4RF N2500AAAA0200A Users Manual

Loading...

Cross Connections | 121

10. Cross Connections

Embedded cross connect switch

The embedded cross-connect switch distributes capacity to each of the interfaces.

Traffic can be distributed to any of the possible 32 interface ports as well as the integrated Ethernet interface. This provides the flexibility to reconfigure traffic as the network demand changes, or groom user traffic onto E1 / T1 bearers between equipment.

The maximum number of simultaneous cross connections per terminal is 256. During cross connection activation, a progress bar shows the number of ports that have activated.

Link Capacity Utilization

Cross connections are able to utilize all of the available capacity of the link on lower capacity radio links (< 2048 kbit/s gross capacity, i.e. up to 500 kHz, 16 QAM). However, as higher capacity radio links allocate bandwidth for E1 / T1 timeslot connections on 64 kbit/s boundaries, some capacity may be unusable (< 64 kbit/s).

The Cross Connections application

The Cross Connections application is a software application that is used to:

manage the cross connections switches within the terminals

create cross connections between the traffic interface ports within one terminal or between the near end and far end terminals via the radio bearer

create cross connections between symmetrical traffic interface ports with the symmetrical connection wizard

get the current cross connection configuration from the terminal

send and activate the cross connection configuration

save and load configuration files

The Cross Connections system requirements

The Cross Connections application requires the following minimum PC requirements:

1024 x 768 screen resolution

Ethernet interface

Java Virtual Machine

Cross Connections | 122

Installing the Cross Connections application

The Cross Connections application is usually started directly from SuperVisor without the need for installation.

However, if you want to use the Cross Connections application offline (without any connection to the terminals), you can install it on your PC. Working offline enables you to simulate new cards or terminal capacities. The cross connections can then be configured and the resulting configuration file saved for later deployment.

To install the Cross Connections application on your PC, navigate to the Cross Connect directory on the supplied CD and copy the application (ccapp_exe_x_x_x.jar where x is the version) to a suitable place on your PC hard disk.

Your PC 'File Types' must associate a *.jar file with the Executable Jar File so that when the *.jar file is clicked on (or double clicked on), it will be executed with Javaw.exe. If clicking on (or double clicking on) the jar file does not bring up the Cross Connections application, the 'File Types' needs to be setup in your PC.

Go to 'My Computer / Tools / Folder Options / File Types’ and click 'New'.

Type 'Jar' in the 'File Extension' box and click OK.

Click 'Change' and 'Select a program from a list'

Select 'Javaw.exe' and click OK.

Opening the Cross Connections application

To open the Cross Connections application from within SuperVisor:

Select Link > Interface > Cross Connections

To open the Cross Connections application without SuperVisor:

Navigate to the installed cross connections application file C-capp_exe_7_1_4.jar and double click on it.

Note: This assumes that you have copied the cross connections application to your PC so you can work offline (without any connection to the terminals).

Cross Connections | 123

The Cross Connections page

The Cross Connections page is split into two panes with each pane displaying one terminal. The local terminal is displayed in the left pane and the remote terminal is displayed in the right pane.

The local terminal is defined as the terminal that SuperVisor is logged into (not necessarily the near end terminal).

The cards displayed depend on the type of cards and where they are inserted in the chassis.

To view the ports for each interface card, click on the button

Tool Tips are available by holding the mouse pointer over objects on the screen.

Total assigned link capacity

The current total assigned capacity (radio link and drop and insert) is shown (in kbit/s) beside the terminal name and IP address:

Cross Connections | 124

Radio link and drop and insert capacity

At the bottom of the Cross Connections page, the capacity pane displays the Radio and Drop and insert capacities for both the local and remote terminals.

The Radio field shows the available radio link capacity (6696 kbit/s shown) and the shaded bar graph shows the capacity assigned for cross connections over the radio link between the terminals as a percentage of the total capacity of the radio link (22 % assigned).

The total capacity of the radio link is determined by the channel size and the modulation type of the radio link.

The Drop and insert field shows the available drop and insert capacity (52584 kbit/s shown) and the shaded bar graph shows the capacity assigned for local drop and insert cross connections as a percentage of the total drop and insert capacity (8 % assigned).

The total drop and insert capacity is 65536 kbit/s minus the assigned radio link capacity.

Tip: On a screen set to 1024 by 768 resolution, this capacity information may be obscured by the task bar if the Windows task bar is docked at the bottom of the screen. To view the capacity pane clearly, either shift the task bar to another screen edge, make it auto-hide, or increase the screen resolution.

Cross connections toolbar

The cross connections toolbar has buttons for commonly-used functions.

Button Explanation

Saves the cross connection configuration file to disk. The button turns orange when you have made changes that have not yet been saved.

Gets the cross connection configuration from the local and remote terminals.

Saves the cross connection configuration to the local and remote terminals. The button turns orange when you have made changes that have not yet been sent to the terminal.

Activates the cross connections on the local and remote terminals. Turns orange when there are cross connections that have been sent but not yet activated.

Expands all the ports for all the interface cards.

Collapses all the ports for all the interface cards.

Opens the symmetrical connections wizard.

Cross Connections | 125

Setting the terminal's address

If the Cross Connections application is launched from SuperVisor, the terminal IP addresses are set automatically by SuperVisor, but if the application is launched from your PC independent of SuperVisor, you will need to set the application Local and Remote IP addresses to the addresses of the Local and Remote terminals you wish to connect to.

To set the application local or remote IP address:

1. Right-click over the terminal name or IP address and select Set Address.

2.Select Local or Remote > Set Address

3.Enter the IP address of the terminal in the dialog box and click OK.

Management and user ethernet capacity

The management ethernet capacity and user ethernet capacity must be identical on both terminals for the ethernet link to work.

Management Ethernet capacity

A management ethernet cross connection between the local and remote terminals is created automatically using the default capacity of 64 kbit/s (connection number = 1). This connection is essential for remote terminal management communication.

The minimum management ethernet capacity requirement for correct management operation over the radio link is 8 kbit/s but if the terminal in on a network with large numbers of broadcast packets, the management may not be able to function.

The management capacity must be set in multiples of 8 kbit/s and the maximum assignable is 64 kbit/s.

User Ethernet capacity

A user ethernet cross connection between the local and remote terminals is created automatically using the default capacity of 0 kbit/s (connection number = 2).

The user ethernet capacity must be set in multiples of 8 kbit/s and the maximum is determined by the available radio link capacity.

To set the management ethernet or the user ethernet capacity

Enter the required kbit/s in the local terminal capacity field. The remote terminal capacity field update automatically.

The red numbers, in the mapping connection boxes, are known as connection numbers and are allocated automatically by the Cross Connections application.

Cross Connections | 126

Setting card types

Note: You only need to do this when creating configurations offline (that is, there is no connection to the terminal). When you are connected to the terminal, the Cross Connections application automatically detects the card types fitted in the terminal slots.

You can specify the card type for any of the slots (A-H).

1. Right-click a slot.

2. Select Card Type and then select the interface card.

Getting cross connection configuration from the terminals

You can get the entire existing cross connection configuration from the terminals.

1. Download the existing cross connections (if any) from the local and remote terminals by clicking ‘Get cross connection configuration from terminal’.

Cross Connections | 127

Creating cross connections

Point to point cross connections

Three examples of point to point cross connections are shown below:

Example 1

One 2 wire DFXO interface on the near end terminal slot E port 1 is cross connected via the radio link to a 2 wire DFXS on the far end terminal slot E port 1. This cross connection includes the four bits of signalling (ABCD bits) but as the DFXO / DFXS signalling is configured for 'multiplexed', the four bits are multiplexed into one bit over the radio link. This cross connection uses 72 kbit/s of radio link capacity, 64 kbit/s for the voice and 8 kbit/s for the signalling bit.

The port 2s of the same DFXO / DFXS cards are cross connected using the same method.

Cross Connections | 128

Example 2

One 2 wire DFXS interface on the near end terminal slot E port 1 is cross connected via the radio link to a framed E1 on the far end terminal slot D port 1 in timeslot 1. This cross connection includes four bits of signalling as the DFXS signalling is configured as 'non-multiplexed signalling' (ABCD bits). This cross connection uses 96 kbit/s of radio link capacity, 64 kbit/s for the voice and 32 kbit/s for the signalling bits.

Another 2 wire DFXS interface on the near end terminal slot F port 1 is cross connected via the radio link to a framed E1 on the far end terminal slot D port 1 in timeslot 2. This cross connection includes one bit of signalling as the DFXS signalling is configured in '4 wire compatible' mode (A bit only). This cross connection uses 40 kbit/s of radio link capacity, 32 kbit/s for the ADPCM voice and 8 kbit/s for the signalling bit.

Example 3

One 2 wire DFXS interface on the near end terminal slot E port 1 is cross connected via the radio link to a framed E1 on the far end terminal slot D port 1 in timeslot 1. This cross connection includes one bit of signalling as the DFXS signalling is configured as 'multiplexed' signalling. This cross connection uses 72 kbit/s of radio link capacity, 64 kbit/s for the voice and 8 kbit/s for the signalling bit.

Cross Connections | 129

Drop and insert cross connections

An example of a drop and insert cross connection is shown below:

Two 4 wire E&M interfaces on the near end terminal slot C ports 3 & 4 are dropped out of a framed E1 on the near end terminal slot D port 1 in timeslots 1 & 2. This cross connection includes one bit of signalling (A bit).

Another two 4 wire E&M interfaces on the near end terminal slot C ports 1 & 2 are inserted into the radio link to a framed E1 on the far end terminal slot D port 1 in timeslots 1 & 2. This cross connection includes one bit of signalling (A bit).

The remaining framed E1 on the near end terminal slot D port 1 timeslots are transported over the radio link to the framed E1 on the far end terminal slot D port 1. This cross connection includes four bits of signalling (ABCD bits).

Cross Connections | 130

Sending cross connection configuration to the terminals

You can send the entire cross connection configuration to the terminals.

1.To send the new cross connection configuration into the terminals, click ‘Send cross connection configuration to terminal’.

2.When the transfer is successfully complete, a message appears asking if you want to activate the configuration now.

If you click Yes, a message warning of the activation delay.

If you click No, you can activate the new cross connection configuration later by clicking ‘Activate cross connection configuration’.

Saving cross connection configurations

You can save the entire cross connection configuration to file so that you can restore it to the same link (if this is ever required), or transfer it to another link if you want them to be identical.

1.Click on ‘Save cross connection configuration file to disk’ or select File > Save.

2.Navigate to the directory where you want to save the file, enter the filename in the dialog box and then click Save.

3.Once you have specified a filename and a directory save any further changes by clicking Save.

Using existing cross connection configurations

To load a previously-saved cross connection configuration from an existing file:

1.Select File > Open.

2.Navigate to the file and select it, and then click Open.

Cross Connections | 131

Printing the cross connection configuration

You can print out a summary of the cross connection configuration so that you can file it for future reference. Using the printout, you can recreate the cross connection configuration.

If you don't have the configuration saved to disk see "Saving cross connection configurations" on page 130, or use it to review the cross connections without connecting to the terminal.

The cross connection configuration summary shows information for the local and remote terminals such as:

The IP address and terminal name

The interface card fitted in each slot

How the ports are configured

To preview the cross connection configuration summary:

Select File > Preview Configuration Summary.

In this dialog box you can:

Save the summary to disk (as an HTML file) by clicking Save Summary As.

Print the summary by clicking Print.

Copy and paste the information into another application (for example, spreadsheet, email, and word processor) by right-clicking over the summary and selecting Select All. Then right-click over the summary again and select Copy.

To print the cross connection configuration summary:

Select File > Print Configuration Summary.

Cross Connections | 132

Deleting cross connections

Note: It is not possible to delete the management and user Ethernet cross connections. These are made automatically and are required for correct terminal operation.

To delete cross connections for an interface card:

1.Right-click over an interface card.

2.Select Delete All Connections on this Card.

To delete the cross connections associated with a particular port:

1. Right-click over a port.

2. Select Delete All Connections on this Port.

To delete all the cross connections for a terminal:

1.Right-click over the terminal name and IP address.

2.Select Delete All Connections on this Terminal.

Cross Connections | 133

Configuring the traffic cross connections

Once you have configured the interface cards (see "Configuring the traffic interfaces" on page 77), you can configure the traffic cross connections between compatible interfaces.

Compatible interfaces

Cross connections can be made between any compatible interfaces of equal data rates. Compatible interfaces are shown in the table below:

 

Ethernet (management)

Ethernet (user)

QJET E1 Unframed

QJET T1 Unframed

QJET E1 Framed PCM 31

QJET E1 Framed PCM 30

QJET T1 Framed SF

QJET T1 Framed ESF

Q4EM voice only

Q4EM with E&M

QV24 with signalling

DFXO

DFXS

HSS data

HSS signalling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethernet (management)

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethernet (user)

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QJET E1 Unframed

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QJET T1 Unframed

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QJET E1 Framed PCM 31

 

 

 

 

9

9

 

 

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

QJET E1 Framed PCM 30

 

 

 

 

9

9

 

 

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

QJET T1 Framed SF

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

QJET T1 Framed ESF

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

Q4EM voice only

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q4EM with E&M

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

 

9

 

9

9

 

 

QV24 with signalling

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

DFXO

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

 

9

 

 

9

 

 

DFXS

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

 

9

 

9

 

 

 

HSS data

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

HSS signalling

 

 

 

 

9

9

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cross Connections | 134

QJET cross connections

Expand the E1 / T1 display by clicking on the relevant icons.

The QJET card can operate in several modes allowing you greater flexibility in tailoring or grooming traffic. The Data type selection are Off, E1, or T1 rates.

Note: An unframed E1 / T1 port requires 5 bits (or 40 kbit/s) of overhead traffic per port for synchronization.

An unframed E1 port with 2048 kbit/s of traffic requires 2088 kbit/s of link capacity. An unframed T1 port with 1544 kbit/s of traffic requires 1584 kbit/s of link capacity.

Cross Connections | 135

For each port that you want to put into service, choose the required mode (either Unframed or Framed):

Unframed mode

Leave the Framed checkbox unticked.

Select the required Data type from the drop-down list E1 or T1.

Local drop and insert connections are not possible between Unframed E1 / T1 ports.

Framed mode

Tick the Framed checkbox.

Select the required framed mode from the drop-down list:

Local drop and insert connections are possible between framed E1 ports on the same interface card or E1 ports on different interface cards.

Local drop and insert connections are possible between framed T1 ports on the same interface card or T1 ports on different interface cards.

Local drop and insert connections are not possible between framed E1 ports and framed T1 ports.

Cross Connections | 136

E1 Framed Modes

Framed Mode

Description

 

 

 

E1

– PCM 30

Provides 30 timeslots to transport traffic. Timeslot 16 carries channel

 

 

associated signalling data (CAS).

E1

– PCM 31

Provides 31 timeslots to transport traffic. Timeslot 16 can be used for common

 

 

channel signalling or to transport traffic.

E1

– PCM 30C

Same as E1 – PCM 30 mode but supports CRC-4.

 

 

 

E1

– PCM 31C

Same as E1 – PCM 31 mode but supports CRC-4.

 

 

 

E1 CRC-4 (cyclic redundancy check) is used to ensure correct frame alignment and also used to gather E1 performance statistics e.g. Errored Seconds (ES), Severely Errored Seconds (SES).

The first three bits of timeslot 0 NFAS (bits 0,1 & 2) and all of timeslot 0 FAS are not transported across the link, but rather terminated and regenerated at each terminal.

The last five bits of timeslot 0 NFAS (bits 3 – 7) are the National Use Bits (NUBs) which can be cross connected locally or over the link.

E1 - PCM 30 mode

E1 - PCM 30 modes are used when access to the signalling bits (ABCD) is required, for example:

Splitting a PCM 30 E1 into two separate PCM 30 E1s

Cross connecting signalling from DFXS, DFXO or Q4EM interfaces into an PCM 30 E1

Drop and Insert connections between PCM 30 E1s

In PCM 30 / PCM 30C mode, the timeslot table left column is used to map timeslot bits and the timeslot table right column is used to map CAS bits (ABCD) for signalling. Timeslot 16 is reserved to transport the CAS multi frame.

One use of this mode is to connect the 4 wire E&M interfaces to third-party multiplexer equipment over the E1 interface using CAS in TS16 to transport the E&M signalling.

To configure this mode correctly, you must have a detailed knowledge of the CAS signalling modes for the third-party equipment to ensure the signalling bits are compatible and configured to interoperate.

E1 - PCM 31 mode

E1 - PCM 31 modes are used to cross connect timeslots bits without the signalling bits (ABCD).

TS16 can be cross connected between E1 ports (to transport the entire CAS multi frame) or used for common channel signalling or to transport traffic.

The timeslot table left column is used to map timeslot bits but the timeslot table right column for CAS bits (ABCD) is not used.

Cross Connections | 137

T1 Framed Modes

Framed Mode

Description

 

 

 

T1

- SF

Provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 12 frame Super

 

 

Frame without signalling. There is no CRC capability with the SF.

 

 

 

T1

– SF 4

Provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 12 frame Super

 

 

Frame with 4 state signalling (AB bits). There is no CRC capability with the SF.

 

 

 

T1

– ESF

Provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 24 frame Extended

 

 

Super Frame with CRC and without signalling.

 

 

 

T1

– ESF 4

Provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 24 frame Extended

 

 

Super Frame with CRC and 4 state signalling (AB bits).

 

 

 

T1

– ESF 16

Provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 24 frame Extended

 

 

Super Frame with CRC and 16 state signalling (ABCD bits).

 

 

 

For the 24 framed modes of ESF 4 and ESF 16, the Data Link bit is shown in the timeslot table but is currently unavailable for use.

T1 - SF mode

T1 SF mode provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 12 frame Super Frame without demultiplexing the signalling. Complete timeslots can be cross connected including the inherent robbed signalling bits.

The timeslot table left column is used to map timeslot bits but the timeslot table right column for CAS bits (ABCD) is not used.

T1 SF mode is used when access to the signalling bits is not required but are transported between T1s, for example:

Drop and Insert connections between 12 frame Super Frame T1s or data interfaces

T1 - SF 4 mode

T1 SF 4 mode provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 12 frame Super Frame with four state demultiplexed signalling using the AB bits.

The mapping left column is used to map timeslot bits and the timeslot table right column is used to map the CAS A&B bits for signalling (C&D bits are not used).

T1 SF mode is used when access to the signalling bits is required, for example:

Cross connecting signalling from DFXS, DFXO or Q4EM interfaces into a 12 frame Super Framed T1 using ‘multiplexed’ signalling from the interface.

Drop and Insert connections between 12 frame Super Framed T1s or data interfaces

T1 - ESF mode

T1 ESF mode provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 12 frame Extended Super Frame without demultiplexing the signalling. Complete timeslots can be cross connected including the inherent robbed signalling bits.

The timeslot table left column is used to map timeslot bits but the timeslot table right column for CAS bits (ABCD) is not used.

T1 ESF mode is used when access to the signalling bits is not required but are transported between T1s, for example:

Drop and Insert connections between 24 frame Extended Super Framed T1s or data interfaces

Cross Connections | 138

T1 - ESF 4 mode

T1 ESF 4 mode provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 24 frame Extended Super Frame with four state demultiplexed signalling using the AB bits each with a bit rate of 667 bit/s.

The mapping left column is used to map timeslot bits and the timeslot table right column is used to map the CAS A&B bits for signalling (C&D bits are not used).

T1 ESF 4 mode is used when access to the signalling bits is required, for example:

Cross connecting signalling from DFXS, DFXO or Q4EM interfaces into a 24 frame Extended Super Framed T1 using ‘multiplexed’ signalling from the interface.

Drop and Insert connections between 24 frame Extended Super Framed T1s or data interfaces

T1 - ESF 16 mode

T1 ESF 16 mode provides 24 timeslots to transport traffic using the G.704 24 frame Extended Super Frame with sixteen state demultiplexed signalling using the ABCD bits each with a bit rate of 333 bit/s.

The mapping left column is used to map timeslot bits and the timeslot table right column is used to map the CAS ABCD bits for signalling.

T1 ESF 16 mode is used when access to the signalling bits is required, for example:

Cross connecting signalling from DFXS, DFXO or Q4EM interfaces into a 24 frame Extended Super Framed T1 using ‘non-multiplexed’ signalling from the interface.

Drop and Insert connections between 24 frame Extended Super Framed T1s or data interfaces

Cross Connections | 139

Selecting and mapping bits and timeslots

This section describes how to select and map:

a single bit

multiple bits

a 64 kbit/s timeslot

multiple timeslots

Selecting a single bit

Each timeslot is represented by 8 rectangles (each representing a single bit). Each bit can carry 8 kbit/s.

One or more consecutive bits can be selected in a timeslot if a rate of greater than 8 kbit/s is required.

1. Click on the rectangle that represents the bit you require. It will turn red.

2. Click and drag this bit to the rectangle representing the bit on the interface you want it to be connected to, and release the mouse button.

The red rectangle will be replaced by the allocated connection number at each interface.

Cross Connections | 140

Selecting multiple bits

It is possible to select multiple consecutive bits if circuit capacity of greater than 8 kbit/s is required.

1. Click the first bit, and then hold down the Ctrl key while selecting the remaining bits.

2. Click and drag the whole block by clicking the bit on the left hand side of your selection, and drag to the required interface. Release the mouse button.

Tip: It is also possible to select multiple bits by holding down the Shift key, and dragging across the required rectangles.

Differing numbers of bits display in different colors when the cross-connect is completed:

Cross Connections | 141

Selecting a 64 kbit/s timeslot

1. Click on the TSX timeslot number (where X is the desired timeslot from 1 to 31).

Alternatively, right-click over any of the bits in the timeslot, and click on Select Timeslot.

2. Drag and drop in the normal way to complete the cross connection.

Selecting multiple non consecutive timeslots

1.Click on one TSn timeslot number (where n is the desired timeslot 1 to 31).

2.Hold down the Ctrl key while clicking on each of the required timeslot numbers.

3. Drag and drop in the normal way to complete the cross connection.

Cross Connections | 142

Selecting multiple consecutive timeslots

1.Click on the first TSn timeslot number (where n is the desired timeslot 1 to 31).

2.Hold down the Shift key while clicking on the last required timeslot number.

3. Drag and drop in the normal way to complete the cross connection.

Selecting all timeslots in a port

1. Right-click over any of the rectangles.

2. Click Select All.

Cross Connections | 143

Q4EM cross connections

1. Expand the Q4EM display by clicking the relevant icon.

2.Set the Voice capacity by selecting 16, 24, 32, or 64 kbit/s rates.

3.Drag and drop from the Voice mapping connection box to the required partner interface to create the voice cross connection.

4.If E&M signalling is required, drag and drop from the Signalling mapping connection box to the required partner interface to create the E&M cross connection.

Cross Connections | 144

DFXS & DFXO cross connections

1. On one side of the link, expand the DFXS display, as required, by clicking .

2. On the other side of the link, expand the corresponding DFXO display, as required, by clicking .

3. For the DFXS card and corresponding DFXO card, select the Signalling type as required, according to the table below. The CAS signalling between DFXO / DFXS interfaces uses 4RF proprietary allocation of control bits.

The Signalling type affects both ports of the DFXO / DFXS interface. If a mixture of signalling types is required, then multiple DFXO / DFXS cards are needed.

Signalling

Application

Overhead

 

 

 

Multiplexed

Multiplexers the four ABCD bits from the interface into a

8 kbit/s

(default)

single 8 kbit/s channel.

 

 

Use when interworking DFXO to DFXS, between an XE

 

 

and a SE radio or when limited bandwidth is available.

 

 

This signalling type cannot be used for interworking

 

 

between framed E1 and voice interfaces.

 

 

 

 

Non-multiplexed

Transports each of the four ABCD bits in separate 8 kbit/s

32 kbit/s

 

channels.

 

 

Use when interworking DFXO cards to DFXS cards or

 

 

when signalling bits are mapped into an E1 / T1 timeslot.

 

4 wire compatible

Use when interworking the DFXO card or DFXS card to a

8 kbit/s

 

Q4EM interface

 

 

• DFXS to DFXO A bit mapped to off-hook

 

 

• DFXO to DFXS A bit mapped to fault

 

 

 

 

4.Set the Voice capacity and create the Voice connection by dragging and dropping between the mapping connection boxes of the DFXO and DFXS corresponding ports.

5.Link the Port Signalling connection by dragging and dropping between the mapping connection boxes of the DFXO and DFXS corresponding ports. The DFXO / DFXS control signals (off hook, ring, etc) will not function without this connection.

Cross Connections | 145

QV24 cross connections

1. Expand the QV24 displays, as required, by clicking the relevant icons.

2.Select the Port Baud Rate as required (default is 9600).

3.Drag and drop to the required partner interface to create the V.24 Data connection. If the partner interface is a QJET:

If the V.24 Baud Rate selected is 38400 is less, drag from the QV24 mapping connection box to the QJET timeslot. The correct QJET capacity for the baud rate selected will automatically be assigned.

If the V.24 Baud Rate selected is greater than 38400, select the QJET capacity required, as per the following table, and drag from the QJET to the QV24 mapping connection box.

Baud Rate

Bits Required

Bit Rate

 

 

 

 

300

- 7200

2

16 kbit/s

 

 

 

 

9600

- 14400

3

24 kbit/s

 

 

 

19200 - 23040

4

32 kbit/s

 

 

 

28800

5

40 kbit/s

 

 

 

38400

6

48 kbit/s

 

 

 

57600

9

72 kbit/s

 

 

 

115200

16

128 kbit/s

 

 

 

 

Cross Connections | 146

HSS cross connections

1. Expand the HSS displays, as required, by clicking the relevant icons.

2. Select the Synchronous Clock Selection mode (see “HSS synchronous clock selection modes” on page 114).

3.Set the Data rate to a value between 8 and 2048 (in multiples of 8 kbit/s). The net data rate available to the user is defined by Data Rate – overhead

e.g. a date rate set to 2048 kbit/s with an overhead of 40 kbit/s provides a user data rate of 2008 kbit/s

4.Drag and drop to the required partner interface to create the HSS Data connection.

If the partner interface is a QJET, select the capacity on the QJET and drag it to the HSS Data mapping connection box.

The QJET capacity selected must be the sum of the data rate required plus the overhead rate selected.

5.Drag and drop to the required partner interface to create the HSS Signalling cross connection. A minimum of 8 kbit/s of capacity is required and must be set symmetrically at both ends of the link.

Cross Connections | 147

Cross connection example

This is an example of cross connection mapping:

Circuit

Local port

Remote port

Capacity

Connection

 

 

 

(kbit/s)

numbers

 

 

 

 

 

Radio management

 

 

64

1

 

 

 

 

 

User Ethernet

 

 

1024

2

 

 

 

 

 

3 wire E&M circuit

Q4EM port 1

Q4EM port 1

72

7/15

 

(slot C)

(slot C)

 

 

Unframed E1 data

QJET port 1

QJET port 1

2088

65

 

(slot D)

(slot D)

 

 

Unframed T1 data

QJET port 2

QJET port 2

1584

66

 

(slot D)

(slot D)

 

 

Loop Interface

DFXO port 1

DFXS port 1

72

8/32

 

(slot E)

(slot E)

 

 

V.24 data circuit

QV24 port 1

QV24 port 1

24

14

9600

(slot G)

(slot G)

 

 

HSS data circuit

HSS port 1

HSS port 1

1088

31/16

1024 kbit/s

(slot H)

(slot H)

 

 

Cross Connections | 148

Symmetrical Connection Wizard

The Cross Connections application has a Symmetrical Connection Wizard which simplifies the cross connection configuration when the terminals are fitted with symmetrical / matching interface types.

A symmetrical connection is a connection between the local and the remote terminal where the local slot, card type, port and connection details are identical to those of the remote terminal.

The only exception is DFXO / DFXS connections where DFXO cards are considered to match DFXS cards (as they normally interwork).

Framed E1 / T1 CAS connections, drop-and-insert connections, and connections that do not involve entire timeslots, are considered to be asymmetrical.

Starting the wizard

When starting the wizard with unsaved changes, the following popup dialog should appear

Click on 'Save' if you wish to save the current configuration to a file. Clicking on 'Continue' will continue with the wizard and overwrite any changes made when the wizard finishes.

The wizard can be cancelled at any time by clicking on the 'Cancel' button or by closing the window.

Wizard Navigation

Click on the Next button to progress through the wizard. The current stage is indicated in the navigation bar on the left. You can jump directly to a stage by clicking on the stage required.

Cross Connections | 149

Setting the IP address

If the local or remote terminal IP addresses have been setup, they will be displayed in the Local and Remote fields. If the IP addresses are not displayed, enter the IP addresses of the local and remote terminals.

Click on 'Get Configuration' to upload the existing cross connections configuration from the local terminal. The Radio bandwidth bar will show the available bandwidth and will be updated as bandwidth is assigned to cards.

Setting the bandwidth

If the Cross Connections Application is opened from SuperVisor, the Total Capacity of the radio link will be shown in the Bandwidth field.

If the Cross Connections Application is opened as a stand alone application, the Total Capacity of the radio link will be need to be entered in the Bandwidth field.

The 'Remove asymmetrical connections' button will be active if there are existing asymmetrical cross connections. If you want to remove existing asymmetrical cross connections, click on this button. The Radio bandwidth bar will update accordingly.

Cross Connections | 150

Card Selection

If the Cross Connections Application is opened from SuperVisor, existing cards installed in the local terminal that match cards installed in the remote terminal will be displayed. Mismatched cards will be shown as 'Empty Slot'.

If the Cross Connections Application is opened as a stand alone application, select the card types that will be fitted in the terminal.

To copy the card type selected in Slot A to all the other slots (B – H), click on the Copy Card button. This assumes that the same interface card types are fitted in all the card slots.

Cross Connections | 151

Interface configurations

Setup the interface configurations as per the wizard instructions. Existing asymmetrical connections will be replaced with symmetrical connections if an interface parameter is changed.

Q4EM

QJET

DFXO / DFXS

QV24

HSS

Ethernet

To copy the port configuration selected in Port 1 to all the other ports on the card, click on the Copy Port button.

To copy the card configuration to all other cards of the same type fitted in the terminal, click on the Copy Card button. This can save time when setting up multiple cards of the same type.

Cross Connections | 152

Symmetrical connection summary

Click Finish.

Send symmetrical connection configuration

Click OK to send the configuration to the terminals.

The process is completed.

Note: The wizard may change the connection numbers of existing connections.

Protected terminals | 153

11. Protected terminals

Monitored Hot Stand By (MHSB)

This section describes configuring the protected terminal in MHSB mode. A protected terminal in MHSB mode comprises two radios interconnected using the tributary and RF switches as shown below:

The MHSB switch protects terminals against any single failure in one radio. It also monitors the alarm output of each radio and switches between radios if major radio link alarms occur.

The MHSB switch uses a CPU to monitor the alarm status received from both the connected radios' alarm ports. When a relevant major radio link alarm is detected on the active radio (that is, transmitter, receiver, power supply or modem), the CPU switches a bank of relays that switches all the interfaces and the transmit port from the main radio to a functioning stand-by radio. The stand-by radio now becomes the active radio.

The tributary switch and the RF switch are both a 19-inch rack-mount 1U high chassis. The total rack space required is 6U. The MHSB switch option is available for the following bands: 300, 400, 700, 900, 1400, 2000, and 2500 MHz.

Protected terminals | 154

Tributary switch front panel

No.

Description

Explanation

 

 

 

1

Power supply input

Input for DC power or AC power

 

 

 

2

Protective earth

M5 terminal intended for connection to an external protective

 

 

conductor for protection against electric shock in case of a fault

 

 

 

3

Interface ports

Port for connecting to customer interface equipment

 

 

 

4

Radio A interfaces

These connect to the interface ports on radio A

 

 

 

5

Radio B interfaces

These connect to the interface ports on radio B

 

 

 

6

Console

For factory use only

 

 

 

7

Ethernet

Port for connecting to customer Ethernet network. This port is also

 

 

used to set up and manage the radios remotely over an IP

 

 

network

 

 

 

8

Radio A Ethernet

Connects to an Ethernet port on radio A

 

 

 

9

Radio B Ethernet

Connects to an Ethernet port on radio B

 

 

 

10

Alarms

Alarm input/output connections for customer equipment

 

 

 

11

Radio A alarms

Connects to the alarm port on radio A

 

 

 

12

Radio B alarms

Connects to the alarm port on radio B

 

 

 

13

RF SW

Provides power and signalling to the RF switch

 

 

 

14

Mode switch

Three-position locking toggle switch to set the MHSB switch into

 

 

automatic mode or radio A / radio B test mode

 

 

 

15

LEDs

Mode and status LEDs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Protected terminals | 155

Tributary protection switch LEDs

 

 

 

 

 

LED

Colour

Appearance

Explanation

 

 

 

 

A

Green

Solid

The radio is active and is OK

 

 

 

 

 

Green

Flashing

The radio is in standby mode and is OK

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Solid

The radio is active and there is a fault

 

 

 

 

 

No colour (off)

-

The tributary switch is in 'slave' mode and the

 

 

 

switching is controlled by the master tributary

 

 

 

switch

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Flashing

The radio is in standby mode, and there is a fault

 

 

 

 

B

Green

Solid

The radio is active and is OK

 

 

 

 

 

Green

Flashing

The radio is in standby mode and is OK

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Solid

The radio is active and there is a fault

 

 

 

 

 

No colour (off)

-

The tributary switch is in 'slave' mode and the

 

 

 

switching is controlled by the master tributary

 

 

 

switch

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Flashing

The radio is in standby mode, and there is a fault

 

 

 

 

~

Green

Solid

The tributary protection switch is in 'auto' mode

 

 

 

 

 

Green

Flashing

The tributary protection switch is in 'slave' mode

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Solid

The tributary protection switch is in 'manual' mode

 

 

 

(A or B)

 

 

 

 

On

Blue

Solid

Indicates that there is power to the tributary

 

 

 

protection switch

 

 

 

 

RF switch front panel

No.

Description

Explanation

 

 

 

1

Radio QMA

QMA connectors for connecting the protected radios

 

 

 

2

Protective earth

M5 terminal intended for connection to an external protective

 

 

conductor for protection against electric shock in case of a fault

 

 

 

3

Antenna port

N-type female connector for connection to the antenna feeder

 

 

cable. This view shows an internally mounted duplexer. If an

 

 

external duplexer is fitted, the antenna port will be on the external

 

 

duplexer

4

Slave tributary switch

Connects to secondary tributary switch for control of additional

 

outputs

interfaces

5

Tributary switch

Connects the RF switch to the tributary switch (the master if more

 

 

than one tributary switch is required)

6

LEDs

Status LEDs

 

 

 

4RF N2500AAAA0200A Users Manual

 

 

 

Protected terminals | 156

RF protection switch LEDs

 

 

 

 

 

LED

Colour

Appearance

Explanation

 

 

 

 

Tx A

Green

Solid

RF is being received from radio A

 

 

 

 

Tx B

Green

Solid

RF is being received from radio B

 

 

 

 

On

Blue

Solid

Indicates that there is power to the RF protection switch

 

 

 

 

Slave tributary switches

Each tributary switch protects up to eight ports. Up to three slave tributary switches may be added to a MHSB terminal to protect up to 32 ports. Each slave tributary switch is interconnected by means of the slave tributary switch ports on the RF switch, as shown below.

Note: A tributary switch that is operating as a slave (rather than a master) has a RJ-45 V.24 loopback connector plugged into the console port. If the connector is missing, contact Customer Support. Alternatively, you can make this connector. Follow the standard pinouts for a V.24 RJ-45 connection (see "QV24 Interface connections" on page 228).

Protected terminals | 157

MHSB cabling

The two radios are interconnected as follows:

Caution: Do not connect Transmit to Receive or Receive to Transmit as this may damage the radio or the MHSB switch.

Cables supplied with MHSB

The following cables are supplied with a MHSB terminal:

Ethernet interface: RJ-45 ports standard TIA-568A patch cables .

Alarm interface: RJ-45 ports standard TIA-568A patch cables.

RF ports: two QMA male patch cables are supplied.

MHSB power supply

See “DC power supply” on page 32 and “AC power supply” on page 35.

Protected terminals | 158

Configuring the radios for protected mode

The MHSB switch does not require any special software. However, the radios connected to the MHSB switch must be configured to work with the MHSB switch. This sets the alarm outputs and inputs to function in MHSB mode.

You must configure the interfaces of both radios connected to the MHSB switch identically. To perform this, you can either connect directly to the radio or use the test mode of the MHSB switch.

IP address setup

Before configuring the link, you must ensure that the two independent links have correctly configured IP address details.

All four radios in the protected link must be on the same subnet.

Protected terminals | 159

Mounting the MHSB radios and switch

Once the IP addresses are correctly configured, it is important to connect the A and B radios' Ethernet and Alarm ports correctly. In general, mount radio A above the MHSB switch and radio B below the MHSB switch:

There is an Ethernet connection between any of the four Ethernet ports on each radio and the Ethernet port on the Tributary switch. There is also a connection between radio A and radio B, which ensures Ethernet traffic is maintained if a radio loses power.

The Ethernet port on the protection switch can be connected to an Ethernet hub or switch to allow multiple connections.

Important: The management Ethernet capacity on each of the four radios in the protected terminal must be identical for remote communications to work and there should only be one IP connection to the management network (via the tributary switch Ethernet port).

Protected terminals | 160

Configuring the terminals for MHSB

It is recommended that you configure the local and remote A side first, then the local and remote B side. Both the local A and B radios must be configured identically, and both the remote A and B radios must be configured identically.

Tip: As illustrated below, you may find it helpful to have two browser sessions running simultaneously. You can then easily see both the A and B sides of the protected link.

To configure MHSB operation:

1. Select Link > Maintenance > MHSB.

2.Enable MHSB mode.

3.Select whether the radio is A or B.

Ensure that the radio connected to the A side of the protection switch (normally above the MHSB switch) is set to Radio A and the radio connected to the B side of the protection switch (normally below the MHSB switch) is set to Radio B.

In the event of a power outage, the radios will switch over to the A side of the protection switch when the power is restored. The A side is also the default active side.

4.When you have made your changes, click Apply to apply changes or Reset to restore the previous configuration.

5.Repeat steps 2 to 4 for the other side of the protected link.

Protected terminals | 161

Clearing MHSB alarms

If a switchover event occurs, the OK LED on the front panel and on the Terminal status and menu bar in SuperVisor changes to orange.

1. Select Clear Switched Alarm from the MHSB Command drop-down list.

2. Click Apply to apply changes or Reset to reset the page.

Note: When MHSB mode is enabled, external alarm input 2 is used by the protection system to carry alarms from the protection switch to the radio. In MHSB mode, therefore, only external alarm input 1 is available for user alarms.

In-service commissioning | 163

12. In-service commissioning

Before you start

When you have finished installing the hardware, RF and the traffic interface cabling, the system is ready to be commissioned. Commissioning the terminal is a simple process and consists of:

1.Powering up the terminals

2.Configuring both the local and remote terminals using SuperVisor

3.Aligning the antennas

4.Synchronizing the terminals

5.Testing the link is operating correctly. As a minimum, conduct the suggested tests to ensure correct operation. More extensive testing may be required to satisfy the end client or regulatory body requirements.

6.Connecting up the client or user interfaces

What you will need

Appropriately qualified commissioning staff at both ends of the link.

Safety equipment appropriate for the antenna location at both ends of the link.

Communication equipment, that is, mobile phones or two-way radios.

SuperVisor software running on an appropriate laptop, computer, or workstation at one end of the link.

Tools to facilitate loosening and re-tightening the antenna pan and tilt adjusters.

Predicted receiver input levels and fade margin figures from the radio link budget (You can use Surveyor (see "Path planning" on page 19) to calculate the RSSI, fade margin, and availability).

In-service commissioning | 164

Applying power to the terminals

Caution:

Before applying power to a terminal, ensure you have connected the safety earth and antenna cable.

Apply power to the terminals at each end of the link.

When power is first applied, all the front panel LEDs will illuminate red for several seconds as the system initializes.

After the system is initialized, the OK LED on the front panel should illuminate green and if the terminals are correctly configured, the TX and RX LED should also be illuminated green.

If the RX LED is:

Red — the antennas are may be significantly mis-aligned with no signal being received.

Orange — the antennas may be roughly aligned with some signal being received.

Green — the antennas are well-aligned and adequate signal is being received to create a reliable path.

If the TX LED is:

Red — there is a fault in the antenna or feeder cable, or the transmitter is faulty.

Green — this means the transmitter is working normally.

Review the link configurations using SuperVisor

1.Connect a PC, with SuperVisor installed, to both terminals in the link.

2.Log into the link.

3.Select Link > Summary and confirm the following basic information:

Terminal IP address(es)

Terminal TX and RX frequencies

RSSI (dBm)

TX power (dBm)

SNR (dBm)

Note: If the terminals have not already been configured, refer to "Configuring the terminal" on page 61, "Configuring the traffic interfaces" on page 77, and "Configuring the traffic cross connections" on page 121.

In-service commissioning | 165

Antenna alignment

For any point-to-point link, it is important to correctly align the antennas to maximize the signal strength at both ends of the link. Each antenna must be pointing directly at the corresponding antenna at the remote site, and they must both be on the same polarization. The antennas are aligned visually, and then small adjustments are made while the link is operating to maximize the received signal.

Directional antennas have a radiation pattern that is most sensitive in front of the antenna, in line with the main lobe of the radiation pattern. There are several other lobes (side lobes) that are not as sensitive as the main lobe in front of the antenna.

For the link to operate reliably, it is important that the main lobes of both antennas are aligned. If any of the side lobes are aligned to the opposite antenna, the received signal strength of both terminals will be lower, which could result in fading. If in doubt, check the radiation patterns of the antennas you are using.

Checking the antenna polarization

Check that the polarization of the antennas at each end of the link is the same.

Antenna polarization of grid antennas are normally indicated by an arrow or with “H” and “V” markers (indicating horizontal and vertical).

On Yagi antennas, ensure the orientation of the elements are the same at each end of the link.

Transmit frequency and power, and antenna polarization would normally be defined by a regulatory body, and typically licensed to a particular user. Refer to your license details when setting the antenna polarization.

In-service commissioning | 166

Visually aligning antennas

1. Stand behind the antenna, and move it from side to side until it is pointing directly at the antenna at the remote site. The remote antenna may be made more visible by using a mirror, strobe light, or flag.

If the remote end of the link is not visible (due to smoke, haze, or local clutter, etc), align the antenna by using a magnetic compass. Calculate the bearing using a scale map of the link path.

When setting the antenna on the desired bearing ensure that you use the appropriate true-north to magnetic-north offset. Also ensure that the compass reading is not affected by standing too close to metallic objects.

2.Once the antenna is pointing at the remote antenna, tighten the nuts on the U-bolt or antenna clamp just enough to hold it in position. Leave the nuts loose enough so that small adjustments can still be made. Check that the antenna is still pointing in the correct direction.

3.Move the antenna up or down until it is pointing directly at the remote site.

4.Tighten the elevation and azimuth adjustment clamps.

5.Mark the position of the antenna clamps so that the antenna can be returned to this rough aim point easily when accurately aligning the antennas.

6.Repeat steps 1-5 at the opposite site.

Note: Low gain antennas need less adjustment in elevation as they are simply aimed at the horizon. They should always be panned horizontally to find the peak signal.

+ 105 hidden pages