BlackBerry R802D-2-O Integrator manual

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RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem Integrator’s Guide

Last Updated: August 24, 1999

Model No. R802D-2-O

© 1999, RESEARCH IN MOTION LIMITED

Research In Motion and RIM are registered trademarks of Research In Motion Ltd. MS-DOS is a registered trademark, and Windows is a trademark, of Microsoft Corp.

Warning: This document is for the use of licensed users only. Any unauthorised copying, distribution or disclosure of information is a violation of copyright laws.

While every effort has been made to ensure technical accuracy, information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Research In Motion Limited.

Research In Motion

295 Phillip Street Waterloo, Ontario Canada N2L 3W8 tel. (519) 888-7465 fax (519) 888-7884

Email: rim802d@rim.net

Web site: www.rim.net

DRAFT FCC Compliance Statement (USA)

FCC Class B Part 15

This device complies with Part 15 of FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:

1.This device may not cause harmful interference, and

2.This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

Warning

Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate this equipment.

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the manufacture’s instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.

There is no guarantee, however, that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

NRe-orient or relocate the receiving antenna.

NIncrease the separation between the equipment and receiver.

NConnect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.

NConsult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.

DRAFT Industry Canada Certification

This device complies with Industry Canada RSS 119, under certification number xxxxx.

IC Class B compliance

This device complies with the Class B limits for radio noise emissions as set out in the interference-causing equipment standard entitled “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003 of Industry Canada.

Contents

DRAFT FCC Compliance Statement (USA)

.......................... i

DRAFT Industry Canada Certification .................................

ii

About this guide....................................................................

v

1.

Introduction...............................................................

1

 

Radio performance......................................................................

1

 

DataTAC network technology.....................................................

4

2.

Getting started...........................................................

7

 

Test board overview ....................................................................

8

 

How to connect the test board......................................................

9

 

The MENU diagnostics tool .......................................................

10

3.

Mechanical integration ...........................................

17

 

Environmental properties...........................................................

17

 

Physical properties.....................................................................

18

 

Mounting methods.....................................................................

20

 

Cables and connectors................................................................

23

4.

Power requirements ................................................

27

 

Load specifications ....................................................................

27

 

Calculating overall power consumption......................................

29

 

Batteries ....................................................................................

30

 

Plug-in supplies .........................................................................

31

 

Automotive supplies...................................................................

32

5.

Interface specification .............................................

33

 

NCL and RAP link-layer protocols.............................................

33

 

Pin descriptions .........................................................................

35

 

How to turn the radio on and off ................................................

40

 

Loading firmware (optional) ......................................................

41

6.

Antenna selection ....................................................

43

 

Selecting an antenna ..................................................................

43

 

Introduction to antenna terminology ..........................................

45

Antenna design considerations...................................................

47

Shielding ...................................................................................

49

FCC radio frequency exposure rules...........................................

50

Specifications ......................................................................

55

Glossary of terms ................................................................

57

About this guide

This guide will assist you in integrating the RIM 802D OEM radio modem into a variety of devices such as laptop computers, handhelds, vending machines, point-of-sale terminals, vehicle-based mobile terminals, and alarm system.

Topics covered in this guide include:

N

N

N

N

mounting requirements

power (battery) characteristics

interfacing to the RIM 802D

antenna selection and placement

Throughout the guide, there are suggestions and precautions that will ease the implementation of a wireless communication solution. You are encouraged to contact RIM if you would like to discuss the technical implementation of this radio modem.

Introduction

With the introduction of the RIM 802D, Research In Motion (RIM) has set a new standard for radio modem performance. The RIM 802D is unrivaled in the key areas of receiver sensitivity, output efficiency, noise immunity, and power consumption. Its small size and weight make it suitable for virtually any wireless data application, including handheld devices and mobile terminals.

The RIM 802D is designed for use with DataTAC wide-area wireless data networks operating in the 800 MHz range, such as the American Mobile ARDIS network and the Bell Mobility ARDIS network.

RIM radio modems are specifically designed to integrate easily into a computing device. Potential applications include:

N

Laptop computers

N Vehicle tracking and location

N

Point of sale devices

N

Monitoring and telemetry

N

Ruggedized terminals

N

Vending machines

N

Handheld PC’s

N

Utility meters

N

Parking meters

N

Billboards

N

Dispatching

N

Security alarm panels

Radio performance

The RIM 802D offers the highest performance of any radio modem for DataTAC wireless data networks:

2 Introduction – Radio performance

Receiver sensitivity

Receiver sensitivity is a measure of how well a radio modem can “hear” a network base station. This figure is important when a device will be used in areas where signal strength is weak, such as inside buildings and in locations that are not close to a base station. A radio modem with good receiver sensitivity can be used in more places than a radio modem with poor sensitivity.

The RIM 802D has a receiver sensitivity of –118 dBm (MDC) and –111dBm (RD-Lap) at 0.01 BER. This means that the radio can interpret received data from a very weak 0.0025 picowatt signal with a 1% bit error rate. Although 1% may seem like a high error rate, the sophisticated over-the-air DataTAC protocol corrects these errors before the data is passed to the application, ensuring error-free communication. This capability is already built into the radio’s firmware, and does not require any additional software development.

Noise immunity

The RIM 802D is not de-sensitized by the electromagnetic interference (EMI) or “noise” that is generated by the electronics of the terminal into which it is integrated. As a result, no special shielding is required between the radio and your device.

Noise immunity offers several key benefits, including:

N

easier integration

N

improved RF performance

N

longer battery life

N more coverage from each base station

N

increased reliability

N

no need for special RF shielding

Low power requirements

If you are planning to integrate the RIM 802D into a handheld or portable device, battery life is a critical issue: your customers will insist on long lasting devices without heavy battery packs. The RIM 802D sets a new power consumption standard for DataTAC radio modems. This ensures efficiency and maximizes battery life.

Integrator’s Guide – RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem DRAFT VERSION

Introduction – Radio performance

3

Transmitting data: 1.7 amps or less (at 4.4 V), depending on output power

The transmitter is ON for a pulse of up to 1.1 seconds, depending on the amount of data transmitted. The maximum packet size for a DataTAC device is 2048 bytes.

Receiving data: 66 mA (at 4.4 V)

The radio’s receiver is usually turned off, and turned on periodically for the purpose of listening to the network for messages. The base station will only attempt to communicate with the radio during these windows. To minimize latency during rapid two-way communication, the receiver is also turned on and kept on for 10 seconds after any communication (transmit or receive) with the network.

Standby power: 0.2 mA (at 4.4 V)

Standby power consumption is very low and occurs when no radio activity has taken place for at least 10 seconds and the radio is not in a receiveron window. The radio and base station are closely synchronized to ensure that a communication attempt is not missed when the radio is in standby mode.

Battery life is not a concern for certain applications, such as in-vehicle applications that draw power from the vehicle battery. For these applications, it is possible to put the radio in an express operating mode, in which power consumption is higher than normal but packet transfer latency is reduced to a minimum.

Small size

Using a single board design, the RIM 802D is very thin, and much smaller than a business card, at only 42.0 by 67.5 mm. This tiny size allows the RIM 802D to meet tight space requirements within most applications. Its single-board design is more reliable than multi-board designs, particularly in high-vibration environments (such as vehicles) or in devices that can be dropped (such as handheld PCs).

RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem – Integrator’s Guide DRAFT VERSION

4 Introduction – DataTAC network technology

DataTAC network technology

The DataTAC wireless network technology has become an international data communication standard. DataTAC is a secure, reliable, wireless packet switching network specifically designed for wide-area wireless data communications.

DataTAC networks are deployed around the world. DataTAC provides highly reliable, two-way digital data transmission. The network provides error detection and correction to ensure the integrity of the data being sent and received, and includes transmission acknowledgment.

The DataTAC network has a hierarchical structure that allows messages to be routed from sender to receiver along the most direct path possible. Each radio cell is served by an intelligent base station. Because intelligence is distributed throughout the network, data is only forwarded to the lowest network node common to the sender and the receiver. For example, one base station is able to handle all traffic in its coverage area.

The network constantly monitors the location of the mobile users. As a mobile device moves from one area of coverage to another, base stations track its signals, sending updated mobile location and status information to the network. If the network goes down at any point in transmission, the message is held until network service is restored. If the mobile receiver moves outside the coverage area, the base station stores the data until coverage is re-established, then forwards it to the mobile. This prevents data loss, and increases the reliability of transmission.

DataTAC is optimized for data communication. It uses a packet switching technique to provide the greatest flexibility in data transmission. Conventional cellular phone systems, by contrast, use a circuit-switched network, in which a physical connection is created between the sending and receiving nodes, and must be maintained throughout the duration of the transmission. With circuitswitched systems, the set-up time for establishing a connection involves significant overhead and airtime cost, especially when only a small amount of data needs to be transferred.

DataTAC packets include information about the origin, destination, size, type, and sequence of data to be sent. This enables packets to be transmitted individually, in any order, as traffic permits. Internal to the network, individual packets may travel along different routes, in any order, without interfering with

Integrator’s Guide – RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem DRAFT VERSION

Introduction – DataTAC network technology

5

other packets sent over the same frequency by different users. At the receiving end, all packets are accounted for, and reassembled into the original message.

Set up time is eliminated and network connection is instantaneous. As a result, packet-switching makes far more efficient use of channel capacity, typically allowing 10 to 50 times more users over a radio channel than a circuit switched network.

RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem – Integrator’s Guide DRAFT VERSION

Getting started

RIM is committed to facilitating the integration of the RIM 802D OEM radio modem. We provide the necessary resources to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a wireless communication solution, and work closely with our partners to develop an application in the shortest time possible.

Years of intense R&D have spawned several tools that have been used internally to help streamline our own development process. We have included many of these tools with the RIM 802D OEM Developer’s Kit. The purpose of the Kit is to accelerate radio integration and to help system designers evaluate the RIM 802D. Using the Kit, you can quickly begin interfacing the radio modem to your computing device.

We’re here for you!

RIM has a team of experienced engineers who can support you in the design and implementation of your project. If you need help getting started, or if you have any questions about the radio technology or its integration into your platform, please contact the RIM 802D engineering development team:

e-mail: rim802d@rim.net

phone: +1 (519) 888-7465

fax: +1 (519) 888-7884

web: www.rim.net

8 Getting started – Test board overview

Test board overview

The RIM test board provides a standard RS-232 serial interface between a PC and the radio modem. It is designed to help you quickly interface the RIM 802D to a standard PC (through a COM port) or a terminal device with an RS-232 serial port. The test board also provides access points to the radio’s communication port, which allows you to monitor activity with a logic probe, multimeter, or oscilloscope.

The test board includes the following components and functionality:

RS-232 interface

The serial (COM) port on a PC and most terminal devices operates at RS-232 signal levels, which are typically H12V. This high voltage would damage the RIM 802D, which is typically integrated into a device that operates an asynchronous serial port at 3.0V. The RS-232 interface on the test board allows you to produce an output from the radio that is easily interpreted by a PC.

Test points

The test board is more than just an RS-232 interface. It also features debugging facilities to help you test your application. It provides direct access to each of the 22 pins on the radio interface cable, which allows connectivity to analytical equipment (e.g. logic probe, multimeter, or oscilloscope) and real-time indication of data flow.

On/off switch

With the switch in the ON position, the radio will turn on whenever power is applied to the test board. When the switch is moved to the OFF position, the radio will shut down.

Power supply

The RIM 802D must be provided with a clean, high-current power source. In this case, we use a standard plug-pack to provide the current necessary to

Integrator’s Guide – RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem DRAFT VERSION

Getting started – How to connect the test board

9

operate the radio. The voltage is converted into the necessary levels by the power supply section on the test board.

LED indicators

The test board includes several LED indicators designed to indicate the flow of data to and from the host (in real time), the radio power status, power to the test board, and more.

How to connect the test board

Now that you are familiar with the components and functions of the test board, you are ready to connect the RIM 802D radio modem to an antenna and to a PC (or some other computing device with an RS-232 serial interface). To do this, you will use the test board and cables supplied with your RIM 802D Developer’s Kit.

1. Flat interface cable (test board to radio)

The flat interface cable carries data between the test board and the RIM 802D. Control and status signals such as TURNON are also carried on this cable. Use this cable to connect the RIM 802D to the test board.

This cable also carries clean, regulated power to the RIM 802D.

When inserting the cable, ensure that the side with the bare pins are in direct contact with the pin side of the connector. To ensure proper contact, do not force the cable into the connector. Instead, pull the tabs on either side of the connector, slide the cable in, then push the tabs back in to tighten.

2. DB-9 serial cable (test board to PC)

Connect the male end of the straight-through DB-9 serial cable to the test board.

Connect the female end of the cable to your PC’s COM port.

RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem – Integrator’s Guide DRAFT VERSION

10 Getting started – The MENU diagnostics tool

3. Power adapter (test board to AC outlet)

Plug the 5VDC, 2.4A, center-pin-positive power adapter into the wall outlet. Connect the other end to the power jack of the test board.

4. Antenna cable (radio to magmount antenna)

Your developer’s kit includes a high-performance, 6dB-gain magmount antenna. This antenna is terminated with a screw-on SMA plug. The RIM 802D radio modem includes a snap-on MMCX jack. The antenna cable supplied with your developer’s kit connects the antenna’s SMA plug to the radio’s MMCX jack.

The magmount antenna provides optimum RF performance when placed on a broad metal surface, such as the roof of a car. When used inside a building, performance is improved if the antenna is located near a window, with few obstacles (wall, furniture, equipment, etc.) between the antenna and the window. The antenna must be oriented vertically for best performance, and performs equally well whether positioned rightside up or upside down.

5. Turn the system on

The power switch on the test board is connected to the TURNON line of the RIM 802D radio modem. To determine whether the radio is on, look at the LED marked ONI. It is lit when the radio is on.

The MENU diagnostics tool

Now that you have successfully connected your RIM 802D radio modem to your PC, you are ready to send a test packet through the DataTAC network.

Your radio modem must be activated by the network operator in order to be used on the DataTAC network and to establish an airtime agreement. If you have not already arranged for activation of your radio, contact your network operator.

Integrator’s Guide – RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem DRAFT VERSION

Getting started – The MENU diagnostics tool

11

The RIM 802D contains a diagnostic utility called MENU. With this utility, you can set the current network, “ping” your radio modem, or view radio and network status values.

Setup

The following instructions assume that your RIM 802D is connected to a PC running a terminal program, such as Windows HyperTerminal. The MENU utility is based in the RIM 802D’s firmware, so HyperTerminal is the only software required to use it.

The MENU utility’s user interface is a full-screen text mode interface, and uses the ANSI cursor command set. Programs like HyperTerminal support the ANSI codes by default. If you are using a different terminal program that does not provide ANSI cursor control, the MENU utility will drop into a line-by-line interface. The appearance of the line-by-line interface is not documented here, but the commands it uses are the same as those described below.

Select the COM port which communicates with the RIM 802D and configure for 9600 bps, and either 7E1 (7 bits, Even parity, 1 stop bit) or 8N1 (8 bits, No parity, 1 stop bit). If you have set this up correctly, you may see occasional bursts of characters from the radio modem. These character bursts are normal; they represent an NCL frame, which you can ignore for now.

Type the word menu (all in lower case letters only) then press the ENTER key. You can expect to see a full screen of information. If nothing happens, simply re-enter menu until the radio modem responds. The word “menu” itself will probably not appear on the screen as you type it in.

If you re-enter menu and nothing occurs, ensure that the radio is turned on and connected to the PC, and that all cables are securely connected. Please contact RIM for assistance if you are stuck at this point.

Once the utility has been started, the terminal program’s screen will look similar to the following:

RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem – Integrator’s Guide DRAFT VERSION

BlackBerry R802D-2-O Integrator manual

12

Getting started – The MENU diagnostics tool

 

 

 

RIM 802D Firmware Version 1.0.0

 

(c) 1999 Research In Motion Limited

 

Radio Setup

Radio Serial Number = 031/11/066300

Command Key

Description

Networks Available:

-----------

-----------

-------------------

Q

 

Quit and reset the radio.

1. AMSC

 

 

 

2. BELLMOB

N

 

Set the current network.

 

P

 

Ping: Send a Status SDU to yourself.

 

Your Choice ?

 

 

 

 

LLI=88231144

RSSI= 40% 24 dBuV

Battery=

97%

Network=AMSC

Contact=Yes

Mode=PowerSave

Tx=Enabled

 

 

Status=0080

 

 

 

 

The screen displays the software version and build date, the radio modem’s serial number, the list of available DataTAC radio networks, current radio modem status indicators, the “ping” function, and other relevant information.

RSSI stands for Received Signal Strength Indicator. This is a measure of network coverage. The higher the number, the better the coverage. The RSSI is given both as a percentage and in dB2V (decibel microvolts). To obtain the RSSI in dBm (decibel milliwatts), subtract 113 from the dB2V value. Note that RSSI= 0% 0 dB2V does not necessarily represent the complete absence of a signal; in many cases, the radio is capable of communicating with the network at signal strengths of 0 dB2V or even less. Actual contact with the DataTAC network would be indicated by the Contact field. The RSSI is updated every ten seconds, or whenever you press D.

The Battery indicator shows the level of supplied voltage. The battery level is updated once every thirty seconds, or whenever you press D.

Network tells you which network you are currently using. The example shows AMSC (American Mobile Satellite Corporation, which operates the ARDIS network in the United States) and BELLMOB (Bell Mobility ARDIS operates a DataTAC network in Canada).

LLI stands for Logical Link Identifier, which is a unique number that identifies each DataTAC radio modem. The LLI is used for addressing packets. The screen will also display a Radio Serial Number, which is unique to each radio

Integrator’s Guide – RIM 802D OEM Radio Modem DRAFT VERSION

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