but have different functions. Filters allow frames to be eliminated based upon content of the frame, usually the network protocol header fields within the frame. For example, filters can be set to eliminate some or all IP traffic or Novell IPX traffic.

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Filtering occurs regardless of whether the destination address is in the forwarding database. Using filters can improve the performance of the access point and prevent undesired frames from being forwarded to wireless stations attached to the access point.

Flooding decisions are made after frames have been received on a port and filtered. Flooding settings determine how the access point forwards frames to destination addresses not in the forwarding database.

Radio Ports

Each of the two radio ports in the access point are a connection into a LAN segment consisting of all wireless stations and access points that use the same wireless technology, are within wireless communications range of the access point, and are configured to communicate together.

The two PC card slots are intended for wireless NICs and are designated as NIC1 and NIC2. Internally, they are configured as Port 3 and Port 2, respectively. The following wireless options are currently supported:

"WLIF (2.4 GHz).

"900 MHz.

"450 MHz S-UHF.

The different media options provide alternative coverage and throughput tradeoffs. Radio media options are described in more detail in Appendixes B, C, and D.

The access point also supports combinations of two adapters for operation in mixed media systems; or, for WLIF radios, a wireless access point capability. The following dual radio configurations are supported:

"WLIF and 900 MHz.

"WLIF and S-UHF.

"WLIF and WLIF (limited to Master/Slave configuration for wireless access points).

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SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Configuration of individual radio options and the WLIF wireless access point configuration are discussed in Section 4, “Configuration.”

OWL/IP Port

The OWL/IP port is a logical port used in installations where the wireless infrastructure is required to operate across multiple IP subnets; that is, in installations where IP routers are used.

The OWL/IP port is an advanced capability that allows stations supporting IP and nonroutable protocols such as NNL (used in some terminal emulation installations) to roam without losing connectivity when a wireless LAN installation must extend over multiple IP subnets. In some cases, OWL/IP may also provide connectivity in larger, routed networks when roaming between IP subnets is not required, but where it is desirable to configure a single wireless network across router boundaries.

OWL/IP uses General Router Encapsulation (GRE), a registered protocol from the TCP/IP protocol suite. GRE allows frames destined for stations on a different IP subnet to be encapsulated with an IP address that passes transparently through routers. Encapsulation is also sometimes referred to as tunneling.

To simplify configuration, OWL/IP functionality is treated as an additional port within the access point architecture. It is a logical port in that there is no physical radio or wired LAN port associated with OWL/IP.

Encapsulated frames may be sent through any of the three physical ports. Access points separated by one or more routers may be thought of as originating and receiving nodes on the two sides of a tunnel that is established through the router.

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The forwarding database entry for a station on the other side of the tunnel includes the physical port (NIC1, NIC2, or Ethernet) the frame should be forwarded through, and an indication that encapsulation is required. The receiving access point on the other side of the tunnel de-encapsulates the frame and then forwards it on the correct physical port.

OWL/IP is described in more detail in Section 4, “Configuration,” and Appendix E, “OWL/IP.”

Configuration and Management

Configuration

The access point can be configured through a local RS-232 connection, or remotely through a TCP/IP connection. The access point includes a command monitor and menu driven configuration with online help. The command monitor and file system configuration are contained in permanent read-only memory (ROM) within the access point, and can be accessed through the RS-232 diagnostics port even if software is not loaded in the access point.

Most access point functionality is provided by the software stored within the file system. Configuration parameters are stored in nonvolatile EEPROM memory, and are maintained in the event of power loss.

Diagnostics and Configuration Port

An RS-232 configuration port is provided for direct access to the access point’s command monitor and configuration menus. Access through the diagnostics port is password-protected for security.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-11

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

The port uses a standard PC AT style cable, and operates at speeds up to 57.6 Kbps. Configuration using this port is described in Section 4, “Configuration.”

Remote Access

Remote access is available over TCP/IP connections using Telnet or Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) for configuration management, and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) for network management.

TCP/IP

The access point supports remote access through a Request for Comments (RFC) compliant TCP/IP stack. Before initial usage, the stack must be initially configured with an IP address and an optional default router through the RS-232 diagnostics port. Alternatively, the access point may be configured with a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server name. The access point then obtains its IP address, default router, and subnet mask from a DHCP server.

DHCP Client

The access point contains a DHCP client, allowing it to receive an IP address over the network. The DHCP client supports temporary and permanent leases. It also accepts permanent leases from a Bootstrap Protocol (Bootp) server. See Section 4, “Configuration,” for further detail on DHCP operation.

Telnet

Telnet may be used to access the access point’s configuration menus. The command interface is identical to the command interface through the diagnostics port. See Section 4, “Configuration,” for more information about access through Telnet.

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HTTP

The access point supports configuration using HTTP from a workstation equipped with a Web browser. Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator is recommended. See Section 4, “Configuration,” for more information about access through a Web browser.

Electronic Software Distribution

The access point supports electronic software distribution, which allows software upgrades after installation. The access point provides a dual bank file system with one active bank and one inactive bank. It operates from the active bank, allowing software upgrades to be stored in the inactive bank. This enables upgrades to be loaded while the access point is operating.

The upgrade can be started immediately after downloading by swapping the active and inactive banks and rebooting. The access point can also be programmed to load the new software at a later time, such as after all access points have been upgraded or during a time of little system activity.

TFTP Client and Server

Software downloads are accomplished using the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP), another member of the IP suite. Each access point contains a TFTP client and server. The TFTP client allows the access point to obtain software updates from a TFTP server. The server can be an access point configured with the TFTP server enabled, or another network workstation with TFTP server capability.

Scripting

The access point supports a scripting capability that automates most of the software download process. Scripts can be uploaded to the access point through Telnet or SNMP.

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SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Network Management

The access point is instrumented for network management, with variables defined in the Management Information Base (MIB). The MIB is SNMP V1 compliant.

Management information can be accessed through the SNMP agent. The MIB may be ordered separately and compiled for any SNMP network management platform. Additional capabilities are supported in the OWLView network management application for HP OpenView.

Appendix G, “MIB,” contains the 6710 Access Point MIB. Consult the following documentation for more information on network management:

"NORAND Open Wireless LAN with HP OpenView for Windows User’s Guide (961-051-009)

"OWLView for HP OpenView for UNIX User’s Guide

(961-051-011)

"OWLView for HP OpenView for Windows User’s Guide

(961-051-010)

Sample Configuration

Figure 2-3 shows a sample network configuration. It also shows access points providing additional coverage and wireless links to secondary Ethernet LANs.

" NOTE: Consult Appendix D, “S-UHF Specifications and Antennas,” for network configuration limitations for S-UHF systems.

2-14 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

 

Host

Terminal Emulation

LAN Server

Gateway

 

Distribution LAN

6710 Access Point

6710 Access Points

Wireless Hop

6710 Access Point

(Designated Bridge)

 

 

 

 

PEN*KEYR 6400

Notebook

 

 

 

 

(WLIF)

 

 

Secondary Ethernet LAN

Computer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

esktop

 

 

 

 

 

 

PEN*KEY 6400

Computer

Figure 2-3

Sample Network Configuration

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-15

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Components

Figure 2-4 shows access point components, described on the following pages. Not shown is the mounting bracket, which attaches the access point to a wall or ceiling.

Figure 2-4

Access Point Components

2-16 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

1.Protective cover. The cover protects two Type II or Type III PC card slots. Figure 2-5 shows where the slots are located.

1

1

1. PC card slots

Figure 2-5

PC Card Slots

2.Indicator lights. Four pairs of indicator lights (LEDs) on the front panel show the status of the access point. During the power-up sequence, the lights show the results of the power-up self diagnostics and provide information about the operating status.

After the power-up sequence, the lights show the current operating status and indicate if a problem exists. Section 6, “Indicator Lights,” describes the lights in detail.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-17

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

3.Rubber feet. Four nonskid rubber feet provide a stable base for the access point when you place it on a desktop or other horizontal surface.

When the mounting bracket is installed for an access point mounted vertically or on the ceiling, the rubber feet provide a small amount of tension to the bracket to help hold it in place.

4.AC INPUT. The AC INPUT connector is a standard IEC type, three-prong AC input connector. The power cord attaches to this connector. The internal power supply is an autosensing international power supply. It accepts a source voltage between 85 and 264 V ac, with a frequency between 47 and 63 Hz.

5.10 BASE 2. The 10 BASE 2 port is a standard BNC port through which the access point connects to 10BASE2 Ethernet (thinnet).

6.10 BASE T. The 10 BASE T port is a standard RJ45 port through which the access point connects to 10BASE-T (UTP) Ethernet.

7.AUI. The AUI port is a 15-pin, D-subminiature (D-sub) port. The access point connects to an AUI network adaptor through this port, for connection to 10BASE5 Ethernet (thicknet). Appendix F, “Port and Cable Pin-Outs,” contains pin definitions.

"NOTE: Section 3, “Installation,” shows how to connect the access point to

10BASE2, 10BASE5, and 10BASE-T.

8.DIAG. The DIAG port is a 9-pin D-sub communication port that communicates at RS-232 levels. Use this port to configure the access point, download new software, and retrieve statistics. Appendix F contains pin definitions.

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SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

Accessories

Power Cord

The power cord connects the access point to the wall outlet. The following chart lists power cord part numbers.

Country

Part Number

Australia

321-472-001

Denmark

321-501-001

Europe

321-473-001

Italy

321-471-001

Germany

321-515-001

United Kingdom

321-474-001

United States

321-054-001

Industrial Locking Mounting

Bracket

The Industrial Locking Mounting Bracket “locks” the access point into the bracket. This bracket is recommended for installations where vibration, shaking, or other movement can dislodge the access point from its mount.

Item

Part Number

Mounting kit

203-386-001

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 2-19

SECTION 2 " Features and Functional Overview

2-20 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

Section 3

Installation

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

This section describes how to:

"Check the access point’s default configuration.

"Prepare for the installation.

"Collect the networking equipment you need.

"Find the best location.

"Connect to the Ethernet medium.

"Install PC cards.

"Apply power.

Checking the Default Configuration

The access point is shipped with default settings for system software parameters, which are listed in Section 4, “Configuration.” You may need to change some default settings to achieve a more efficient configuration for your site. See Section 4 for information about reconfiguring the access point. The access point should be properly configured before it is connected to the network.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-1

SECTION 3 " Installation

Preparing for the Installation

" NOTE: Someone who knows and understands all applicable local building codes and is proficient with the tools and equipment used to install FCC Class B electromechanical devices should physically install the access point.

Before you install the access point, unpack it and inspect it for damage or missing parts. Save all the paperwork you received. If the access point appears to be damaged, contact the Customer Response Center for instructions on returning the unit for replacement.

The shipment contains the access point with FLASH and the following items:

"Mounting bracket

"AC power cord

"Warranty card

Collecting the Equipment

Before you install the access point onto the network, collect the equipment you will need.

Ethernet LAN Components

The access point directly connects to 10BASE2, 10BASE-T, or 10BASE5 Ethernet medium. Consult a cabling reference for maximum run lengths and node limits for Ethernet wiring.

3-2 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

10BASE2 Components

10BASE2 components include a T-connector, a cable terminator, and the proper lengths of 10BASE2 coax cable. The 10BASE2 T-connector (Figure 3-1) attaches to the access point’s 10BASE2 port, and connects the access point to the middle or end of 10BASE2 cable.

Figure 3-1

T-Connector

A cable terminator (Figure 3-2) attaches to the T-connector. It is required for a device connected to the end of 10BASE2 cable. The terminator properly terminates the network cable to maintain proper impedance. Proper termination is necessary for reliable Ethernet operation.

Figure 3-2

Cable Terminator

10BASE-T Component

10BASE-T coax cable is normally used to connect the access point to an Ethernet hub. The cable has an RJ45 plug on each end (Figure 3-3).

Figure 3-3

Cable With RJ45 Plugs

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-3

SECTION 3 " Installation

10BASE5 Components

10BASE2 components include the proper lengths of 10BASE5 coax cable, an AUI drop cable (less than or equal to 50 feet/15 meters long), and a transceiver. Two types of transceivers are the intrusive N-Series transceiver and the nonintrusive vampire tap.

The N-Series transceiver (Figure 3-4) is a T-shaped connector with a 15-pin AUI port and two type N connectors. This transceiver is intrusive because network service is disrupted while the coaxial cable is cut and a threaded N-series connector placed on each end of the cable.

A 10BASEF (fiber optic) adapter may be attached directly to the AUI connector.

Figure 3-4

N-Series Transceiver

The vampire tap is an insulation-piercing clamp device that clamps onto the coaxial cable (Figure 3-5). The vampire tap pierces the coaxial cable’s insulation and makes contact with the shield and inner conductor without cutting the cable.

3-4 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

Figure 3-5

Vampire Tap

Communication Equipment

You can access the access point’s system software configuration menus locally through the unit’s DIAG port, or remotely through a Telnet session or Web browser.

Local DIAG Port Access

For local access, you need the following:

"Third-party communications software terminal emulation package with Y-modem capability (such as PROCOMM PLUS by DataStorm Technologies, Inc.). Install the program according to its user guide.

"PC (personal computer) station, which should meet the requirements outlined in the user guide for the terminal emulation program.

"Cable to connect the PC to the access point’s DIAG port. The following chart lists cables.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-5

SECTION 3 " Installation

For this PC Port

Use Cable Part Number

9-pin

226-106-001 (null modem cable)

25-pin

321-355-001

Telnet

You need the following to access the configuration menus through a Telnet session:

"PC or workstation with an installed and configured network interface card and a Telnet application. You can also use a host capable of acting as a Telnet client.

"Telnet VT emulator (TNVT) installed on the PC.

"IP address for the access point. See Section 4 for more information about IP addresses.

Web Browser

The access point’s configuration menus are designed for HTML Level 2.0 or higher. You need the following to access the configuration menus through a Web browser:

"Graphical browser application.

"Internet or local network connection.

"IP address for the access point. See Section 4 for more information about IP addresses.

Network Management Platform

To manage the system through a network management platform, you need the platform (such as OpenView for Windows by Hewlett-Packard) installed on a network management station using SNMP. The station must meet the requirements outlined in the platform’s user guide.

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SECTION 3 " Installation

Finding the Best Location

Site Survey

Intermec strongly recommends that Intermec or certified providers conduct a site survey to determine the ideal locations for all of your network components. A proper site survey requires special equipment and training. A site survey provides an installation recommendation that addresses various factors, which can affect the performance of your wireless LAN system.

General Installation Guidelines

Coverage in most sites requires a network of access points to be installed. Radio coverage varies greatly with factors such as building construction, number and type of obstructions in the signal path, and the RF media in use. Additional factors related to the intended use of the system also dictate installation practices. The following general practices should be followed in any installation:

"Locate access points centrally within areas requiring coverage.

"Try to position the access point so its indicator lights are visible. The lights are useful for troubleshooting the installation.

"Position antennas below roof trusses and away from I-beams, racks, or other structures and obstructions.

"Overlap access point coverage areas to avoid coverage holes.

"Install wired LAN cabling within node limit and cable length limitations.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-7

SECTION 3 " Installation

"Ensure that a power outlet is within 6 feet of the access point. An uninterruptable power supply is recommended when the ac power system is not reliable.

"Ensure that LAN and ac cables can reach the access point after you install it. Leave sufficient room around the access point so you can easily attach and remove cables.

"Do not locate an access point with the S-UHF radio option in a computer room. RF emissions from the higher speed processors in current-generation computers may reduce system range.

Mounting the Access Point

You can mount the access point horizontally on a tabletop, vertically on a wall or post, or on the ceiling.

Horizontal (Tabletop) Mount

1.Remove the mounting bracket from the bottom of the access point. The bracket is not needed for a tabletop installation.

2.Set the access point in position. The unit rests securely on four rubber feet that keep it from slipping out of place.

3.Make all Ethernet connections. See “Connecting to Ethernet” on page 3-10.

4.Make all power connections. See “Applying Power” on page 3-20.

5.Watch the indicator lights to verify that the access point is working properly. See Section 6, “Indicator Lights,” for help.

3-8 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

Vertical and Ceiling Mounts

See Figure 3-6 and the procedure following it.

" NOTE: If mounting the access point on a hollow wall, secure the mounting plate to a 3/4” (thick) plywood base by four 1” X 1/4” nuts, bolts, and washers. Anchor the plywood base to two separate wall studs by four 2” X 1/4” diameter lag screws (two lag screws in each stud).

6.00"

1.00"

2.00"

1.00"

2.00”

1.00"

Figure 3-6

Mounting Bracket

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-9

SECTION 3 " Installation

1.Inspect where the access point will be mounted and determine what hardware is needed. Different surfaces such as drywall, wood, and concrete block require different mounting hardware. For this reason, a universal mounting bracket is included with the access point.

2.Remove the mounting plate from the bottom of the access point.

3.Using the mounting plate as a template, mark where the anchors that secure the mounting plate to the surface should be located.

4.Attach the access point mounting plate to the wall or ceiling with 2I x 1/4I diameter lag screws or bolts, depending upon the surface. The mounting plate must be secured to the surface by at least four anchors, one on each corner.

5.Reattach the access point to the mounting plate.

6.Make all Ethernet connections. See “Connecting to Ethernet.”

7.Make all power connections. See “Applying Power” on page 3-20.

8.Watch the indicator lights to verify that the access point is working properly. See Section 6, “Indicator Lights,” for help.

"NOTE: An optional locking kit is available. See Section 2, “Features and

Functional Overview,” for more information.

Connecting to Ethernet

The following pages show how to connect the access point to 10BASE2, 10BASE5, and 10BASE-T Ethernet.

3-10 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

10BASE2 Ethernet

The access point connects to the end or middle of the 10BASE2 cable segment.

" NOTE: Cable lengths between network devices on the 10BASE2 Ethernet LAN must meet ANSI/IEEE standards.

End of Segment

See Figure 3-7 and the procedure following it.

10 BASE 2

10 BASE T

AUI

DIAG

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1

2

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.Cable terminator (50 ohm)

2.T-connector

3.10BASE2 cable

Figure 3-7

End of 10BASE2 Segment

1.Plug the T-connector (2) into the 10 BASE 2 port.

2.Plug one end of the Ethernet cable (3) into an open end of the T-connector. Align the notches in the cable end with the posts on the T-connector, push the cable in, and twist one-quarter turn.

3.Plug the cable terminator (1) into the other end of the T-connector.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-11

SECTION 3 " Installation

Middle of Segment

See Figure 3-8 and the procedure following it.

10 BASE 2

10 BASE T

AUI

DIAG

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1

2

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. 10BASE2 cable

2. T-connector

Figure 3-8

Middle of 10BASE2 Segment

1.Plug the T-connector (2) into the 10 BASE 2 port.

2.Plug one end of the Ethernet coaxial cable (1) into an open end of the T-connector. Align the notches in the cable end with the posts on the T-connector, push the cable in, and twist about one-quarter turn.

3.Plug the end of another Ethernet coaxial cable segment into the other open end of the T-connector.

3-12 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

10BASE5 Ethernet

The access point connects to 10BASE5 through an N-Series transceiver or vampire tap.

" NOTE: Cable lengths between network devices on the 10BASE5 Ethernet LAN must meet ANSI/IEEE standards.

N-Series Transceiver

See Figure 3-9 and the following procedure.

1.Attach one end of the drop cable (1) to the AUI port.

2.Route the drop cable to the 10BASE5 cable (4) and determine a suitable spot to cut the cable and attach the transceiver (3).

3.Attach the transceiver to the 10BASE5 cable, then connect the other end of the drop cable to the AUI port

(2) on the transceiver.

Vampire Tap

See Figure 3-10 and the following procedure.

1.Attach one end of the drop cable (1) to the AUI port.

2.Route the drop cable to the 10BASE5 cable and determine a suitable spot on the cable to attach the vampire tap (3).

3.Attach the vampire tap to the 10BASE5 cable, then connect the other end of the drop cable to the AUI port

(2) on the tap.

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SECTION 3 " Installation

10 BASE 2

10 BASE T

AUI

DIAG

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1

3

2

 

4

4

1.

Drop cable

 

2

15-pin AUI port

 

3.

N-Series transceiver

 

4.

10BASE5 coax

 

Figure 3-9

N-Series Transceiver

3-14 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

10 BASE 2

10 BASE T

AUI

DIAG

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1

3

2

4

4

1.Drop cable

2.15-pin AUI port

3.Vampire tap

4.10BASE5 coax

Figure 3-10

Vampire Tap

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-15

SECTION 3 " Installation

10BASE-T Ethernet

See Figure 3-11 and the procedure following it.

10 BASE 2

10 BASE T

AUI

DIAG

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1

1.Cable with RJ45 plugs

2.RJ45 jack (or hub port)

Figure 3-11

10BASE-T

1.Plug the cable with RJ45 jacks (1) into the 10 BASE T port.

2.Plug the other end of the cable into RJ45 jack or hub port (2).

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SECTION 3 " Installation

Installing PC Cards

The following pages describe how to install WLIF, 900 MHz, and S-UHF PC cards.

WLIF

The WLIF radio option is a Type III PC card that can be installed in either slot. To install the card, see Figure 3-12.

1

6

7

1. Nonskid rubber feet (4)

2 Access point (no radio)

3.PC card (RM180)

4.Antenna cable

5.End plate

6.4-40 captive thumb screws

7.Hex nut and lock washer (supplied with antenna cable)

Figure 3-12

WLIF PC Card Assembly

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-17

SECTION 3 " Installation

900 MHz

The 900 MHz radio option is a Type III PC card that can be installed in either slot. To install the card, see Figure 3-13.

1

6

7

1. Nonskid rubber feet (4)

2 Access point (no radio)

3.PC card (RM160)

4.Antenna cable

5.End plate

6.4-40 captive thumb screws

7.Hex nut and lock washer (supplied with antenna cable)

Figure 3-13

900 MHz PC Card Assembly

3-18 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 3 " Installation

S-UHF

The S-UHF radio option is a Type II PC card that can only be installed in the left-hand slot (with LEDs facing down). To install the card, see Figure 3-14.

1

 

1.

Nonskid rubber feet (4)

 

 

2

Access point (no radio)

 

 

3.

Sliding latch (open for RM111 adapter)

 

3

4.

PC card (RM111)

 

 

 

5.Flex circuit

6.RM111 adapter

7.Radio bracket

8.Conductive washer

9.End plate

10.4-40 captive thumb screws

11.4-40 x .25 PH

12. Antenna adapter

6

10

11

12

Figure 3-14

S-UHF PC Card Assembly

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SECTION 3 " Installation

Applying Power

BCAUTION:

NEVER remove the cover of the access point with power

 

applied. ALWAYS make the access point connection before

 

making the connection at the source (“load to source”).

 

Damage to the radio or other devices can occur with the cover

 

removed.

" NOTE:

Connect the access point to an uninterruptable power source — a

 

power source that cannot be inadvertently turned off or otherwise

 

disconnected.

Power is applied to the access point through the grounded AC INPUT connector. See Figure 3-15 and the following procedure.

1.Plug the receptacle end of the power cord (1) into the AC INPUT connector.

2.Insert the three-prong plug on the other end of the power cord (2) into a grounded power outlet.

3.See Section 6, “Indicator Lights,” for descriptions of the indicator lights.

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SECTION 3 " Installation

10 BASE 2

10 BASE T

AUI

DIAG

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1

2

1.Receptacle on power cord

2.Three-prong plug

Figure 3-15

AC Power Input Connection

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 3-21

SECTION 3 " Installation

3-22 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

Section 4

Configuration

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

This section describes how to:

"Create a local DIAG port, Telnet, and Web browser session with the access point.

"Access the access point’s FLASH and ROM.

"Set up the access point through its configuration menus.

You can configure the access point locally through its DIAG port, or remotely through Telnet or a Web browser. The following chart shows the sessions you can use to do other tasks.

Task

DIAG Port

Telnet

Browser

Change configuration pass-

Ö

Ö

Ö

words

 

 

 

Modify the configuration

Ö

Ö

Ö

Upgrade FLASH

Ö

Ö

 

Check the FLASH version

Ö

Ö

 

Access ROM

Ö

 

 

Check the ROM version

Ö

 

 

Use online help

Ö

Ö

Ö

 

 

 

 

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-1

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Only one type of session can be running at a time. For example, if someone starts a Telnet session while someone else is configuring the access point through its DIAG port, the configuration through the DIAG port will terminate.

Creating a Local DIAG Port Session

In summary, you establish a local DIAG port session with the access point through a VT100 terminal emulation program. Most general purpose communications software (such as PROCOMM PLUS) supports this emulation.

To create a session, see Figure 4-1 and the procedure following it. You should carefully review the procedure first to become familiar with the process.

4-2 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

1

2

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10BASE2

AUI

 

 

 

 

10BASET

 

 

 

 

 

DIAG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AC INPUT 100/240 VAC

1.PC with terminal emulation program

2.Cable: 321-355-001 for a 25-pin PC COM port or

Cable: 226-106-001 for a 9-pin PC COM port (standard null modem cable)

3.6710 Access Point DIAG port

Figure 4-1

Local Session

1.Ensure the terminal emulation program is installed on the PC.

2.With both the PC and access point powered OFF, connect the communication cable to the appropriate PC COM port.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-3

SECTION 4 " Configuration

3.Connect the other end of the communication cable to the DIAG port on the access point. Turn the PC on.

4.After the PC boots, start the terminal emulation program.

5.Set the terminal emulation program’s options according to what you want to do: Access the configuration menus, or access the ROM command monitor.

Accessing the Configuration

Menus

1.Set the terminal emulation parameters in your communications software. If you are configuring this access point for the first time, set the parameters to the access point’s default settings:

9600, 8N1, full duplex

If you have already changed the default settings, set the parameters to those you set in FLASH mode through the configuration menus.

2.Plug the access point into the outlet. These messages appear:

QXS6700K <version> <date>

<Press any key within 5 seconds to enter the ROM monitor> Executing file USTART29.BIN from segment <segment number> Quickly press a key to perform configuration before startup Starting system

3.To access the configuration menus, wait until you see the message “Quickly press a key to perform configuration before startup.” Press any key to access the configuration menus.

4.See “Configuring the Access Point” on page 4-12.

4-4 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Accessing the ROM Command

Monitor

1.Set the terminal emulation parameters in your communications software. If you are configuring this access point for the first time, set the parameters to the default settings for ROM mode:

9600, 8N1, full duplex

If you have already changed the default settings, set the parameters to those you set in ROM mode through the ROM command monitor.

2.Plug the access point into the outlet. These messages appear:

QXS6700K <version> <date>

<Press any key within 5 seconds to enter the ROM monitor> Executing file USTART29.BIN from segment <segment number> Quickly press a key to perform configuration before startup Starting system

3.Press any key within 5 seconds of the first ROM message.

Note that if the access point is in Power-Up Quiet mode (versus Power-Up Normal mode, the default setting), the ROM messages do not display. More information about Power-Up Quiet (PQ) mode and Power-Up Normal (PN) mode starts on page 5-27 in Section 5, “Software Download.”

4.See page 5-22 in Section 5, “Software Download,” for information about the ROM command monitor.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-5

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Creating a Telnet Session

Before you can configure the access point through Telnet, you must connect the unit to the Ethernet cable. (See Section 3, “Installation,” for help.) You must also perform initial configuration through the DIAG port to:

"Set an IP address or DHCP server name. You should also configure a subnet mask and IP router address.

"Set the Ethernet cable type.

"NOTE: The access point includes an autodetect feature that senses the

Ethernet medium if traffic is present. If no traffic is present on the cable, the system software defaults to 10BASE-T. For most installations, it is recommended that you explicitly set the Ethernet type.

The access point must go through its boot sequence before you can create a Telnet session. If you reboot the unit while in a session, the session terminates. You can create a new session after the unit reboots.

To create a Telnet session, see Figure 4-2 and the procedure following it.

Ethernet LAN

Telnet

 

1

2

1.PC or workstation with Telnet VT emulator (TNVT)

2.6710 Access Point

Figure 4-2

Telnet Session

4-6 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

1.Ensure the access point is connected to the Ethernet cable, and has an assigned IP address and cable type.

2.Ensure the PC or workstation has an installed and configured Ethernet interface card.

3.Ensure the Telnet VT emulator is installed on the PC or workstation.

4.Open a new Telnet session on the PC or workstation.

5.Enter the access point’s IP address in the host name or IP address field.

6.See “Configuring the Access Point” on page 4-12.

Default and Site Settings

The access point is factory configured with the default settings listed in the following charts. You may need to change the defaults to match the way your system is set up. You can record your site’s settings in the table for reference.

TCP/IP

Option

Default

Site Setting

IP Address

0.0.0.0

 

IP Subnet Mask

255.255.255.0

 

IP Router

0.0.0.0

 

IP Frame Type

DIX

 

DHCP

Enabled, if IP Ad-

 

 

dress is zero

 

DHCP Server Name

Norand DHCP Server

 

Auto ARP Minutes

5

 

 

 

 

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-7

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Security

Option

Default

Site Setting

Password

CR52401

 

Service Password

Enabled

 

Advanced Password

“” (empty string)

 

Bridge

 

 

Option

Default

Site Setting

Serial Number

(Read-only)

 

Lan ID

0

 

[Root]

 

 

Root Priority

1

 

[Global Radio]

 

 

UHF Rfp Threshold

 

 

Set Globally

Disabled

 

Value

70

 

UHF Frag Size

 

 

Set Globally

Disabled

 

Value

250

 

Falc Frag Size

 

 

Set Globally

Disabled

 

Value

250

 

Awake Time

 

 

Set Globally

Disabled

 

Value

0

 

[Global Flooding]

 

 

Inbound

 

 

Multicast

Primary

 

Unicast

Disabled

 

Outbound to Secondaries

 

 

Multicast

Disabled

 

Unicast

Disabled

 

Outbound to Stations

 

 

Multicast

Disabled

 

Unicast

Disabled

 

 

 

 

4-8 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Option

Default

Site Setting

[Ports]

 

 

Ethernet port:

 

 

Name

omde

 

MAC Address

(Unique number)

 

Status

Enabled

 

Hello Period

2 seconds

 

[Ethernet]

 

 

OWL Frame Type

DIX

 

Cable Type

Auto Detect

 

[Static Addresses]

00:00:00:00:00:00

 

[Normal RX Filter]

 

 

[Frame Types]

 

 

Action

Pass

 

Scope

Unlisted

 

[SubTypes 1]

 

 

Action

Pass

 

SubType

(Various)

 

Scope

(Various)

 

[SubTypes 2]

 

 

Action

Pass

 

SubType

DIX--IP--TCP--Port

 

Scope

00 00

 

[Advanced RX Filter]

 

 

[Expressions]

 

 

ExprSeq

0

 

Offset

0

 

Op

EQ

 

Value Id

0

 

Action

And

 

[Values]

 

 

Value

0

 

[Bridging]

 

 

Bridge Priority

1

 

Status

Enabled

 

Flood Register

Disabled

 

 

 

 

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-9

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Option

Default

Site Setting

WLIF radio port:

 

 

Name

omdpxma

 

MAC Address

(Unique number)

 

Status

Enabled

 

Hello Period

2 seconds

 

[WLIF]

 

 

Security Id

NORANDOWL

 

Node Type

Master

 

[Master Parms]

 

 

Channel

1

 

Subchannel

1

 

Wireless Hops

Disabled

 

MAC Config

Default

 

[Manual MAC Parms]

 

 

Hop Period

200 ms

 

Beacon Frequency

2

 

Deferral Slot

Default

 

Fairness Slot

Default

 

Fragment Size

310

 

Transmit Mode

AUTO

 

Norm Ack Retry

255

 

Frag Ack Retry

255

 

Norm QFSK Retry

255

 

Frag QFSK Retry

255

 

900 MHz radio port:

 

 

Name

omdflca

 

MAC Address

(Unique number)

 

Status

Enabled

 

Hello Period

1 second

 

[Falcon]

 

 

File Name

falcon_d.29k

 

Mode--Channel

(First mode in list)

 

ARP Server Mode

Disabled

 

 

 

 

4-10 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Option

Default

Site Setting

S-UHF radio port:

 

 

Name

omduhfb

 

MAC Address

(Unique number)

 

Status

Enabled

 

Hello Period

2 seconds

 

[UHF]

 

 

File Name

synuhf_d.29k

 

Call Sign

“” (empty string)

 

Frequency

(First frequency in list)

 

Master Mode

Disabled

 

Attach Priority

High

 

OWL/IP port:

 

 

Name

omdip

 

MAC Address

(Unique number)

 

Status

Enabled

 

Hello Period

2 seconds

 

[OWL/IP]

 

 

Mode

Listen

 

[IP Addresses]

 

 

Type

Unicast

 

Address

(None)

 

[TX Filter]

 

 

[Frame Types]

 

 

Action

Pass

 

Scope

Unlisted

 

[SubTypes 1]

 

 

Action

Pass

 

SubType

(Various subtypes)

 

Scope

(Various settings)

 

[SubTypes 2]

 

 

Action

Pass

 

SubType

DIX--IP--TCP--Port

 

Scope

00 00

 

 

 

 

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-11

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Configuring the Access Point

When you create a local DIAG port or remote Telnet session with the access point, the configuration program’s password screen appears:

Configuration of Access Point

Copyright (c) 1995-1997 Norand Corporation. All rights reserved.

Portions copyright Epilogue Technology Corporation 1988-1995.

All rights reserved

IP: 0.0.0.0

Serial: (Unique 10-digit number.)

Password:

" NOTE: A different screen appears when you create a session through a Web browser. See page 4-88 for information about Web browser sessions.

The password screen shows the current settings for the IP address and serial number. It also shows the prompt for the top-level password. Enter the password (case insensitive) to display the Main Menu. The default password is CR52401.

Main Menu

After you enter the top-level password, the Main Menu appears:

4-12 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Loading configuration from EEPROM

Command

Description

File

File system menu

View

View/modify the configuration

Clear

Set the configuration to default values

Read

Read the configuration from EEPROM

Write

Write the configuration to EEPROM

Reboot

Restart using last written configuration

Exit

Disconnect

?

Display this help

>

 

The menu lists the commands you can use to do various tasks, described on the following pages. The screen also displays the command prompt (>). At the prompt, type the name of the command you want to perform and press [Enter]. (Commands are case insensitive.) The Main Menu redisplays when you enter an invalid command.

The following chart describes how to use the commands.

Use

To

File

List file system commands and descriptions.

 

Section 5, “Software Download,” describes the

 

commands and file system methodology.

View

View or modify configuration program settings.

 

See “Using the View Command” on page 4-14.

Clear

Reset the access point’s configuration to the facto-

 

ry-set default settings, which start on page 4-7.

Read

Load the most recent configuration from

 

EEPROM. The configuration that was written to

 

EEPROM since the access point was last

 

rebooted becomes the new configuration.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-13

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Use

To

Read

The access point’s configuration is stored in

(Continued)

EEPROM. You reprogram the EEPROM

 

whenever you change the configuration, write

 

(save) the new configuration to EEPROM, and

 

reboot the access point.

Write

Write (save) a new configuration to EEPROM.

 

This command overwrites the previous configura-

 

tion. You must write the new configuration

 

to EEPROM and reboot the access point for

 

any changes to take effect.

Reboot

Reboot the access point. You must reboot the unit

 

for any changes you made to the configuration to

 

take effect.

Exit

Quit the configuration program. If you exit a new

 

configuration without writing it to EEPROM, any

 

changes you made are not saved.

?

Display online help for a command, option, or

 

setting.

Using the View Command

To view or modify configuration program settings, type View at the command prompt. The Main Options Menu appears:

[Tcpip]

[Bridge]

[Security]

The following chart describes how to use the options.

4-14 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Use

To

[Tcpip]

Set options necessary for communications with

Page 4-16

this access point. The options apply to all

 

TCP/IP ports. Telnet, SNMP, and HTTP

 

communications are supported.

[Bridge]

Control the bridging of messages among the

Page 4-23

radio and Ethernet ports for this access point.

 

Settings to control interaction with other access

 

points are also under the [Bridge] option.

[Security]

Set the configuration program’s top-level

Page 4-86

password and other security passwords.

The screens in this section show the options’ default settings. Some settings (such as the serial number) are unique to each access point. Other settings (such as certain radio configurations) are automatically set and you cannot change them. This section identifies the settings you cannot change as “read-only.”

The following chart shows how to navigate the View command’s menus and edit data.

Press

To

[-] or [--]

Scroll up through items in a list.

[¯], [+], [=], or [Tab]

Scroll down through items in a list.

[®], [Enter], or [Spacebar]

Display an option’s settings or

 

prompt after you highlight the

 

option. Also use these keys to

 

select the desired setting.

[¬], [Esc], or [Backspace]

Exit a menu or prompt.

[Esc]

Cancel editing.

[Enter]

Complete editing.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-15

SECTION 4 " Configuration

TCP/IP Options

Use [Tcpip] to set options necessary for communications with this access point, such as IP addresses. Addresses are required for remote setup or SNMP network management. Options are:

IP Address

0.0.0.0

IP Subnet Mask

255.255.255.0

IP Router

0.0.0.0

IP Frame Type

<DIX>

DHCP

<Enabled, if IP address is zero>

DHCP Server Name

“Norand DHCP Server”

Auto ARP Minutes

5

 

 

IP Address

IP Address is the unique address locally assigned to this access point. The prompt is:

Range is:

4 nums 0..255

The default is 0.0.0.0, which disables the ability to use TCP/IP. Following are suggestions for setting the address:

"If you are installing this access point on an existing Ethernet segment, you should allocate the IP address from the same pool as the existing computers on the segment.

"If you are installing this access point on a new Ethernet segment that is not going to connect to the Internet, try using this Class B address:

172.16.h.h

4-16 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

The host number is “h.h.” This Class B network address is reserved by the numbering authority for a company’s internal use. If the Class B address appears on the Internet, routers drop the data.

Note the following:

"If the IP address is 0.0.0.0 and DHCP is set to “Enabled, if IP address is zero,” this IP address is obtained through DHCP.

"If DHCP is set to Enabled, DHCP is used to obtain the IP address.

"If the IP address is 0.0.0.0 and DHCP is disabled, TCP/IP access to this access point is disabled.

A discussion of DHCP starts on page 4-19.

IP Subnet Mask

IP subnets partition traffic and are connected by routers. The subnet mask indicates how many bits of the IP address represent a network number and how many indicate a host number. The prompt is:

Range is:

4 nums 0..255

The default is 255.255.255.0. Following are suggestions for setting the subnet mask:

"If you are installing this access point on an existing Ethernet segment, the subnet mask should match the other computers on the segment.

"If you are using the 172.16.h.h address suggested for IP Address, you may want to use a subnet mask of 255.255.248.0. This mask provides the network 172.16 with 30 subnets of 2046 computers each.

The IP address breakdown is:

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-17

SECTION 4 " Configuration

"16 bits of network address.

"5 bits of subnet address. Do not use all 0’s or all 1’s.

"11 bits of host address. Do not use all 0’s or all 1’s.

The following chart lists IP addresses when the submask is 255.255.248.0.

Subnet

First Address

Last Address

1

172.16.8.1

172.16.15.254

2

172.16.16.1

172.16.23.254

3

172.16.24.1

172.16.31.254

.

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

30

172.16.240.1

172.16.247.254

If you are using DHCP to obtain an IP subnet mask for this access point, the subnet mask obtained from DHCP overrides the setting for the IP Subnet Mask option.

IP Router

" NOTE: The IP address of the router is required only if this access point will communicate with devices on the other side of the router.

IP Router identifies the default router used to forward data frames to addresses on another subnet. The prompt is:

Range is:

4 nums 0..255

The default is 0.0.0.0, which disables the ability to exchange TCP/IP traffic with another subnet or network.

4-18 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

A router that connects subnet 1 to subnet 2 might have the address 172.16.8.1 on subnet 1 and 172.16.16.1 on subnet 2. A host with IP address 172.16.16.5 would specify an IP router address of 172.16.16.1 to reach host 172.16.8.10.

IP routers are usually configured so a computer only needs to know one router’s address. This is true even if several routers on the segment connect to several other segments.

If you are using DHCP to obtain an IP router address, and the DHCP server specifies a default IP router, the DHCP server specification overrides the setting for IP Router.

IP Frame Type

IP Frame Type sets the type of frame containing IP traffic:

DIX 802.3

Setting Description

DIX (default) Sets Ethernet type to DIX (Ethernet 2.0) for IP frames.

802.3Sets Ethernet type to 802.3 with a SNAP header for IP frames. Select 802.3 if other network computers use SNAP encapsulation for IP frames.

DHCP

DHCP provides a way for this access point (the client) to obtain IP addresses from a DHCP server on the network. Settings are:

Enabled

Enabled, if IP address is zero

Disabled

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-19

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Setting

Description

Enabled

DHCP always obtains IP addresses for the

 

access point, subnet mask, and (optional)

 

default router when the access point reboots.

 

It also obtains the lease expiration time.

Enabled, if IP

If IP Address is 0.0.0.0, DHCP obtains IP

address is zero

addresses for the access point, subnet mask,

(default)

and (optional) default router. It also obtains

 

the lease expiration time. The access point

 

ignores other DHCP configuration options.

Disabled

Disables DHCP. You must manually set the IP

 

addresses before the TCP/IP stack is enabled.

" NOTE: If you are using OWL/IP tunneling, you should not use DHCP to allocate IP addresses to super root candidates or designated bridges unless a permanent lease is used, and the access point is rebooted after getting an address. OWL/IP options start on page 4-79.

The access point responds only to address offers from DHCP or Bootp servers. In either case the server is specified in the DHCP server name field.

DHCP Server Name

The prompt for the DHCP server name is:

Range is: 31 chars

The access point responds only to the named server. The default server name is “Norand DHCP Server.” This name prevents the access point from inadvertently obtaining an IP configuration from existing servers on the network.

If the DHCP server name is configured with a null string (“”), the access point responds to offers from any server.

4-20 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

The class identifier string for the access point is “Norand Access Point.” Servers use this string to identify the access point.

Bootp Operation

The access point can also accept addresses from a Bootp server identified in the DHCP server name field. An address offer from a Bootp server is treated as if it were an infinite lease from a DHCP server.

Networks With DHCP and Bootp Servers

If the DHCP server name is configured as “”, the access point responds to either DHCP or Bootp servers. The access point gives preference to DHCP offers. If a Bootp reply arrives at the access point before any DHCP offers are received, the access point waits an additional 4 seconds for a DHCP offer before responding. If a DHCP offer is received within the 4-second period, the Bootp reply is ignored and the DHCP offer is accepted.

Handshaking

When the access point responds to a DHCP or Bootp server, it broadcasts a single ARP request to the address offered. If no ARP response is received within 3 seconds, the access point assumes the IP address is unique and completes the negotiation for that address. If an ARP reply is received before the timeout, the access point assumes the address is a duplicate and declines the offer.

Infinite Leases

A DHCP server may be configured to grant an infinite lease to the access point. A Bootp grant is always treated as an infinite lease. The access point stores the IP address, subnet mask, and default router in the EEPROM configuration register and disables DHCP. These settings are maintained if the access point is powered off or rebooted through the ROM command monitor. To restore DHCP client operation, reconfigure the IP address to 0.0.0.0.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-21

SECTION 4 " Configuration

" NOTE: DHCP is documented in RFCs 1533, 1534, and 1541. Bootp is documented in RFC 951.

Auto ARP Minutes

The access point periodically sends an unsolicited ARP response so routers can update their routing tables. The response enables a network management platform to learn about the access point on the network by querying routers.

Auto ARP Minutes is the number of minutes between periodic ARP requests. The prompt is:

Range is: 0..120

The default is 5 minutes. A setting of 0 disables Auto ARP Minutes.

If the default router’s address is 0, the ARP request is sent to the IP address of this access point. Without the Auto ARP Minutes option, an access point might not use its IP address for extended periods of time and expire from the router’s ARP table.

Auto ARP Minutes enhances the discovery of the network architecture by network management tools, such as OpenView by Hewlett-Packard. The network management tool queries IP router ARP tables to locate the active IP addresses for the subnet IP addresses for access points should not be allowed to expire. The network management program would then need to ping all potential addresses on a subnet to locate active IP addresses, or require the user to enter a list.

4-22 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Bridge Options

Use [Bridge] to configure options that define the bridging topology of the open wireless LAN. Options are:

Serial Number

“(Unique 10-digit number.)”

Lan ID

0

[Root]

 

[Ports]

 

ARP Server Mode

<Disabled>

 

 

Serial Number

Serial Number is a read-only setting that displays this access point’s unique 10-digit serial number, which identifies this unit on the network.

Lan ID

The LAN ID (also called domain) is a number that logically isolates adjacent but independent open wireless LANs. The prompt is:

Range is: 0..254

Following are ranges:

"900 MHz and S-UHF radios: 0 (default) to 254.

"WLIF radio: 0 to 15.

"NOTE: For mixed systems containing WLIF radios, you must use LAN ID 0

to 15.

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-23

SECTION 4 " Configuration

You should change the default of 0 to another number to avoid a potential conflict with an adjacent network. All access points and wireless stations in the same network must have the same LAN ID.

" NOTE: See page 4-87 for information about combining WLIF, 900 MHz, and S-UHF radios in a common network by following basic guidelines for LAN ID and controller setup.

[Root]

[Root] options apply to access points configured to operate as the super root. They should be set to the same settings in all access points with a nonzero root priority configured. Options are:

Root Priority

[Global Radio]

[Global Flooding]

Root Priority

Root Priority determines which access points are candidates to become the super root node on the distribution LAN (also called primary LAN). The prompt is:

Range is: 0..7

The default is 1.

Super Root Candidates

Access points assigned a root priority between 1 and 7 are candidates to become the super root. Access points assigned a root priority of 0 are prohibited from becoming the super root.

4-24 6710 Access Point User’s Guide

SECTION 4 " Configuration

Super Root Selection

The access point with the highest assigned root priority becomes the super root whenever it is powered on and active. If the current super root goes offline, the remaining candidates negotiate to determine which one becomes the new super root. This normally takes about 1 minute.

The super root is always the access point with the highest root priority (other than 0). If two or more access points have the same root priority, the unit with the highest Ethernet address becomes the super root.

Super Root Redundancy

For redundancy, two or three access points should have a nonzero root priority. All other access points should have a root priority of 0. (Redundancy is the ability of another access point to take over if the super root goes offline.)

You should do the following:

"Configure one access point as a primary super root (with the highest root priority).

"Configure one or two access points as “fallback” super roots (with lower priority).

"Configure remaining access points with a root priority of 0.

[Global Radio]

" NOTE: Use the same [Global Radio] settings in all super root candidates.

[Global Radio] distributes network-wide configuration parameters. Settings in the super root are distributed throughout the network. Options are:

 

 

Set Globally

Value

 

 

UHF Rfp Threshold

<Disabled>

70

 

UHF Frag Size

<Disabled>

250

 

Falcon Frag Size

<Disabled>

250

 

Awake Time

<Disabled>

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

6710 Access Point User’s Guide 4-25

SECTION 4 " Configuration

The previous sample screen shows the options’ default settings, which are optimum for most installations. It is recommended that you not change the defaults.

Option

Description

UHF Rfp Threshold

This option adjusts the S-UHF protocol

 

characteristics for smaller data frames.

 

The recommended setting in most cases is

 

Disabled. For installations that primari-

 

ly send very small frames, Enabled at the

 

default value of 70 may improve network

 

response time.

UHF Frag Size

For reliable transmission, large frames

 

may be fragmented or split into several

 

smaller frames. The receiver reassembles

 

the fragments into a complete frame. The

 

default is 250.

Falcon Frag Size

For reliable transmission, large frames

 

may be fragmented or split into several

 

smaller frames. The receiver reassembles

 

the fragments into a complete frame. The

 

default is 250.

Awake Time

This option establishes an awake time

(Does not apply to

after a station transmits. Portable

WLIF radio.)

stations do not enter a power managed

 

state for this time period. The access

 

point may deliver a response without

 

using the pending message delivery

 

mechanism during the awake time.

 

The time is specified in tenths of seconds.

 

When awake time is Disabled (the

 

default), each station uses its own default

 

(2 seconds for 900 MHz or S-UHF

 

stations). Longer awake times may

 

reduce station battery life.

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

Each [Global Radio] option has the following settings:

Set Globally

<Disabled>

Value

0

 

 

Set Globally

The value for all radios in the system is specified according to how Set Globally is configured.

Setting

Description

Enabled

If this access point is the super root, it sets the

 

value for all stations and access points in the

 

network. This setting has no effect in access

 

points other than the super root.

Disabled

The super root does not distribute global

(default)

parameters. All radios in the network use local

 

settings or defaults.

Value

Following are ranges and defaults for the Value option.

Value

Range

Default

UHF Rfp Threshold

0--250 octets

70

UHF Frag Size

0--250 octets

250

Falcon Frag Size

0--250 octets

250

Awake Time

0--255 (tenths of seconds)

0

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

[Global Flooding]

" NOTE: Use the same [Global Flooding] settings in all super root candidates.

Use [Global Flooding] to set system-wide flooding options. The settings are sent throughout the network when and if this access point becomes the super root. Options are:

 

 

Multicast

Unicast

 

 

Inbound

<Primary>

<Disabled>

 

Outbound to Secondaries

<Disabled>

<Disabled>

 

Outbound to Stations

<Disabled>

<Disabled>

 

 

 

 

 

An access point normally forwards frames only to destination addresses it has learned and stored in the forwarding database. Frames are forwarded only on the port that provides the shortest path to the destination address. The access point can be configured to flood frames on one or more ports when the destination address is unknown.

Global flooding options allow for different flooding configurations to optimize performance. Settings in the super root are distributed to all other access points.

A frame flooded toward the distribution LAN (LAN segment containing the super root) is inbound. A frame flooded away from the distribution LAN is outbound. A special case of outbound is outbound to secondary LANs.

" NOTE: A Flooding Level Checklist starts on page 4-31.

Inbound

Flooding may be configured separately for unicast (single physical address) and multicast (group address) frame types. Many network protocols use multicast messages for establishing and maintaining connections, and use unicast messages for data exchange.

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

Inbound options are:

Multicast <Primary>

Unicast <Disabled>

Multicast and Unicast options have the following settings:

 

Enabled

 

 

Primary

 

 

Disabled

 

 

 

 

Setting

Description

 

 

 

 

Enabled

Access point floods to all ports, similar to a

 

 

conventional bridge.

 

Primary

Frames are flooded inbound only. This

 

(Multicast default)

setting is useful in many wireless installa-

 

 

tions where the super root, servers, or

 

 

gateways for wireless stations are on the

 

 

same Ethernet segment.

 

Disabled

Frames are not flooded. Use this setting

 

(Unicast default)

only if the Outbound to Secondaries option

 

 

is also set to Disabled.

 

Outbound to Secondaries

Outbound to Secondaries floods frames with unknown destinations to secondary LAN segments. Settings are:

Enabled

Registered

Disabled

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

Setting

Description

Enabled

All designated bridges flood to secondary

 

LANs. This setting allows the super root to

 

control flooding for all access points serving

 

as designated bridges for secondary LANs

 

(see page 4-57).

Registered

Designated bridges flood according to their

 

individual flood register settings. This set-

 

ting allows individual designated bridges to

 

be configured separately.

Disabled

Flooding is disabled in all designated

(Multicast and

bridges. This setting allows the super root to

Unicast default)

control flooding for all access points serving

 

as designated bridges for secondary LANs

 

(see page 4-57). This setting should be used

 

only if Inbound flooding is Disabled.

Outbound to Stations

Outbound to Stations applies only to access points with the WLIF radio option. Settings are:

 

Enabled

 

 

Disabled

 

 

 

 

Setting

Description

 

 

 

 

Enabled

Frames are flooded.

 

Disabled

Frames are not flooded.

 

(Multicast and

 

 

Unicast default)

 

 

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

Flooding Level Checklist

You can use the following list of questions to determine the required flooding levels for the Inbound and Outbound to Secondaries options. The list is structured so that you should skip later questions as soon as you determine the appropriate flood level settings.

If your answer is “I do not know,” go to the next question. If you cannot determine the appropriate flooding levels, use the higher (multicast) flooding levels.

" NOTE: If extensive flooding is enabled, it will be more important to set Ethernet filters to reduce unnecessary traffic in the radio network. In general, the need for filters increases with the amount of traffic on the distribution LAN and the flooding levels. Filtering starts on page 4-43.

1.Is the open wireless LAN used only with NORANDR emulation terminals?

Answer Settings

Yes Inbound/Unicast/Disabled

Inbound/Multicast/Enabled

Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/Disabled

Outbound to Secondaries/Multicast/Disabled

Comments:

Unicast flooding is not required to support NORAND terminal emulation because the NORAND transport layer (used for terminal emulation) periodically generates traffic. Inbound multicast flooding is required. Outbound multicast flooding is not required because NORAND terminal emulation stations do not need to receive multicast frames.

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

2.Does the network contain only 900 MHz or S-UHF access points?

Answer Settings

Yes Inbound/Unicast/Disabled

Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/Disabled

Comments:

Unicast flooding is never required for 900 MHz or S-UHF access points, since stations supporting these media options establish reliable connections as they roam between access points. The correct port for S-UHF or 900 MHz stations is always known.

3.Do all nodes in the radio network routinely transmit a frame at least once every 4 minutes?

Answer Settings

Yes Inbound/Unicast/Disabled

Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/Disabled

4.Do any nodes in the radio network need to receive multicast or broadcast messages?

Answer Settings

No Inbound/Multicast/Enabled

Outbound to Secondaries/Multicast/Disabled

Note: TCP/IP nodes must receive broadcast ARP frames.

Comments:

The destination of a multicast frame is never known. The Disabled setting should be used for any network where stations do not need to receive multicast frames. The Disabled setting can be used for secondary LANs that only need to receive ARP frames. When WLIF wireless stations must receive multicast frames, set Outbound to Stations to Enabled.

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

5.Do nodes in the radio network communicate with other nodes in the radio network?

Answer Settings

Yes Inbound/Unicast/Enabled Inbound/Multicast/Enabled

No Inbound/Unicast/Primary Inbound/Multicast/Primary

Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/Registered Outbound to Secondaries/Multicast/Registered

Comments:

The Enabled settings facilitate peer-to-peer applications, where nodes in the open wireless LAN communicate with each other.

In general, the Primary and Registered settings are designed for client or terminal applications where nodes in the open wireless LAN communicate with server nodes on the distribution LAN.

6.Do radio-equipped wireless station nodes (open or non-wireless LAN) need to receive multicast or broadcast frames?

Answer Setting

Yes

Outbound to Stations/Multicast/Enabled

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SECTION 4 " Configuration

7.Does the radio network contain WLIF nodes that do not periodically generate traffic?

Answer Setting

Yes Inbound/Unicast/Primary

Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/Registered*

or

Inbound/Unicast/Enabled**

*Support communications with a distribution LAN.

**Supports general peer-to-peer communications.

"NOTE: WLIF nodes using NORAND terminal emulation periodically

generate traffic, and do not require flooding.

Comments:

You may need to enable unicast flooding if the radio network contains WLIF terminal nodes or nodes on a secondary Ethernet LAN that do not periodically generate traffic. Occasional traffic is needed to maintain information in the forwarding database.

You can also do the following:

"Use the Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/ Enabled setting to force unicast flooding to WLIF nodes.

"Use the Inbound/Unicast/Primary or Outbound to Secondaries/Unicast/Registered setting in combination with the Flood Register/Unicast setting for selected secondary Ethernet LANs.

These settings avoid network-wide universal flooding if nodes that do not periodically generate traffic are restricted to those secondary Ethernet LANs.

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