Toro DL2000 Series PC Dripline, Drip In PC Brown Dripline Design Guide

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Landscape

Dripline

Design

Landscape Dripline Design_____________________________________________________________

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3

General Design Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8

Product Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Water Availability and Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Soil Types and Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Plant Material Classification and Planting Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Emitter and Dripline Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Spacing Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Dripline Placement From Edges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Designing for Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Designing for Slopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Designing for Elevation Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Typical Design Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-17

Designing a Subsurface System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Design Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Typical Design Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-17

Irrigation Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-19

Application Rate Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Water Application Rate Table (In Inches Per Hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Zone Run Time Scheduling Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-34

Installation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Planting Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Installation Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

Installation Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-34

Routine Preventative Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36

System Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Routine Inspection Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Component Maintenance Checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38

Remote Control Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Pressure Regulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Dripline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Flush Caps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Troubleshooting Checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Excessively Wet Soil Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Excessively Dry Soils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

System Components and Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-43

Drip Tubing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

Blank Tubing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

Check Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

Flushing Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Pressure Regulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Air Vent/Vacuum Relief Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Compression Fittings and Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Coupling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Micro Tubing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Micro Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Micro Fitting Swivel Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Dual Goof Plug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Micro Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Optional Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Irrigation Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Fertilizer Injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Water Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Soil Moisture Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

i

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design Introduction

Toro provides more than just irrigation products — we provide turf solutions. For more than forty-five years, we’ve supplied a full line of quality irrigation equipment to fit any turf need. Customers have grown to trust Toro because we translate new technology into productive irrigation products for every turf requirement.

In addition to Drip In® PC Brown Dripline for at-grade installations, Toro also offers a complete below-grade dripline system, DL2000®, designed specifically for the residential and commercial turf markets. Toro DL2000® is the most technologically advanced subsurface irrigation system available. Through revolutionary ROOTGUARD® technology, DL2000 prevents emitter

clogging while delivering optimal water application directly to the root zone. DL2000 is perfect for odd-shaped designs, median strips, public recreation areas and residential property — any place where sprinklers don’t fit the application.

Whether installing dripline at-grade or below-grade, Toro has the perfect solution to fit your needs.

Typical Dripline Layout

Air/Vacuum

Flush Valve

Relief Valve*

 

Dripline

 

Emitter

Control Valve

 

Water Source

 

Filter

Pressure Regulator

 

*Only Required on Subsurface Installations

This manual has been written with the assumption that users already possess a fundamental understanding of basic irrigation design.

Introduction

1

Landscape Dripline Design _____________________________________________________________

Terminology

Terminology

Application Rate — the rate at which a subsurface grid applies water to a specific zone, over a given period of time, measured in inches per hour.

Backflow Prevention Device — the device, required by law, on an irrigation system that prevents water from re-entering the potable water lines once it flows into the irrigation pipes.

Blackwater — wastewater from toilet, latrine, and agua privy flushing and sinks used for food preparation or disposal of chemical or chemical-biological ingredients.

BOD— the abbreviation for “Biochemical Oxygen Demand;” a measure or the amount of oxygen required to neutralize organic wastes.

Controller — the device that sends timing commands to remote control valves for actuation.

Design Operating Pressure — the pressure a designer uses to determine spacing distances and flow for driplines. The design operating pressure is determined by subtracting estimated friction losses from the static water pressure.

Dynamic Pressure — the pressure reading in a pipeline system with water flowing.

Effluent Water — any substance, particularly a liquid, that enters the environment from a point source. Generally refers to wastewater from a sewage treatment or industrial plant.

Emitter — a device used to control the rate at which water is applied to a specific area. Emitters are usually injection molded out of chemical-resistant plastics and come in both inline and online configurations. Toro dripline is manufactured with factory-installed, inline emitters.

Evapotranspiration — the combined rate at which water evaporates into the atmosphere and/or is consumed by plants.

Flow — the movement of water through the irrigation piping system. Flush Cap — a device used to automatically flush sediment and debris from

driplines within a grid. Flushing occurs at the beginning of each irrigation cycle and ends as soon as the system operation pressure reaches 10 PSI.

Flush Manifold — the end line or pipe in a subsurface grid that connects to all the driplines. A flush valve and/or cap is installed in the manifold to flush debris and sediment from the grid during each irrigation cycle.

FPS — the abbreviation for “feet per second;” refers to the velocity of water in pipes.

Friction Loss — the loss of pressure (force) as water flows through the piping system.

GPH — the abbreviation for “gallons per hour;” unit of measure for water flow. GPM — the abbreviation for “gallons per minute;” unit of measure for

water flow.

Greywater —wastewater from washing machines, showers, bathtubs, lavatories and sinks that are not used for disposal of chemical or chemical-biological ingredients.

I.D. — the abbreviation for “inside diameter.”

Lateral — the pipe in an irrigation system located downstream from the remote control valve. Lateral pipes carry water directly to a zone.

Main Line — the pipe in an irrigation system that delivers water from the backflow prevention device to the remote control valves. This is usually the largest pipe on the irrigation system, generally under constant pressure and located upstream from the remote control valves.

2

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design Terminology

NOTES:

Manifold — a group of control valves located together in the same area. O.D. — the abbreviation for “outside diameter.”

PSI — the abbreviation for “pounds per square inch;” unit of measure for water pressure.

PVC Pipe — Poly Vinyl Chloride pipe; the most common pipe used in irrigation systems.

P.O.C. — abbreviation for “point of connection.” This is the location on the irrigation system where a tap is made for connection of a backflow prevention device or water meter.

Potable Water — water used for drinking purposes.

Reclaimed Water — domestic wastewater that has been treated to a quality suitable for a beneficial use and is under the direct control of a treatment plant.

Remote Control Valve — the component in the irrigation system that regulates the on/off of water from the main line to the driplines; activated by the controller.

Service Line — the pipe supplying water from the city water main to the water meter.

Spacing — the distance between the emitters or the driplines.

Static Water Pressure — the pressure that exists in a piping system when there is no flow; measured in pounds per square inch (PSI).

Subsurface Grid — a group of parallel, inline driplines that are connected to supply manifolds and flush manifolds.

Supply Manifold — the pipe connected to the remote control valves that supplies water to the driplines within a subsurface grid.

Surge — the build-up of water pressure in a piping system due to certain characteristics of the pipe, valves and flow.

TDS — the abbreviation for “total dissolved solids.” The sum of all inorganic and organic particulate material within a given amount of water. TDS is an indicator test used for wastewater analysis and is also a measure of the mineral content of bottled water and groundwater.

TSS — the abbreviation for “total suspended solids.” The sum of all nondissolved inorganic and organic material within a given amount of water. The other component of Total Solids (TS) in water are Total Dissolved Solids, so generally TSS + TDS = TS.

Velocity — the speed at which water flows through the piping system; measured in feet per second (FPS).

Wastewater — water containing waste including grey water, black water or water contaminated by waste contact, including process-generated and contaminated rainfall runoff.

Water Main — the city water pipe located in the street or right-of-way.

Water Pressure — the force of water that exists in a piping system; measured in pounds per square inch (PSI).

Working Pressure — the remaining pressure in the irrigation system when all friction losses are subtracted from the static pressure.

Zone — a subsurface grid or area of dripline that is controlled by the same remote control valve.

3

Landscape Dripline Design _____________________________________________________________

General Design Parameters

Design Parameters

Design Parameters

Toro dripline is designed for use in applications using the

grid concept, with supply and flush manifolds at each end to create a closed-loop system. The result of the grid design is a completely subsurface-wetted area that is ideal for plant growth and root development. Toro dripline can also be installed on both sides of tree and shrub rows when the grid installation is not justified.

Product Selection

Pressure-compensating dripline is available in two nominal

emitter flow rates, 0.5 GPH and1.0 GPH with emitters spaced at 12” and 18” intervals. Please consult performance charts for actual flows. Product choice is dependent on site conditions and soil types. The choice of dripper spacing, dripline lateral spacing and depth is dependent on the types of soil and plants used.

Water Availability and Quality

The allowable water flow (75% of available flow) and pressure are the determining factors for the maximum allowable zone flow. This is determined by the capacity at the point of connection and supply restrictions beyond the point of connection. Available flow and pressure can be obtained from the following sources:

Physical pressure and volume tests (most reliable)

Your local water district office

Engineered calculations based on the size of the point of connection, meter and static pressure

Always make these determinations during the time of day at which the water pressure is at its lowest point.

Water quality determines the type of filter used, any necessary treatment and, in the case of reclaimed or effluent water, which drip emitter product to use. Water quality varies significantly according to the source which can be classified generally as:

Potable water

Irrigation district water

Greywater or industrial recycled water

Effluent water

Recycled water

Well water

4

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design General Design Parameters

Potable water, the most common type of water used in landscape

NOTES:

applications, has relatively little debris and chemical contamination.

 

Therefore, it only needs to be filtered with a screen or disk filter. With

 

other water sources, it is advisable to obtain a water analysis prior to

 

designing and installing the system. Some of the important parameters

 

are:

 

• Total dissolved solids (tds)

 

• Iron content

 

• Calcium, magnesium, sulfates, bicarbonates and hardness

 

• Chemical compounds present, bod and tss (grey water, industrial

 

treated water and recycled water)

 

• The types and amount of sediment present (irrigation district water

 

and well water)

 

Soil Types and Preparation

 

For design purposes, soil classifications of clay (heavy), loam (medium)

 

and sand (light) are used in conjunction with plant types to determine

 

the emitter and lateral spacings necessary to provide a uniform subsur-

 

face soil moisture regime for the plant material.

 

As with all types of landscape irrigation systems, properly prepared soil is

 

necessary to provide a homogenous bed for proper plant establishment,

 

plant growth and uniform water distribution. Heavily compacted and

 

layered soils should be ripped and tilled at a uniform eightto twelve-

 

inch depth to improve the consistency and tilth of the soil.

 

Soil and water analyses are recommended when the soil texture, soil Ph

 

and water quality are in doubt. This is necessary in order to recommend

 

soil amendments and water treatment when required. If possible,

 

pre-irrigate the installation site when the soil is too dry to till and trench.

 

Plant Material Classification and Planting Layouts

 

Emitter and lateral spacings are determined by soil and plant material

 

classifications. For design purposes, two general plant classifications are

 

used: 1) trees, shrubs and ground cover, and 2) turf. Turf plantings have

 

a much more intense and compact root structure, thus requiring a closer

 

emitter and lateral spacing to efficiently irrigate these areas.

 

Planting layouts determine the size and type of irrigation design

 

necessary to provide uniform moisture distribution. Individual or isolated

 

planting areas separated by large expanses of unplanted areas or

 

hardscapes require individual grids that provide moisture within the

 

foliage canopy of the landscaped area.

 

5

Landscape Dripline Design _____________________________________________________________

General Design Parameters

NOTES:

Narrow, linear tree and shrub plantings require narrow, linear subsurface grids consisting of two to four laterals. More intense plantings that provide a complete foliage canopy at maturity require a grid design that applies uniform moisture levels within the foliage canopy (turf, groundcover, and dense shrub and tree plantings).

Use the Spacing Guidelines Table (Table 1.2) to determine the proper emitter and lateral spacing.

Emitter and Dripline Selection

Toro offers the following types of dripline products:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installation Type

 

Tubing

Flow

Pressure

Emitter

ROOTGUARD®

 

 

Dripline

Below-

At-Grade/

 

Dia.

Rate

Comp.

Spacing

Protected

Grade

Mulched

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DL2000®

5⁄8”

0.5 &

Yes

12”, 18”

Yes

X

X

1.0 GPH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drip In®

5⁄8”

0.5 &

Yes

12”, 18”

No

 

X

1.0 GPH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microline

1⁄4”

0.5 GPH

No

6”, 12”

Yes

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soakerline™

1⁄4”

0.5 GPH

No

6”, 12”

No

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 1.1

6

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design General Design Parameters

NOTES:

Using 1/4” dripline

Toro’s two 1/4” dripline offerings, Microline and Soakerline, are ideal for small, tight areas because of their flexibility. They can also be used to loop around trees and bushes. They’re often used to retrofit sprinkler risers and bubblers to subsurface drip because they easily attach to a multi-outlet manifold.

Spacing Guidelines

Soil Type

Emitter

Row

Emitter

Burial

Spacing

Spacing

Flow

Depth*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Sand

12”

18”

1.0 GPH

4”

• Trees/Shrubs/Groundcover

• Turf*

12”

12”

1.0 GPH

4”

 

 

 

 

 

Loam

18”

18”

1.0 GPH

6”

• Trees/Shrubs/Groundcover

• Turf*

12”

18”

1.0 GPH

4”

 

 

 

 

 

Clay

18”

24”

0.5 GPH

6”

• Trees/Shrubs/Groundcover

• Turf*

18”

18”

0.5 GPH

4”

 

 

 

 

 

* For Subsurface Only

 

 

 

TABLE 1.2

Dripline Placement From Edges

Consideration of dripline location is necessary when laying out zone edges. Hardscape materials act as heat collectors and cause landscape edges to dry out before the center of the landscape, making it essential to compensate by placing the first driplines no more than two to four inches from the landscape edge. In uncontained landscape areas, start the first dripline two to four inches outside of the planted area. In subsurface applications specifically watering turf, add dripline over the supply and flush manifolds to ensure that these edges have adequate moisture coverage.

Wind

As with all total-coverage irrigation systems, attention must be given to windward turf edges in high-wind areas to prevent browning. Place the first dripline no more than two to four inches from the edge of hardscaped areas or two to four inches outside the turf edge in uncontained landscape areas. Add an extra dripline six inches from the first line between the first and second lateral lines on the windward lateral edge.

7

Landscape Dripline Design _____________________________________________________________

General Design Parameters

NOTES:

Slopes

Driplines should be located parallel to the contour of slopes whenever possible. Since dripline runoff occurs on areas with a slope of greater than 3%, consideration must be given to dripline density from the top to the bottom of the slope. The dripline on the top two-thirds of the slope should be placed at the recommended spacings for the soil type and plant material in use. On the lower one-third, the driplines should be spaced 25% wider. The last dripline can be eliminated on slopes exceeding 5%. For areas exceeding ten feet in elevation change, zone the lower one-third of the slope separately from the upper two-thirds to help control drainage.

Elevation Differences

When utilizing non-pressure-compensating dripline, elevation differences of five feet or more require separate zones or individual pressure regulators for each six-foot difference on uniform slopes (see detail number 17, p. 31).

When working with rolling landscapes with elevation differences of five feet or more within a zone, it is best to use pressure-compensat- ing dripline to equalize pressure differentials created by the elevation differences.

Though vacuum relief valves aren’t necessary when installing Toro dripline at-grade - even when mulching over - all subsurface irrigation zones must have a vacuum relief valve at the highest point in order to eliminate the vacuum created by low-line drainage, which causes soil ingestion. This is especially crucial when the dripline laterals are placed perpendicular to the contour of the slope as in street medians. All subsurface dripline laterals within the elevated area must be connected with an air relief lateral (see detail number 12, p. 28).

In-line spring-check or swing-check valves should be used on slopes where low-line drainage could cause wet areas in the lowest areas of an irrigation zone (see detail number 23, p. 34).

8

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design Typical Design Procedures

Designing a System

Try designing your own dripline system using the diagram shown below and the tables and information provided in the remainder of this section. When you have finished the design worksheet, check your answers on page 17 at the end of this section.

Design a typical dripline installation for zone #1 where the width is 5’ and the length is 50’.

 

Flat, Sandy Soil Area

 

 

 

Is In Constant Shade

 

 

50’

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.O.C

 

 

 

2

3

 

 

Flat, Sandy Soil

F35% Slope,

 

Property

 

 

Clay Soil

 

 

 

Exposed When

Property

Line

 

 

 

 

Contractor Cut

Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

Into Hill To

 

 

 

 

Place The House

 

 

Shady,

Sunny,

Sunny,

 

 

Sandy Soil,

Flat,

Clay Soil,

 

 

Sandy

Sandy

Grass

 

 

 

 

Point Of

 

 

 

 

Connection

 

Allowable Water Supply = 15 GPM

 

 

Dynamic Pressure = 45 PSI

 

 

Regulated Dynamic Pressure = 25 PSI

 

Fig. 1

Procedures Design

9

Landscape Dripline Design _____________________________________________________________

Typical Design Procedures

NOTES:

Design Worksheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use this worksheet to determine the type and quantity of product

 

 

required for the system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW1 Allowable Water Supply ____________ GPM

 

 

 

 

DW2 Dynamic Pressure ____________ PSI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zones*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soil Texture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plant Type

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slope %

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dripline Product

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emitter Spacing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Max. Dripline Lateral

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spacing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nominal Flow Rate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actual Flow Rate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Max. Run Length

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exact Lateral Spacing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DW13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone Flow (GPM)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* The number of zones may vary depending on the specific needs of each installation.

 

TABLE 2.1

Typical Design Steps

Step 1: Obtain or draw a scaled plan of the area to be irrigated.

Step 2: Locate the point of connection on the scaled plan.

Determine the water meter size and/or allowable volume of the water source: ______ GPM (DW1)

Verify the regulated dynamic water pressure: ______ PSI (DW2)

At this point in a typical installation, it would be necessary to select a pressure regulating device to establish/control the pressure in the system. Since there’s

a number of factors that can apply to a design (slope, length of run, dripline type — pressure-compensating vs. non-pressure-compensating), a regulated dynamic pressure of 25 PSI has been chosen for this example.

10

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design Typical Design Procedures

Step 3: Note the site and environmental parameters.

NOTES:

■ Soil texture (clay, loam or sand): ____________ (DW3)

 

■ Plant material(s) (trees, shrubs, ground cover or turf):

 

____________ (DW4)

 

■ Direction and degree of slope: ______________% (DW5)

 

Step 4: Lay out the laterals.

Use Table 2.2 below to determine the type of dripline product necessary to fit the irrigation needs of the site (i.e., pressure-compensating or non-pressure-compensating; microline or dripline).

Dripline product: _______________ (DW6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installation Type

 

Tubing

Flow

Pressure

Emitter

ROOTGUARD®

 

 

Dripline

Below-

At-Grade/

 

Dia.

Rate

Comp.

Spacing

Protected

Grade

Mulched

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DL2000®

5⁄8”

0.5 &

Yes

12”, 18”

Yes

X

X

1.0 GPH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drip In®

5⁄8”

0.5 &

Yes

12”, 18”

No

 

X

1.0 GPH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microline

1⁄4”

0.5 GPH

No

6”, 12”

Yes

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soakerline™

1⁄4”

0.5 GPH

No

6”, 12”

No

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2.2

Use non-pressure-compensating dripline in applications with less than 20 PSI pressure in flat areas.

Using the Spacing Guidelines Table below, determine the maximum recommended spacing between drippers and spacing between driplines based on plant material and soil types.

Soil Type

Emitter

Row

Emitter

Burial

Spacing

Spacing

Flow

Depth*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Sand

12”

18”

1.0 GPH

4”

• Trees/Shrubs/Groundcover

• Turf*

12”

12”

1.0 GPH

4”

 

 

 

 

 

Loam

18”

18”

1.0 GPH

6”

• Trees/Shrubs/Groundcover

• Turf*

12”

18”

1.0 GPH

4”

 

 

 

 

 

Clay

18”

24”

0.5 GPH

6”

• Trees/Shrubs/Groundcover

• Turf*

18”

18”

0.5 GPH

4”

 

 

 

 

 

* For Subsurface Only

 

 

 

TABLE 2.3

Emitter spacing: ________ inches (DW7)

Maximum dripline lateral spacing: ________ inches (DW8)

11

Landscape Dripline Design _____________________________________________________________

Typical Design Procedures

NOTES:

Step 4: Lay out the laterals: (cont.)

Using the Spacing Guidelines Table, determine the nominal emitter flow rate.

Nominal emitter flow rate: __________ GPH (DW9)*

* Actual flow is a function of pressure. Use the Flow vs. Pressure Table (Table 2.4) to determine actual flow per emitter: __________ GPH (DW10)

 

EMITTER FLOW (IN GPH) VS. PRESSURE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tube

Nominal

 

 

Actual Flow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dia.

Flow

15 PSI

20 PSI

25 PSI

30 PSI

35 PSI

40 PSI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DL2000®

5⁄8”

0.5 GPH

0.53

0.53

0.53

0.53

0.53

0.53

and Drip In®

5⁄8”

1.0 GPH

1.02

1.02

1.02

1.02

1.02

1.02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microline

1⁄4”

0.5 GPH

0.50

0.60

0.70

n/a

n/a

n/a

and Soakerline™

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2.4

Determine the maximum recommended run length from Table 2.5 below for the selected product and pressure. Maximum length of run: _________ feet (DW11)

MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED LENGTH OF RUN @ 0% SLOPE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tube

Nominal

Initial

Spacing Between Emitters

 

Dia.

Flow

Pressure

6”

12”

18”

DL2000®

5⁄8”

0.5 GPH

15 PSI

n/a

 

250’

350’

and Drip In®

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

1.0 GPH

15 PSI

n/a

 

160’

240’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

0.5 GPH

25 PSI

n/a

 

360’

515’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

1.0 GPH

25 PSI

n/a

 

240’

340’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

0.5 GPH

35 PSI

n/a

 

400’

565’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

1.0 GPH

35 PSI

n/a

 

260’

375’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

0.5 GPH

40 PSI

n/a

 

460’

650’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5⁄8”

1.0 GPH

40 PSI

n/a

 

300’

430’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microline

1⁄4”

0.5 GPH

20 PSI

19’

 

33’

n/a

and Soakerline™

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2.5

12

_____________________________________________________________Landscape Dripline Design Typical Design Procedures

NOTES:

Step 4: Lay out the laterals: (cont.)

Calculate the exact lateral spacing based on the dimensions of the area to be irrigated with subsurface drip.

Perimeter

Perimeter Spacing 2”-4”

Widest

Width

Dripline Lateral

Lateral Spacing

Lateral

Area

Perimeter Spacing 2”-4”

Perimeter

TABLE 2.6

A.Measure, in inches, the subsurface drip area at its widest width.

Width: ________ inches

B.The first and last lateral perimeter spacings can be no further than two to four inches from the confining hardscape or two to four inches outside of unconfined landscapes. For this example we will use 4” spacing.

C.Subtract the sum of the perimeter spacings from the width to determine the lateral area to be covered by subsurface driplines.

Width (in inches) – perimeter spacings (in inches) = Lateral area: ______ inches

13

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