Intermec 6110 User Manual

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6110 Hand-Held Computer

USER’S GUIDE

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

PN: 961-028-102

Revision F

August 2000

" NOTICE

This publication contains information proprietary to Intermec Technologies Corpo-

 

ration. It is being supplied to you with the express understanding that the informa-

 

tion contained herein is for the benefit of the contracting party only, and may not

 

be copied, distributed, or displayed to third parties without the express written

 

consent of Intermec Technologies Corporation, and shall be returned to Intermec

 

Technologies Corporation upon written request. If a purchase, license, or nondisclo-

 

sure agreement has been executed, the terms of that agreement shall govern this

 

document.

 

This publication is furnished for information only, and the information in it is

 

subject to change without notice. Although every effort has been made to provide

 

complete and accurate information, Intermec Technologies Corporation assumes no

 

responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this

 

document.

 

Disclaimer of Warranties. The sample source code included in this document is

 

presented for reference only. The code does not necessarily represent complete,

 

tested programs. The code is provided “AS IS WITH ALL FAULTS.” ALL

 

WARRANTIES ARE EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED, INCLUDING THE

 

IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A

 

PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

 

We welcome your comments concerning this publication. Although every effort has

 

been made to keep it free of errors, some may occur. When reporting a specific

 

problem, please describe it briefly and include the book title and part number, as

 

well as the paragraph or figure number and the page number.

 

Send your comments to:

 

Intermec Technologies Corporation

 

Publications Department

 

550 Second Street SE

 

Cedar Rapids, IA 52401

 

INTERMEC, NORAND, PEN*KEY, PEN*VIEW, ROUTE-COMMANDER, and

 

BEVERAGE ROUTEBOOK are registered trademarks and NOR*WARE and

 

RAPIDREP are trademarks of Intermec Technologies Corporation.

Ó1998 Intermec Technologies Corporation. All rights reserved.

Acknowledgments

Alexander is a registered trademark of Alexander Manufacturing Co.

Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corporation.

Microclean II is a registered trademark of Foresight International.

Microsoft, MS, and MS-DOS, and Windows, are registered trademarks and Visual Basic for Windows, and Windows for Pen are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

SanDisk is a trademark of SanDisk Corporation

CONTENTS

"" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

SECTION 1

General Information

About This User’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-1

Hand-Held Computer Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-2

Hand-Held Computer Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4

Hand-Held Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4

Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-5

Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-5

Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-6

[Gold] (Shift) Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-10

[I/O] Suspend and Resume Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-10

Serial Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-11

Resetting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-11

Options and Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-11

Radio Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-11

Integrated Scanner Pod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-12

Port Replicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-13

Magnetic Stripe Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-14

Serial Pod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-15

Global Systems for Mobile Communication (GSM)

 

with Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) . . . . . . . . .

1-16

Hand-Held Computer Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-17

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CONTENTS

SECTION 2

Operation

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-1

Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-1

Rechargeable Battery Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-2

Installing the Main Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-3

Charging The Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-4

In Your Hand-Held Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-4

In External Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-6

Removing the Main Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-8

Measuring Battery Pack Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-9

Backup Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-10

Backup Battery Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-10

Using PC Cards to Load Your Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Booting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

BIOS Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Installing PC Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-11

Removing PC Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-13

Installing a Modem Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-14

Using the Magnetic Stripe Reader (MSR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-16

Installing the Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) . . . . . . . .

2-17

SECTION 3

 

Routine Care and Maintenance

 

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-1

Low Battery Indication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-1

Cleaning Your Hand-Held Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

Case and Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

Docking Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

SECTION 4

 

Troubleshooting

 

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-1

Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-2

Repair Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-6

ii 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

CONTENTS

APPENDIX A

Connector Pin-Outs

8-Pin Docking Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-2

RJ-45 Phone Jack Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-3

APPENDIX B

 

PEN*KEY Utilities Program

 

Entry Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-1

Pop-Up Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-1

Drop-Down Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-2

Alphanumeric Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-3

Title Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-4

Language Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-5

Communications Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-6

Option 1 BEGIN COMM SESSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-7

Option 2 COMM SETTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-17

Option 3 UNIT ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-21

Option 4 NETWORK PARAMETERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-21

Option 4 MODEM PARAMETERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-23

Option 5 NETWORK INTERFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-27

Option 5 PHONE NUMBER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-28

Option 9 ADVANCED UTILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-29

FIGURES

 

Figure 1-1 Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-3

Figure 1-2 Back View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-3

Figure 1-3 16-Key Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4

Figure 1-4 PC Card Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-8

Figure 1-5 PC Card Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-9

Figure 1-6 Integrated Scanner Pod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-12

Figure 1-7 Port Replicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-13

Figure 1-8 Magnetic Stripe Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-14

Figure 1-9 Serial Pod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-15

Figure 1-10 GSM with SIM card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-16

Figure 2-1 Installing Main Battery Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-3

Figure 2-2 Power Status LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-5

Figure 2-3 Multipack Charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-6

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CONTENTS

Figure 2-4 Single Pack Charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-7

Figure 2-5 SPAN Charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-7

Figure 2-6 Removing the Main Battery Pack . . . . . . . . . . .

2-8

Figure 2-7 Main Battery Pack Underside View

 

Showing Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-9

Figure 2-8 Accessing the PC Card Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-12

Figure 2-9 Individual PC Card Slot Ejector Buttons . . . . .

2-13

Figure 2-10 Installing Modem Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-14

Figure 2-11 Installing Modem Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-15

Figure 2-12 Using the Magnetic Stripe Reader . . . . . . . . .

2-16

Figure 2-13 Removing SIM Socket Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-17

Figure 2-14 Installing SIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-18

Figure A-1 Docking Connector Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-2

Figure A-2 Phone Jack Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A-3

TABLES

 

Table 4-1 Basic Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-2

GLOSSARY

INDEX

iv 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Section 1

General Information

"" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

About This User’s Guide

Section 1

Contains general information about the components of your Intermec 6110 Hand-Held Computer. This includes telling you how the user guide is organized, a summary of the sections, and the specifications for your hand-held computer.

Section 2

Tells you how to prepare for using your computer.

Section 3

Contains routine maintenance information for your computer. Routine maintenance includes recharging the main battery pack, and cleaning the computer.

Section 4

Steps you through some procedures to use when troubleshooting your computer. This section does not contain all troubleshooting that can be done by an authorized Customer Support Specialist, but does contain information to aid you in determining the level of assistance you may need.

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SECTION 1

Appendix A

Contains the pin-outs for the external connectors of your hand-held computer. This section is not usually needed for day-to-day tasks but more to provide technical assistance for interfacing with other manufacturer’s products.

Appendix B

Contains the Utilities Program screens. This is system level information for your system administration people when defining and setting parameters to support your application.

Hand-Held Computer Description

Hand-held computers are used in the mobile systems marketplace to perform a wide variety of tasks. This hand-held computer provides features and benefits that include:

"Fast data processing

"Large data and program storage

"Touch screen display

"Signature capture

Additionally, your computer has the ability to use:

"PC (Personal Computer) cards

"Internal modem with PC card size and format

The following descriptions will familiarize you with the name, function, and locations of the main computer components. Figure 1-1, and Figure 1-2, on pages 1-3, show you the location for your hand-held computer key components.

1-2 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 1

General Information

Touch Screen

Stylus

Keypad

DC Power Jack

Optional External

RF Jack

Infrared (IrDA)

Lens

Speaker

Docking Connector

Slot

 

Figure 1-1

Front View

Battery Pack

Battery Pack Latch

Magnetic Strip Reader (optional)

PC Card Door

RJ-45 Jack (optional)

External Antenna Jack or

DEX Connector (optional)

Figure 1-2

Back View

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SECTION 1

Hand-Held Computer Keyboard

The hand-held computer provides a 16 key keyboard. All keys with the exception of the I/O key are programmable for individual functions. Figure 1-3 details the basic keyboard layout.

Power Status LED

Scanning Status LED

I/O (Suspend/Resume) Key

 

Tab Key

Numeric Keys

BkSp (Back Space) Key

 

GOLD (Shift Key)

ENTER Key

 

ESC (Escape) Key

Figure 1-3

16-Key Keyboard

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SECTION 1

General Information

Display

This hand-held computer offers an easy to read Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) with touch screen. The display shows status messages, keyed-in entries, customer or product lists, calculations, and prompts for responses. The touch screen can be used with a stylus, or your finger to choose functions, record signatures, or enter data.

Adjusting the contrast setting for the display is done by pressing the gold Shift key and tap either the 1 (increase) or 2 (decrease) key until you achieve the desired level. Of course, this will depend on if these keys have not been programmed for other functions.

Backlight

Your hand-held computer display and keyboard comes equipped with a backlight. Backlighting provides a great benefit in dark conditions.

Backlighting does, however, reduce battery life, therefore, turn off the backlight when done using.

To turn the backlight on, press the gold Shift key and the 3 key. To turn the backlight off, press gold Shift and the 3 key again. The amount of time the backlight stays on before shutting itself off is set and controlled through the Configuration Program.

Battery

" NOTE: It is important to charge your hand-held computer for at least 14 hours before you use it the first time. This ensures that both the backup battery and the main battery pack are fully charged.

This hand-held computer uses a 1500 mA hour lithium ion rechargeable main battery pack. Your hand-held computer can check battery capacity by various methods. One, the battery pack has four LEDs that will display remaining ca-

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 1-5

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SECTION 1

pacity when two of the contacts are touched at the same time. More on this in Section 2 on page 2-9. A second method is to use a software fuel gauge based on the APM 1.1 specification.

If your hand-held computer goes into a shutdown mode because of low battery condition, data is protected by the backup battery. Your computer contains two 100 mA hour vanadium lithium backup batteries. The backup battery charges itself from the main pack or a charging source so it is constantly ready to take over data protection.

This user’s guide will occasionally use the term “cycles” when presenting rechargeable battery instructions. Cycles, are the number of times the rechargeable battery pack can be charged and discharged during the life of battery. The Lithium Ion rechargeable battery design, used in the main pack, should give you approximately 500 cycles of use. There are no guarantees on this number because it depends greatly on how the battery pack is used and cared for.

Memory

Three types of memory are available with this computer:

"Main Memory DRAM

"Flash ROM

"PC Cards

Main Memory

Standard main memory DRAM configuration is 8 megabytes (MB), this can be extended to 16, or 32 MBs. Main memory was ordered at the time your unit was purchased. You are able to upgrade to a larger memory size by having a new memory board installed at your Customer Support Center.

The main memory is protected by the backup battery during low main battery conditions or when the main battery pack is removed.

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SECTION 1

General Information

Flash ROM

Flash ROM stores the BIOS and BIOS extensions for your hand-held computer.

PC Cards

Different brands of PC cards can be used in your hand-held computer. Memory cards are available in a variety of sizes and types. Check with your Sales Representative or System Engineer for specific options.

Your computer is equipped with three PC card slots. These slots can be used with memory cards for storage of data, much like a floppy disk drive on a PC. These slots can also be used for modems, radios, hard drives, and other options as they become available.

Two of the PC card slots are version 2.0 Type II and the other slot is an ATA card slot. Type III cards can be installed but you sacrifice slot space. The ATA and two PC slots have card guides, but the empty bay on top does not. There is no blockage between any of the slots, so any pair of Type II bays can accommodate a Type III card.

EXAMPLE: A Type III ATA hard drive card can be installed in the ATA slot, but it takes up the PC slot B bay space. A Type III PC card installed in slot B takes up slot B and A; and a Type III PC card installed in slot A takes up slot A and the empty bay.

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SECTION 1

Empty Bay

Slot A (typically used for a radio card)

Slot B (typically used for a modem card

Slot C (typically used for a hard drive card or a SanDisk flash ATA card)

Figure 1-4

PC Card Slots

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SECTION 1

General Information

Slot A

Slot B

Slot C

Flashdisk or hard drive card Slot C

Radio card

Slot A

Modem card

Slot B

Figure 1-5

PC Card Slots

When a card is installed, the top label of the card faces upward (per the orientation shown in Figure 1-5). Slot C (ATA slot) must always have a mass storage device to serve as the system disk (C:). This can be a SanDisk flash memory card or a rotating hard disk drive. The system will not operate without this disk present.

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General Information

SECTION 1

Slots A and B are true PC card slots, and can accommodate a variety of pc cards such as modems, radios, or additional mass storage.

A special factory installed option involves a serial interface radio card (example: Motorola Series 500 Radio) for use in slot A. This type of card does not have PC interface, therefore, it cannot be inserted all the way into the connector at the back of the bay. A special bracket holds the card in place, and the serial interface is attached via a flex cable.

" NOTE: Section 2 page 2-11 shows you how to install the PC cards.

[Gold] (Shift) Key

Hold down and press desired gold (shifted) key functions. Continue to hold down the [GOLD] key for each shifted key stroke you wish to make.

[I/O] Suspend and Resume Key

In order to conserve power your hand-held computer may automatically suspend when there has been no activity for a set period of time. This time is determined by the configuration program.

To force a suspend, press the key defined as the suspend key and hold the key down for three seconds. To resume operation, press the [I/O] key. Additionally, pressing the release button on the battery pack door forces a suspend. This protects against losing data when removing the battery pack.

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SECTION 1

General Information

Serial Ports

"Optional DB9 pod

"Optional RS-232 subset through the DEX connector.

"Optional RS-232 through RJ-45 jack in top of computer.

"IrDA partial serial port through IR lens.

Resetting

In the rare event that your hand-held computer fails to respond to your input, it may be necessary to “reset.” To reset press the Gold (shift), Ctrl, Alt keys at the same time, hold the keys down for three seconds, and your computer will reboot.

Options and Accessories

Radio Card

Your hand-held computer can be ordered with a radio card. Using a radio card allows you to operate in a mobile environment and have real-time interaction with a host computer. The radio card slides into either PC card slot A or B (see page 2-11 for installation and location detail).

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SECTION 1

Integrated Scanner Pod

WARNING: Do not point the scanner at someone’s eyes or look directly into it when scanning.

AVERTISSEMENT: Ne regardez pas la fenêtre du scanner lorsque vous effectuez une scannérisation. Ne pointez jamais le rayon laser vers les yeux de quelqu’un.

Scanner Trigger

Integrated Laser

Scanner Housing

Laser Scanner Lens

Figure 1-6

Integrated Scanner Pod

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SECTION 1

General Information

Port Replicator

Slide the Port Replicator onto the computer as shown in

Figure 1-7.

Power Jack (for connecting to the wall charger or cigar lighter adapter)

IrDA Port

Keyboard Connector

Serial Port

RF Antenna Connector

 

 

Figure 1-7

Port Replicator

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SECTION 1

Magnetic Stripe Reader

The Magnetic Stripe Reader (MSR) is an optional attachment for your hand-held computer. Your MSR reads credit, charge, and debit (for example, ATM) cards.

Magnetic Stripe Reader

Figure 1-8

Magnetic Stripe Reader

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SECTION 1

General Information

Serial Pod

The serial pod provides a standard 9-pin serial port on a standard D-sub connector. As a software configuration option, +5 volts of power can be provided on pin 9 (the Ring pin). This option powers external devices such as tethered scanners.

9-pin D-sub Serial Port Connector

RJ-45 Jack

External Antenna Jack or

DEX Connector

Figure 1-9

Serial Pod

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General Information

SECTION 1

Global Systems for Mobile

Communication (GSM) with

Subscriber Identity Module (SIM)

Allowing access to the SIM allows you to change service providers and not have to send your unit in for reprogramming.

SIM Cover

SIM

SIM Socket

Radio Antenna

Figure 1-10

GSM with SIM card

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SECTION 1

General Information

Hand-Held Computer Specifications

Size:

8.1 inches (20.57 cm) long

 

4.3 inches (10.92 cm) wide

 

2.2 inches (5.59 cm) tall

Temperature:

 

Operating:

14 to +122_F (--10 to +50_C)

Storage:

--22 to +158_F (--30 to +70_C)

Weight:

1 lb. 12 oz. (793.79 g) with battery

Humidity:

5 to 95% noncondensing

Static

 

Protection:

15 kV (noncontact) 8 kV (contact)

Power source:

 

Main battery:

7.2 V, 1500 mA hour lithium ion battery pack (standard)

Backup battery:

Two 3V, 100 mA hour vanadium lithium battery (standard)

Charging rate:

 

32 to 140 °F:

Fast charge (fully charge 2.5 hours;

(0 to +60 _C)

95% fully charged 1.5 hours )

Communication:

Interface:

RS-232, RS-485, and Infrared

Protocol:

Norand Proprietary Communications Protocol (NPCP),

 

Xmodem, Ymodem, IrDA

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SECTION 1

System Components:

FLASH:

512K FLASH array (standard)

RAM:

8 Megabytes (standard)

 

16, and 32 Megabytes (optional)

Operating

Win 95

System:

 

Card Options:

One ATA PC card slot for system disk (Type II or Type III

 

card); plus two PC card slots (two Type II cards, or one Type

 

II and one Type III card)

Processor:

99 MHz AMD Élan SC400

Display:

 

Type:

Quarter size VGA LCD, CGA Controller, with Backlight

Size:

240 (wide) by 320 (long) pixel, portrait orientation, panning

 

enables viewing of a full 640 x 480 window.

1-18 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Section 2

Operation

"" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

Introduction

This section tells you how to:

"Install the main battery pack

"“Power-up” your hand-held computer

"Install PC cards

"Connect to peripheral devices

Getting Started

Unpack your Intermec 6110 Hand-Held Computer and inspect it for signs of physical damage from shipment or storage.

When you start using your hand-held computer or any time that all power has been completely removed, you are “cold booting” your hand-held computer. The method you use depends on your application.

For example you may download (transfer from the host computer to your hand-held computer) the application and data into your computer. Or, you may use PC cards to load the application and data.

Depending on the method you are using, the result will be the same but the steps you go through may vary from the way this user’s guide presents the material.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-1

Operation

SECTION 2

Rechargeable Battery Label

Lithium ION rechargeable batteries must be recycled. This is the label that appears on the battery pack.

6110 TERMINAL BATTERY PACK

317-206-001

9742

 

Made in Japan

 

CAUTION: Burn hazard,

 

Do Not Disassemble,

 

Heat Above 212°F,

 

Or Incinerate.

WARNING:

The lithium ion battery can explode if replaced incorrectly.

 

Replace the battery with a similar kind.

AVERTISSEMENT: La batterie au lithium peut exploser si elle est replacée de manière incorrecte. Elle ne doit être remplacée que par une batterie identique ou similaire.

WARNING:

The lithium battery can explode if placed incorrectly in the

 

charger.

AVERTISSEMENT: Les batteries au lithium peuvent exploser ou prendre feu si elles sont trop chargées à cause d’une mauvaise installation de la station d’accueil.

2-2 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Installing the Main Battery

" NOTE: Your computer is shipped with uncharged batteries for safety reasons. Refer to Figure 2-1 to show how to install the battery pack in your computer. Charge your computer for 14 hours before using it the first time. This will ensure that both the main and backup batteries are fully charged.

1.With the gold battery pack contacts facing into the battery compartment place the curved portion of the pack in the bottom of the compartment.

2.Press down on the battery pack until it snaps into place. As you press down on the battery pack you should hear three clicks before the pack is completely seated into place.

"NOTE: After the initial charging of 14 hours, the normal charge time for the

main battery pack is 2-1/2 hours.

1

2

3

1

Figure 2-1

Installing Main Battery Pack

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-3

Operation

SECTION 2

Charging The Batteries

Charging your battery pack can be done either in your hand-held computer or in a charger. The following devices provide charge to the batteries while they are connected to your computer:

In Your Hand-Held Computer

"AC adapter

"Auto adapter

"Single dock

"Multidock

"Vehicle dock

The multidock, single dock, and vehicle dock installation and instructions are contained in a separate publication

6100 Series Dock Installation Instructions PN:962-020-003.

2-4 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Power Status LED

Charging Status:

Blinking Red indicates low battery status

Continuous Red indicates charging in process

Continuous Green indicates charging complete

Blinking Green indicates computer is in standby mode

Off indicates normal operation

Figure 2-2

Power Status LED

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-5

Operation

SECTION 2

In External Source

When your battery pack is placed in a multipack or single pack charger, the dock will indicate the charge state (red = charging; green = fully charged; blinking red = bad battery or bad connection). Figure 2-3 shows a multipack charger and Figure 2-4 shows a single pack charger.

Battery Pack Compartments (8)

Fuse

Charge Indicator LED (one per compartment)

Power Cord Connector

Figure 2-3

Multipack Charger

2-6 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Power Cord

Battery Pack Compartment

Battery Pack

Contacts

Charge Indicator LED

Figure 2-4

Single Pack Charger

Battery Pack

Battery Pack Compartment

Contacts

 

Charge Indicator LED

Figure 2-5

SPAN Charger

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-7

Operation

SECTION 2

Removing the Main Battery

The following steps on pages 2-8 and 2-9, detail how to remove the main battery, check how much power the battery contains, and replace the battery pack.

" NOTE: If you are using Windows 95, ensure that you shut down that operation before removing the battery pack. Otherwise, your computer will treat this as a crash.

1.Press and hold down on the Release Button (see Figure 2-6, Figure 2-7 and pages 2-8, and 2-9, for battery compartment details). This causes your computer to go into a suspend mode and makes sure you do not lose your data.

2.Slide the Battery Latch towards the release button and remove the battery.

11

Battery Latch

Battery Pack

2

 

1

3

 

Figure 2-6

Removing the Main Battery Pack

2-8 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Measuring Battery Pack Capacity

= LED on = LED off

2

1

1.Touch finger across first two contacts

2.Capacity is displayed from right to left. The higher the capacity the more LEDs light.

one LED = less than 25% capacity;

two LEDs = 25-50% capacity;

three LEDs = 50-75% capacity;

four LEDs = more than 75%

Figure 2-7

Main Battery Pack Underside View Showing Contacts

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-9

Operation

SECTION 2

Backup Battery

This hand-held computer comes with two 100 mA hour vanadium lithium backup batteries. These batteries provide protection of your data when the main battery is removed from the hand-held computer or when the main battery goes into a low battery condition. The backup battery will not, nor is it intended to, run your application with the main battery pack run down or removed from your computer.

A fully charged backup battery will provide protection for maintaining data approximately 2 days with the main battery removed or completely run down.

The backup battery is not user replaceable. To have your backup battery replaced, send it in to the Customer Service Center nearest you. Whenever you send in your hand-held computer for service, include a description of what you would like to have done.

Backup Battery Life

The backup battery is rechargeable and will recharge every time it needs it from either an external charging source or the main battery pack. If completely run down it will take at least 14 hours to completely recharge the backup battery. A frequently run down main battery will not keep the backup battery fully charged.

The backup battery should last approximately 2000 discharge and recharge cycles if deep discharged, maintains data for 16 hours if your unit has 32 MBs of RAM, and provides service for about 5 years before it needs to be replaced. If your hand-held computer alerts you that the backup battery needs to be replaced, send it in to the Customer Service Center for replacement.

2-10 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Using PC Cards to Load Your Programs

Drives

" Drive C:, ATA drive in slot closest to the display

Booting

In order to boot your hand-held computer format on an ATA PC card with the system files and put it into the slot closest to the display (Drive C:)

For complete details on creating a “boot” card, refer to the instructions in the PEN*KEYRModel 6110 Series HandHeld Computer Programmer ’s Reference Guide PN: 977-054-001.

BIOS Update

To update the BIOS stored in the flash (6.EXE), obtain the latest from the Intermec web site and execute the BIOS Reflash Program.

Installing PC Cards

1.Lift the PC card door tab and flip open.

2.Slide the cards in one of the slots.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-11

Operation

SECTION 2

1

PC Card Slot Door

2

Slot Door Open

Individual Card Slots

Figure 2-8

Accessing the PC Card Slots

2-12 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Removing PC Cards

The PC card compartment contains ejector buttons for removing the cards from the slots (see Figure 2-9 for location). The bottom slot also has a plastic latch called an ATA latch, which retains the card in the slot. This latch must be pressed before you can remove the card from the slot. The latch is to prevent the card which contains the Operating System from being removed accidentally.

ATA Latch

Individual Slot

Ejector Buttons

Figure 2-9

Individual PC Card Slot Ejector Buttons

Press in on the ejector button to release and eject the card. The button will eject the card far enough so you can pull it the rest of the way with your fingers.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-13

Operation

SECTION 2

Installing a Modem Card

The modem card can go into either the top or middle slot (with your computer in the position shown in Figure 2-10. However, it you are also going to use a radio card, install the modem card in the middle slot (B).

To install:

1.Lift the PC card door tab and flip open (see Figure 2-8).

2.Slide the modem card into slot B (see Figure 2-10).

Modem card shown partially installed in Slot B

Figure 2-10

Installing Modem Card

2-14 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

3.Push the modem card all the way into the slot.

4.Line up the modem cable to the connector on the modem card and push into place (see Figure 2-11).

Modem Card Connector

Modem Cable

Figure 2-11

Installing Modem Cable

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-15

Operation

SECTION 2

Using the Magnetic Stripe Reader (MSR)

"To use the card reader simply sweep the card through the reader, in either direction (with the magnetic strip on the bottom of the card).

Figure 2-12

Using the Magnetic Stripe Reader

2-16 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 2

Operation

Installing the Subscriber Identity Module (SIM)

1. Remove the SIM cover from the hand-held computer.

Tamper Proof Driver (p/n 901-136-001)

Tamper Proof Screw

Phillips Screw (use #0 bit)

Figure 2-13

Removing SIM Socket Cover

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 2-17

Operation

SECTION 2

2.Cut away the SIM from the plastic card.

3.Open the SIM socket by sliding the sleeve forward and swinging upward.

4.Insert the SIM into the sleeve. Close and secure by swinging it down and sliding the sleeve back to lock into place.

5.Reattach the cover.

SIM on cutaway plas-

tic card

SIM

1

2

SIM Socket Sleeve

Figure 2-14

Installing SIM

2-18 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Section 3

Routine Care and Maintenance

"" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

Introduction

Your Intermec 6110 Hand-Held Computer is designed to withstand normal use in harsh environments. Occasional maintenance is required to ensure trouble-free operation.

The procedures in this section should help keep your handheld computer in good working condition.

Maintenance procedures included in this section provides instructions on identifying low battery conditions, and cleaning your computer.

Low Battery Indication

If you attempt to turn your hand-held computer on and it does not respond, this usually means the battery is run down. Just to be sure, insert your computer in a dock or other charging device, turn it ON, and see if it responds. If it does, follow the instructions for Charging Your Battery Pack beginning on page 2-4. If it does not respond when inserted in the charging source, another problem could exist. Refer to the Troubleshooting section for solutions.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 3-1

Routine Care and Maintenance

SECTION 3

 

 

Cleaning Your Hand-Held Computer

 

Periodic cleaning helps maintain the appearance and reli-

 

ability of your hand-held computer. When cleaning your

 

computer, inspect the keyboard, covers, display, connectors,

 

and peripheral products for obvious signs of damage or

 

wear.

B CAUTION:

Do not use any abrasive cleaning compounds, ketonic solvents

 

(acetone or ketone) or aromatic solvents (toluene or xylene) to

 

clean any part of your computer. These solutions will cause

 

permanent damage.

 

Never pour cleaners directly on the display or the case.

 

Instead put the cleanser on a soft cloth and gently wipe the

 

case.

Case and Display

We recommend cleaning the exterior of your hand-held computer using a soft cloth dampened with MICRO-CLEAN II cleanser, made by Foresight International, Inc. 4887 F Street, Omaha, NE 68127-0205.

Docking Connectors

If docking connector contacts become dirty or tarnished, clean them with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. It may also be necessary to lightly burnish them with a pencil eraser.

3-2 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Section 4

Troubleshooting

"" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

Introduction

Should you encounter difficulties in routine operation, printing, or communications, there are a few things you may be able to do to correct the problem.

"Refer to your applications (software user) manual for printing and telecommunication procedures.

"Ensure that electrical and mechanical connections are secure and undamaged.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 4-1

Troubleshooting

SECTION 4

Troubleshooting Chart

This Troubleshooting table lists conditions you might see and offers some basic remedies:

 

 

Table 4-1

 

Basic Troubleshooting

Condition

Solution

 

 

Low Battery

Recharge the main battery pack.

 

 

 

Bad TCOM

1.

Review and retry communications

 

procedures.

 

2.

Check cable connections.

 

 

Does Not

Check to ensure that the dock is

Respond To

plugged in and hand-held computer

Power

is making good contact.

 

 

 

Hand-Held

1.

Ensure that there is a main

Computer Will

battery in the computer.

Not Turn ON

2.

The battery door may not be closed

When The [I/O]

completely.

Key Is Pressed

3.

The main battery may be low and

 

need recharging.

As The Battery Lithium Ion batteries will lose half of Pack Ages It Is their available capacity after about Losing Capacity 500 cycles (use and recharge = 1 and Fewer LEDs cycle). Therefore, a fully charged are lighting. battery pack will show fewer than

four lit LEDs, this is normal. Either replace the battery pack or plan your charging needs accordingly, and note that the capacity will continue to decrease with each cycle.

Battery Does Not 1. Charge battery pack then recheck.

Light Any Of The 2. Replace battery pack if needed.

LEDs

4-2 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 4

Troubleshooting

Table 4-1 (continued)

Basic Troubleshooting

Condition

Solution

Hand-Held

The printer may be running off

Computer Will

battery power. The printer does not

Not Turn ON

charge the battery in your computer

When Inserted In

when it is running off battery power

A Printer

itself.

 

 

The Power

The Power Status LED on the front

Status LED

panel of your hand-held computer

Starts Blinking

informs you of the status of your

 

battery pack when it is connected to

 

a charging device. The Power Status

 

LED reads:

 

Off when in a normal operating

 

mode;

 

Blinking red when the battery is low;

 

Continuous red when charging;

 

Continuous green when done

 

charging;

 

Blinking green when in a standby

 

mode;

 

 

The Charger

The Charger Status LED on the

Status LED

external charging device, used for

Starts Blinking

charging the battery packs, informs

 

you of the status of the battery pack.

 

The Charging Status LED reads:

 

Continuous red for charging;

 

Continuous green when done

 

charging;

 

Blinking red when there is a bad

 

connection. Lift the pack out and

 

reseat. If it still blinks call Customer

 

Service.

 

 

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 4-3

Troubleshooting

SECTION 4

Table 4-1 (continued)

Basic Troubleshooting

Condition

Solution

Hand-Held

1.

Main and Backup Battery are

Computer Will

Critically Low.

Not Power Up,

2.

Ensure that your computer has

Screen is Blank,

been on a charger for at least five

RS-485 Network

minutes, then remove from the dock

Does Not Work

and preform the reset procedure. The

 

display will then be active.

 

3.

Continue to charge your computer

 

for at least 14 hours to ensure both

 

the main and backup batteries are

 

fully charged. After this initial

 

charge, the normal time for the main

 

battery pack to charge is about 2 1/2

 

hours.

 

 

 

Hand-Held

1.

Ensure the dock is plugged in.

Computer Will

2.

Ensure that there is a main

Not Turn ON

battery in your hand-held computer.

When Placed In

3.

Ensure the battery door is

A Dock

completely closed.

 

 

 

 

Hand-Held

1.

You may have hit the battery door

Computer Shuts

latch, this will cause your computer

Down During

to suspend. Check the latch.

Operation

2.

You may have a very low battery,

 

 

try recharging the battery.

 

 

Hand-Held

This is the correct operation, the unit

Computer Turns

shuts down to conserve energy and

OFF When You

save data.

Open the Battery

 

 

Door

 

 

 

 

 

4-4 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

SECTION 4

Troubleshooting

 

Table 4-1 (continued)

 

Basic Troubleshooting

Condition

 

Solution

 

 

 

 

Hand-Held

 

1. May not turn OFF when it is

Computer Does

 

connected to a charging device.

Not Turn OFF

 

2. May not turn OFF when it is

 

 

 

 

processing data.

 

 

If either of these conditions continues

 

 

for a long period of time, contact our

 

 

support personnel as this will run

 

 

down the batteries.

 

 

 

Hand-Held

 

1. Ensure that full contact is made in

Computer

 

the dock, try reseating computer in

Displays A Bad

 

dock.

TCOM Message

 

2. Ensure there is a good connection

 

 

 

 

between the dock and the host.

 

 

 

Hand-Held

 

Normal time is between 30--45

Computer Takes

 

seconds. If longer than this, may

A Long Time To

 

need to contact our support

Boot Up After A

 

personnel.

Reset

 

 

 

 

 

If these basic solutions do not solve your problem, there could be a number of reasons. Additional things to do are:

"Refer to the software documentation written for your application. This documentation contains troubleshooting information.

"Contact the Customer Support Specialist at your Customer Service Center. Your regional Customer Service Center is fully staffed and equipped to repair your hand-held computer. Customer Support Center addresses and telephone numbers are printed on a Product Service Information card. This document is packed with all our products.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide 4-5

Troubleshooting

SECTION 4

Repair Service

Be sure to carefully pack the unit and include a description of the problem and the measures you took to correct it.

If possible, include any printout (if applicable) or write down displayed error messages to illustrate the problem.

4-6 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Appendix A

Connector Pin-Outs

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide A-1

Connector Pin-Outs

APPENDIX A

8-Pin Docking Connector

8 6 4 2

7 5 3 1

Pin

Signal

Function

1

BCLK

Battery Clock

2

12.0 Volts

Power

3

GND

Ground

4

BDAT

Battery Data

5

TXD

Transmit for Serial Port

6

RXD

Receive for Serial Port

7

RTS

Ready To Send for serial port

8

CTS

Clear To Send for serial port

 

 

 

Figure A-1

Docking Connector Pin-Outs

A-2 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

APPENDIX A

Connector Pin-Outs

RJ-45 Phone Jack Pin-Outs

J1

 

 

 

 

 

Receptacle

 

 

 

J2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

GND

 

 

Phone Jack

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

DCD

 

1

 

 

 

3

RXD

 

2

 

 

 

4

TXD

 

3

 

 

 

5

DTR

 

4

 

 

 

6

PWR

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

DSR

 

6

 

 

 

8

RTS

 

7

 

 

 

9

CTS

 

8

 

 

 

10

RI

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure A-2

Phone Jack Pin-Outs

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide A-3

Connector Pin-Outs

APPENDIX A

A-4 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Appendix B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

The PEN*KEYR Utilities Program provides basic functions required to prepare your Hand-Held Computers for use.

Entry Point

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

PSROMOC Vx.xx

Screen Title

COPYRIGHT 1994--1999

INTERMEC Key Description

TECHNOLOGIES

CORPORATION.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

[ENT]CONTINUE

This screen appears after cold-booting the computer.

"Screen Title: (dark bar at the top) contains the application name, such as “PEN*KEY UTILITIES”, and the specific screen name, such as “MODEM PARAMETERS.”

"Key Description: (dark bar at the bottom) contains “action” keys. Movement keys, such as arrows, are not shown.

Pop-Up Menus

Pop-Up menus appear after a menu option. Press the number of an option you want to select; or press the Y or B

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide B-1

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

CHANGE UNIT ID

UNIT ID

2233233

WORKGROUP 6200IPL

[F4]RESET FACTORY

[ESC]QUIT

keys to scroll through the list and press the [ENT] key to enter. Select one option each time.

Press the [ESC] key to exit a pop-up menu.

Drop-Down Lists

1.NETWORK. . .

2.MODEM/DIRECT

3.ACCESSORY CARD

4.HANDHELD

5.REMOTE OPS

6.INTERSERVER

Drop-down lists provide suboptions for a pop-up menu. Press the number of a suboption, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list and press the [ENT] key to enter. Select one suboption each time.

Press the [ESC] key to exit a drop-down list.

B-2 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Alphanumeric Fields

NETWORK PARAMETERS

SERVER NAME

I.U.N. INCORPORATED

SERVER IP ADDRESS 123.123.123.123

CLIENT IP ADDRESS 123.123.123.123

ROUTER

0. 0. 0. 0 SUBNET MASK

0. 0. 0. 0

[ESC]QUIT

If your computer has a numeric keyboard, enter alphanumeric data by pressing the A and " keys to scroll back and forth through the set of alphanumeric characters. After a character is selected, press the [ENT] key to enter that character. Press [ENT] again to move to the next field.

If your computer has an alphanumeric keyboard, press the characters, then press the [ENT] key to move to the next field.

Press [ENT] to save the entries and exit the menu. Press the [ESC] key to exit without saving the entries.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide B-3

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Title Screen

When you reboot or reset your computer, the Title Screen appears:

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

PSROMOC Vx.xx

COPYRIGHT 1994--1999

INTERMEC

TECHNOLOGIES

CORPORATION.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

[ENT]CONTINUE

Press the [ENT] key to continue.

B-4 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Language Selection

" NOTE: The PEN*KEY Utilities Program checks files for available language options. If no language resource files exist, you do not see this menu.

If your application requires non-English languages, the Language Selection menu appears. English is the first option, followed by up to nine additional options:

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

LANGUAGE SELECTION

1. ENGLISH

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

0.

[ESC]QUIT

Press the number of a language, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter.

Press the [ESC] key to exit this menu.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide B-5

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Communications Menu

"NOTE: The default is the NPCP RS-485 communication.

"NOTE: If your computer does not support any of the features listed, the fol-

lowing pop-up menu appears. Press the [ENT] key to continue:

COMMUNICATIONS

FEATURE

NOT SUPPORTED

[ENT]CONTINUE

The “Communications Menu” appears after the “Title

Screen:”

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

COMMUNICATIONS

1.BEGIN COMM SESSION

2.COMM SETTING

NRINET

3.UNIT ID

4.NETWORK PARAMETERS SERVER NAME

CLIENT IP ADDRESS

0.0.0.0

ROUTER

0.0.0.0

SUBNET MASK

0.0.0.0

9. ADVANCED UTILITIES

[ESC]QUIT

B-6 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Option 1 BEGIN COMM SESSION

If you select Option 1, the computer repeats communications until successful or you press the [ESC] key.

" NOTE: If you press the [ESC] key, this verification window appears:

ARE YOU SURE YOU

WANT TO STOP

COMMUNICATIONS

NOW?

[ENT]STOP

[ESC]RESUME

" NOTE: This window may not appear immediately. For most communication settings, a session cannot be interrupted once it has started, so the [ESC] key is not processed until the next session is attempted.

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide B-7

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

BEGIN COMM SESSION with NETWORK

If you select the communications option and Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to NETWORK, this “Communication Status” menu appears:

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

COMMUNICATIONS

COMM SETTINGS:

NRINET

SERVER NAME

CLIENT IP ADDRESS 0.0.0.0

ROUTER

0.0.0.0

SIGNING ON

STATUS: 20

[ESC]STOP COMM

While SIGNING ON is onscreen, STATUS: may appear with the status of the attempted connection. Refer to Session Status on page B-12 for meaning.

Following a successful session, PEN*KEY Utilities executes the downloaded application. If the necessary program files are not found, this message window appears:

MISSING SYSTEM

FILES

[ENT]CONTINUE

B-8 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

If the session is unsuccessful, LAST SESSION appears with the failure status, such as “T803.”

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

COMMUNICATIONS

COMM SETTINGS:

NRINET

SERVER NAME

CLIENT IP ADDRESS 0.0.0.0

ROUTER

0.0.0.0

SIGNING ON

STATUS: 20

LAST SESSION

T803

INVALID HOST NAME

OR IP ADDRESS

[ESC]STOP COMM

6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide B-9

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

BEGIN COMM SESSION with MODEM/DIRECT

If you select the communications option and Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to MODEM/DIRECT, this “Communication Status” menu appears:

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

COMMUNICATIONS

COMM SETTINGS:

MODEM/DIRECT

MODEM TYPE

NM2400/NM2400A

PROTOCOL BPS FMT

TTY 2400 8N1

AUTO ANSWER

CONFIGURING

ESC

 

LAST SESSION:

T289

NO RESPONSE FROM

MODEM

[ESC]STOP COMM

" NOTE: The computer may stay at the “CONFIGURING” screen for about 20 seconds if a modem is not detected.

If the session is unsuccessful, LAST SESSION appears with the failure status, such as “T289.”

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

BEGIN COMM SESSION with ACCESSORY CARD

If you select the communications option and Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to ACCESSORY CARD, the system attempts to execute the application from a PC card. If the “MISSING SYSTEM FILES” message appears, press the [ENT] key to continue.

BEGIN COMM SESSION with INTERSERVER

If you select the communications option and Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to INTERSERVER, this “Communication Status” menu appears:

Transfer:

Press the [ESC] key to exit this screen.

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Session Status

The first single character code (“T”) is the session status, which applies to all COMM SETTINGS. There are five statuses possible:

"“G” Good session

"“T” Unexpected end of transmission

"“H” Incorrect file header encountered

"“F” File error encountered

"“L” Telecommunications aborted before first file header received

The three digit number (“289”) indicates the specific protocol error. These error codes apply when COMM SETTINGS is set to NPCP RS-485 or NPCP RS-232:

“0” No error

“1” MININET.EXE not installed

“6” User aborted communications by pressing

[ESC]

“11” Invalid parameter specified in control file

" NOTE: The following values indicate an error returned by MININET.EXE. 100 is added to the error returned by MININET.EXE to avoid conflict with other defined errors.

“101” Illegal buffer length “103” Invalid command “105” Command timed out “106” Message incomplete

“108” Illegal local session number “109” No resource available “110” Session closed

“111” Command canceled

“113” Duplicate name in local name table “114” Name table is full

“115” Name is deregistered, command complete “117” Local session table full

“118” Session open rejected

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

“119” Invalid name number “120” No answer

“121” Name not found

“122” Name in use on remote adapter “123” Name deleted

“124” Session ended abnormally “125” Name conflict

“126” Incompatible remote device “133” Network interface is busy

“134” Too many commands outstanding “135” Invalid LAN adapter number

“136” Command completed while cancel occurring “138” Command not valid to cancel

“164”-“179” Unusual network condition “180”-“354” Adapter malfunction

These error codes apply when COMM SETTINGS is set to

MODEM/DIRECT and PROTOCOL is set to TTY:

“0”

No error

 

“6”

[ESC] key pressed, aborting communications

“11”

Invalid parameter specified in control file

“23”

End of transmission

“101”

Line lost

 

“102”

Parity error

 

“103”

Character gap too long

“104”

Data loss

 

“105”

Excessive NAKs (negative acknowledgements)

“106”

Block count error

“107”

Block check error

“108”

Block framing error

“109”

Control character error

“2xx”

Modem error

 

“xx” Hayes response code, or code defined by

 

program:

 

“03”

No carrier

 

“04”

Command not recognized

 

“06”

No dial tone

 

“07”

Dialed number is busy

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

“08” No answer

“86” Error sending command to modem

“87” Expected numeric response not numeric

“88” Invalid response format “89” No significant response from

modem

“97” COM port disabled by system due to low battery or removal of PC card modem.

“98” Unrecognized English response “99” Memory allocation error

" NOTE: For response codes not listed above, if you purchased this modem from the Norand Mobile Systems Division of Intermec Technologies Corporation, contact Customer Response Center at 800-755-5505 (U.S.A. or Canada) or 425-356-1799.

If this modem is not from the Norand Mobile Systems Division, contact your modem supplier.

These error codes apply when COMM SETTINGS is set to

NOVELL NETWARE:

“0”

No error

“6”

User aborted communications by pressing

“100”

[ESC] key.

Connection to host failed. Verify network

 

connection, verify that PENKEY login name

“101”

exists on host.

Could not access include file. Verify existence

“102”

of include file on host.

Could not allocate needed memory.

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

These error codes apply when COMM SETTINGS is set to

NRINET:

“0”

No error

“6”

User aborted communications by pressing

“800”

[ESC] key.

PC TCP/IP kernel is missing.

“801”

Invalid client IP address. Make sure the entry

 

for CLIENT IP ADDRESS is correct, or make

“802”

sure the DHCP server is running.

Invalid Service or Service Type, or invalid port

“803”

number.

Invalid host name or IP Address. Make sure

 

the entry for SERVER NAME is correct, and

“804”

that the server is running.

Could not create socket. Check all cables and

“806”

network connections.

Block sent was incomplete or block received

“807”

was incomplete.

Client and server negotiation failed.

“808”

Server specified an unsupported block size.

“809”

Invalid buffer pointer.

“810”

All server connections are already in use. Try

“811”

again later.

Timeout while sending data. Connection to

 

remote machine dropped. Make sure the host

 

is still running, and check all cables and

“812”

network connections.

Timeout while receiving data. Connection to

 

remote machine dropped. Make sure the host

 

is still running, and check all cables and

“813”

network connections.

An attempt to send data to the server failed

 

due to a closed connection. Ensure the server

 

is still running, check all cables and network

“814”

connections.

An attempt to receive data from the server

 

failed due to a closed connection. Ensure the

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

server is still running, check all cables and network connections.

“815” Could not access the network attach information.

“816” An error occurred reading the network attach information.

“817” Server did not respond to the connect request. Ensure the server is still running, check all cables and network connections.

“818” An error occurred reading the TCP/IP kernel information.

“935” Operation would block. “939” Destination address required. “940” Message too long.

“948” Address already in use. “950” Network is down. “951” Network is unreachable.

“952” Network dropped connection or reset. “954” Connection reset by peer.

“955” No buffer space available. “960” Connection timed out. “961” Connection refused.

“962” Too many levels of symbolic links. “963” File name is too long.

“964” Host is down. “965” Host is unreachable. “966” Directory not empty.

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

These error codes apply when COMM SETTINGS is set to

TFTP:

“0”

No error.

“1”

PSROB0C.EXE could not be loaded.

“6”

User aborted communications by pressing

“100”

[ESC] key.

TCP/IP kernel is missing.

“101”

Invalid client IP address. Ensure the entry for

 

CLIENT IP ADDRESS is correct or ensure the

“201”

DHCP server is running.

TFTP.EXE failed.

“202”

TFTP.EXE not found.

“203”

Unknown server.

“204”

Remote file name is invalid.

“205”

Local file name is invalid.

“206”

File not found on server.

“207”

Timeout.

Option 2 COMM SETTING

If you select this option, the “Communications Settings” drop-down list appears:

1.NETWORK. . .

2.MODEM/DIRECT

3.ACCESSORY CARD

4.HANDHELD

5.REMOTE OPS

6.INTERSERVER

Press the number of a communications settings, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter.

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Suboption 1 NETWORK

If you select this suboption, a drop-down list appears with various networks:

1.NPCP RS485

2.NPCP RS232

3.NRINET

4.TFTP

5.NOVELL NETWARE

Press the number of a network or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter. The computer returns to the “Communications Menu” with the selected network assigned to Option 2. COMM SETTING. See a sample menu on page B-6.

Press the [ESC] key to exit this drop-down list. The computer takes you to the “Communications Menu.”

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Suboption 2 MODEM/DIRECT

If you select this suboption, the computer returns to the Communications Menu with the MODEM/DIRECT option assigned to Option 2. COMM SETTING:

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

COMMUNICATIONS

1.BEGIN COMM SESSION

2.COMM SETTING MODEM/DIRECT

3.UNIT ID

4.MODEM PARAMETERS MODEM TYPE

NM2400/NM2400A

PROTOCOL BPS FMT TTY 2400 8N1 AUTO ANSWER

ESC

5. PHONE NUMBER

9...131369282

9. ADVANCED UTILITIES

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Suboption 3 ACCESSORY CARD Suboption 6 INTERSERVER

If you select either of these suboptions, the computer returns to the Communications Menu with ACCESSORY CARD or INTERSERVER assigned to Option 2. COMM

SETTING.

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

COMMUNICATIONS

1.BEGIN COMM SESSION

2.COMM SETTING ACCESSORY CARD

3.UNIT ID

9. ADVANCED UTILITIES

Suboption 4 HANDHELD

Suboption 5 REMOTE OPS

These suboptions are not supported at this time.

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Option 3 UNIT ID

If you select this option, the “Change Unit ID” pop-up menu appears:

CHANGE UNIT ID

UNIT ID

2233233

WORKGROUP 6200IPL

[F4]RESET FACTORY

[ESC]QUIT

Enter up to eight characters to change the Unit ID. Use the [¬SP] key to backspace and use the [CLR] to restore the previous ID. Press the [ENT] key to save the new ID and return to the “Communications Settings” menu. Press the [F4] key to reset the ID to factory default. Press [ESC] to exit this pop-up menu.

Option 4 NETWORK PARAMETERS

Network Parameters appears as Option 4 when Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to one of these three NETWORK options: NRINET, TFTP, or NOVELL NETWARE.

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APPENDIX B

NETWORK PARAMETERS with NRINET or TFTP

If you select this option and Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to NRINET or TFTP, this “Network Parameters” popup menu appears:

NETWORK PARAMETERS

SERVER NAME

SERVER IP ADDRESS

0. 0. 0. 0 CLIENT IP ADDRESS

0. 0. 0. 0

ROUTER

0. 0. 0. 0 SUBNET MASK

0. 0. 0. 0

[ESC]QUIT

If you have an alphanumeric keyboard, press the characters to the host name, then press the [ENT] key to save the entry and move to the next field.

If you have a numeric keyboard, use the A and " keys to scroll back and forth through the given set of alphanumeric characters. After a character is selected, press the [ENT] key to enter that character. Press [ENT] again to move to the next field. Press the Y or B keys to move between fields.

Press [ENT] to save the entries and exit the “Network Parameters” menu. Press the [ESC] key to exit without saving the entries.

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

NETWORK PARAMETERS with NOVELL NETWARE

If you select this option and Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to NOVELL NETWARE, this frame type drop-down list appears:

1.802.2

2.ETHERNET II

3.802.3 RAW

4.802.2 W/ SNAP

Press the number of a frame type, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list and press the [ENT] key to enter. Press the [ESC] key to exit this drop-down list without changing the frame type.

Option 4 MODEM PARAMETERS

Modem Parameters appears as Option 4 when Option 2.

COMM SETTINGS is set to MODEM/DIRECT.

If you select this option, the “Modem Parameters” pop-up menu appears.

MODEM PARAMETERS

1. MODEM TYPE NM2400/NM2400A

2. PROTOCOL

TTY

3. BPS RATE

2400

4. DATA FORMAT

8N1

5. AUTO ANSWER ESC

[ESC]DONE

Press the number of a modem parameters option, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] button to enter.

Suboption 1 MODEM TYPE

If you select this suboption, a drop-down list appears with supported modem types. Press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] button to enter.

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

"If you select drop-option OTHER EXTERNAL or OTHER INTERNAL, the “Modem Init String” pop-up menu appears:

MODEM INIT STRING

ATE0V0Q0&M0&S1&C1&

D2&R/QX0L1

[F2]TEST STRING

[ENT]O ESC]QUIT

a.Enter the initialization string of the modem you are using. Refer to your modem’s reference manual for information.

"NOTE: Use A and " keys on numeric keyboards to scroll the alphanumeric

character set.

"NOTE: If you leave this menu blank, a string is not saved.

b.Press the [ENT] key to enter the string or press [ESC] to exit this pop-up menu.

B-24 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

"NOTE: Testing the modem initialization string is optional.

" To test the modem string, do the following:

a.Press the [F2] key. The computer replies with “PLEASE WAIT” and tests the string:

MODEM INIT STRING

ATE0V0Q0&M0&S1&C1&

D2&R/QX0L1

PLEASE WAIT . . .

[F2]TEST STRING

[ENT]OK [ESC]QUIT

Momentarily, the computer displays the modem’s response:

MODEM INIT STRING

ATE0V0Q0&M0&S1&C1&

D2&R/QX0L1

RESULT: 97

[F2]TEST STRING

[ENT]OK [ESC]QUIT

" NOTE: Zero indicates the modem was successfully configured. Any other value indicates an error. See page B-13 for a list of modem errors. If you purchased this modem from the Norand Mobile Systems Division, contact Customer Response Center at 800-755-5505 (U.S.A. or Canada) or 425-356-1799.

If this modem is not from the Norand Mobile Systems Division, contact your modem supplier.

b.Press the [ENT] key to update the modem initialization string. The computer returns to the “Modem Parameters” pop-up menu with OTHER EXTERNAL or OTHER INTERNAL assigned.

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Suboption 2 PROTOCOL

If you select this suboption, a drop-down list of available protocols appears:

1. TTY

" NOTE: TTY is the only protocol currently supported.

Press the number of a protocol, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter. The computer returns to the “Modem Parameters” pop-up menu with the selected protocol assigned.

Press the [ESC] key to exit this drop-down list.

Suboption 3 BPS RATE

If you select this suboption, the BPS Rate drop-down list appears with various bits per second (BPS) rates:

1. 1200

2. 2400

3. 4800

4. 9600

5. 19200

6. 38400

7. 57600

8. 115200

Press the number of a BPS rate, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter. The computer returns to the “Modem Parameters” pop-up menu with the selected BPS rate assigned.

Press the [ESC] key to exit this drop-down list.

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Suboption 4 DATA FORMAT

If you select this suboption, the “Data Format” drop-down list appears:

1. 8N1

2. 7E1

Press the number of a data format, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter. The computer returns to the “Modem Parameters” pop-up menu with the selected data format assigned.

Press the [ESC] key to exit this drop-down list.

Suboption 5 AUTO ANSWER

This suboption is not supported at this time.

Option 5 NETWORK INTERFACE

“Network Interface” appears as Option 5 when Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to NRINET, TFTP, or NOVELL NETWARE.

If you select this option, the “Network Interface” drop-down list appears:

1. ETHERNET

2. RS485

Press the number of a network interface, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter. The computer returns to the “Communications” menu with the selected network interface assigned.

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Option 5 PHONE NUMBER

Phone Number appears as Option 5 when Option 2. COMM SETTINGS is set to MODEM/DIRECT.

If you select this option, the “Phone Number” pop-up menu appears:

PHONE NUMBER 9...13193693282

[ . ]DIALING PAUSE

[ENT]OK [ESC]QUIT

Enter up to 16 characters. Use the [¬SP] key to backspace; use the [CLR] to reset to the previous phone number, and press [.] to insert a dialing pause command (“,”).

Press the [ENT] key to save the new phone number and return to the “Communications Settings” menu.

Press the [ESC] key to exit this pop-up menu.

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APPENDIX B

PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

Option 9 ADVANCED UTILITIES

If you select this option, the “Advanced Utilities” menu appears:

PEN*KEY UTILITIES

ADVANCED UTILITIES

1.SET DATE/TIME

2.BATTERY STATUS

Press the number of an advanced utility option, or press the Y or B keys to scroll through the list, then press the [ENT] key to enter.

" NOTE: Suboption 4 FORMAT RAM CARD appears only if the FORMAT.COM program is in the PATH.

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PEN*KEYR Utilities Program

APPENDIX B

Suboption 1 SET DATE/TIME

If you select this suboption, the “Set Date/Time” pop-up menu appears:

SET DATE/TIME

DATE: 01/20/80

TIME: 23:12:04

[ESC]QUIT

Enter numbers for the month, day, year (1980--2079), hour, minute, and second (up to 23:59:59). Press the [ENT] key after each entry. An incorrect entry causes the computer to default to the initial number. Press the [ESC] key to exit this pop-up menu.

B-30 6110 Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

Glossary

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

6100

A generic term for the 61XX members of the PEN*KEYâ Hand-Held Computer products.

API

Application Program Interface.

Application (ADK)

Computer program used for a particular kind of work. This term is used interchangeably with “program.”

ASYNC

Asynchronous communications. A method of transmitting data using an external clocking source (the transmitted characters are preceded by a start bit and followed by a stop bit).

ATA Card

A credit-card-sized device, which has been specially designed to meet the needs of small computers, and can be inserted and removed from a PC Card slot. In the PEN*KEY products, it is generally a flash storage card, modem, radio, etc. (See also: Flash Card, SanDisk, Spinning Media, or Hardcard)

Auto Panning

The Auto Panning mode causes the display driver to automatically pan, so the active window remains displayed inside the viewport. (See also: Pan Border)

Baud Rate

The speed at which information can be transferred.

6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide Glossary-1

GLOSSARY

BISYNC (BInary SYNChronous communications)

A method of transmitting data in which the transmission of a character is marked by a drop or rise in the signal. An IBM defined, byte-controlled communications protocol, using control characters and synchronized transmission of binary coded data.

Boot Default Drive

The drive from which the computer will boot. By default, it is the flash drive D: but another drive (RAM drive or card slot) may be selected.

Bootable ATA

The ability to run the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT from an ATA card. In some older versions of flash, the CONFIG.SYS from the flash drive had to be run to load the drivers for the ATA card. With Bootable ATA the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT are run from the ATA card without loading any drivers.

Bus (network)

The main (multiple access) network cable or line that connects network stations. Also refers to a network topology of multiple stations communicating directly with the same cable with terminators at both ends, like an Ethernet or token bus.

Button

An object that can be clicked, selected, or unselected in your windows. Usually an event tree is attached to a button so that when it is clicked, an action is performed.

CD

Carrier detect.

CD

Compact disk, a removable read-only storage medium.

Channel

Refers to a logical data channel. A port may contain one or more channels. Data for any given wireless station is

Glossary-2 6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

GLOSSARY

contiguous on a channel. Each of the remote ports on a controller may contain up to three channels apiece.

Click

Press the primary mouse button to select an object on the screen with the pointer. Unless reversed for left-handed operation, the left mouse button is the primary button and the right mouse button is the secondary button. (See also: Right Click)

CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor)

1.Usually refers to the system configuration and real-time clock information, which is often stored in CMOS memory.

2.The construction method for a type of low-power computer chip.

Controller

The communication control element of the NORANDâ radio data network. Controls the timing and flow of data messages between the host computer and the radio terminals.

CPU

Central Processing Unit.

CRC (Customer Response Center)

The Norand Mobile Systems Division of Intermec Technologies Corporation CRC (technical support), telephone # 1-800-755-7705.

Email: crc@norand.com If you want to Email a problem or question to the CRC be sure to include the following information in your message:

Your name

The company name

The company address

Phone # and Email address where you or the customer can be contacted

Problem description / Question (be specific)

6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide Glossary-3

GLOSSARY

Also if the equipment was purchased through a VAR please include the VAR information

Default Drive

See Boot Default Drive.

Dock

A device in which one or more hand-held computers may be placed for charging and communication.

DOS (Disk Operating System)

A program or set of programs that tells a disk-based computer system to schedule and supervise work, manage computer resources, and operate and control its peripheral devices.

Double-Click

Press the primary mouse button twice quickly to select an object with the pointer. Primary is usually the left button.

Download

The transmission of data from a host computer to a mobile computer.

DSD (Direct Store Delivery)

That section of the grocery industry dealing with products delivered from a supplier directly to a store, rather than to some intermediate warehouse or distributor. DSD offers retailers reduced overhead expenses, but carries as a cost a loss of inventory control.

DSR (Data Set Ready)

An RS-232 modem interface control signal (sent from the modem to the DTE on pin 6) that indicates the modem is connected to the telephone circuit.

DTE (Data Terminal Equipment)

The devices in a category that includes terminals and computers. Also refers to the interface to users’ equipment as opposed to the DCE interface to the network.

Glossary-4 6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

GLOSSARY

DTR (Data Terminal Ready)

An RS-232 modem interface control signal (sent from the DTE to the modem on pin 20) that indicates the DTE is ready for data transmission and requests the modem be connected to the circuit.

EAN (European Article Numbering) (Bar Code Symbology)

European Article Numbering Code. A bar code symbology similar to the UPC symbology except that EAN contains 13 characters and uses the first two to identify a country.

EBCDIC (Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code)

An 8-bit character code scheme used in IBM environments.

EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)

Specifically EDI Standards. The EDI Standards are a collective group of standards of different industries used for exchanging data between computers. All EDI Standards share certain basic concepts for formatting data. There are EDI standards covering transportation, warehousing, grocery retail, general merchandise retail, general business, and other industries.

EEPROM

Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory.

EIA (Electronics Industries Association)

A United States trade organization that issues its own standards and contributes to ASNI. Best known for its development RS-232 and the building wiring standard, 568. Membership includes US manufacturers.

EOF (End Of File)

A constant following the last data in a file that signals its end.

EOT

End Of Transmission or End Of Tape.

Ethernet

A general term indicating both 802.3 and DIX Ethernet (also called Ethernet 2.0). See also: 802.3

6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide Glossary-5

GLOSSARY

ETX (End Of Text)

A control character used to indicate the conclusion of a message.

Flash

A technology for nonvolatile memory storage. A special type of EEPROM that can be erased and reprogrammed.

Flash Card

A memory storage PC Card that meets the ATA standard.

(See also: ATA Card, SanDisk, Spinning Media, or

Hardcard)

FSK (Frequency Shift Keying)

A method of frequency modulation in which a binary “1” is sent as one frequency and a “0” as another frequency. Used in modems operating at 1200 bps or slower.

FTP (File Transfer Protocol)

One of the protocols typically included as part of the TCP/IP suite of protocols supported in most implementations of TCP/IP. FTP is a TCP/IP-based protocol for transferring files between different systems.

Function

A collection of declarations and statements returning a value that can be called by name.

Function Prototype

A function declaration that includes a list of names and types of formal parameters in the parentheses following the function name.

Gateway (GW) (SNMP)

In current usage, “gateway” and “application gateway” refer to translating systems that convert data traveling from one environment to another.

GPS (Global Positioning System)

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite based positioning and navigation system that provides precise position, velocity, and time information.

Glossary-6 6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide

GLOSSARY

GUI (Graphical User Interface)

Provides a graphical representation of the environment which results in a simpler way to detect problem areas. Also promotes uniformity in operating management applications, which means greater management productivity. An example is Network Manager from SUN Microsystems.

GUI/PM

Graphical User Interface / Presentation Manager.

Hardcard

A spinning media, or PC Card hard drive that plugs into a PC Card slot. (See also: ATA Card, Flash Card, SanDisk, or Spinning Media)

Heap (ADK)

An area of memory set aside for dynamic allocation by a program.

HHC (Hand-Held Computer)

A generic acronym for a NORAND Hand-Held Computer, including the 4000 Series (43XX, 44XX, 4500) and the PEN*KEY or 6000 Series (61XX, 62XX, 63XX, 6400, 65XX, 66XX).

Also the trademark of another company.

HHC Remote Port

An ADCCP, TTY, or NPCP port which can connect to HHC or remote controllers. Data channels on HHC ports are multiplexed onto the host port.

Hop

Used in vector distance routing. A hop equals one data link. A path to the final destination on a net is a series of hops away from the origin.

Host

A customer’s host computer.

A computer that provides services directly to users, such as the user’s computer. In TCP/IP, an IP addressed device.

6110 Series Hand-Held Computer User’s Guide Glossary-7

GLOSSARY

A large computer that serves many users, such as a minicomputer or mainframe.

Host Address

The part of an internet address that designates which node on the (sub)network is being addressed. Also called host number.

Host Computer

A large computer that serves many users, such as a PC, minicomputer, or mainframe.

Host Controller

A 4980 Controller that is functioning as a host to a secondary controller.

Host Port (com4980)

A port that can connect to a host or a 4980 Network

Controller.

Host System (com4980)

The Unix system that the COM4980 Package runs on.

Hot Swap

Remove and insert a PC Card without rebooting the unit.

I/0 Key

The power suspend or resume switch on the 6100 Computer

not the same as the reset button. Suspends or resumes operation depending on the current state of the computer.

Icon

A symbol on the computer desktop that graphically represents the purpose or function of an application or file.

IFL Card (Initial Flash Load)

An SRAM card that installs the flash contents on most PEN*KEY systems.

InfraRed

A method for short-range wireless data communication.

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GLOSSARY

internet

While a network, “internet” usually refers to a collection of networks interconnected with routers. See also: network.

Internet

(Note the capital “I”.) The world’s largest internet, including large national backbone nets (such as MILNET, NSFNET, and CREN) and many regional and local networks world-wide. The Internet uses the TCP/IP suite. Networks with only Email connectivity are not considered on the Internet.

IR

InfraRed. (see also: IrDA)

IrDA

A standard for InfraRed communications. An IrDA device creates a connection between two devices or a device and a network, without a physical connection, using signals transmitted in the infrared spectrum.

KB (Kilobyte)

One thousand bytes.

LAN (Local Area Network)

A group of network devices in which each device can communicate through a wired or wireless link. The wired link may have several segments joined by repeaters and bridges. The LAN is characterized by the relatively short distance it is designed to cover, a high speed of operation, and relatively low error rates. The geographic scope of LANs is limited to thousands of feet or closely-spaced building complexes.

Laser (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation)

A method of scanning that uses a coherent light consisting of one frequency with high density of energy.

Layer

A modular portion of a stacked protocol that consists of one or more semi-independent protocols. Each layer builds on

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GLOSSARY

the layer beneath it and feeds information to the protocols in the layers above it. TCP/IP has five layers of protocols, and OSI has seven.

LCD

Liquid Crystal Display.

LLC (Logical Link Control)

The upper portion of the data link layer, defined in the IEEE 802.2 standard. The LLC layer represents a uniform interface to the user of the data link service, usually a network layer.

Local Controller

A controller which is directly connected to a host computer. A local controller uses either secondary ADCCP or ASYNC on its host port.

Master Boot Card

See IFL Card

MB (Megabyte)

One million bytes.

Memory Cards

See PC Card

Modem

A communication device that enables a computer to transmit information over a telephone line.

Modem Baud Rate

The speed of the modem connection. The higher the number the faster the rate.

Modem Device Name

The name of the communications port, for example: COM1, AUX2, HOST3, or DIGI4.

Modem Settings

The command strings required by your modem.

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GLOSSARY

MQL (Multi-Quad Lockbox)

Multi-quad lockboxes are used for ADCCP communications with 121/141 HHCs.

MS-DOS (Microsoft Disk Operating System)

A master control program for 16-bit, Intel-based system. One of the more common operating systems on PC systems.

NAK (Negative Acknowledgement)

Response to receipt of a corrupted packet of information.

Native Mode (ADK)

A command set for asynchronous communication. NORAND command set compatible among previous generations of NORAND RF equipment.

Network

A computer data communications system which interconnects computer systems at various sites. A network may include any combination of LANs, MANs, or WANs. See also: LAN, WAN, internet.

(ADK) A computer network or terminals connected by means of (wires or radio transmissions) using software that enables them to exchange information.

Network Address (SNMP)

In TCP/IP, the network portion of an IP address. For a class A network, the network address is the first byte of the IP address. For a class B network, the network address is the first two bytes of the IP address. For a class C network, the network address is the first three bytes of the IP address. In each case, the remainder is the host address. In the Internet, assigned network addresses are globally unique. See also: Internet, IP address, subnet address, host address.

In NetWare, the unique number assigned to each logical node of the network.

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GLOSSARY

NMSD

NORAND Mobile Systems Division of Intermec

Technologies Corporation.

Norlib Tool Kit

A NORAND application tool kit for C/C++ programmers. DOS based. Includes a large C++ class library. Supports 4000 Series Hand-Held Computers and 61XX, 62XX, 63XX, and 66XX PEN*KEY Computers

NOS (Network Operating System)

Provides many of the services that are distributed throughout the network to the various servers. Typically provides the following services: print, file and database, messaging, communication, and network management.

NPCP (NORANDâ Portable Communications Protocol)

NPCP, a NORAND proprietary protocol, provides session, network, and datalink services for NORAND HHCs in the NORAND LAN environment used with printers and data communications.

NRINET

A NORAND protocol that transfers data over TCP/IP.

NULL

A constant, valued at zero.

Null Modem Baud Rate

The speed of the modem connection.

Null Modem Device Name

The name of the communication port, for example, COM1, AUX2, HOST3, or DIGI4.

OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer)

A term that identifies certain hardware vendors who produce PC hardware for a system built by another company.

On Key

This key is found on some units. It will not turn the unit “On” or “Off” but it will suspend/resume operation.

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GLOSSARY

Open Systems

Comprises protocols and components that meet standards set by industry-accepted governing bodies. The standards ensure that when new protocols and components are introduced into an existing system, they will meet the standards and be able to communicate with the existing system. The OSI model is the basis for a system to communicate with any other system. The model is a framework of standards that create protocol stacks and applications for networking applications.

Open Wireless LAN Node

Any access point or wireless station that connects to the network using the 900 MHz or synthesized UHF radio option.

OS

Operating system.

Pan Border

An invisible border that extends inward from the edges of the physical display, providing an easy means of panning. (See also: Auto Panning)

PC (Personal Computer)

1.A desktop computer developed by IBM or a clone based on the same architecture developed by a third party vendor.

2.Sometimes used more generically to refer to other desktop systems, such as the Apple Macintosh. 3. The original IBM computer using an Intel 8088 CPU and an 8-bit internal bus.

PC Card

A device that fits in the card slots of an Intermec or other computer. In some PEN*KEY computers, the smaller type II card occupies one slot, while a type III card blocks the second slot. The card may be used for data storage, modem, printer, wireless, or other purposes.

Generally, PC Card is used in reference to devices, whereas PCMCIA is a reference to the standard.

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GLOSSARY

PC Card Icon

An icon located in the System Tray, which indicates a PC Card is plugged into the PC Card slot. (See also: System Tray)

PCMCIA (Personal Computer Memory Card International Association)

An industry group responsible for creation of the standard for devices (slightly larger than a credit card) for small computers, such as laptop and hand-held computers.

Formerly, devices were referred to as PCMCIA cards, but are now generally referred to as PC Cards, while PCMCIA is a reference to the standard.

PDU (Protocol Data Unit) (SNMP)

An OSI term for “packet.” A data object exchanged by protocol machines (entities) within a given layer. In TCP/IP, it defines the type of SNMP message being sent.

Pen

An input device similar in usage to a mouse, but similar in appearance to a writing instrument.

Pend

Wait for a particular response or event to occur. Used interchangeably with “wait.”

PEN*KEY

A family of NORAND Hand-Held Computers, also known as the 6000 Series with touch screen capability. Examples include: 6100, 6110, 6210, 6300, 6350, 6400, 6500, and 6600 Computers.

PEN*KEY Tool Kits

System-oriented programmer’s tool kits. The current tool kits support: 6100, 6200/6300 6400, 6600 Computers.

PEN*KEY Utilities

A program that provides the basic functions needed to prepare the PEN*KEY for use, including program load and data communications.

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GLOSSARY

PenRight

A third party development environment that allows users to create DOS or Windows applications by dragging and dropping. You can visit their web site at: www.penright.com

Physical Port

Equates to port connector. The 4980 Controller has four internal physical ports (“A”, “B”, “C”, and “D”). It also has six connectors (“A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “LAN1”, and “LAN2”). Ports “B”, “C”, and “D” are permanently attached to the 15-pin connectors labeled “B”, “C”, and “D” respectively on the back of the controller. Port “A” is attached to either the 15-pin RS-232 connector labeled “A” or to both of the two 9-pin RS-485 connectors labeled “LAN1” and “LAN2”. Port “A” is attached to the RS-485 connectors when it is configured as a LAN port, otherwise it is attached to the RS-232 connector labeled “A.”

PING (Packet Internet Groper)

A utility program that determines if a TCP/IP connection exists between a workstation and a server.

Pixel

The smallest graphic unit to be displayed on screen.

Plug and Play

The combination of BIOS, operating system, and peripheral device components that provides an environment that configures itself, thereby avoiding potential hardware conflicts for the operating system by polling the peripheral devices, assessing their requirements, and determining and implementing optimal settings for each device.

Polled Protocol

A system for multiplexing with more than one radio terminal by systematically querying each unit for traffic.

Port

The physical hardware communication port.

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GLOSSARY

(SNMP) Physically, an access point to a computer, multiplexer device, or network. Logically, a pointer to a TCP/IP application.

Port Replicator

A device that provides connections for a number of devices, such as: keyboard, serial peripheral, radio antenna, power, and IrDA printer.

Portrait Mode

In terms of the display, it has an orientation such that the information displayed on the screen is viewed in a normal manner, without rotating the image, resulting in a narrow display.

POST (Power-On Self-Test)

A set of routines for system diagnostics and configuration that is run by the BIOS during system initialization.

Programmer’s Reference Guide

The comprehensive repository of information about

PEN*KEY programming. It is usually included with a

PEN*KEY Tool Kit.

Proprietary Systems

Systems where all the component devices, protocols, and standards are from a single vendor, usually with patent, trade mark, or copyright protection.

Protocol

A formal description of message formats and the rules computers must follow to exchange those messages.

Protocol Stack (SNMP)

A modular set of functions, one at each layer of the stack, that form a network service. Each layer of the stack uses the services of the module beneath it.

Radio Network

Radio-enabled network devices and communication paths. A group of fixed-end devices and wireless stations in which

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