Royal Appliance Air Furnace User Manual

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Installation, Operation and

Maintenance Manual

Oil Fired Warm Air Furnace

HO-B Series Up-flow or Horizontal Model

THE INSTALLATION OF THIS FURNACE SHALL BE IN

ACCORDANCE WITH THE REGULATION OF

AUTHORITIES HAVING JURISDICTION AND NFPA

STANDARD 31 (U.S.A.) OR CSA STANDARD B139 (CAN.).

FOR YOUR SAFETY

Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors or liquids in the vicinity of this or any other appliance.

Oneida Royal Division

Utica, New York

Please read this manual completely before beginning installation. These instructions must be kept with the furnace for future reference.

29733 R2 06/01/2003

How to read an Oneida Royal Model Number:

 

 

 

 

 

 

HO B 120 F B A 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Highboy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooling Airflow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 – 3 Tons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 – 4 Tons

2nd Generation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 – 5 Tons

Heat Exchanger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil Burner Mfgr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A – Beckett

Nominal Output (BTUH)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R – Riello

80 – Compact Highboy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

120 – Standard Highboy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blower System

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B – Belt Drive

Breech Location

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D – Direct Drive

F – Front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the above example, the furnace is an Oneida Royal Highboy with the 2nd generation heat exchanger, standard size, front breeched, belt drive, Beckett Oil Burner, 4 tons of cooling.

In this Installation, Operation & Maintenance Manual, the models will be abbreviated as 80F for compact models, and 120F for standard models.

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Table of Contents

1.

Introduction..........................................................................................................................................................

4

2.

Heat Loss..............................................................................................................................................................

4

3.

Location of Unit ...................................................................................................................................................

4

4.

Air Conditioning Applications ............................................................................................................................

6

5.

Combustion Air....................................................................................................................................................

6

6.

Chimney Venting .................................................................................................................................................

7

7.

Barometric Damper Control................................................................................................................................

8

8.

Furnace Controls .................................................................................................................................................

9

9.

Electrical Connections ........................................................................................................................................

9

10.

Humidifier .........................................................................................................................................................

10

11.

Oil Tank.............................................................................................................................................................

10

12.

Piping Installation............................................................................................................................................

10

13.

Oil Filter ............................................................................................................................................................

11

14.

Oil Burner Nozzles...........................................................................................................................................

11

15. Combustion Chamber ......................................................................................................................................

11

16.

Burner Electrodes............................................................................................................................................

12

17.

Oil Burner Set Up.............................................................................................................................................

12

18.

Circulating Air Blower .....................................................................................................................................

14

19.

Maintenance and Service................................................................................................................................

15

20.

Furnace Installation Set Up ............................................................................................................................

16

21.

Operating Instructions ....................................................................................................................................

17

Table A-1 Beckett AF Oil Burner Set-Up..............................................................................................................

18

Table A-2 Riello 40F Oil Burner Set-Up ...............................................................................................................

18

Table A-3 Direct Drive Blower Set-Up..................................................................................................................

19

Table A-4 Direct Drive Blower Characteristics ...................................................................................................

19

Table A-5 Belt Drive Blower Set-Up .....................................................................................................................

20

Table A-6 Belt Drive Blower Characteristics.......................................................................................................

20

General Dimensions ...............................................................................................................................................

21

Wiring Diagram: Oil Furnace With ST9103 EFT & R7184 Control.....................................................................

22

Wiring Diagram: Oil Furnace With ST9103 EFT & Riello Oil Burner.................................................................

23

Wiring Notes: ..........................................................................................................................................................

24

R7184 Detailed Sequence of Operation................................................................................................................

25

Table C-1: ST9103 Detailed Sequence of Operation ..........................................................................................

29

R7184 LED Diagnostic Light..................................................................................................................................

31

Table C-2: Cad Cell Resistance............................................................................................................................

31

Table C-3: R7184 Troubleshooting ......................................................................................................................

32

Table C-4: System and General Troubleshooting ..............................................................................................

36

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IMPORTANT:

SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS FOR FUTURE REFERENCE

1. INTRODUCTION

Please read these instructions completely and carefully before installing and operating the furnace.

The furnace must be installed and set up by a qualified contractor

MODEL 80F

Model 80F is an oil-fired upflow forced air furnace, with an output capacity range of 58,100 BTU/Hr. to 78,900 BTU/Hr. The 80F furnace equipped with a direct drive blower may be installed in both horizontal positions.

MODEL 120F

Model 120F is an oil-fired upflow forced air furnace, with an output capacity range of 87,700 BTU/Hr. to 113,400 BTU/Hr. The 120F furnace equipped with a direct drive blower may be installed in both horizontal positions.

NOTE: Furnace models equipped with belt drive blowers are not suitable for horizontal applications.

Both 80F & 120F Model furnaces are listed with the

Canadian Standards Association, (CSA), complies with both Canadian and American (U.S.) standards for use with No. 1 (Stove) and No. 2 (Furnace) Oil. Please refer to the tables in the appendix for performance and dimensional data.

DO NOT USE GASOLINE, CRANK CASE OIL, OR ANY OIL CONTAINING GASOLINE.

In the United States of America, the installation of the furnace and related equipment shall be installed in accordance with the regulations of NFPA No. 31,

Installation of Oil Burning Equipment, as well as in accordance with local codes.

In Canada, the installation of the furnace and related equipment shall be installed in accordance with the regulations of CAN/CSA - B139, Installation Code For Oil Burning Equipment, as well as in accordance with local codes.

When installation or application questions arise, regulations prescribed in the National Codes and Local

Regulations take precedence over the general instructions provided with this installation manual. When in doubt, please consult your local authorities.

All models are shipped assembled and pre-wired. The furnace should be carefully inspected for damage when being unpacked.

2. HEAT LOSS

To determine the correct furnace and firing rate for an application, it is necessary to calculate the maximum hourly heat loss of the building based on local design conditions. In new construction, the heat loss should be calculated on a room-by-room basis to enable proper sizing of the trunk and branch ducts. In retrofit applications, a building shell (overall) heat loss calculation may be used.

In the United States, Manual J. titled, "Load Calculation" published by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, describes a suitable procedure for calculating the maximum hourly heat loss.

In Canada, the maximum hourly heat loss may be calculated in accordance with the procedures described in the manuals of the Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), or by other method prescribed by authorities having jurisdiction that are suitable for local conditions.

3. LOCATION OF UNIT

The furnace should be located such that the flue connection to the chimney is short, direct and consists of as few elbows as possible. When possible, the unit should be centralized with respect to the supply and return air duct work. A central location minimizes the trunk duct sizing. All models may be installed on combustible floors.

Minimum installation clearances are listed in Table 1.

Table 1: Clearance to Combustibles

 

 

HO-B – All Models

 

 

 

 

Location

 

Up-flow

Horizontal

 

 

Top

 

2 in.

2 in.

 

 

 

Bottom

 

0 in.

1 in.

 

 

 

S/A Plenum

 

1 in.

1 in.

 

 

 

Rear

 

1 in.

1 in.

 

 

 

Sides

 

1 in.

1 in.

 

 

 

Front

 

9 in. 1

9 in. 1

 

 

Flue Pipe

 

9 in.

9 in.

 

 

 

Enclosure

 

Closet

Alcove

 

 

1 24” clearance is

required for servicing.

 

 

4

 

 

 

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06/01/2003

 

 

 

 

TABLE 2.: GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS

 

 

 

 

BECKETT AFG BURNER

 

 

 

 

 

MODEL

INPUT

OUTPUT

 

 

NOZZLE

BURNER

 

BURNER

PUMP

U.S. GPH

BTU/Hr.

 

 

(Delavan)

MODEL

 

HEAD

PRESSURE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80F

0.50

 

58,100

 

 

0.50 / 70° W

AF76BO

 

F0

100 PSIG

0.65

 

68,000

 

 

0.65 / 70° W

AF76BN

 

F3

 

0.70

 

78,900

 

 

0.70 / 70° W

AF76BN

 

F3

 

 

120F

0.75

 

87,700

 

 

0.75 / 70° W

AF76BZHS

 

F4

100 PSIG

0.85

 

98,800

 

 

0.85 / 70° W

 

 

1.00

 

113,400

 

 

1.00 / 70° W

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES:

OVER-FIRE DRAFT FOR ALL MODELS IS -0.02 IN. W.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATIC PLATE DIAMETER: 3-3/8 inch for AF76BO and 2-3/4 inch for AF76XN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RIELLO 40F3 BURNER

 

 

 

 

 

MODEL

INPUT

 

OUTPUT

 

 

NOZZLE

 

PUMP

TURBULATOR

 

AIR BAND

 

U.S. GPH

 

BTU/Hr.

 

 

(Delavan)

 

PRESSURE

 

SETTING

 

SETTING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80F

0.50

 

58,000

 

 

0.40 / 60°W

 

160 PSIG

1.5

 

2.25

 

0.60

 

73,000

 

 

0.50 / 60°W

 

150 PSIG

1.5

 

2.5

 

 

0.70

 

79,000

 

 

0.60 / 60°W

 

145 PSIG

2.0

 

3.0

 

120F

0.75

 

87,000

 

 

0.60 / 60°W

 

150 PSIG

2.0

 

3.5

 

0.85

 

100,000

 

 

0.70 / 60°W

 

150 PSIG

2.5

 

4.0

 

 

0.95

 

112,000

 

 

0.75 / 60°W

 

160 PSIG

3.0

 

6.0

 

NOTE:

OVER-FIRE DRAFT FOR ALL MODELS IS -0.02 IN. W.C.

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: The recommended installation clearances do not take into consideration the clearances necessary to replace the air filter or perform other routine maintenance.

UP-FLOW INSTALLATION

Both furnaces models have been assembled for installation in the up-flow position. Maintain all clearances to combustibles as outlined in Table 1. Suggestion; as a measure to prevent fuel oil from accumulating in locations other than the fire pot, as could be the case in the event of nozzle drip, install the furnace with an approximate 2 degree slope from the oil burner casing towards the fire pot. Use shims made of noncombustible material.

Heat

Exchanger

Support

Screw

In the upflow position, the heat exchanger support screw shown in picture may be removed. This may be preferable if the furnace rear panel will be inaccessible after installation. The screw must be removed if the heat exchanger must be removed from the cabinet. Do not remove this screw if installing furnace in a horizontal position.

HORIZONTAL INSTALLATION

The furnaces are assembled and shipped ready for installation in the up-flow position. The direct drive equipped furnace may be installed in either of the horizontal positions; warm air discharging left or warm air-discharging right by following these steps:

1.Rotate the furnace 90° to the desired position.

2.Remove the three nut and washer sets fastening the oil burner assembly to the furnace (Beckett Burner) or loosen the burner mount Allen screw (Riello burner). Rotate the oil burner assembly to be in the normal upright position.

3.Re-align the oil burner assembly to the combustion chamber (fire-pot), then secure into place with the three nut and washer sets (Beckett burner) or by retightening the mounting Allen screw (Riello burner).

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29733 R2 06/01/2003

NON-SUSPENDED INSTALLATION

Maintain clearances to combustibles as outlined in Table 1. Installation on a combustible floor requires a clearance of 1 inch. This can be done by using a noncombustible material such as one-inch thick channel iron or similar material. The furnace must be supported in such a way as to not allow twisting or sagging of the cabinet. Suggestion; as a measure to prevent fuel oil from accumulating in locations other than the fire pot, as could be the case in the event of nozzle drip, install the furnace with an approximate 2 degree slope from the oil burner casing towards the fire pot. Use shims made of noncombustible material.

SUSPENDED INSTALLATION

Refer to Figure 1. Maintain clearances to combustibles as outlined in Table 1. The furnace may be suspended by field fabricating a cradle of angle iron and threaded rod. Secure the furnace with 2 inch minimum slotted angle or equivalent, as shown in Figure 1. The furnace must be supported in such a way as to not allow twisting or sagging of the cabinet. Position the supports so as to not interfere with accessing the burner and blower compartments. Suggestion; as a measure to prevent fuel oil from accumulating in locations other than the fire pot, as could be the case in the event of nozzle drip, install the furnace with an approximate 2 degree slope from the oil burner casing towards the fire pot.

4. AIR CONDITIONING APPLICATIONS

If the furnace is used in conjunction with air conditioning, the furnace shall be installed in parallel with or upstream from the evaporator coil to avoid condensation in the heat exchanger. In a parallel installation, the dampers or air controlling means must prevent chilled air from entering the furnace. If the dampers are manually operated, there must be a means of control to prevent the operation of either system unless the dampers are in the full heat or full cool position. The air heated by the furnace shall not pass through a refrigeration unit unless the unit is

specifically approved for such service.

The blower speed must be checked and adjusted to compensate for the pressure drop caused by the evaporator coil. Refer to Appendix B for recommended wiring and electrical connections of the air conditioning controls.

5. COMBUSTION AIR

When a furnace is installed in the full basement of a typical frame or brick house, infiltration is normally adequate to provide air for combustion and draft operation. If the furnace is installed in a closet or utility room, two (2) ventilation openings must be provided connecting to a well ventilated space (full basement, living room or other room opening thereto, but not a bedroom or bathroom). One opening shall be located 6" from the top and bottom of the enclosure at the front of the furnace. For furnaces located in buildings of unusually tight construction, such as those with high quality weather stripping, caulking, windows and doors, or storm sashed windows, or where basement windows are well sealed, a permanent opening communicating with a well ventilated attic or with the outdoors shall be provided, using a duct if necessary. Size all of the openings and associated ductwork by the standards provided in the latest Oil Installation Code editions; NFPA 31 in the United States, CAN/CSA B139 in Canada. Take all fuel burning appliances in the area into consideration when calculating combustion and ventilation air requirements.

The Model CAS-2B-90E Furnace Boot manufactured by Field Controls, Inc. may be used with the furnace to obtain combustion air directly from outdoors. Use of this device does not alter the need for ventilation air; however, it does provide a good direct source of combustion air and is connected directly to the oil burner.

Figure 1: Typical Suspended Application

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Figure 2: Common Chimney Problems

Installation Code For Oil Burning Equipment for correct

 

sizing information

Table 3: Common Chimney Problems

6. CHIMNEY VENTING

The chimney must be sized correctly and be in good repair. If the chimney is oversized, there is a high risk of the flue gases condensing resulting in damage to the chimney and other venting parts. This problem may be corrected by the use of an appropriately sized chimney liner.

If the chimney serves the furnace only, the vent should be sized at 4 inch minimum, 5 inch maximum. The table below is based on dedicated venting. If the furnace is to be co-vented with other appliances, refer to NFPA 31,

Standard for the Installation of Oil Burning Equipment and NFPA 211, Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances or CAN/CSA B139,

Refer to Figure 2

Key

Trouble

Diagnostic

Remedy

 

Top of chimney

 

Extend

 

 

chimney above

 

lower than

 

A

Observation

all surrounding

surrounding

 

 

objects within

 

objects

 

 

 

30 feet.

 

 

 

B

Chimney Cap

Observation

Remove

or ventilator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make opening

C

Coping restricts

Observation

as large as

opening.

inside of

 

 

 

 

 

chimney.

 

Obstruction in

Can be found

Use weight to

D

chimney

by light and

 

mirror reflecting

break and

 

 

conditions in

dislodge.

 

 

chimney.

 

 

 

 

Must be

 

Joist protruding

Lowering a light

handled by

E

on an extension

competent

into chimney.

 

cord.

masonry

 

 

 

 

 

contractor.

 

 

Smoke test -

Must be

 

 

build smudge

 

Break in

fire blocking off

handled by

F

other opening,

competent

chimney lining.

 

watching for

masonry

 

 

 

 

smoke to

contractor.

 

 

escape.

 

 

Collection of

 

Clean out with

 

Lower light on

weighted brush

 

soot at narrow

G

or bag of loose

space in flue

extension cord.

 

gravel on end

 

opening.

 

 

 

of line.

 

 

 

 

 

Lower light on

Change to

H

Offset

straight or to

extension cord.

 

 

long offset.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The least

 

 

 

important

 

Two or more

Found by

opening must

I

openings to the

inspection from

be closed,

 

same chimney.

basement.

using some

 

 

 

other chimney

 

 

 

flue.

 

 

 

Leaks should

 

Loose-seated

 

be eliminated

J

pipe in flue

Smoke test.

by cementing

 

opening.

 

all pipe

 

 

 

openings.

7

29733 R2 06/01/2003

Table 2: Common Chimney Problems - continued

Key

Trouble

Diagnostic

Remedy

 

 

Measurement

Length of pipe

 

 

of pipe from

must be

 

Smoke pipe

within or

reduced to

K

extends into

observation of

allow end of

 

chimney.

pipe by means

pipe to be flush

 

 

of a lowered

with inside of

 

 

light.

tile.

 

 

 

 

 

Failure to

 

 

 

extend the

By inspection

Extend partition

L

length of flue

or smoke test.

to floor level.

 

partition to the

 

 

 

 

floor.

 

 

M

Loose-fitted

Smoke test.

Close all leaks

clean-out door.

with cement.

 

 

NOTE: This furnace is approved for use with L-Vent.

NOTE: Maximum temperature for L-Vent is 575°F (300°C).

Table 4: Min. Chimney Base Temperatures (°F)

Model

 

Chimney Height (ft.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

20

28

 

36

 

 

Chimneys with Thermal Resistance less than R6

80F (060)

300

400

535

 

725

80F (070)

275

340

430

 

535

80F (080)

270

330

405

 

505

120F (090)

260

320

380

 

475

120F (100)

250

300

355

 

430

120F (120)

225

300

365

 

430

Model

 

Chimney Height (ft.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

20

28

 

36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chimneys with Thermal Resistance greater than R6

80F (060)

185

200

220

250

80F (070)

175

185

205

220

80F (080)

175

185

195

215

120F (090)

175

185

195

210

120F (100)

165

185

195

205

 

 

 

 

 

120F (120)

165

185

195

205

IMPORTANT: The chimney must be capable of providing sufficient draft at all times for the safe removal of the products of combustion.

The chimney should be tested under “winter” conditions; doors and windows closed, all other fossil fuel burning

appliances on, clothes dryer on, bathroom fans on, etc. If the chimney cannot overcome the competition for air, it will be necessary to access the reason for it, and take corrective action. If the chimney is found to be sized correctly and in good repair, it will probably be necessary to re-evaluate the availability of combustion and ventilation air, and take corrective action.

The flue pipe should be as short as possible with horizontal pipes sloping upward toward the chimney at a rate of one quarter inch to the foot. The flue pipe should not be smaller in cross sectional area than the flue collar on the furnace. The flue pipe should connect to the chimney such that the flue pipe extends into, and terminates flush with the inside surface of the chimney liner. Seal the joint between the pipe and the lining. The chimney outlet should be at least two feet above the highest point of a peaked roof. All unused chimney openings should be closed. Chimneys must conform to local, provincial or state codes, or in the absence of local regulations, to the requirements of the National Building Code.

See Figure 2 and Table 3 for common chimney problems and their remedies.

THE FURNACE MUST BE CONNECTED TO A FLUE HAVING SUFFICIENT DRAFT AT ALL TIMES TO ENSURE SAFE AND PROPER OPERATION OF THE APPLIANCE.

The flue pipe must not be routed through concealed space, because it must be visually checked for signs of deterioration during the annual inspection and servicing. The flue pipe must not pass through any floor or ceiling, but may pass through a wall where suitable fire protection provisions have been installed. Refer to the latest edition of CAN/CSA B139 for rules governing the installation of oil burning equipment. In the United States, refer to the latest edition of NFPA 31 for regulations governing the installation of oil burning equipment.

7. BAROMETRIC DAMPER CONTROL

This device is used in conjunction with conventional chimney venting. This control (or draft regulator) automatically maintains a constant negative pressure in the furnace to obtain maximum efficiency. It ensures that proper pressures are not exceeded. If the chimney does not develop sufficient draft, the draft control cannot function properly. The draft regulator, must be installed within the same room or enclosure as the furnace, and should not interfere with the combustion air supplied to the burner. The control should be located a minimum of 3 flue pipe diameters from the furnace breeching and

8

29733 R2 06/01/2003

installed in accordance to the instructions supplied with the regulator.

8. FURNACE CONTROLS

The furnace is controlled by either of two systems, depending on the oil primary control and electronic fan timer combination. System 1, used with Beckett burners, includes the blower mounted Honeywell ST9103 ELECTRONIC FAN TIMER (EFT) combined with the R7184 OIL PRIMARY CONTROL. System 2, used with Riello burners, includes the blower mounted Honeywell ST9103 ELECTRONIC FAN TIMER (EFT) combined with a transformer / burner relay mounted internally on the 40F3 burner housing to operate the oil burner.

Figure 3: R7184 Oil Primary

The furnace functions are controlled by either System 1 or System 2, and bi-metallic snap disc limit switches. These groupings also provide control for add-on air conditioning. The ST9103 EFT is located in a control box mounted to the blower support rails.

The circulating fan is controlled by the ST9103 EFT. The heat delay-on time is fixed, at 30 seconds. This provides a delay between the start of the burner and the start of the circulating fan to reduce the amount of ambient unheated air flowing through the ductwork. The end of the circulating fan cycle is also delayed to remove residual heat from the furnace. There are four delay-off choices, 60, 90, 120 and 150 seconds, which are field adjustable by manipulating the DIP switches on the ST9103 EFT board.

The cooling delay-on and delay-off times are fixed at 30 seconds.

The furnace is protected against over-heating by fixed high temperature limits. These controls are factory set and are not field adjustable. If an over temperature

Figure 4: ST9103 EFT

condition is detected, one or both limit switches will interrupt power to the oil primary control, which will shut of the oil burner. The circulating fan will continue to operate. The high limit switches will automatically reset when the furnace returns to a safe temperature.

9. ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS

The furnace is listed by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA). It is factory wired and requires minimal field wiring. In the United States, the wiring must be in accordance with the National Fire Protection Association NFPA-70, National Electrical Code, and with local codes and regulations. In Canada, all field wiring should conform to CAN/CSA C22.1 Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, and by local codes, where they prevail.

The furnace should be wired to a separate and dedicated circuit in the main electrical panel; however, accessory equipment such as electronic air cleaners and humidifiers may be included on the furnace circuit. Although a suitably located circuit breaker can be used as a service switch, a separate service switch is advisable. The service switch is necessary if reaching the circuit breaker involves becoming close to the furnace, or if the furnace is located between the circuit breaker and the means of entry to the furnace room. The furnace switch (service switch) should be clearly marked, installed in an easily accessible area between the furnace and furnace room entry, and be located in such a manner to reduce the likelihood that it would be mistaken as a light switch or similar device.

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The power requirements for the HO-B Series models are: 120 VAC, 1 , 60 Hz., 12A. 5-ton models: 120 VAC, 1 , 60 Hz., 16A.

Accessories requiring 120 VAC power sources such as electronic air cleaners and humidifier transformers may be powered from the ST9103 EFT. Do not use the direct drive motor connections as a power source, since there is a high risk of damaging the accessories by exposure to high voltage from the auto-generating windings of the direct drive motor.

Thermostat wiring connections and air conditioning contactor low voltage connections are shown in the wiring diagrams. Some micro-electronic thermostats require additional controls and wiring. Refer to the thermostat manufacturer's instructions.

The thermostat should be located approximately 5 feet above the floor, on an inside wall where there is good natural air circulation, and where the thermostat will be exposed to average room temperatures. Avoid locations where the thermostat will be exposed to cold drafts, heat from nearby lamps and appliances, exposure to sunlight, heat from inside wall stacks, etc.

Normal heat anticipator setting: 0.1 A. For more precise adjustment, the heat anticipator may be adjusted to the amperage draw of the heating control circuit as measured between the "R" and "W" terminals of the thermostat. To reduce the risk of damaging the heat anticipator, do not measure circuit without first removing one of the two wires first. To determine the heating circuit amperage draw:

1.Disconnect one of the “R” or “W” wires from the thermostat terminal.

control. Do not use direct drive motor connections as a source of power for 120 VAC humidifiers and humidifier transformers.

11. OIL TANK

Oil storage tanks must be selected and installed in compliance with applicable codes; in the United States,

NFPA 31, Standard for the Installation of Oil Burning Equipment, Chapter 2. Observe all local codes and bylaws. And in Canada, CAN/CSA-B139, Installation Code for Oil Burning Equipment, Section 6

In general, the oil tank must be properly supported and remain stable in both empty and full condition. The oil tank must be fitted with vent and supply pipes to the outdoors. Refer to the above-mentioned codes for sizing. The vent pipe must be no less than 1¼ inches I.P.S., and terminate with an appropriate vent cap in a location where it will not be blocked. The fill pipe must be no less than 2 inches I.P.S., and terminate with an appropriate cap in a location where debris will not enter the fill pipe during oil delivery.

If located indoors, the tank should normally be in the lowest level, (cellar, basement, etc.). It must be equipped with a shut-off valve at the tank outlet used for the oil supply. The oil tank must be located as to not block the furnace / room exit pathway. Observe all clearances specified in the above-mentioned codes.

12. PIPING INSTALLATION

In the United States the installation must be in accordance with the requirements of NFPA No. 31 and local codes and regulations.

2.Connect an ammeter between the wire and the thermostat terminal to which it was attached.

3.Note the amperage reading when the heating contacts are closed. (System switch must be on “HEAT” if so equipped.

4.Re-connect the thermostat wire. If the thermostat is serving a combination heating and air conditioning system, pay particular attention to polarity.

5.When the thermostat is reconnected and replumbed, adjust the heat anticipator setting to match the observed amperage reading.

10. HUMIDIFIER

A humidifier is an optional accessory available through most heating supplies outlets. Installation should be carried out in accordance with the humidifier manufacturer's installation instructions. Water or water droplets from the humidifier should not be allowed to come into contact with the furnace heat exchanger. Terminals (115 v) are provided on the ST9103 EFT

In Canada, the entire fuel system should be installed in accordance with the requirements of CAN/CSA B139, and local regulations. Use only approved fuel oil tanks piping, fittings and oil filters.

Ensure that all fittings used in a copper oil line system are high quality flare fittings. Do not use compression fittings.

Do not use Teflon tape on any fittings.

Pressurized or gravity feed installations must not exceed 3 PSIG. Pressures greater than 10 PSIG may cause damage to the shaft seal. If the height of the oil stored in a tank above the oil burner exceeds 11½ feet, it may be necessary to use a pressure-regulating device approved for this purpose.

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The furnaces may be installed with a one-pipe system with gravity feed or lift. The maximum allowable lift on a single line system is 8 feet. Lift should be measured from the bottom (outlet) of the tank, to the inlet of the burner. Sizing a single line system is complex because of the difficulty estimating the pressure drop through each fitting, bend and component in the line. In general, keep single line systems short as possible. If the furnace is to be installed in a suspended position, a two-pipe system may be the better alternative. 2-stage oil pumps are not available for either the Beckett or Riello burner. The following chart shows the allowable line lengths (horizontal + vertical) for single and two stage oil pumps. All distances are in feet.

In retrofit applications, where an existing oil line system is in place, a vacuum check will help determine the efficacy of the existing oil line system The vacuum in a system featuring a Beckett burner should not exceed 6” Hg. for a single pipe system, nor 12” Hg. for a two-pipe system. The vacuum in a system featuring a Riello burner should not exceed 6” Hg. for a single pipe system, nor 11.44” Hg. for a two-pipe system.

Table 5: Oil Lines

Copper Tubing Oil Line Lengths (Feet)

Beckett Oil Burner

Lift

Single-Pipe

Two-Pipe

⅜” O.D.

½” O.D.

⅜” O.D.

½” O.D.

(feet)

 

Tubing

Tubing

Tubing

Tubing

0

53

100

68

100

1

49

100

65

100

2

45

100

63

100

3

41

100

60

100

4

37

100

58

100

5

33

100

55

100

6

29

100

53

100

7

25

99

50

100

8

21

83

48

100

9

17

68

45

100

10

13

52

42

100

12

- - -

- - -

37

100

14

- - -

- - -

32

100

16

- - -

- - -

27

100

18

- - -

- - -

22

88

 

 

 

 

Riello Oil Burners

 

Lift

Single-Pipe

Two-Pipe

⅜” O.D.

½” O.D.

⅜” O.D.

½” O.D.

(feet)

 

Tubing

Tubing

Tubing

Tubing

1.5

33

65

100

330

3.0

65

130

80

330

5.0

130

260

65

295

6.5

195

325

50

230

9.5

- - -

- - -

25

100

11

- - -

- - -

20

65

For additional information, see the installation information sheet included in the documents envelope or affixed to the oil burner.

NOTE: Both the Beckett and Riello oil burners require the use of a bypass plug when converting from single-pipe to two-pipe oil piping systems. See burner manufacturer’s instructions.

NOTE: The Riello oil burner is manufactured with British Parallel Thread pump ports. Adapters are supplied with the oil burner to convert from British Parallel Thread to NPT (National Pipe Thread). Direct connection of NPT fittings to the Riello oil burner ports will result in damage to the pump body. This also applies to pressure and vacuum gauges. (See Riello manual)

13. OIL FILTER

All fuel systems should include an oil filter between the fuel oil storage tank and the oil burner. For best results, install the oil filter as close to the burner as possible. When using an indoor oil tank, the oil filter may be installed at the tank downstream from the shut-off valve. If firing the furnace under the 0.65 gph rate, a 7 to 10 micron line filter should be installed as close to the oil burner as possible.

14. OIL BURNER NOZZLES

The 80F Series furnace is certified for multiple firing rates, ranging from 58,100 to 78,900 BTU/hr, while the 120F Series Furnace is certified for multiple firing rates of 87,000 113,400 BTU/hr. By changing the oil burner nozzle within the specific Model Range, and temperature rise, the furnace may be fired at an ideal rate for a wide range of structures.

Table 6: Nozzles (Beckett Oil Burner)

MODEL

NOZZLE (Delavan)

HEAD

STD.

ALT.

 

 

 

80F (060)

0.50/70°W

0.50/80°A

F0

80F (070)

0.65/70°W

0.65/80°A

F3

80F (080)

0.70/70°W

0.70/80°A

F3

120F (090)

0.75/70°W

0.75/80°A

F4

120F (100)

0.80/70°W

0.80/80°A

F4

120F (120)

1.00/70°W

1.00/80°A

F4

15. COMBUSTION CHAMBER

This furnace is equipped with an efficient cerafelt combustion chamber. It is held in place by a retaining bracket.

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CHECK THE ALIGNMENT OF THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER AND OIL BURNER BEFORE FIRING. IT IS POSSIBLE FOR THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER TO SHIFT IF SUBJECTED TO ROUGH HANDLING DURING TRANSIT.

The cerafelt combustion chamber is quite soft initially. After firing, it becomes very brittle. Be sure to do all alignment and positioning adjustments before the first firing.

The combustion chamber should be inspected for damage or carbon build up whenever the oil burner is removed for repairs or routine maintenance.

BEFORE OPERATING THE FURNACE CHECK BURNER ALIGNMENT WITH COMBUSTION CHAMBER. THE END CONE OF THE AIR TUBE MUST BE CENTRED TO THE ACCOMODATING RING PROVIDED IN THE DESIGN OF THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER. ADJUST ALIGNMENT AND AMULET POSITION (RIELLO BURNER) AS NECESSARY BEFORE FIRST FIRING.

16. BURNER ELECTRODES

Correct positioning of the electrode tips with respect to each other, to the fuel oil nozzle, and to the rest of the burners is essential for smooth light ups and proper operation.

Beckett Oil Burner:

The electrode tips should be adjusted to a gap of 5/32”, 1/16” ahead of the nozzle, 5/16” above the centerline of the nozzle. The “Z” dimension (front edge of the burner head to the front face of the nozzle is 1-1/8 inches.

Riello Oil Burner:

The electrode tips should be adjusted to a gap of 5/32”, 3/32” ahead of the nozzle, 13/64” above the centerline of the nozzle.

The electrode porcelains should be free of cracks, the electrode tips should be tapered and free of burrs, and the contact rods must be clean and be in firm contact with the ignition transformer contact springs. The electrodes must not come into contact with the burner head.

build-up throughout the heat exchanger passages. Excess combustion air causes a bright roaring fire and high stack temperatures resulting in poor fuel efficiency.

PREPARATIONS:

Drill a ¼” test port in the venting, ideally at least 2 flue pipe diameters away from the furnace breeching, if venting horizontally from the furnace, or from the flue pipe elbow if venting vertically before reaching the furnace. (see Figures 5 and 6).

The test port will allow flue gas samples to be taken and stack temperatures to be measured.

Before starting the burner, check the burner alignment with the combustion chamber (fire pot), check that the correct nozzle is tightened into place, and that the burner electrodes are properly positioned. The Beckett burner bulk air band is should be closed, and the air shutter initial setting should be approximately 7.00.

Refer to Table A-2, page 18, for Riello oil burner air damper and turbulator settings.

Figure 5: Test port location for smoke test horizontal.

Note A: Locate hole at least 6 inches on the furnace side of the draft control.

Note B: Ideally, hole should be at least 12 inches from breeching or elbow.

17. OIL BURNER SET UP

The burner air supply is adjusted to maintain the fuel to air ratio to obtain ideal combustion conditions. A lack of air causes "soft" and "sooty" flames, resulting in soot

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