Intel NetportExpress 10-100 User Manual

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Intel Express 10/100

Fast Ethernet Switch

User Guide

Part No. 663096-001

First edition

December 1996

Copyright © 1996, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.

Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124-6497

Intel Corporation assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in this manual. Nor does Intel make any commitment to update the information contained herein.

*Other product and corporate names may be trademarks of other companies and are used only for explanation and to the owners’ benefit, without intent to infringe.

Contents

 

Quick Start

 

1

Chapter 1

Hardware Installation and Network Topology

3

Overview ..........................................................................................................................................

 

3

Installation and Setup .......................................................................................................................

4

Using the Switch ...............................................................................................................................

 

5

Port status LEDs ........................................................................................................................

5

Management status LEDs ..........................................................................................................

6

Cabling Requirements .......................................................................................................................

7

UTP requirements ......................................................................................................................

7

Fiber optic requirements ............................................................................................................

7

Straight-through vs. crossover cables .........................................................................................

8

Typical Configurations ...................................................................................................................

10

Configuring the mixed 10 and 100 Mbps workgroup environment ...........................................

10

Configuring the Wide Area Network (WAN) or multi-floor environment ................................

12

Repeater count limitations .......................................................................................................

14

Chapter 2

Configuring and Managing the Switch

15

Accessing the Console Manager .....................................................................................................

16

Using the Console Manager ............................................................................................................

17

Entering commands .................................................................................................................

17

Console Manager command groups ..........................................................................................

19

Sample Console Manager Session ...................................................................................................

20

Configuring the SNMP agent for IP .........................................................................................

21

Configuring a port for full duplex ............................................................................................

22

Creating Virtual LANs (VLANs) .............................................................................................

23

Monitoring traffic ....................................................................................................................

25

Chapter 3

Console Command Reference

31

Console Command-line Summary ...................................................................................................

32

Console Commands ........................................................................................................................

38

System Commands .........................................................................................................................

39

IP Commands .................................................................................................................................

 

43

IP configuration .......................................................................................................................

43

Ping Commands .......................................................................................................................

46

Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) Commands .......................................................................

47

iii

C O N T E

N T S Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

 

SNMP Commands ..........................................................................................................................

48

SNMP community strings ........................................................................................................

48

SNMP trap message commands ...............................................................................................

49

Switching Database Commands ......................................................................................................

50

Database control commands .....................................................................................................

51

Custom filtering .......................................................................................................................

54

VLAN Commands ..........................................................................................................................

56

Spanning Tree Commands ..............................................................................................................

60

Port Configuration Commands ........................................................................................................

65

Statistics Commands .......................................................................................................................

66

Chapter 4

Troubleshooting

71

General Problems ...........................................................................................................................

72

Flow Control Problems ...................................................................................................................

73

Appendix A

Technical Information

75

Default Configuration .....................................................................................................................

75

Specifications .................................................................................................................................

 

77

SNMP and MIB Support .................................................................................................................

80

Limited Hardware Warranty ...........................................................................................................

81

Index

 

85

Intel Automated Customer Support

Inside back cover

iv

Quick Start

1.Install the Express 10/100 Switch in a rack or on a shelf or table and plug the cord in. If you’re in Europe or Asia, or any other country that has a 220-volt electrical system, set the power supply switch to 230 (115 is the default). Otherwise, leave the switch set to 115. Turn the power on.

Brackets and screws for standard 19-inch equipment rack placement.

Rubber feet for shelf or table placement.

2. Connect the network devices to the switch.

Cabling Guidelines

 

 

 

at 10 Mbps

at 100 Mbps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Server/

CAT 3, 4, or 5

CAT 5

 

 

Workstation

straight-through

straight-through

 

 

to Switch

 

 

Crossover cables

Straight-through cables

Hub to

CAT 3, 4, or 5

CAT 5 crossover

to hubs or other

Switch

crossover

 

to servers/workstations.

 

 

 

 

switches.

Switch to

CAT 3, 4, or 5

CAT 5 crossover

 

 

 

Switch

crossover

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Check the LEDs for power and links.

Lights when a

device is attached.

Always on.

Lights briefly while the switch performs self-tests.

Blinks every two seconds.

Lights when a 100BASE-TX

device is attached.

Next steps (Optional)

Continue to the next page if you want to configure the switch to work with an SNMP-compliant Network Management System (NMS).

See Chapter 2 if you want to use the Console Manager to change port configurations (set a port for full duplex or manually set the speed), assign an IP address, or check port statistics.

1

(Optional) Quick Start for SNMP Management

4.Use the null-modem cable to connect the Console port to a COM port on a workstation.

A null-modem cable is provided with the switch.

5.Open a terminal emulation program (such as HyperTerminal in Microsoft Windows* 95). Use these communication parameters:

9600 baud

8 data bits

No parity

1 stop bit

Xon/Xoff flow control

6.Press Eand log into the Console Manager:

Login:

password:

By default, no password or user name is assigned. If you enter one, it’s saved upon reset.

7.Set the IP configuration using the set-ip-conf command:

set-ip-conf 192.1.1.64 255.255.255.0 192.1.1.255 E

IP address

netmask

broadcast address

Replace these addresses with the numbers for your network. Specify the IP address, netmask (subnet mask), and broadcast address (default gateway), in that order.

8.Download the Intel MIB (Management Information Base) file from an Intel online service and compile it into your NMS.

The MIB filename is SWCH2MIB.EXE. You can find the file on Intel’s Customer Support web site (http://support.intel.com) or the Intel BBS (Host: ftp.intel.com, Directory: pub/support/ enduser_reseller). See your NMS documentation for instructions on compiling the MIB for a new device.

2

1

Hardware Installation

and Network

Topology

Overview

The Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch features eight autonegotiating 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX ports. Each port supports an Ethernet (10 Mbps) or Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps) segment. The switch also has two slots for optional two-port media adapters (such as 100BASE-TX or 100BASE-FX).

The switch also has a built-in SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) agent and can be monitored and controlled through any SNMP-compliant Network Management System (NMS), such as Intel LANDesk® Network Manager. See page 21 for information on using the switch with an SNMP NMS and getting the switch’s MIB.

3

C H A P T E R

1 Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

WARNING

If you’re in a country that has a 220-volt electrical system, you must set the power switch to 230.

Most European and Asian countries have 220-volt systems.

The power cord is a North American type, UL-listed/ CSA-certified power supply cord. Immediately discard this cord if it is inappropriate for the electrical system of your country, and obtain the proper cord as required by your national electrical codes or ordinances and certified for use in your region.

Installation and Setup

1 Install the switch in a rack or on a shelf.

For rack placement, connect the switch to a 19-inch rack using the enclosed rack mount brackets.

For shelf placement, attach the enclosed rubber feet to each corner of the bottom of the switch and place it on a flat, level surface.

2 Plug the switch in and turn the power on.

Plug the switch into an active AC outlet and turn the power on. If you’re in Europe or Asia, or any other country that has a 220-volt electrical system, set the power supply switch to 230 (115 is the default). Otherwise, leave the switch set to 115.

The United States and Japan both have 110 volt systems.

3 Connect the 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX devices.

Follow these general guidelines:

You don’t need to manually set the speed. The switch automatically detects the speed of the connected devices.

Always use Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (CAT 5 UTP) cable when connecting 100BASE-TX devices. You can use CAT 3, 4, or 5 UTP for 10BASE-T devices.

Limit the distance between devices connected with UTP cable to 100 meters.

Use a crossover cable when directly connecting a hub (also called a repeater or concentrator) to the switch. Use straight-through cables when connecting to servers or workstations. If you don’t have a crossover cable, use the MDI connector on port 1 to connect a hub.

Configure the network so devices that talk primarily to each other are on the same segment. Each port is a single segment.

4 Is setup complete?

If you’re using the switch as a stand-alone device (not under the control of network management software), you’re done.

If you want to change the default configuration (shown in Appendix A) or manage the switch, continue to Chapter 2.

4

C H A P T E R 1 Hardware Installation and Network Topology

Ports on the switch are wired MDI-X for connection to MDI ports using a straight-through UTP cable. See page 8 for more information.

Using the Switch

The switch requires minimal user intervention. It automatically learns the addresses of new devices as you connect them, and will relearn addresses dynamically if you reconfigure the network. It also automatically detects the speed of connected devices. You don’t need to manually set the speed.

Port status LEDs

Port LEDs provide information about each port’s configuration and the status of devices connected to the ports.

 

Xmt

Transmit. Lights when the switch is transmitting

 

 

packets from this port to another port. Normally

 

 

blinks at regular intervals, even if no devices are

 

 

connected, while it updates the internal SNMP

 

 

agent.

 

Rcv

Receive. Lights when packets are received on this

 

 

port, even if they are not forwarded.

NOTE

Coll/Fdpx

Collision (default) or Full Duplex. Blinks when

The default configuration of

 

collisions are detected. Collisions are normal in an

all ports is half-duplex mode.

 

Ethernet environment. However, if the collision

To change to full duplex, use

 

LED is on continuously, you may have a problem

the Console Manager. See

 

with a device on the segment.

page 22 for instructions.

 

If you’ve enabled full duplex on the port, the LED is

 

 

 

 

on solid. When full duplex is enabled, collisions

 

 

aren’t possible because packets are sent and

 

 

received on their own wire pair, so they can’t

 

 

collide.

5

C H A P T E R

1 Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

Use these communications settings when accessing the built-in Console Manager application. See page 16 for more information.

Flow Flow control. Lights whenever too much traffic is entering on a port. When this happens, the switch’s buffers fill and it’s forced to back pressure the traffic out to the segment for retransmission. This allows the switch’s buffers to clear before the segment retransmits the traffic. See page 73 for a description of flow control.

100Speed. Lights when a 100BASE-TX device is connected to the port. The LED is off when a 10BASE-T device is connected.

Link

Link. When solid, indicates a connection is

 

established. If the Link LED is off, check for loose

 

cable connections. Also, make sure you’re using the

 

correct type of cable, either straight-through or

 

crossover. See page 8 for more information.

Management status LEDs

Management status LEDs provide information about the overall operation of the switch and its SNMP management components.

SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol. Always on, indicating the built-in SNMP agent is working.

Mgmt Management. Blinks on at regular intervals as the SNMP agent is polled for updated information.

Power Power. Indicates the status of the power supply. The LED is normally on. It may remain off for a few seconds during the power-on self-test.

Fault Fault. Indicates that the switch has detected a problem. It may remain on for a few seconds during the power-on self-test. If this indicator blinks or remains lit after self-test, there’s a problem with the switch.

See Chapter 4 for troubleshooting information.

6

C H A P T E R 1 Hardware Installation and Network Topology

Cabling Requirements

Incorrect cabling is often the cause of network configuration problems. It’s important that you understand cabling requirements before connecting devices to the switch.

UTP requirements

The 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet specification requires you use Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (CAT 5 UTP) cabling to operate at 100 Mbps per second. If you use lower grade cabling (CAT 3 or

CAT 4), you may get a connection, but will soon experience data loss or slow performance.

The 10BASE-T Ethernet specification allows you to use CAT 3, CAT 4, or CAT 5 UTP cabling.

You’re limited to 100 meters between any two devices with UTP cable whether you’re running at 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps. However, you can extend the total diameter by installing a fiber optic media adapter and using fiber optic connections between switches, or between the switch and a hub (repeater), router or bridge. See page 12 for an example.

Fiber optic requirements

The optional 100BASE-FX fiber optic media adapter (Intel product code ES101MAFX) lets you use multimode fiber optic cable to connect two switches, or to connect the switch to a hub, bridge, or router. The media adapter uses an SC fiber optic connector.

With multimode fiber optic cable, signals can travel up to 412 meters between two switches or between the switch and a router when the link is configured at half duplex. If configured at full duplex, the signal can travel up to 2 kilometers.

The signal can travel up to 160 meters between the switch and a hub (repeater). Full duplex isn’t possible between the switch and a hub.

7

C H A P T E R

1 Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

NOTE

When making your own cables, wires 1 and 2 must be a twisted pair and 3 and 6 must be a twisted pair.

Straight-through vs. crossover cables

Ports on the switch are wired MDI-X so you can use a straightthrough cable when connecting to a workstation or server (adapter cards are wired MDI). For direct connection to another MDI-X port (most hubs and some switches), you must use a crossover cable.

NIC RJ-45 (MDI)

Switch/Hub RJ-45 (MDI-X)

A straight-through (standard) cable connects MDI ports to MDI-X ports.

Switch/Hub RJ-45 (MDI-X)

Switch/Hub RJ-45 (MDI-X)

A crossover cable connects MDI-X ports to MDI-X ports (or MDI ports to MDI ports).

8

C H A P T E R 1 Hardware Installation and Network Topology

Determining which cable to use

Different switch and repeater manufacturers implement their port configurations differently. The following guidelines are based on the Express 10/100 Switch, the Intel Express 100BASE-TX Stackable Hub (repeater) and the EtherExpress™ family of adapters (server or workstation). These apply to the majority of switches and hubs and all servers or workstations:

For this connection

Use this cable

Switch to repeater

Crossover

Switch to server or workstation

Straight-through

Switch to switch

Crossover

Repeater to server or workstation

Straight-through

Port 1 on the switch has both an MDI and MDI-X connector. If you’re not seeing a link on a port, try plugging into each of the port 1 connectors.

9

C H A P T E R

1 Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

Typical Configurations

Configuring the mixed 10 and

100 Mbps workgroup environment

In the mixed 10 and 100 Mbps environment, workgroup clients should be connected to a hubs such as the Intel Express 10/100BASE-TX Stackable Hub. All hub stacks should be connected to the Express 10/100 Switch. Servers or busy workstations should also be connected directly to the 10/100 Switch.

10

C H A P T E R 1 Hardware Installation and Network Topology

Configuration guidelines:

Servers or workstations: Configure servers or workstations directly connected to the switch for full duplex. Since the traffic is two-way traffic, you’ll see a performance increase with a full duplex configuration. See page 22 for instructions on configuring full duplex.

Security considerations: If you have concerns about server access or other security issues, configure security virtual LANs (SVLANs) to prevent segments (ports) from accessing other ports. In the example on the previous page, you may want to prevent workstations on the 10 Mbps hub on port 4 from accessing the file server on port 2. See page 23 for more information on configuring SVLANs.

100 Mbps or 10 Mbps hubs: Leave hubs (repeaters) at half duplex with flow control enabled. Since hubs broadcast traffic among all ports and full duplex requires a point-to-point connection, you can’t configure a 10 or 100 Mbps hub for full duplex.

11

C H A P T E R

1 Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

Configuring the Wide Area Network (WAN) or multi-floor environment

Connections to the backbone are most effective using fiber optic floors or

kilometers

12

C H A P T E R 1 Hardware Installation and Network Topology

Configuration guidelines:

Fiber optic connections to switches or routers: Use multi-mode fiber to connect to a router or another switch. You must purchase a 100BASE-FX expansion module separately (Intel order code ES101MAFX). Each module comes with two ports.

If the switch or router is capable of full duplex, the maximum cable length between the two devices is 2 kilometers. At half duplex the maximum is 412 meters.

Two-port 100BASE-TX expansion are also available (Intel order code ES101MATX).

Full duplex and flow control between Express 10/100 switches:

The only time you can configure full duplex and flow control simultaneously is between two Express 10/100 switches. Special information is added to packets between switches to accomplish this. This works with both fiber optic and CAT 5 cabling.

Fiber optic connections to repeaters: Since repeaters aren’t capable of full duplex mode operation, you’re restricted to 160 meters of fiber optic cable between the Express Switch and a repeater.

Multi-workgroup server configuration: Always put servers accessed by multiple workgroups off of the switch. Because the server has a point-to-point connection, you can configure it for full duplex and increase the bandwidth of the connection. Note that the adapter in the server must be capable of full duplex.

Network administrator’s workstation: Connect the administrator’s workstation directly to the switch. This reduces the risk of the administrator getting dropped off the network and allows the administrator to get network information faster.

Local workgroup server configuration: Always connect servers accessed by local workgroups to a hub, not to the switch. This reduces the amount of traffic passing through the switch and improves the performance for all workgroups connected to it. However, if more than one workgroup accesses a server, connect the server directly to the switch.

13

C H A P T E R

1 Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

5-4-3-2-1 general rule for

10BASE-T

Five segments are allowed

Four repeater hops

Three repeaters can have nodes attached

Two segments can’t be populated and are links only

All of this makes One collision domain with a maximum of 1024 stations.

One repeater hop for

100BASE-TX

Only one repeater hop is allowed for 100BASE-TX. Also, the distance between the node and switch can’t exceed 200 meters.

Repeater count limitations

The switch doesn’t count as a repeater. Each port on the switch can support a full Fast Ethernet or Ethernet network.

10BASE-T

There can be four 10BASE-T repeaters/hubs between the switch and any workstation or server. However, only three of the repeaters can have devices attached.

100BASE-TX

There can be one class 1 repeater/hub between the switch and any workstation or server (a stack of Intel Express 100BASE-TX Hubs counts as a single hub). Also, the total diameter of a segment can’t exceed 200 meters when using UTP cable. That is, the distance between any two nodes on a segment (or the switch and a node on the other side of a hub) can’t exceed 200 meters.

can’t daisy-chain 100 Mbps hubs with UTP cable.

Express 100BASE-TX hubs, use cascade cables. other 100 Mbps hubs,

the documentation that came with the hub.

14

2

Configuring and

Managing the Switch

You don’t need to read this chapter or Chapter 3 unless you want to change the Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch’s default configuration (see Appendix A for a list of defaults) or intend to manage the switch. The switch is ready to go simply by plugging it in and turning the power on.

However, if you need to change the default configuration or manage the switch, there are two ways:

• Use SNMP-compliant management software such as Intel LANDesk Network Manager (not included).

• Use the Express 10/100 Switch’s internal Console Manager either by directly connecting a serial cable or through Telnet.

To use SNMP management software or Telnet to the switch, you must first connect to the switch using a serial cable and use the Console Manager to assign an IP address.

15

set-passwd

C H A P T E R 2

Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

NOTE

For more information about any of the commands used in this chapter, see Chapter 3, Console Command Reference.

NOTE

In HyperTerminal, you must set flow control (unrelated to the switch’s flow control feature) to Xon/Xoff.

Accessing the Console

Manager

The Console Manager software is contained in the switch’s nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM). You don’t need to install any software.

To access the Console Manager:

1Use the null-modem cable (included with the switch) to connect a workstation’s COM port to the Console port on the switch.

2Open a terminal emulation program (such as HyperTerminal in Windows 95).

3Select the COM port and these communication parameters:

9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, Xon/Xoff flow control

(To set these parameters in HyperTerminal, choose Properties from the File menu. Then click the Configure button.)

4Press E. The login prompt appears:

Please Login username: password:

By default, no username or password is assigned. If you enter a password, it becomes active only after you reset the switch or turn off the power. If you want the password to take effect immediately, use the command.

Accessing the Console Manager remotely

To access remotely through Telnet, first set the IP configuration of the switch using the set-ip-conf command through the Console port (see page 21 for instructions). Then use Telnet to reach the switch.

All commands work as if a terminal were directly connected to the Console port. Only one console session can be active at a time (either local or remote). After the first Telnet session is established, other Telnet connections are refused until the current session is closed.

16

C H A P T E R 2

Configuring and Managing the Switch

Using the Console Manager

The Console Manager provides an out-of-band (not on the network) connection to the switch. Use the Console Manager to

assign an IP configuration to the switch.

configure the ports.

monitor network performance.

create VLANs.

Entering commands

To enter commands, type the command name followed by any parameters and press E. For example, typing sys-stat E at the command prompt displays basic system status information.

Items in angle brackets mean you need to enter a specific value. For example, <IPaddress> represents an IP address in dotted decimal notation (such as 123.1.1.7).

Items in { } and separated by | represent alternatives for an argument. For example,

get-comm {read|write|*}

means you can type one of the following

get-comm read get-comm write get-comm *

If you enter a command incorrectly, a message indicates the type of error. For example, typing a nonexistent command gives the message:

SYS_console> pin command <pin> not found

Entering an existing command with an incorrect number of parameters displays this message:

SYS_console> ping too few arguments

17

help-kbd

C H A P T E R 2

Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

Some commands have parameters that determine how settings are saved and when they’re implemented. Some are changed in

the running configuration so that the new value is used immediately (the run option).

the NVRAM so that the changes are saved and occur only in the next session (the nvram option).

both the running and the NVRAM configuration (the all option).

For an explanation of a command’s parameters, add a question mark

(?) after the command name:

SYS_console>

set-lt-age

?

 

set-lt-age

sets the

LT

aging period

[arg

#0]

database type

- either {run|nvram|all}

[arg

#1]

aging time in seconds

The Console Manager provides a history of the last several commands you entered. To cycle through them, press ! or cP at the prompt.

To correct a command line, use the following special keys (see the command):

! or cP for the previous command

cW to delete the previous word

cU to delete the entire line

When you type a command that results in more than one screen of text appearing, you can press Q to stop the process or any other key to continue to the next screen.

You can press Tto see the list of commands that start with the text already typed. For example:

SYS_console> get-c T

Commands matching <get-c>

---------------------------------------------------

get-comm

show

current

read

or/and write

community

get-con-matrix

displays

the

VLAN

connectivity

matrix

get-colls-cnt

gets

the

collision distribution counters per port

18

C H A P T E R 2

Configuring and Managing the Switch

Console Manager command groups

The Console Manager has several categories of commands:

Console commands: help, banner, login/logout, console parameters setup.

System commands: system status, reset commands, download commands, and system debug commands.

IP commands: IP address setup, parameter and information display, and remote boot setup.

SNMP agent commands: SNMP community string settings, management, and trap options.

Switching database commands: aging time management and switching database entry management.

VLAN commands: management of security virtual LANs, virtual broadcast domains, and port mirroring commands.

Port configuration commands: duplex, speed, and flow control port settings.

Switching statistics commands: RMON and Ethernet traffic and packet counters.

Spanning tree commands: disabling or manually configuring the spanning tree protocol.

The following example Console Manager session explains some of the more commonly used commands for configuring ports and monitoring traffic statistics. An example network is provided for reference.

19

C H A P T E R 2

Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

Sample Console Manager

Session

Refer to the diagram below when reading the sample configuration procedures on pages 21 through 29.

Procedures using this diagram

Configuring the SNMP agent for IP (page 21)

Configuring a port for full duplex (page 22)

Creating VLANs (page 23)

Monitoring traffic (page 25)

20

warm-reset

C H A P T E R 2

Configuring and Managing the Switch

NOTE

If you don’t specify an IP configuration, the agent won’t respond to any in-band requests, including ping messages and network management applications.

Configuring the SNMP agent for IP

You can monitor and control the switch through any SNMP-compliant network management system (NMS). First, you must configure the SNMP agent by assigning an IP address.

In the diagram on page 20, a laptop is used to connect to the switch’s serial port. You must connect directly to the serial port for first-time IP configuration. See page 16 for more information on connecting to the switch via the serial port.

Commands used

set-ip-conf <ip address> <netmask> <broadcast address>

ping <ip address> <number|0>

To configure the SNMP agent

1 Set the IP configuration. Type the command:

set-ip-conf 192.1.1.64 255.255.255.0 192.1.1.255

IP address netmask

broadcast address

Replace the numbers with those for your network. If the switch doesn’t have an IP configuration (default), then the specified IP configuration is used immediately and saved in NVRAM.

192.1.1.255 is the address of the router in the diagram on page 20.

If you previously assigned an IP configuration, the command changes only the NVRAM. To use the new parameters, reset the switch using the command.

2 Test the installation. Type the command:

SYS_console> ping 192.1.1.1 2

This example tests connectivity from the switch to the network administrator’s workstation (IP address 192.1.1.1). The option 2 tells the switch to send two requests. Use 0 for an endless ping. For more information on the ping command, see page 46.

3Download the MIB from Intel’s Customer Support World Wide Web site (http://support.intel.com). The file is compressed in the file SWCH2MIB.EXE.

4Compile the MIB into your NMS. See your NMS documentation for more information.

You can now access the switch remotely with your NMS or through Telnet.

21

C H A P T E R 2

Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

NOTE

You must have a point-to- point connection to establish a full-duplex connection (shared hubs/repeaters/ concentrators aren’t capable of full duplex). Additionally, both points of the connection must be configured for full duplex.

NOTE

Setting a port to full duplex automatically disables flow control. Since collisions don’t occur on a full-duplex link, flow control isn’t possible.

One exception is between two Express 10/100 switches. Special information is added to packets traveling between switches to accomplish this.

The Coll/Fdpx LED is solid green when the port is configured for full duplex.

Configuring a port for full duplex

Configuring a port for full duplex allows the switch to send and receive packets simultaneously with the destination device. To establish a full-duplex link, the switch and the destination device both must be configured for full duplex.

Additionally, the link must be to a switch, workstation, or server. You can’t establish a full-duplex link to a device that broadcasts incoming packets to every port on the device. This excludes shared hubs, repeaters, or concentrators from using full duplex.

Commands used

get-port-cfg

set-speed-sel <port> {asense|10|100} set-port-dplex <port> {full|half}

Recommended environments

Full duplex is best when two devices exchange information to and from each other (such as a file server). In the diagram on page 20, the Payroll and Finance 100 Mbps workgroups frequently copy files to and from the file server on port 5.

To configure a port for full duplex

1Configure the device on the other end for full duplex. In the diagram on page 20, you’d configure the adapter in the file server for full duplex.

2Get the current port settings using the get-port-cfg command. If the port is set to autosense the speed (asense is the default) then you must set the speed to either 10 or 100. This example sets port 5 to 100 Mbps.

set-speed-sel 5 100

3Set the port to full duplex. (This command fails is you haven’t manually changed the speed to 10 or 100).

set-port-dplex 5 full

4Check the Coll/Fdpx LED. It should be solid green, indicating full duplex.

22

C H A P T E R 2

Configuring and Managing the Switch

Creating Virtual LANs (VLANs)

You can create two types of VLANs:

Security VLANs (SVLANs). Ports in an SVLAN can exchange frames only with other ports in the same SVLAN. SVLANs are used for security to prevent access to devices on the network.

They’re also used to reduce unnecessary traffic on the network since all traffic, including broadcast and unicast frames, is prevented from crossing SVLAN boundaries.

Virtual Broadcast Domains (VBDs). Ports in a virtual broadcast domain can exchange broadcast frames only with other ports in the same VBD. However, they can exchange unicast frames with any other port on the switch. VBDs reduce broadcast traffic on the network, while allowing other types of traffic to pass through.

Commands used

set-sec-vlan del-sec-vlan get-svlan-tbl

set-vbc-domain del-vbc-domain get-vbc-tbl

Sets up an SVLAN.

Deletes an SVLAN.

Displays the SVLAN table.

Sets up a VBD.

Deletes a VBD.

Displays the VBD table.

To create an SVLAN

1Determine the ports you want to group together.

In the diagram on page 20, the file server on port 5 contains sensitive information that only the Payroll and Finance workgroups should see. Creating an SVLAN that includes the Payroll and Finance workgroups along with the file server will accomplish this. However, Payroll and Finance still need to communicate with stations on the other ports. Creating another SVLAN that includes all ports except the file server port will solve this problem.

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C H A P T E R 2

Intel Express 10/100 Fast Ethernet Switch

2 Create the two SVLANs. Type the commands:

set-sec-vlan all 3-5-7 set-sec-vlan all 1-2-3-4-6-7-8

These commands create two SVLANs and saves the entries in NVRAM. Replace all with nvram to save the entry without changing it immediately or with run to change the entry now without saving it.

3 To display a summary of saved SVLANs, type:

get-svlan-tbl nvram

Any SVLANs created with the nvram or all options are displayed.

To create a VBD

1Determine the ports you want to group together.

The Engineering workgroup on port 8 experiences a high volume of traffic just within its own workgroup. Broadcast traffic from other workgroups adds to the problem. By grouping port 8 and port 6 into a VBD, the Engineering workgroup can access the common application server on port 6 while being shielded from the rest of the network’s broadcast traffic.

However, this configuration prevents ports 1-4 and 7 from seeing the application server. Another VBD that includes ports 1-4 and 6-7 will allow other ports to reach the file server.

2Type the commands:

set-vbc-domain run 6-8

set-vbc-domain run 1-2-3-4-6-7

These VBDs are temporary (only until the next reset or power down). To save the entries for future use and have them take effect now, replace run with all.

3 To display a summary of saved VBDs, type:

get-vbc-tbl nvram

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