Fedders F80A User Manual

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Installation, Operation and Maintenance

MODEL F80A

CATEGORY I NATURAL GAS AND LP GAS

MID EFFICIENCY WARM AIR FURNACE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 FURNACE SIZING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 LOCATION of UNIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 INSTALLATION POSITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 AIR CONDITIONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 INSPECTION/ACCESS PANEL . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 CLEARANCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 DIMENSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 DUCTWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 DETERMING COMBUSTION AIR . . . . . . . . . .7 FURNACE VENTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 GAS SUPPLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 CONVERSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 HIGH ALTITUDE & AIRFLOW

SPECIFICATION TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 ELECTRICAL SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . .15 START UP PROCEDURES/

SEQUENCE OF OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 AIR FLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 ADJUSTING BLOWER SPEEDS . . . . . . . . . . .19 MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 WIRING DIAGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

For future reference write down the model, serial number, and date of purchase. Use these numbers in any correspondence or service calls concerning your furnace.

Model

Serial Number

Date of Purchase

Keep these instructions for future reference.

Please read the operating instructions and safety precautions carefully and thoroughly before installing and operating your furnace. Keep this manual in a safe place for future reference.

USER’S INSTRUCTION GUIDE LOCATED AFTER PAGE 25 OF THIS INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

23-23-0427N-006

MODEL F80A

INTRODUCTION

This gas fired midefficiency (non-condensing) furnace is an up flow, counterflow or horizontal flow warm air furnace suitable for residential and light commercial heating applications from 35,000 to 135,000 BTU/Hr.

This appliance is a CGA / AGA design certified as a Category I chimney vent central forced air furnace with all combustion air supplied from the ambient air around the furnace.

Furnace models F80A50, F80A70, F80A85, F80A100, F80A115 and F80A135 may be field converted from natural gas to LP gas using Kit No. 30482, or may be field converted from LP gas to natural gas using Kit No. 30551. Contact manufacturer for conversion kit availability. *Furnace model F80A35 cannot be converted to LP, and is not approved for conversion.

The furnace is shipped completely assembled. Please inspect for damage, as the furnace is unpacked.

SAFETY

Throughout the manual, symbols and words are used to draw attention to potentially hazardous conditions.

DANGER

THIS INDICATES AN IMMINENTLY HAZARDOUS SITUATION WHICH, IF NOT AVOIDED, WILL RESULT IN DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY.

WARNING

THIS INDICATES A POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS SITUATION WHICH, IF NOT AVOIDED, COULD RESULT IN DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY.

CAUTION

THIS INDICATES A POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS SITUATION, WHICH, IF NOT AVOIDED, MAY RESULT IN MINOR OR MODERATE INJURY.

SAFETY RULES:

1.Use this furnace only with type of gas approved for this furnace. Refer to the furnace rating plate.

2.Install this furnace only in dry indoor locations (protected from weather).

3.Provide adequate combustion and ventilation air to the furnace space as specified in the Determining Combustion Air section on page 7 of these instructions.

4.Combustion products must be discharged outdoors. Connect this furnace to an approved vent system only, as specified in the Furnace Venting section on page 8 of these instructions.

5.Never test for gas leaks with an open flame. Use a commercially available soap solution made specifically for the detection of leaks to check all connections as specified in the Gas Supply section on page 12 of these instructions.

6.Always install furnace to operate within the furnace’s intended temperature rise range with a duct system which has an external static pressure within the allowable range, as specified in the Furnace Sizing section on page 3, the Ductwork section on page 6, and the Airflow section on page 19 of these instructions.

7.When a furnace is installed so that the supply ducts carry air circulated by the furnace to areas outside the space containing the furnace, the return air shall also be handled by duct(s) sealed to the furnace casing and terminating outside the space containing the furnace. (Furnace for heating the home located in the attached garage, for example).

8.A gas fired furnace for installation in a residential garage must be installed so that the burners and ignitor are no less than 18 inches above the floor. The furnace must be located, or protected to avoid physical damage by vehicles.

9.THIS FURNACE IS NOT TO BE USED FOR TEMPORARY HEATING FOR BUILDINGS UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

10.Nox Baffles are factory installed in the heat exchanger tubes of this furnace, and must remain installed regardless of fuel being used.

DANGER

DO NOT INSTALL THIS FURNACE IN A MOBILE HOME!

THIS FURNACE IS NOT APPROVED FOR INSTALLATION IN A MOBILE HOME. DOING SO COULD CAUSE FIRE, PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

WARNING

THE FURNACE CONTAINS FOIL COVERED FIBERGLASS INSULATION. INHALATION OF FIBERGLASS PARTICLES IS ASSOCIATED WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASE INCLUDING CANCER.

WARNING

THE FUEL SUPPLIER NORMALLY ODORIZES NATURAL GAS AND PROPANE. IN SOME CASES, THE ODORANT MAY NOT BE PERCEIVABLE. INSTALLATION OF UL AND CUL RECOGNIZED FUEL GAS DETECTORS INSTALLED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THEIR MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS IS RECOMMENDED AS AN ADDITIONAL MARGIN OF SAFETY.

DANGER

FIRE OR EXPLOSION HAZARD

If the information in these instructions is not followed exactly, a fire or explosion may result, causing property damage, personal injury or loss of life.

CAUTION

MAKE SURE TO REMOVE FOAM BLOWER HOUSING SHIPPING SUPPORTS BEFORE OPERATING FURNACE.

SHIPPING SUPPORTS ARE LOCATED ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT AND BOTTOM LEFT SIDES OF BLOWER HOUSING.

1

WARM AIR FURNACE

DANGER

WHAT TO DO IF YOU SMELL GAS:

DO NOT TRY TO LIGHT ANY APPLIANCE

DO NOT TOUCH ANY ELECTRICAL SWITCH; DO NOT USE ANY PHONE IN YOUR BUILDING

IMMEDIATELY CALL YOUR GAS SUPPLIER FROM A NEIGHBOR’S PHONE, OR A CELLULAR PHONE FROM A LOCATION WELL AWAY FROM THE BUILDING. FOLLOW THE GAS SUPPLIER’S INSTRUCTIONS.

IF YOU CANNOT REACH YOUR GAS SUPPLIER, CALL THE FIRE DEPARTMENT

DO NOT ENTER THE BUILDING UNTIL AUTHORIZED TO DO SO BY THE GAS SUPPLIER OR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT

IMPROPER INSTALLATION, OPERATION, ADJUSTMENT, ALTERATION, SERVICE OR MAINTENANCE CAN CAUSE INJURY, PROPERTY DAMAGE OR LOSS OF LIFE. REFER TO THIS MANUAL FOR PROPER INSTALLATION, OPERATION, SERVICE, AND MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS.

A QUALIFIED INSTALLER, SERVICE AGENCY OR THE GAS SUPPLIER MUST PERFORM INSTALLATION AND SERVICE.

DO NOT DESTROY THIS MANUAL

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY AND KEEP IN A SAFE PLACE FOR FUTURE REFERENCE BY A SERVICE TECHNICIAN.

WARNING

THESE INSTRUCTIONS ARE INTENDED AS AN AID TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL FOR PROPER INSTALLATION, ADJUSTMENT AND OPERATION OF THIS FURNACE. READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS THOROUGHLY BEFORE ATTEMPTING INSTALLATION OR OPERATION. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS MAY RESULT IN IMPROPER INSTALLATION, ADJUSTMENT, SERVICE OR MAINTENANCE, POSSIBLY RESULTING IN FIRE, ELECTRICAL SHOCK, CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING, EXPLOSION, PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.

DO NOT STORE OR USE GASOLINE OR OTHER FLAMMABLE VAPORS AND LIQUIDS, OR OTHER COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS IN THE VICINITY OF THIS OR ANY OTHER APPLIANCE.

WARNING

THE EXHAUST GASES FROM THIS FURNACE CONTAIN CHEMICALS, WHICH ON SOME OCCASIONS MAY INCLUDE CARBON MONOXIDE (CO). CARBON MONOXIDE IS AN ODORLESS, TASTELESS, CLEAR COLORLESS GAS, WHICH IS HIGHLY TOXIC. EVEN LOW CONCENTRATIONS ARE SUSPECTED OF CAUSING BIRTH DEFECTS AND OTHER REPRODUCTIVE HARM.

UL AND CUL RECOGNIZED CO DETECTORS ARE RECOMMENDED FOR ALL BUILDINGS EQUIPPED WITH FOSSIL FUEL BURNING APPLIANCES. ALL CO DETECTORS SHOULD BE INSTALLED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THEIR MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS AND APPLICABLE LOCAL BUILDING CODES.

DANGER

WHEN THIS FURNACE IS INSTALLED IN A RESIDENTIAL GARAGE, IT MUST BE INSTALLED SO THE BURNERS AND IGNITION SOURCE ARE LOCATED NO LESS THAN 18 INCHES ABOVE THE FLOOR TO PREVENT THE RISK OF IGNITING FLAMMABLE VAPORS WHICH MAY BE PRESENT IN THE GARAGE.

THE FURNACE MUST BE LOCATED OR PROTECTED TO AVOID PHYSICAL DAMAGE BY VEHICLES.

FAILURE TO HEED THESE WARNINGS CAN CAUSE A FIRE OR EXPLOSION, RESULTING IN PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

CODES:

This furnace must be installed:

In accordance with all local codes, bylaws and regulations by those authorities having jurisdiction

In the United States, this furnace must be installed in accordance with the current ANSI Z223.1 (NFPA 54) National Fuel Gas Code

In Canada, this furnace must be installed in accordance with the current CAN/CGA -B149 Installation Code for Fuel Burning Appliances

Electrical connections must be made in accordance with:

Any applicable local codes, bylaws and regulations

Canada: current edition of CAN/CSA C22.1, Canadian Electrical Code (Part 1)

United States: current edition of ANSI/NFPA 70, National Electrical Code

Codes and additional information may be obtained from:

American Gas Association

1515 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA, 22209 703-841-8400

National Fire Protection Association

1 Batterymarch Park Quincy, MA, 02269-9101 617-770-3000

Canadian Gas Association

Suite 1, 243 Consumers Road North York, ON, M2J 5E3 416-498-1994

2

MODEL F80A

FURNACE SIZING

The maximum hourly heat loss for each heated space shall be calculated in accordance with the procedures described in Manual J titled, "Load Calculation" published by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, or by any other method which is suitable for local conditions, provided the results obtained are in substantial agreement with, and not less than those obtained using the procedure described in their manual.

In Canada, the maximum hourly heat loss for each heated space shall be calculated in accordance with the procedures described in the manuals of the Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), or by any other method which is suitable for local conditions, provided the results obtained are in substantial agreement with, and not less than those obtained using the procedure described in their manuals.

If the installation is a retrofit application, do not rely on the capacity of the existing heating equipment as a method to size the new furnace. Many of the heat transfer multiples listed in earlier versions of load calculation manuals were much higher than those listed in more recent editions. It is possible that energy saving measures have been completed since the installation of the existing furnace. This might include additional insulation in the attic or walls, the application of sprayed foam insulation, the addition of storm windows and doors, weather stripping, caulking, etc.

Many of the older furnaces were equipped with large belt drive blower systems, operating at low RPMs. If replacing an existing furnace, be sure that the existing ductwork can handle the amount of airflow necessary for a reasonable temperature rise. Most older gas furnaces operated with a system temperature rise of 70 - 100°F. This series furnace has been designed for operation with a system temperature rise (DT) of 35 - 65°F or 30 – 60°F depending on which model is being installed. See Table 1A below. If the furnace selected has an identical output capacity as the original furnace, a substantial increase in system airflow will be required. See Table 1B below.

TABLE 1A

TABLE 1B

FURNACE TEMPERATURE RISE

TYPICAL AIR FLOW

Furnace Model

Tem perature

 

Rise

 

 

35-2

 

50-3

35 – 65 F

70-3

 

 

 

70-4

30 – 60 F

 

 

85-3

35 – 65 F

85-4

30 – 60 F

 

 

100-3

35 – 65 F

100-4

 

100-5

30 – 60 F

115-5

 

135-5

30 – 65 F

 

 

 

CFM Requi ed for a

T of:

Model

 

 

 

 

35

45

55

65

35-2

737

574

469

397

 

 

 

 

 

50-3

1053

819

670

567

70-3

1433

1114

912

771

70-4

1433

1114

912

771

85-3

1791

1393

1140

964

85-4

1791

1393

1140

964

 

 

 

 

 

100-3

2107

1639

1341

1134

100-4

2107

1639

1341

1134

100-5

2107

1639

1341

1134

115-5

2423

1884

1542

1305

135-5

2844

2212

1810

1532

Existing ductwork should be assessed for its air handling capabilities. For residential applications, the recommended air velocity of a supply air trunk duct is 700 feet per minute (fpm), and should not exceed 900 fpm. The recommended air velocity of a supply air branch run is 600 fpm, and should not exceed 900 fpm. These values are slightly lower for flexible ducting. The recommended air velocity of a return air trunk duct is 600 fpm, and should not exceed 700 fpm. The recommended and maximum air velocity of a return air branch is 600 fpm.

The equal friction chart, as published by ASHRAE and HRAI, is the basis for the various air duct calculators available through heating supply companies.

NOTE: The return air system is equally as important as the supply air system. An undersized return air system will prevent sufficient quantities of air from reaching the supply air system, properly sized or otherwise, and will consequently reduce the service life of the furnace and its components.

LOCATION of UNIT

GENERAL:

1.The furnace is not weatherized. Select a dry indoor location.

2.Select a location where the furnace venting can be routed between the furnace and the chimney or B-Vent with a minimum of lengths and fittings. Be sure to check that the proposed routing will meet code requirements with respect to minimum clearances.

3.Select a location as near as possible to the existing or proposed duct system.

4.The furnace location must permit access for servicing, and be within the clearance to combustibles guidelines as marked on the appliance rating plate.

5.The furnace should be installed on a firm base when installed in the upflow position. This is typically a concrete floor if installing the furnace in a basement.

6.If the furnace is being installed so that the return air will enter through the bottom, the perimeter of the furnace must be properly supported.

7.When installed in the horizontal position, the furnace may be supported from the bottom, or suspended.

8.When installed in the down flow position on a combustible floor, subbase kit #30476 is required (contact manufacturer for availability).

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:

This furnace is not to be used for temporary heating of buildings or structures under construction.

If this furnace is to be used with air conditioning and is to be installed in an area over a finished ceiling or living area, install a field fabricated auxiliary drain pan under the furnace to protect that area from accidental condensate spills. The auxiliary pan should be large enough to collect accidentally spilled condensate from the air conditioning evaporator coil assembly if applicable. Follow local codes.

These furnaces are approved for installation in attics, alcoves, utility rooms, closets and crawlspaces. If this furnace is to be installed in a utility room, be sure that it is located in such a way as to allow access for servicing or the removal of any other appliance, (hot water heater, for example).

If the furnace is to be installed in a garage, the burners must be a minimum of 18 inches (460 mm) above the floor.

If the furnace is to be installed in a commercial (repair) garage, the burners must be a minimum of 4.5 feet (1375 mm) above the floor.

The furnace must be protected from physical damage by metal barriers or other acceptable means.

3

WARM AIR FURNACE

If the furnace is to be located in an area where the combustion air is laden with chemical compounds such as bromine, chlorine or fluorine, as may be found in swimming pool chemicals, laundry detergents, etc., use outdoor air for combustion. These compounds when exposed to flame, form acids, which attack the heat exchanger and other components.

A partial list of these contaminants includes:

-Aerosols, particularly CFC based aerosols

-Air fresheners

-“Airplane” glue and similar cements

-Ammonia, as is commonly found in permanent wave solutions used in women’s hair dressing salons

-Anti-static fabric softeners used in clothes dryers

-Carbon tetrachloride

-Chlorinated cleaners and waxes

-Chlorine and bromine based swimming pool chemicals and treatments

-Deicing salts or chemicals, rock salt, etc.

-Dry cleaning solutions such as perchloroethylene

-Halogen based refrigerants including R-12 and R-22

-Hydrochloric acid, muriatic acid, or other acid based masonry washing compounds

-Polyurethane and similar derivatives fumes

-Printer’s inks, paint removers, furniture strippers, varnishes, varsol, toluene, etc.

-Water softener salts and chemicals

INSTALLATION POSITIONS

NONSUSPENDED INSTALLATION

Maintain clearances to combustibles as outlined in Table 2 on page 5. The furnace must be supported in such a way as to not allow twisting or sagging of the cabinet.

SUSPENDED INSTALLATION

Refer to Figure 1 (below). Maintain clearances to combustibles as outlined in Table 2 on page 5. The furnace may be suspended by field fabricating a cradle of angle iron and threaded rod. Secure the furnace with 2 inch minimum slotted angle or equivalent, as shown in Figure 1 (below). The furnace must be supported in such a way as not to allow twisting or sagging of the cabinet. Position the supports so as not to interfere with accessing the burner and blower compartments.

FIGURE 1: SUSPENDED INSTALLATION

SUGGESTED METHOD FOR

 

 

3

NCH THREADE

ROD

 

 

2 INCH ANGLE IRON

 

SUSPENDING HORIZONTAL FURNACE

ALLOW ENOUGH ANGLE

 

JAM NUTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IRON OVERH

 

 

 

 

L

SHER

 

 

 

 

P

PENING THE

 

 

 

 

F

SHER

 

 

 

 

B

DOOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R

R PLENUM

 

 

 

S

ENUM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

UPFLOW INSTALLATION

This furnace comes assembled for installation in the upflow position and ready for vertical venting. In the event that the furnace will be installed in another position, the following guidelines should be followed.

COUNTERFLOW INSTALLATION

WARNING

WHEN INSTALLED IN THE COUNTERFLOW POSITION ON A COMBUSTIBLE FLOOR, SUBBASE KIT #30476 IS REQUIRED. FAILURE TO INSTALL SUBBASE KIT COULD RESULT IN FIRE, DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY.

The opening in the floor must provide adequate clearances to the combustible material.

According to the Clearances to Combustibles Table 2 on page 5, 1/2 inches clearance will be required between the plenum and the combustible material. If installed on a non-combustible material, zero clearance is required.

Inducer position changes required shall be performed in accordance with the inducer rotation instructions in the Furnace Venting section on page 8 of this manual. In the counterflow installation, this furnace can only vent through the left or right side of the furnace.

HORIZONTAL INSTALLATION

Inducer position changes required shall be performed in accordance with the inducer rotation instructions in the Furnace Venting section on page 8 of this manual. In the horizontal installation, it is not permissible to vent downwards. Therefore the orientation of left or right horizontal position will determine the inducer orientation.

NOTE: It is not permissable to use a rear return on this furnace although side and end returns may be used.

AIR CONDITIONING

This furnace may be used as part of an air conditioning system. The furnace wiring and control system are “air conditioning ready”. There are the following factors to consider:

The air conditioning evaporator coil must be downstream of the heat exchanger. The cooled air passing over the warm ambient air inside the heat exchanger tubes can cause condensation inside the tubes, resulting in corrosion and premature failure.

A parallel duct system can be installed to direct the air from the furnace through the evaporator coil only. Use dampers or other means to bypass the heat exchanger. If [summer/winter] dampers are used, they should be interlocked to prevent system operation unless the dampers are in the full open or full closed position.

INSPECTION / ACCESS PANEL

If an air conditioning coil is not to be used in the supply air plenum, it is recommended that the outlet duct be provided with a removable access panel, which is accessible when installed so the heat exchanger may be viewed for possible openings using light assistance or a probe that can be inserted for sampling the air stream. The access cover must be fabricated in such a manner as to prevent leaks.

MODEL F80A

CLEARANCES

Table 2 (below) provides the certified clearances to combustibles.

IMPORTANT:

This furnace requires a minimum of 24-inches of front clearance for service purposes. For this purpose, service clearance takes precedence over clearance to combustibles.

TABLE 2: CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLES

 

 

UPFLOW

COUNTERFLOW

HORIZON

UNIT TOP

1"

0"

2"

PLENUM

1"

1"

2.5"

T

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLENUM SIDES

.5"

.5"

.5"

UNIT FRONT

3.5"*

3.5"*

3.5"*

 

 

 

 

UNIT BACK

0"

0"

0"

 

 

 

 

UNIT SIDES

0"

0"

1"**

 

 

 

 

UNIT BASE

0"***

0"****

0"

 

 

 

 

 

FLUE

C VENT

6"

6"

6"

PIPE

B VENT

1"

1"

1"

 

 

 

 

 

ENCLOSURE

CLOSE

CLOSE

CLOSE

CABINET

CABINET

CABINET

 

 

*24 inches required for service

**Supply air end 1 inch / return air end 0 inches

***Certified for closet installation on combustible flooring

****Certified for installation on combustible flooring only when installed on special base (part # 30476).

See the appliance rating plate affixed to the furnace for specific model number, serial number and clearance to combustibles information.

DANGER

COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL MUST NOT BE PLACED ON OR AGAINST THE FURNACE JACKET.

THE AREA AROUND THE FURNACE MUST BE KEPT CLEAR AND FREE OF ALL COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS INCLUDING GASOLINE AND OTHER FLAMMABLE VAPORS AND LIQUIDS.

PLACEMENT OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS ON, AGAINST OR AROUND THE FURNACE JACKET CAN CAUSE AN EXPLOSION OR FIRE RESULTING IN PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

THE HOMEOWNER SHOULD BE CAUTIONED THAT THE FURNACE AREA MUST NOT BE USED AS A BROOM CLOSET OR FOR ANY OTHER STORAGE PURPOSE.

UPFLOW FURNACES ARE DESIGN CERTIFIED FOR INSTALLATION ON COMBUSTIBLE FLOORS. THIS SHALL BE INTERPRETED AS A WOOD FLOOR ONLY.

THE FURNACE MUST NOT BE INSTALLED DIRECTLY ON CARPETING, VINYL TILE, OR OTHER COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL EXCEPT WOOD. INSTALLATION ON COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL CAN RESULT IN FIRE, CAUSING PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.

FIGURE 2: DIMENSIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

H

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

D

TABLE 3: DIMENSIONS

DIMENSIONS (Inches)

MODEL

 

WIDTH

DEPTH

 

HEIGHT

 

SUPPLY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

C

 

F x G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

35-2

 

14-1/2

29

 

35

 

13-1/2 x 19

50-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70-3

 

16

29

 

35

 

15 x 19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70-4

 

17-1/2

29

 

35

 

16-1/2 x 19

85-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

85-4

 

20-1/2

29

 

35

 

19-1/2 x 19

1

3

 

 

 

100-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100-5

 

20-1/2

29

 

35

 

19-1/2 x 19

115-5

 

22

29

 

35

 

21 x 19

135-5

 

22

29

 

35

 

21 x 19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MODEL

 

 

RETURN

 

 

VENT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SIDE

BOTTOM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D x E

J x K

L

 

H

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

35-2

 

14 x 22

13-1/2 x 22

1/2

3

1

50-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70-3

 

14 x 22

14-1/2 x 22

3/4

4

70-4

 

14 x 222

14-1/2 x 22

1-1/2

4

85-3

 

14 x 22

14-1/2 x 22

1-1/2

4

85-4

 

14 x 22

16 x 22

2-1/4

4

1

3

 

100- 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100-5

 

14 x 22 2

16 x 22

2-1/4

4

115-5

 

14 x 22 2

19 x 22

1-1/2

5 1

135-5

 

14 x 22 2

19 x 22

1-1/2

5 1

1 Vent outlet 4” - Use reducer fittings.

2 Two return air openings required

5

WARM AIR FURNACE

DUCTWORK

Proper airflow is required for the correct operation of this furnace. Insufficient airflow may cause erratic operation, could cause the furnace to cycle on the high temperature limit, and may damage the heat exchanger. Excessive airflow may result in an excessively noisy duct system and may result in undesirable consequences such as creating uncomfortable drafts and causing drapes or curtains to blow around.

If air conditioning is to be used with the furnace, the duct system must be capable of delivering the correct amount of airflow for each system.

The ductwork should be sized and constructed in accordance with accepted industry standards. Duct sizing and construction information may be obtained from:

A.C.C.A. (Air Conditioning Contractors of America)

A.S.H.R.A.E. (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers)

H.R.A.I. (Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Institute (Canada)

S.M.A.C.N.A. (Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association (United States)

All of the above professional organizations have duct sizing manuals available.

The total static pressure drop of the air distribution system should not exceed 0.5 inches water column.

NOTE:

UNITS 70-4, 100-5, 115-5 AND 135-5 MUST HAVE DUAL RETURN AIR INLETS FOR OPTIMAL AIRFLOW AND AIR FILTRATION. IF NOT SPECIFICALLY STATED BY THE FILTER MANUFACTURER, FOR EFFECTIVE AIR FILTRATION, ASSUME A MAXIMUM VELOCITY OF 300 FPM FOR DISPOSABLE TYPE FILTERS, OR 600 FPM FOR PERMANENT TYPE FILTERS.

GUIDE:

Filter free area (in2) = 144 x (CFM / desired velocity (fpm))

IMPORTANT: Some high efficiency filters have a greater than normal resistance to airflow. This can adversely affect furnace operation. Ensure to check the airflow when using any filter.

WARNING

DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, CONNECT RETURN OR SUPPLY AIR DUCTWORK TO OR FROM ANY OTHER HEAT-PRODUCING DEVICE SUCH AS A FIREPLACE INSERT, STOVE, ETC. DOING SO MAY RESULT IN FIRE, CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING, EXPLOSION, PERSONAL INJURY, LOSS OF LIFE, OR PROPERTY DAMAGE.

6

DUCTWORK STEPS:

1.Position the furnace to minimize ductwork length and fittings.

2.Cut open a return air inlet. The choices are:

a)either side

b)furnace bottom

c)any combination, i.e. two sides or a side and the bottom. Note: 2 return openings required for 70-4, 100-5, 115-5 and 135-5.

CAUTION

DO NOT USE THE REAR PANEL AS A RETURN AIR INLET. THERE IS INSUFFICIENT ROOM TO PERMIT ADEQUATE AIRFLOW.

In all cases, cut the inlet air opening the full width of the knockouts.

NOTE: When two return air inlets are used, both must be equipped with filters.

3.Install the filter rack(s) (field supplied).

4.Connect the return air duct or fitting to the furnace. The connection should be as air tight as possible to prevent entraining combustion gases from an adjacent fuel burning appliance, or entraining combustion air for this furnace .

5.Ensure that there is adequate space and accessibility for the air filter.

6.If an air conditioning evaporator coil is required, position it on the top of the furnace. Ensure that no air can bypass the evaporator coil.

7.Connect the supply air plenum to the supply air outlet. Flexible duct connectors are an effective device to prevent the telegraphing of mechanical noise from the furnace to other parts of the home via the ductwork. If using flexible connectors, ensure that the adjoining duct is independently supported.

Adequate provisions for combustion and ventilation air must be in accordance with ANSI Z223.1 (NFPA 54), section 5.3 "Air for Combustion and Ventilation" in the United States, and CAN/CGA B149 in Canada. Check with local authorities for any additional building codes, bylaws or regulations.

WARNING

NEVER ALLOW THE PRODUCTS OF COMBUSTION FROM THE FLUE TO ENTER THE RETURN AIR OR SUPPLY AIR DUCTWORK.

ALL RETURN AIR DUCTWORK MUST BE ADEQUATELY SEALED AND SECURED TO THE FURNACE WITH SHEET METAL SCREWS. TAPE THE SHEET METAL SEAMS IN THE VICINITY OF THE FURNACE WITH DUCT TAPE OR SIMILAR MATERIAL.

WHEN THE FURNACE IS MOUNTED ON A PLATFORM WITH RETURN AIR THROUGH THE BOTTOM, IT MUST BE SEALED AIR TIGHT BETWEEN THE FURNACE AND THE RETURN AIR PLENUM. THE FLOOR OR PLATFORM MUST PROVIDE SOUND PHYSICAL SUPPORT OF THE FURNACE WITHOUT SAGGING, CRACKS OR GAPS AROUND THE BASE, PROVIDING A SEAL BETWEEN THE SUPPORT AND THE BASE.

FAILURE TO PREVENT PRODUCTS OF COMBUSTION FROM BEING CIRCULATED INTO THE LIVING SPACE CAN CREATE POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS, INCLUDING CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING THAT COULD RESULT IN PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.

MODEL F80A

DETERMING COMBUSTION AIR

DANGER

READ, UNDERSTAND AND FOLLOW ALL INSTRUCTIONS IN THIS SECTION. FAILURE TO PROPERLY VENT OR SUPPLY COMBUSTION AIR TO THIS FURNACE CAN CAUSE CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING, OR AN EXPLOSION OR FIRE, RESULTING IN PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

DANGER

THIS FURNACE AND ANY OTHER FUEL BURNING APPLIANCE MUST BE PROVIDED WITH ENOUGH FRESH AIR FOR PROPER COMBUSTION AND VENTILATION OF THE FLUE GASES. MOST HOMES WILL REQUIRE THAT OUTSIDE AIR BE BROUGHT TO THE FURNACE AREA. FAILURE TO DO SO CAN CAUSE PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH FROM CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING.

CASE 1:

FURNACE LOCATED IN AN UNCONFINED SPACE

Unconfined space does not necessarily mean that combustion and ventilation will not have to be introduced from the outdoors, particularly in airtight homes. Refer to the appropriate installation code requirements regarding the minimum combustion air required for all fuel burning appliances located within the unconfined area.

If the amount of combustion and ventilation air is insufficient to properly operate the furnace and other fuel burning appliances within the unconfined area, it will be necessary to supply it from the outdoors based on the criteria used when calculating the air supply for a confined space.

NOTE: If planning to use the inside air of an unconfined space, remember to test for proper furnace operation (as well as other fuel burning appliances located within the unconfined space) with respect to adequate combustion and ventilation air with fireplace dampers open, clothes dryer running, bathroom exhaust fans on, kitchen range hood on, etc.

CASE 2:

FURNACE LOCATED IN A CONFINED SPACE

A confined space, (any space smaller than the minimums discussed in CASE 1), must have two air openings one within 12 inches of the ceiling and the other within 12 inches of the floor. The air openings must be sized based on whether the combustion and ventilation air is being taken from indoors or outdoors, the method outdoor air (if used) is introduced, and taking into account any other fuel burning appliances in the confined space.

If sufficient indoor combustion and ventilation air is available for the furnace and all other fuel burning appliances, even when clothes dryers, bathroom fans, range hoods, etc. are running, size each opening according to the appropriate installation codes.

NOTE: If using grilles to cover the two openings, factor in the free area of the grille. Typically, a grille will have a free area approximately 50% of its nominal size. Consequently, if the required opening is 10 inches x 10 inches , it will have to be doubled if using a sidewall grille with 50% free area.

IMPORTANT: If an exhaust fan, fireplace, clothes dryer or any similar device is present in the indoor area from which the combustion and ventilation air will be drawn, negative pressure could be a problem if natural infiltration from the outdoors does not match the rate at which air is exhausted.

CASE 3:

FURNACE LOCATED IN A CONFINED SPACE, OUTDOOR AIR FROM ATTIC OR CRAWL SPACE

In this circumstance, refer to the appropriate installation code for the free area of the combustion and ventilation air openings. If other fuel burning appliances are present, their combustion air and ventilation air requirements must be added to those of the furnace.

CASE 4:

FURNACE LOCATED IN A CONFINED SPACE, OUTDOOR AIR DUCTED HORIZONTALLY

Similar to CASE 3, outdoor air for combustion and ventilation may be drawn through horizontal ducting. Consult the appropriate installation code for the free area for openings. If other fuel burning appliances are present, their combustion air and ventilation air requirements must be added to those of the furnace.

IMPORTANT: The outdoor grilles must be installed in a location where they will not be obstructed in any manner.

IMPORTANT: If grilles are used on the outside wall, they must be sized properly. Most sidewall grilles have only 50% free area, so the grill size opening must be twice the size of the free air opening requirement.

WARNING

DO NOT ALLOW GAS PIPING TO BE ROUTED THROUGH JOIST SPACES THAT ARE USED FOR RETURN AIR PURPOSES. DO NOT USE JOIST SPACES FOR RETURN AIR PURPOSES IF THE JOIST SPACE ALREADY CONTAINS PLUMBING STACKS, CHIMNEY COMPONENTS, ETC. UNLESS THE PORTION USED FOR RETURN AIR PURPOSES CAN BE COMPLETELY ISOLATED FROM PORTIONS WITH OTHER USAGES.

7

WARM AIR FURNACE

FURNACE VENTING

DEFINITIONS

"Vent" and "Chimney" refer to open passageways that convey vent gases from the furnace, or its vent connector, to the outside. Vents and chimneys usually run vertically or nearly vertically. When they serve only one gas appliance, they are called "dedicated" vents or chimneys. When they serve multiple gas appliances, they are called "common" vents or chimneys.

"Vent Connector" refers to a pipe or duct that connects the furnace to a vent or chimney. Vent connectors usually run from the furnace’s vent collar to the vent or chimney. Vent connectors may have vertical and horizontal runs.

"Venting System" refers to a continuous open passageway from the vent collar to the outside. Venting systems usually have a vent connector(s) and a vent or chimney. Venting systems commonly serve a single furnace, or a single furnace and a hot water heater. Other multiple appliance venting systems are less common.

"Fan Assisted Combustion System" refers to an appliance equipped with an integral mechanical means to either draw or force products of combustion through the combustion chamber and/or heat exchanger. This series furnace uses a draft inducer to draw combustion products through the heat exchanger and is considered to have a fan assisted combustion system. Category I furnaces with fan assisted combustion systems must not be vented into single wall metal vents.

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

The furnace is design certified as a Category I appliance, which means that the furnace relies on the buoyancy of combustion products to vent properly. Since buoyancy decreases proportionately with temperature, the chimney size and properties are very important. An oversized chimney, or one that is exposed to the cold will not maintain the required buoyancy as well as it should, and may allow excessive condensation to form.

IMPORTANT: Do not common vent the furnace with Category III or IV gas-fired appliances.

The furnace must be vented in accordance with these instructions, the Venting Tables and rules published in the current editions of ANSI Z223.1 / NFPA 54, National Fuel Gas Code in the United States, or B149, Natural Gas and Propane Installation Code in Canada, and within the requirements of the codes of the local authority having jurisdiction.

Refer to section 5.3 of ANSI Z2213.1/NFPA 54 or sections 7.2, 7.3 or 7.4 of CSA B149 for venting requirements.

The furnace is not equipped with a draft hood to introduce dilution air to the chimney. The products of combustion will therefore have a higher concentration of water vapor within them. If the furnace is the only appliance served by the chimney, a tiled masonry chimney, regardless of tile size, must not be used without a suitably sized certified chimney liner and termination. Consider dedicated venting with a B Vent used as a liner in this case. See Dedicated Venting on page 11.

Multistory and common venting with other Category I gas fired appliances is permitted. The venting system must be in accordance with the National Gas Code, B149 in Canada, ANSI Z223.1/NFPA 54 in the United States, local codes, and approved engineering practices.

CAUTION

Combustion air must be free of acid forming chemicals such as sulphur, fluorine and chlorine. These elements are found in aerosol sprays, detergents, bleaches, cleaning solvents, air fresheners, paint and varnish removers, refrigerants, and many other commercial and household products.

When burned in a gas flame, vapors from these products form acid compounds. Acid compounds increase the dew point temperature of the flue products and are highly corrosive after they condense.

Any furnace failure caused by corrosive elements is excluded from warranty coverage.

The following types of installation sites (but not limited to the following) will require OUTDOOR AIR for combustion because of chemical exposures: commercial buildings, buildings with indoor swimming pools, furnaces installed in laundry rooms, furnaces in hobby or craft rooms, furnaces installed near chemical storage areas.

Exposure to the following substances in the combustion air supply (but not limited to the following) will also require OUTDOOR AIR for combustion:

Aerosols, particularly CFC based or propelled aerosols

Air fresheners

Airplane Glue and similar adhesives and cements

Ammonia, as commonly found in permanent wave solutions used in hair dressing salons

Antistatic fabric softeners used in clothes dryers

Carbon tetrachloride

Chlorinated cleaners and waxes

Chlorine and bromine based swimming pool chemicals

Deicing salts or chemicals, e.g. rock salt, etc.

Dry cleaning fluids such as perchloroethylene

Fumes from curing polyurethane and similar substances

Halogen based refrigerants including R-12 and R-22

Hydrochloric acid, muriatic acid and other acid based masonry washing and curing materials

Printer’s inks, paint removers, varnishes, varsol, toluene, etc.

Water softener salt and chemicals

WARNING

SELECT APPROPRIATE VENTING MATERIALS AND ENSURE PROPER CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLES. INADEQUATE VENTING OR FAILURE TO MAINTAIN PROPER CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLES MAY ALLOW THE ACCUMULATION OF THE PRODUCTS OF COMBUSTION WITHIN THE BUILDING RESULTING IN FIRE, NAUSEA, OR ASPHYXIATION.

DO NOT USE AN UNLINED MASONRY CHIMNEY TO VENT THIS FURNACE. THE USE OF AN UNLINED MASONRY CHIMNEY INCREASES THE RISK OF CONDENSATE FORMATION, WHICH MAY CAUSE THE CHIMNEY TO DETERIORATE, ALLOWING COMBUSTION PRODUCTS AND CONDENSATE TO COLLECT IN THE BUILDING.

8

MODEL F80A

IMPORTANT: THIS FURNACE IS NOT TO BE VENTED IN THE SAME CHIMNEY OR VENTING SYSTEM SERVING A SOLID FUEL APPLIANCE (WOOD OR COAL). IF THE FURNACE IS TO BE VENTED INTO A CHIMNEY THAT NO LONGER SERVES A FIREPLACE, THE FIREPLACE OPENING IS TO BE PERMANENTLY SEALED.

The furnace must connect to a listed chimney (B-1 Vent), or vent complying with a recognized standard, or a suitably sized, constructed and lined masonry chimney. The chimney lining method and material must comply with local requirements. Use corrosion resistant material meeting nationally recognized standards for vent construction.

Avoid over sizing the furnace for the application. A furnace selected as close as possible for the actual building heat loss will have longer firing cycles which will reduce the potential for damaging condensate formation in the venting system.

Take the building orientation and the presence of other buildings or other nearby structures into consideration when planning the venting system location. Certain external structures could create air turbulence around the vent termination leading to downdrafts and similar venting problems.

If local experience indicates that condensation problems are probable, provide for drainage and disposal of venting system condensate.

VENT SIZING

The venting system, taking all appliances to be vented into consideration, must be sized in accordance with the Venting Tables and rules published in the current editions of ANSI Z223.1 / NFPA 54, National Fuel Gas Code in the United States, or B149, Natural Gas and Propane Installation Code in Canada. An undersized venting system will not permit the complete removal of products of combustion, and an oversized venting system will not heat up quickly enough to avoid condensation formation.

VENT INSTALLATION

Vents and chimneys usually extend vertically with offsets not exceeding 45° from vertical. Consider all offsets greater than 45° from vertical as horizontal runs. Include their length in the total horizontal run calculation.

Horizontal runs should be as short as practical and not exceed 75% of the vent height.

The vent height must be a minimum of 5 feet above the highest appliance in a Category I venting system.

Minimize vent connector horizontal runs to the extent possible for best performance. Avoid unnecessary fittings. For example, an offset constructed of 45° elbows is generally better than one made of 90° elbows.

Support all horizontal sections of the venting system with pipe hangers, strap or equivalent at each joint to prevent sagging. Horizontal segments must slope upward from the furnace to vent or chimney with a minimum 1/4 inch per foot.

When the vent tables from ANSI 223.1/NFPA 54 or B149permit more than one pipe diameter for the vent or vent connector, the smallest size is usually the best choice to help reduce the potential for condensation formation.

When using manufactured venting (B-1 Vent for example), follow the vent manufacturer’s instructions. UL listed B-1 venting both flexible and rigid, are suitable venting materials for the furnace.

The installer must ensure that the venting of the furnace and all other gas appliances connected to the vent or chimney function properly.

INDUCER BLOWER INSTALLATION

This furnace can be installed in upflow, counterflow and horizontal applications. The furnace is capable of being vented vertically through the top panel, left or right through the side panels. Each furnace is assembled and supplied set up for vertical venting applications. If the installer chooses to vent through the side panels such as in horizontal or counterflow applications, rotation of the inducer will be required. In addition, the pressure switch will require relocation in the event of a right hand inducer discharge installation.

INDUCER ROTATION STEPS ON 70-3, 70-4, 85-3, 85-4, 100-3, 100-4, 100-5, 115-5 and 135-5 (See Figure 4A below for Right Exhaust, Figure 4B below for Left exhaust)

1.Ensure all power to the furnace is disconnected.

2.Disconnect inducer wiring and pressure switch tubing.

3.Remove four screws securing inducer plate to flue box cover plate.

4.Place inducer plate and gasket in desired position and locate mounting holes required. NOTE: INDUCER PLATE AND GASKET MUST BOTH BE ROTATED.

NOTE: Any holes not concealed by the inducer gasket require the use of screws to plug the holes.

5.Secure inducer plate to flue box cover using four screws in the correct mounting position.

6.Carefully remove side panel knockout corresponding to the venting application and install knockout underneath top panel using two screws (field supplied).

7.In the event of a right hand discharge inducer application, the pressure switch will have to be relocated to the underside of the top panel (see Figure 4A below ) using existing holes in top panel. The pressure switch tubing will have to be cut to the length listed in Table 4 on page 10 if inducer is mounted in right hand configuration.

8.Connect inducer wiring and pressure switch tubing to the inducer housing.

FIGURE 4A: RIGHT INDUCER POSITION

 

 

C2

C3

OFF

ON

C1

 

Inducer Plate mounting screws (all models except 35-2, 50-3)

FIGURE 4B: LEFT INDUCER POSITION

 

 

C2

C3

OFF

ON

C1

 

9

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