United States Stove 1600M, 1600M User Manual

1.24 Mb
Loading...

UNITED STATES

STOVE COMPANY

Keeping North America Warm

Since 1869

MODEL: 1600M

WOOD and COAL FURNACE

SAFETY NOTICE: IF THIS FURNACE IS NOT PROPERLY INSTALLED, A HOUSE FIRE MAY RESULT. FOR YOUR SAFETY, FOLLOW THE INSTALLATION DIRECTIONS. CONTACT LOCAL BUILDING OR FIRE OFFICIALS ABOUT RESTRICTIONS AND INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS IN YOUR AREA. REFER TO MARKINGS ON APPLIANCE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.

Installation/Operator's Manual #851547A

1

INTRODUCTION

Thank you for your purchase of a U.S. Stove Wood and Coal burning furnace. Your decision to buy our Clayton Furnace was undoubtedly reached after much careful thought and consideration. We are very proud you chose the U.S. Stove furnace and trust you will receive the comfort and economy that others realize when heating with a U.S. Stove product.

Your dealer is important in your experience with the Furnace not only in your purchase, but in his recommendations for professional installation in your home. The qualified professional installer (as recommended by your dealer) has been expertly trained in solid-fuel furnace installation to assure the safety and comfort for your family while saving you money. Trust your experienced installer. He is a specialist in his field.

IMPORTANT

Before installing and using your Clayton Furnace, please read the following pages thoroughly and carefully. If you follow the instructions, your Clayton furnace will give you safe and more dependable service in the years to come.

First step; check your local codes. This installation must comply with their rulings.

Do not install this furnace in a mobile home or trailer.

Always have a smoke or ionization detector and a CO detector installed in your home.

To prevent injury or damage, do not allow anyone who is unfamiliar with the furnace to operate it.

Spend some time with your furnace to become well acquainted with different settings and how each will affect its burning patterns. It is impossible to state just how each setting will affect your furnace because of the variations in each installation.

DISCLAIMER NOTICE

The BTU ranges and heating capacity specifications are provided as a guide only and in no way guarantee the output or capacity of the units. The actual BTU output depends on the type of fuel being burned and its conditions, the thermostat setting, the draft adjustment and the chimney to which the unit is attached. The actual area that the unit will heat depends on factors such as the conditions of the building, heat loss, type of construction, amount of insulation, type of air movement, and the location of the unit, and more importantly, your duct work and return air facility.

WARNING:

Do not alter this appliance in any way. Doing so may void your warranty.

These instructions comply with CAN/CSA-B365

LOCATING YOUR FURNACE

The furnace is to be installed maintaining clearances as shown in illustration.

Do not place the furnace directly on a combustible floor. If you're placing it on a combustible floor, an approved fire retardant material equivalent to 3/8" UL Listed millboard should be placed under the furnace. The material must extend at least 16" in front of and 8" on either side of the fuel-loading and ash-removal doors, and underneath the chimney connector and extending at least 2" on either side of the chimney connector.

CLEARANCES

FLAMMABLE WALL

20"

15"

22"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(TOP VIEW)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINIMUM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLEARANCE TO

 

 

 

 

 

FLUE

 

 

FLAMMABLE WALLS

12"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAUTION: Do not

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

store combustible or

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

flammable material

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

near furnace.

REDUCED CLEARANCES

NFPA guidelines and most codes permit reduced clearances to combustible walls and ceilings if adequate protection is added. A common mistake is to assume that sheet metal, masonry, or millboard placed directly against a wall protects it. Materials installed in this manner give very little protection. These materials are good heat conductors, so they will be almost as hot on their back side as they are on the exposed side. Therefore, the combustible wall behind is still a fire hazard.

A wall can be kept cool using these items but only if they're mounted and spaced out from the wall by an inch or two to allow free circulation of room air behind the protective panel. The protective panel should start within a few inches of floor level.

The three rules to follow when constructing wall protectors:

1.Non-combustibility of all materials including mounting or supporting.

2.A well ventilated air space between protector or wall.

3.Sufficient strength and rigidity so that the protector and air space will be durable.

2" FROM CEILING

CONSTRUCTING

NON-FLAMMABLE

PROTECTIVE COVERING

AND ALL SUPPORTS MUST

WALLS

BE NON-COMBUSTIBLE.

1" AIR SPACE

2" FROM FLOOR

CHIMNEY REQUIREMENTS

A fireclay lined masonry or Class A 103HT All-Fuel Metal Insulated Chimney must be used in all airtight wood furnace installations. The minimum recommended flue size for the U.S. Stove Clayton Furnace is 6" (inside diameter) for round flues, and 7" x 7" for square flues. When making new chimney installations, always follow the chimney manufacturers instructions.

2

NOTE: Type of chimney: Class A All-Fuel UL 103HT

TOP OF CHIMNEY MUST BE 2 FT. ABOVE HIGHEST POINT OF ROOF WITHIN

10 FEET

2 FT.

MINIMUMS

MINIMAL 3 FT.

FROM TOP OF CHIMNEY TO POINT AT WHICH IT PASSES

THROUGH THE ROOF.

CAP SHOULD HELP PREVENT DOWNDRAFT WHILE STILL PROVIDING

ADEQUATE EXHAUST.

3 FT.

MINIMUM

RECOMMENDED

MINIMAL 20 FT. HEIGHT

CHIMNEY FLUE

 

SHOULD BE

CHIMNEY FLUE

CONSTANT DIAMETER

MUST BE AS

THROUGHOUT ITS

LARGE OR 20%

ENTIRE HEIGHT.

LARGER THAN

APPROVED

FURNACE FLUE

PIPE

CHIMNEY

 

CLEANOUT DOOR

 

SHOULD HAVE

 

AIRTIGHT FIT. DO

 

NOT LEAVE OPEN

 

WHEN FURNACE IS

 

IN OPERATION.

 

CHIMNEY THIMBLE SHOULD BE

CONSTRUCTED OF FIRE CLAY, AND

SHOULD FIT TIGHTLY TO FLUE PIPE.

1.The furnace should be the only heating appliance using a chimney flue. One furnace per flue.

2.A masonry chimney should have a tile or stainless steel liner.

3.The masonry chimney should not have any missing mortar or loose bricks.

4.There should be no mortar or parts of the chimney blocking the chimney flue.

5.There should be a two inch clearance between any chimney (masonry or metal) and combustibles (such as the house).

6.The chimney should extend at least 2' above the highest point of the house, or 2' above the point at which the chimney is 10' from the roof.

7.The chimney should be relatively straight and vertical.

8.The portion of an all-fuel metal chimney that extends above the roof should be well secured.

9.A masonry chimney should be built on footings and not attached to the house.

10.A rain cap, complete with an animal or bird screen, should be installed on top of the chimney.

CREOSOTE — FORMATION AND NEED

FOR REMOVAL

When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other organic vapors, which combine with expelled moisture to form creosote. The creosote vapors condense in the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow-burning fire. As a result, creosote residue accumulates

on the flue lining. When ignited, this creosote makes an extremely hot fire.

The chimney connector and chimney should be inspected at least twice monthly during the heating season to determine if a creosote build-up has occurred. If creosote has accumulated, it should be removed to reduce the risk of a chimney fire.

SMOKE PIPE INSTALLATION

Clearances to combustible materials (i.e. paneling, ceiling tile, sheet rock, plaster, draperies, casements or wood trim, etc.) will vary with the type of flue connection used. Be sure to maintain the specified clearances for your type of installation.

TYPE OF FLUE

REQUIRED

CONNECTION

CLEARANCE

24 Gauge or Heavier

18"

Single Wall Stainless Steel

 

or Black Pipe

 

Double Wall Stainless Steel

6"

Class A 103HT All-Fuel or Equivalent

2"

According to NFPA standards, single wall stove pipes can be within 9" of combustibles provided an approved fire retardant material covered with 28 gauge sheet metal, spaced out 1" on non-combustible spacers, is utilized. See illustration.

18" 9" 18"

CEILING OR WALL

When using a Class A or double wall flue pipe connection, follow the manufacturer's instructions.

When constructing a single wall smoke pipe, the following guidelines must be observed.

1.The connector pipe should be 24 gauge or heavier stainless steel or black pipe.

2.Secure all joints with three #8 screws.

3.If the connector pipe must pass through a wall, an approved insulated or ventilated thimble, at least three times the diameter of the smoke pipe must be used. (i.e. a 6" diameter smoke pipe needs an 18" thimble).

4.The connector pipe should never be used as a chimney.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR

ALL CONNECTOR PIPES

The connector pipe must be constructed and installed so that it

3

maintains clearances, keeps condensation and creosote within the pipe, and is capable of withstanding a two to three thousand degree chimney fire.

1.The connector pipe should slant down toward the furnace a minimum of 1/4" to the foot. At no time should the pipe turn downward toward the chimney or run horizontal.

2.There should be no more than two 90 degree elbows.

3.The connector pipe should never be longer than six feet. If it is absolutely necessary to make a run of more than six feet (not recommended) use extra support brackets every 3 feet.

4.The connector pipe should never be reduced to a smaller size than flue opening on the furnace.

5.The connector pipe should not block the flue of the chimney or extend into it in any way.

6.A good airtight thimble should be used to hold the connector pipe in the chimney. It should be constructed so the connector pipe can be removed for cleaning.

7.The connector pipe should not leave the heated portion of the building to reach the chimney.

8.The connector pipe should not pass from one story to the next before entering the chimney, nor should it pass through any closed or enclosed space.

9.The connector pipe and any elbows must be of 24 ga. or greater.

10.The connector pipe should not be located near or in a walk way or well traveled area.

11.All male ends of connector pipe should run or point towards the furnace.

DAMPERS ON STOVE PIPES

When you have installed the connector pipe between your furnace and the chimney, tap the pipe hard with your fingernail. Remember the sound it makes - it will be a "ting" echoing inside the stove pipe. If later you tap and hear a muffled thud, you are building up soot in the pipe and should clean it. This pipe should be cleaned at least once or twice during the heating season.

DO NOT CONNECT TWO HEATERS TO THE SAME CHIMNEY FLUE. The National Fire Prevention Association recommends that woodburning appliances vent into a separate flue from gas or oil furnaces. If such an installation is contemplated, first check with a local building inspector to find out if a separate flue for a woodburner is required.

If codes allow, use extreme care in making such installations. Be sure that one pipe is higher than the other so that the two openings will not be opposite each other. Also, when connecting two heaters into the same chimney flue, the flue size should be large enough to handle both heaters. Very few codes and standards allow same flue connection. Such installations can cause severe problems. Gas hoods and barometric dampers allow excess air into the chimney causing cooling of the flue gases and a greater creosote build-up potential. If the same flue connections are used, chimneys must be inspected more frequently and the chimney should be cleaned any time the creosote deposits exceed 1/4" thickness. A creosote fire in such a chimney can burn out of control because of the air leak through the barometric damper or gas hood. Keeping the chimney clean and burning well-seasoned wood is absolutely necessary. This type of installation does require more frequent inspection and maintenance.

HEATED AIR DISCHARGE

The Clayton furnace is designed for use as a supplemental heating source. When used as a supplementary furnace, the 1600M is connected in conjunction with an oil, gas, or electric furnace to the existing duct work which distributes the heated air into several rooms and/or areas.

Though United States Stove Company expressly Does Not recommend the use of its furnaces to be installed and/or used as a free-standing heater, it is possible to achieve a reasonably safe and functional installation IF certain standard procedures are followed. The following are guidlines only and are intended to enable the furnace user to obtain resonable efficiency from his furnace, and with due respect to safety when installing as a "freestanding heater". If installed correctly, and in accordance with the instructions found in this manual, your warm air furnace may be installed as a "space heater" within living quarters, cabins, garage, or workshop. Please adhere to the following:

1)The use of a cold air return and/or filter box is mandatory. This will not only inscrease your blower life and provide filtered air, it will also help prevent the blower or blowers from "capturing" heated air exiting from the top of the furnace heat outlets.

2)If installed as purchased , without directing the heat away from the furnace itself, it will simply sit and cycle, turning the blowers off and on. The thermostat may not function properly.

3)All larger furnaces (or those with multi-speed blowers) absolutely require BACK PRESSURE to prevent premature winding failure. If allowed to operate at high RPM (As in "FREE AIR" mode - no ductwork or flow restrictions) the windings overheat, insulation melts and the motor simply burns up - not covered under warranty.

CONNECTING HOT AIR DUCT TO FURNACE

We strongly recommend that the warm air duct work be installed by a home heating specialist. If doing the installation yourself, before you decide which installation will best suit your needs, consult a qualified heating technician and follow his recommendations as to the safest and most efficient method of installation. The warm air duct must be constructed of metal with a minimum temperature rating of 250°F

The following illustrations are the only acceptable configurations when installed with existing oil or gas furnaces.

INSTALLATION EXAMPLES

INSTALLATION NO.1

With this installation, a back draft damper is inserted into the heat run before the plenum of the existing furnace to prevent air from the existing furnace to blow back into the furnace when it is not in use. When a back draft damper is employed, it should be located as close to the existing furnace plenum as practical.

4

INSTALLATION NO. 2

INSTALLATION NO. 3

Extending the hot air duct from the furnace into the existing plenum will help direct the flow of air from the 1600M as well as the flow in the existing furnace. Ducting entering the existing plenum at an angle (approximately 45 degrees) will facilitate air flow from the furnace while diverting air from the existing furnace.

The baffle on this system should be made the full width of the furnace plenum in order to properly direct the air into the distribution ducts.

 

 

 

 

EXISTING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOTBLAST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FURNACE

FURNACE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2" MIN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1" MIN.

9 FEET

 

 

 

 

9 FEET

1" MIN.

 

 

 

HOT AIR

 

 

 

 

 

PLENUM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXISTING

 

 

 

HOTBLAST

 

 

 

 

 

FURNACE

 

 

 

FURNACE

 

 

 

 

(if used)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOT AIR DUCT

MINIMUM CLEARANCES

TO COMBUSTIBLES

RETURN AIR IS VERY IMPORTANT

When installing a Clayton Furnace, return air must be incorporated into the system. Return air can be provided by installing a separate duct system or by tying into the cold air return of an existing gas or oil furnace. The cold air return duct can be connected to the furnace with either a factory manufactured U.S. Stove filter box or an equivalent fabricated from sheet metal (See pages 22-23).

When installing a cold air return, the following minimum size should be maintained to insure proper furnace performance.

Model 1600M — 16" x 20" or equivalent (320 sq. in.)

Failure to provide return air ducts of the specified size voids the furnace warranty.

A filter should be installed in the cold air return. Furnace filters should be checked and cleaned or replaced regularly.

If return air is not provided, the warm air distributed into your home will be restricted and the efficiency of the furnace decreased. Without a return air system, warm air will be drawn into your basement, unnecessarily heating unused areas of the home. In extreme cases, if your basement or utility room is fairly air tight, the large blower on the 1600M could depressurize the room and pull toxic flue gases from the furnace, a gas water heater, or gas furnace. The fumes could then be distributed throughout the house.

CAUTION: The warm air supply outlet of the supplementary furnace should not be connected to the cold-air return inlet of the central furnace because a possibility exists of components of the central furnace overheating causing it not to operate properly.

INCORRECT

INSTALLATION

NO RETURN

AIR PROVIDED

HOTBLAST

EXISTING

FURNACE

FURNACE

COMBUSTION AIR

All fires need air (specifically oxygen) to burn. Furnaces, fireplaces, and wood-burning furnaces need enough oxygen for complete combustion of their fuels. The incomplete combustion that takes place when a furnace is "air starved" causes carbon monoxide (CO) to be formed in quantities that can be dangerous inside a well-sealed house. Having a source of combustion air from outside prevents this "air starvation" of the furnace. A simple positive air supply can be constructed using dryer vent and a

modified termination.

5

ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS

Your furnace is shipped from the factory in four (2) packages. 1) the furnace, 2) the blower. The draft kit and parts box containing all parts necessary, and the fan thermodisc kit is boxed and packed in the firebox or ash pan. Before assembling the furnace, check to make sure there is no shipping damage, and that all necessary parts are located in the firebox. See parts list below.

If you find shipping damage or any of the parts missing, contact the dealer immediately. He will take the necessary steps to correct the problem.

Parts List

All models include the following:

 

(2)

Door Handles

(1) 1/4" x 1" Hex Bolt

(1)

Fuel Door Latch

(1)

Ash Door Latch

(1)

3/8" Lock Nut

(2)

1/2" Washers

(1) 3/8" Jam Nut

(9)

1/4" Kep Nuts

(2)

3/8" x 2 1/2" Carriage Bolt

(2)

Spin Draft

(6)

1/4" x 3/4" Hex Bolts

(4)

Brass Coil Knobs

(1)

Smoke Door

(1)

Shaker Handle

(1) Hinge Bracket

 

 

(2)

1/4" x 1-1/4" Carriage Bolts

 

 

(2)

Smoke Door Clips

DOOR HANDLE INSTALLATION

Insert door handle into door. From rear side of door place 1/2" washer over threaded part of door handle. Then attach 1/2" lock nut, being careful not to over tighten. Handle should turn freely.

FUEL & ASH DOOR LATCH INSTALLATION

With two 1/4" x 3/4" hex bolts, attach the door latch to the door latch mounting bracket on the left side of door frame as illustrated. Adjust latch until door closes securely.

FUEL DOOR

ILLUSTRATION

ASH DOOR

ILLUSTRATION

LOCK

WASHER

HEX

 

NUTS

6

 

BRICK INSTALLATION

(PRE-INSTALLED AT FACTORY)

NOTE: Prior to operation, be sure to remove brick retaining strips.

MODEL 1600M - (6) BRICKS ON EACH SIDE

FIREBOX LEFT SIDE

BRICK RETAINING STRIP

SLIDE 4th BRICK BACK

BEFORE INSTALLING 5th

AND 6th BRICK

FIREBOX:

The firebrick must be inserted on each side resting on the grate frame. First, place cut brick in each back corner. Place remaining brick in place.

+ 14 hidden pages