Rover 214 1989 1995 Workshop Manual

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Rover 214 & 414

Service and Repair Manual

Mark Coombs and Christopher Rogers

Models covered

(1689-288-9AA3)

Rover 214 and 414 models fitted with eight or sixteen-valve 1397 cc ‘K-series’ engine

Covers major mechanical features of Cabriolet

Does not cover Diesel engine models

© Haynes Publishing 1997

 

 

Printed by J H Haynes & Co. Ltd, Sparkford, Nr Yeovil,

A book in the Haynes Service and Repair Manual Series

Somerset BA22 7JJ

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted

Haynes Publishing

Sparkford, Nr Yeovil, Somerset BA22 7JJ, England

in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including

 

photocopying, recording or by any information storage or retrieval system,

Haynes North America, Inc

without permission in writing from the copyright holder.

861 Lawrence Drive, Newbury Park, California 91320, USA

ISBN 1 85960 458 7

Editions Haynes S.A.

147/149, rue Saint Honoré, 75001 PARIS, France

 

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data

Haynes Publishing Nordiska AB

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Fyrisborgsgatan 5, 754 50 Uppsala, Sverige

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Contents

LIVING WITH YOUR ROVER 214 & 414

Introduction

Page

0•4

Safety First!

Page

0•5

 

 

 

Roadside Repairs

Introduction

Page

0•6

If your car won’t start

Page

0•6

 

 

 

Jump starting

Page

0•7

 

 

 

Wheel changing

Page

0•8

 

 

 

Identifying leaks

Page

0•9

 

 

 

Towing

Page

0•9

 

 

 

Weekly Checks

Introduction

Page

0•10

Underbonnet check points

Page

0•10

 

 

 

Engine oil level

Page

0•11

 

 

 

Coolant level

Page

0•11

 

 

 

Brake fluid level

Page

0•12

 

 

 

Screen washer fluid level

Page

0•12

 

 

 

Power steering fluid level

Page

0•13

 

 

 

Wiper blades

Page

0•13

 

 

 

Tyre condition and pressure

Page

0•14

 

 

 

Electrical systems

Page

0•15

 

 

 

Battery

Page

0•15

 

 

 

Lubricants, Fluids, Capacities and Tyre Pressures

Page 0•16

MAINTENANCE

Routine Maintenance and Servicing

Page

1•1

Maintenance schedule

Page

1•3

 

 

 

Maintenance procedures

Page

1•6

 

 

 

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Contents

REPAIRS AND OVERHAUL

Engine and Associated Systems

Engine in-car repair procedures

Page

2A•1

Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

Page

2B•1

 

 

 

Cooling, heating and ventilation systems

Page

3•1

 

 

 

Fuel and exhaust systems - carburettor engines

Page

4A•1

 

 

 

Fuel and exhaust systems - single-point fuel injected engines

Page

4B•1

 

 

 

Fuel and exhaust systems - multi-point fuel injected engines

Page

4C•1

 

 

 

Emission control systems

Page

4D•1

 

 

 

Ignition system - carburettor engines

Page

5A•1

 

 

 

Ignition system - fuel injected engines

Page

5B•1

 

 

 

Starting and charging systems

Page

5C•1

 

 

 

Transmission

Clutch

Page

6•1

Gearbox

Page

7•1

 

 

 

Driveshafts

Page

8•1

 

 

 

Brakes and Suspension

Braking system

Page

9•1

Suspension and steering

Page

10•1

 

 

 

Body Equipment

Bodywork and fittings

Page

11•1

Body electrical systems

Page

12•1

 

 

 

Wiring Diagrams

Page 12•20

REFERENCE

Dimensions and Weights

Page

REF•1

Conversion Factors

Page

REF•2

 

 

 

Buying Spare Parts and Vehicle Identification

Page

REF•3

 

 

 

General Repair Procedures

Page

REF•4

 

 

 

Jacking and Vehicle Support

Page

REF•5

 

 

 

Radio/cassette Anti-theft System - precaution

Page

REF•5

 

 

 

Tools and Working Facilities

Page

REF•6

 

 

 

MOT Test Checks

Page

REF•8

 

 

Fault Finding

Page REF•12

 

 

Glossary of Technical Terms

Page REF•19

 

 

 

Index

Page REF•24

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•4 Introduction

The Rover 214 Hatchback and 414 Saloon models covered in this Manual are a muchdeveloped version of the original 213 and 216 models first launched in 1984. The 214 five-door model was the first to be introduced in October 1989 and was closely followed by the 414 model introduced in March 1990. The 214 model range was further updated in September 1990 when a three-door variant was introduced.

All models are fitted with the new 1.4 litre ‘K’ series engine. The 214 S model (first introduced in September 1990) has an eightvalve single overhead camshaft version of the engine which is fed by an SU KIF carburettor.

All other 214 and 414 models are equipped with a sixteen-valve double overhead camshaft version of the engine which is controlled by a Rover/Motorola Modular Engine Management System (MEMS) with either single-point fuel injection (SPi) or multipoint fuel injection (MPi). All versions of the engine are able to accept a full range of emission control systems, up to and including a three-way regulated catalytic converter.

The five-speed transmission, which is a joint development by Rover and Peugeot engineers, is of Peugeot design and produced by Rover. The transmission is fitted to the left-

hand end of the engine. The complete engine/transmission unit is mounted transversely across the front of the car and drives the front wheels through unequallength driveshafts.

The front suspension incorporates MacPherson struts and the rear is of the double wishbone type.

Braking is by discs at the front and drums at the rear, with a dual-circuit hydraulic system. On all models in the range, an Antilock Braking System (ABS) was offered as an optional extra. If ABS is fitted, then braking is by discs both at the front and rear.

Rover 114GTa

Rover Metro 1.1S

Your Rover 214 & 414 Manual

The aim of this manual is to help you get the best value from your vehicle. It can do so in several ways. It can help you decide what work must be done (even should you choose to get it done by a garage), provide information on routine maintenance and servicing, and give a logical course of action

and diagnosis when random faults occur. However, it is hoped that you will use the manual by tackling the work yourself. On simpler jobs it may even be quicker than booking the car into a garage and going there twice, to leave and collect it. Perhaps most important, a lot of money can be saved by

avoiding the costs a garage must charge to cover its labour and overheads.

The manual has drawings and descriptions to show the function of the various components so that their layout can be understood. Then the tasks are described and photographed in a clear step-by-step sequence.

Acknowledgements

Thanks are due to Champion Spark Plug who supplied the illustrations showing spark plug conditions, and to Duckhams Oils who provided lubrication data. Thanks are also due to Sykes-Pickavant Limited, who supplied some of the workshop tools, and to

all those people at Sparkford who helped in the production of this Manual.

We take great pride in the accuracy of information given in this manual, but vehicle manufacturers make alterations and design changes during the production

run of a particular vehicle of which they do not inform us. No liability can be accepted by the authors or publishers for loss, damage or injury caused by any errors in, or omissions from the information given.

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Safety First! 0•5

Working on your car can be dangerous. This page shows just some of the potential risks and hazards, with the aim of creating a safety-conscious attitude.

General hazards

Scalding

Don’t remove the radiator or expansion tank cap while the engine is hot.

Engine oil, automatic transmission fluid or power steering fluid may also be dangerously hot if the engine has recently been running.

Burning

• Beware of burns from the exhaust system and from any part of the engine. Brake discs and drums can also be extremely hot immediately after use.

Crushing

When working a raised vehicle, always supplement the jack with axle stands, or use drive-on ramps.

Never venture under a car

is only supported

Take care if torque nuts Initial loosening be done with

Fire

Fuel is highly explosive.

Don’t let fuel

Do not smoke (including pilot vehicle being creating sparks (electrically or by

Fuel vapour is work on the fuel an inspection pit

Another cause overload or short repairing or

Keep a fire suitable for use

Electric shock

• Ignition HT voltage can be dangerous, especially to people with heart problems or a pacemaker. Don’t work on or near ignition system the engine running

the ignition switched on.

• Mains voltage is also dangerous. Make sure that any mains-operated equipment is correctly earthed. Mains power points should be protected by a residual current device (RCD) circuit breaker.

Fume or gas intoxication

Exhaust fumes are poisonous; they contain carbon monoxide, which is rapidly fatal if inhaled Never run the engine in a

confined space such as a garage with the doors shut

Fuel vapour is also poisonous, as are cleaning solvents

your pocket.

• Air conditioning poisonous gas if (including a cigarette) burns on contact.

Special hazards

Hydrofluoric acid

• This extremely corrosive acid is formed when certain types of synthetic rubber, found in some O-rings, oil seals, fuel hoses etc, are exposed to temperatures above 4000C. The

changes into a charred or sticky containing the acid. Once formed,

remains dangerous for years. If it the skin, it may be necessary to the limb concerned.

dealing with a vehicle which has

a fire, or with components salvaged a vehicle, wear protective gloves

them after use.

battery

• Batteries contain sulphuric acid, which attacks clothing, eyes and skin. Take care

topping-up or carrying the battery. hydrogen gas given off by the battery

explosive. Never cause a spark or naked light nearby. Be careful when and disconnecting battery

or jump leads.

can cause injury if they go off

. Take care when removing the wheel and/or facia. Special storage

instructions may apply.

Diesel injection equipment

• Diesel injection pumps supply fuel at very high pressure. Take care when working on the fuel injectors and fuel pipes.

Asbestos

• Asbestos dust can

Warning: Never expose the hands,

or swallowed.

face or any other part of the body

gaskets and in brake

to injector spray; the fuel can

When dealing with

penetrate the skin with potentially fatal

safest to assume

results.

Remember...

A few tips

DO

DON’T

• Do use eye protection when using power

• Don’t attempt to lift a heavy component

tools, and when working under the vehicle.

which may be beyond your capability – get

• Do wear gloves or use barrier cream to

assistance.

• Don’t rush to finish a job, or take

protect your hands when necessary.

• Do get someone to check periodically

unverified short cuts.

• Don’t use ill-fitting tools which may slip

that all is well when working alone on the

vehicle.

and cause injury.

• Do keep loose clothing and long hair well

• Don’t leave tools or parts lying around

out of the way of moving mechanical parts.

where someone can trip over them. Mop

• Do remove rings, wristwatch etc, before

up oil and fuel spills at once.

• Don’t allow children or pets to play in or

working on the vehicle – especially the

electrical system.

near a vehicle being worked on.

• Do ensure that any lifting or jacking

 

equipment has a safe working load rating

 

adequate for the job.

 

 

 

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•6 Roadside repairs

The following pages are intended to help in dealing with common roadside emergencies and breakdowns. You will find more detailed fault finding information at the back of the manual, and repair information in the main chapters.

If your car won’t start and the starter motor doesn’t turn

If your car won’t start even though the starter motor turns as normal

MIf it’s a model with automatic transmission, make sure the selector is in ‘P’ or ‘N’.

MOpen the bonnet and make sure that the battery terminals are clean and tight.

MSwitch on the headlights and try to start the engine. If the headlights go very dim when you’re trying to start, the battery is probably flat. Get out of trouble by jump starting (see next page) using a friend’s car.

MIs there fuel in the tank?

MIs there moisture on electrical components under the bonnet? Switch off the ignition, then wipe off any obvious dampness with a dry cloth. Spray a water-repellent aerosol product (WD-40 or equivalent) on ignition and fuel system electrical connectors like those shown in the photos.

Pay special attention to the ignition coil wiring connector and HT leads. (Note that Diesel engines don’t normally suffer from damp.)

Check that the distributor HT lead

Check that the spark plug HT lead

C lead connections are clean and secure

A connections are clean and secure

B connections are clean and secure -

 

cover removed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D Check the security and condition of the battery connections

Check that electrical connections are secure (with the ignition off) and spray them with a waterdispersing spray like WD40 if you suspect a problem due to damp

E The ECU wiring plugs may cause problems if dirty or not properly connected

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Roadside repairs 0•7

Jump starting will get you out of trouble, but you must

correct whatever made the battery go flat in the first

place. There are three possibilities:

1)The battery has been drained by repeated attempts to start, or by leaving the lights on.

2)The charging system is not working properly (alternator drivebelt slack or broken, alternator wiring fault or alternator itself faulty).

3)The battery itself is at fault (electrolyte low, or battery worn out).

1 to the positive (+) terminal of the flat battery

When jump-starting a car using a booster battery, observe the following precautions:

Before connecting the booster battery, make sure that the ignition is switched off.

Ensure that all electrical equipment (lights, heater, wipers, etc) is switched off.

Take note of any special precautions printed on the battery case.

Jump starting

Make sure that the booster battery is the same voltage as the discharged one in the vehicle.

If the battery is being jump-started from the battery in another vehicle, the two vehicles MUST NOT TOUCH each other.

Make sure that the transmission is in neutral (or PARK, in the case of automatic transmission).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Connect the other end of the red lead

3

Connect one end of the black jump lead

 

 

to the positive (+) terminal of the

 

to the negative (-) terminal of the

 

 

booster battery

 

booster battery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

jump lead to a bolt or bracket on the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

engine block, well away from the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

battery, on the vehicle to be started

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure that the jump leads will not

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

come into contact with the fan,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

drivebelts or other moving parts of the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

engine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start the engine using the booster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

battery, then with the engine running at

 

idle speed, disconnect the jump leads in the reverse order of connection

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•8 Roadside repairs

Wheel changing

Some of the details shown here will vary according to model. For instance, the location of the spare wheel and jack is not the same on all cars. However, the basic principles apply to all vehicles.

Warning: Do not change a wheel in a situation where you risk being hit by other traffic. On busy roads, try to stop in a lay-by or a gateway. Be wary of passing traffic while changing the wheel – it is easy to become distracted by the job in hand.

Preparation

MWhen a puncture occurs, stop as soon as it is safe to do so.

MPark on firm level ground, if possible, and well out of the way of other traffic.

MUse hazard warning lights if necessary.

MIf you have one, use a warning triangle to alert other drivers of your presence.

MApply the handbrake and engage first or reverse gear (or Park on models with automatic transmission).

MChock the wheel diagonally opposite the one being removed – a couple of large stones will do for this.

MIf the ground is soft, use a flat piece of wood to spread the load under the jack.

Changing the wheel

1

Location of spare wheel and tools in boot

2

Unscrew the spare wheel retaining cap

 

3

Remove the trim to expose the wheelnuts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Use the wheel brace to slightly loosen the

5

Locate the jack head in the correct

6

Raise the jack until the wheel is clear of

wheelnuts

jacking point

the ground

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Remove the wheelnuts and lift off the wheel

8 Fit the replacement wheel and tighten the nuts

Finally...

MRemove the wheel chocks.

MStow the jack and tools in the correct locations in the car.

MCheck the tyre pressure on the wheel just fitted. If it is low, or if you don’t have a pressure gauge with you, drive slowly to the nearest garage and inflate the tyre to the right pressure.

MHave the damaged tyre or wheel repaired as soon as possible.

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Puddles on the garage floor or drive, or obvious wetness under the bonnet or underneath the car, suggest a leak that needs investigating. It can sometimes be difficult to decide where the leak is coming from, especially if the engine bay is very dirty already. Leaking oil or fluid can also be blown rearwards by the passage of air under the car, giving a false impression of where the problem lies.

Roadside repairs 0•9

Identifying leaks

Warning: Most automotive oils and fluids are poisonous. Wash them off skin, and change out of contaminated clothing, without delay.

The smell of a fluid leaking from the car may provide a

clue to what’s leaking. Some fluids are distinctively

coloured. It may help to clean the car carefully and to park it over some clean paper overnight as an aid to locating the source of the leak.

Remember that some leaks may only occur while the engine is running.

Sump oil

 

Oil from filter

 

Gearbox oil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engine oil may leak from the drain plug...

...or from the base of the oil filter.

Gearbox oil can leak from the seals at the inboard ends of the driveshafts.

Antifreeze

 

Brake fluid

 

Power steering fluid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leaking antifreeze often leaves a crystalline deposit like this.

A leak occurring at a wheel is almost certainly brake fluid.

Power steering fluid may leak from the pipe connectors on the steering rack.

When all else fails, you may find yourself having to get a tow home – or of course you may be helping somebody else. Long-distance recovery should only be done by a garage or breakdown service. For shorter distances, DIY towing using another car is easy enough, but observe the following points:

MUse a proper tow-rope – they are not expensive. The vehicle being towed must display an ‘ON TOW’ sign in its rear window.

MAlways turn the ignition key to the ‘on’ position when the vehicle is being towed, so

that the steering lock is released, and that the direction indicator and brake lights will work.

MOnly attach the tow-rope to the towing eyes provided.

MBefore being towed, release the handbrake and select neutral on the transmission.

MNote that greater-than-usual pedal pressure will be required to operate the brakes, since the vacuum servo unit is only operational with the engine running.

MOn models with power steering, greater- than-usual steering effort will also be required.

Towing

MThe driver of the car being towed must keep the tow-rope taut at all times to avoid snatching.

MMake sure that both drivers know the route before setting off.

MOnly drive at moderate speeds and keep the distance towed to a minimum. Drive smoothly and allow plenty of time for slowing down at junctions.

MOn models with automatic transmission, special precautions apply. If in doubt, do not tow, or transmission damage may result.

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•10 Weekly checks

Introduction

There are some very simple checks which need only take a few minutes to carry out, but which could save you a lot on inconvenience and expense.

These “Weekly Checks” require no great skill or special tools, and the small amount of time they take to perform could well prove to be very well spent, for example:

mKeeping an eye on tyre condition and pressures, will not only help to stop them wearing out prematurely but could also save your life.

mMany breakdowns are caused by electrical problems. Battery-related faults are particularly common and a quick check on a regular basis will often prevent the majority of these.

mIf your car develops a brake fluid leak, the first time you might know about it is when your brakes don’t work properly. Checking the level regularly will give advance warning of this kind of problem.

mIf the oil or coolant levels run low, the cost of repairing any engine damage will be far greater than fixing the leak.

Underbonnet Check Points

K16 MPi engine with plastic inlet manifold

A B C

Engine oil level dipstick

D Brake fluid reservoir

F

Engine oil filler cap

E Power steering fluid reservoir

G

Coolant expansion tank

 

 

Screen washer fluid reservoir

Battery

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Weekly checks 0•11

Engine oil level

Before you start

Make sure that your car is on level ground.

Check the oil level before the car is driven, or at least 5 minutes after the engine has been switched off.

If the oil is checked

immediately after driving the

vehicle, some of the oil will

remain in the upper engine

components, resulting in an inaccurate

reading on the dipstick.

The correct oil

Modern engines place great demands on their oil. It is very important that the correct oil for your car is used (see “Lubricants and Fluids” on page 0•16).

Car Care

If you have to add oil frequently, you should check whether you have any oil leaks. Place some clean paper under the car overnight, and check for stains in the morning. If there are no leaks, then engine may be burning oil (see “Fault Finding”).

Always maintain the level between the upper and lower dipstick marks. If the level is too low, severe engine damage may occur. Oil seal failure may result if the engine is overfilled by adding too much oil.

1 The dipstick is located at the rear right-hand end of the engine (see “Underbonnet Check Points” on page 0•10 for exact location).

Withdraw the dipstick.

3 dipstick, which should be between the upper HI mark and the lower LO mark. Approximately 1.0 litre of oil will raise the level from the lower mark to the upper mark.

2 Using a clean rag or paper towel, wipe all the oil from the dipstick. Insert the clean dipstick into the tube as far as it will go, then

withdraw it again.

4 Oil is added through the filler cap. Rotate the cap through a quarter-turn anticlockwise and withdraw it. Top-up the level. A funnel may help to reduce spillage. Add the oil slowly, checking the level on the dipstick

often. Do not overfill.

Coolant level

Warning: Do not attempt to remove the expansion tank pressure cap when the engine is hot, as there is a very great risk

of scalding. Do not leave open containers of coolant about, as it is poisonous.

Car Care

● With a sealed-type cooling system, adding coolant should not be necessary on a regular basis. If frequent topping-up is required, it is likely there is a leak. Check the radiator, all hoses and joint faces for signs of staining or wetness, and rectify as necessary.

● It is important that antifreeze is used in the cooling system all year round, not just during the winter months. Don’t top up with water alone, as the antifreeze will become diluted.

1

When the engine is cold, the coolant level

2

If topping-up, wait until the engine is

3

Add a mixture of water and antifreeze

should be between the expansion tank

cold, then cover the filler cap with a layer

through the expansion tank filler neck,

ridge/seam and the level indicated above

of rag and start unscrewing the cap. Wait until

until the coolant is up to the upper level. Refit

COOLANT LEVEL on the side of the

any hissing ceases, indicating that all

the cap, turning it clockwise as far as it will go

expansion tank, which is located in the front

pressure is released, then slowly unscrew the

until it is secure.

right-hand corner of the engine compartment.

cap until it can be removed. At all times keep

 

 

 

 

well away from the filler opening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•12 Weekly checks

Brake fluid level

Warning: Brake fluid can harm your eyes and damage painted surfaces, so use extreme caution when handling and

pouring it. Do not use fluid which has been standing open for some time, as it absorbs moisture from the air, which can cause a dangerous loss of braking effectiveness.

Before you start

Make sure that the car is on level ground.

1

The brake master cylinder and fluid

2

If topping-up is necessary, unplug the

Cleanliness is of great importance when

reservoir is mounted on the vacuum

electrical connector and wipe the area

dealing with the braking system, so take

servo unit in the engine compartment. The

around the filler cap with a clean rag before

care to clean around the reservoir cap

MAX and MIN level marks are indicated on the

removing the cap. When adding fluid, pour it

before topping-up. Use only clean brake fluid

side of the reservoir and the fluid level should

carefully into the reservoir to avoid spilling it

from a container which has stood for at least

be maintained between these marks at all

on surrounding painted surfaces. Be sure to

24 hours (to allow air bubbles to separate

times.

use only the specified brake hydraulic fluid

out).

 

 

since mixing different types of fluid can cause

 

 

 

damage to the system.

Safety first

If the reservoir requires repeated toppingup, this is an indication of a fluid leak somewhere in the system, which should be investigated immediately.

If a leak is suspected, the car should not be driven until the braking system has been checked. Never take any risks where brakes are concerned.

 

3

Before adding fluid, it’s a good idea to

4

Carefully add fluid avoiding spilling it on

 

inspect the reservoir. The system should

surrounding paintwork. Use only the

 

be drained and refilled if dirt is seen in the

specified fluid; mixing different types can

 

fluid (see Chapter 9 for details).

cause damage to the system. After filling to

 

 

 

the correct level, refit the cap securely, to

 

 

 

prevent leaks and the entry of foreign matter.

 

 

 

Ensure that the fluid level switch plunger is

 

 

 

free to move. Wipe off any spilt fluid.

 

 

 

 

 

Screen washer fluid level

Car care

Screenwash additives not only keep the windscreen clean during bad weather, they also prevent the washer system freezing in cold weather - which is when you are likely to need it most. Don’t top up using plain water, as the screenwash will become diluted and will freeze in cold weather.

Check the operation of the windscreen and rear window washers. Adjust the nozzles using a pin if necessary, aiming the spray to a point slightly above the centre of the swept area.

Warning: On no account use

1

The reservoir for the windscreen and rear

2

When topping-up the reservoir(s) a

engine coolant antifreeze in the

window (where fitted) washer systems is

screenwash additive should be added in

screen washer system - this will

located on the left-hand side of the engine

the quantities recommended on the bottle.

damage the paintwork.

compartment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Weekly checks 0•13

Power steering fluid level

Before you start

Make sure that the car is on level ground.

Set the front roadwheels in the straightahead position.

The engine should be stopped.

Do not operate the steering once the engine is stopped.

Safety first

If the reservoir requires repeated toppingup, there is a fluid leak somewhere in the system which should be investigated immediately.

If a leak is suspected, the car should not be driven until the power steering system has been checked.

1

The power steering fluid reservoir is

2

If topping-up is necessary, first wipe the

3

After filling the reservoir to the proper

located on the right-hand side of the

area around the filler cap with a clean rag

level, make sure that the cap is refitted

engine compartment, just behind the cooling

before removing the cap. When adding fluid,

securely to avoid leaks and the entry of

system expansion tank. MAX and MIN level

pour it carefully into the reservoir to avoid

foreign matter into the reservoir.

marks are indicated on the side of the

spillage. Be sure to use only the specified

 

 

reservoir and the fluid level should be

fluid.

 

 

maintained between these marks at all times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wiper blades

1 Check the condition of the wiper blades. If they are cracked or show any signs of deterioration, or if the glass swept area is smeared, renew them. For maximum clarity of vision, wiper blades

should be renewed annually, as a matter of course.

2 To remove a wiper blade, pull the arm fully away from the glass until it locks. Swivel the blade through 90º, press the locking tab with a finger nail and slide the blade out of the arm’s hooked end. On

refitting, ensure that the blade locks securely into the arm.

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•14 Weekly checks

Tyre condition and pressure

It is very important that tyres are in good condition, and at the correct pressure - having a tyre failure at any speed is highly dangerous. Tyre wear is influenced by driving style - harsh braking and acceleration, or fast cornering, will all produce more rapid tyre wear. As a general rule, the front tyres wear out faster than the rears. Interchanging the tyres from front to rear (“rotating” the tyres) may result in more even wear. However, if this is completely effective, you may have the expense of replacing all four tyres at once!

Remove any nails or stones embedded in the tread before they penetrate the tyre to cause deflation. If removal of a nail does reveal that

the tyre has been punctured, refit the nail so that its point of penetration is marked. Then immediately change the wheel, and have the tyre repaired by a tyre dealer.

Regularly check the tyres for damage in the form of cuts or bulges, especially in the sidewalls. Periodically remove the wheels, and clean any dirt or mud from the inside and outside surfaces. Examine the wheel rims for signs of rusting, corrosion or other damage. Light alloy wheels are easily damaged by “kerbing” whilst parking; steel wheels may also become dented or buckled. A new wheel is very often the only way to overcome severe damage.

New tyres should be balanced when they are fitted, but it may become necessary to rebalance them as they wear, or if the balance weights fitted to the wheel rim should fall off. Unbalanced tyres will wear more quickly, as will the steering and suspension components. Wheel imbalance is normally signified by vibration, particularly at a certain speed (typically around 50 mph). If this vibration is felt only through the steering, then it is likely that just the front wheels need balancing. If, however, the vibration is felt through the whole car, the rear wheels could be out of balance. Wheel balancing should be carried out by a tyre dealer or garage.

Tread Depth - visual check

Tread Depth - manual check

Tyre Pressure Check

 

The original tyres have tread wear safety

 

Alternatively tread wear can be

 

Check the tyre pressures regularly with

1

2

3

bands (B), which will appear when the

monitored with a simple, inexpensive

the tyres cold. Do not adjust the tyre

tread depth reaches approximately 1.6 mm.

device known as a tread depth indicator

pressures immediately after the vehicle has

The band positions are indicated by a

gauge.

been used, or an inaccurate setting will result.

triangular mark on the tyre sidewall (A).

 

 

Tyre pressures are shown on page 0•16

4 Tyre tread wear patterns

Shoulder Wear

Underinflation (wear on both sides)

Under-inflation will cause overheating of the tyre, because the tyre will flex too much, and the tread will not sit correctly on the road surface. This will cause a loss of grip and excessive wear, not to mention the danger of sudden tyre failure due to heat build-up.

Check and adjust pressures

Incorrect wheel camber (wear on one side)

Repair or renew suspension parts

Hard cornering

Reduce speed!

Centre Wear

Overinflation

Over-inflation will cause rapid wear of the centre part of the tyre tread, coupled with reduced grip, harsher ride, and the danger of shock damage occurring in the tyre casing.

Check and adjust pressures

If you sometimes have to inflate your car’s tyres to the higher pressures specified for maximum load or sustained high speed, don’t forget to reduce the pressures to normal afterwards.

Uneven Wear

Front tyres may wear unevenly as a result of wheel misalignment. Most tyre dealers and garages can check and adjust the wheel alignment (or "tracking") for a modest charge.

Incorrect camber or castor

Repair or renew suspension parts

Malfunctioning suspension

Repair or renew suspension parts

Unbalanced wheel

Balance tyres

Incorrect toe setting

Adjust front wheel alignment

Note: The feathered edge of the tread which typifies toe wear is best checked by feel.

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Weekly checks 0•15

Electrical system

Check all external lights and the horn. Refer to the appropriate Sections of Chapter 12 for details if any of the circuits are found to be inoperative, and replace the fuse if necessary. Most fuses are located behind the cover in the right-hand lower facia panel. Other fuses are located in the fusebox on the left-hand side of the engine compartment. To replace a blown fuse, pull it from position, using the plastic tool provided. Fit a new fuse of the same rating. If a second fuse blows, it is important that you find the reason - do not use a fuse with a higher rating.

Visually check all accessible wiring connectors, harnesses and retaining clips for security, and for signs of chafing or damage.

If you need to check your brake lights and indicators unaided, back up to a wall or garage door and operate the

lights. The reflected light should show if they are working properly.

1 If a single indicator light, brake light or headlight has failed, it is likely that a bulb has blown and will need to be replaced. Refer to Chapter 12 for details. If both brake lights have failed, it is possible that the brake light switch operated by the brake pedal is faulty.

Refer to Chapter 9 for details.

2 If more than one indicator light or headlight has failed, it is likely that either a fuse has blown or that there is a fault in the

circuit (see Chapter 12).

Battery

Caution: Before carrying out any work on the vehicle battery, read the precautions given in “Safety first” at the start of this manual.

Make sure that the battery tray is in good condition, and that the clamp is tight. Corrosion on the tray, retaining clamp and the battery itself can be removed with a solution of water and baking soda. Thoroughly rinse all cleaned areas with water. Any metal parts damaged by corrosion should be covered with a zinc-based primer, then painted.

Periodically (approximately every three months), check the charge condition of the battery as described in Chapter 5A.

If the battery is flat, and you need to jump start your vehicle, see “Jump starting”.

1 The battery is located on the left-hand side of the engine compartment. The exterior of the battery should be inspected periodically for damage such as a cracked

case or cover.

2 Check the tightness of battery clamps to ensure good electrical connections. You should not be able to move them. Also check each cable for cracks and frayed conductors.

Battery corrosion can be kept to a minimum by applying a layer of petroleum jelly to the clamps and terminals after they are reconnected.

3

If corrosion (white, fluffy deposits) is

4

... as well as the battery cable clamps

evident, remove the cables from the

 

battery terminals, clean them with a small wire brush, then refit them. Accessory stores sell a useful tool for cleaning the battery post ...

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

0•16 Lubricants, fluids, capacities and tyre pressures

Lubricants and fluids

Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cooling system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gearbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Braking system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power steering system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

General greasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Multigrade engine oil, viscosity SAE 10W/40 to spec. API-SG or SG/CD, CCMC G4, or RES.22.OL.G4

(Duckhams QS, QXR, Hypergrade Plus, Hypergrade, or 10W/40 Motor Oil)

Antifreeze to spec. BS 6580 and BS 5117. Ethyleneglycol based with non-phosphate corrosion inhibitors, containing no methanol. Mixture 50% by volume

(Duckhams Antifreeze and Summer Coolant)

Special gearbox oil. Refer to your Rover dealer

(Duckhams Hypoid PT 75W/80 may be used for toppingup only)

Hydraulic fluid to spec. SAE J 1703 or DOT 4

(Duckhams Universal Brake and Clutch Fluid)

Automatic transmission fluid (ATF) to Dexron II D specification (Duckhams Uni-Matic)

Multi-purpose lithium-based grease to NLGI consistency No. 2 (Duckhams LB10)

Capacities

Engine oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.5 litres - including filter

Cooling system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5.8 litres

Gearbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.0 litres

Power steering reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.2 litres

Fuel tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

55 litres

Washer system reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.1 litres

Tyre Pressures (tyres cold)

 

Front

Rear

155 SR 13 tyres

 

 

Normal driving conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.1 bar (30 psi)

2.1 bar (30 psi)

Loads in excess of four persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.1 bar (30 psi)

2.3 bar (34 psi)

Speeds in excess of 100 mph - all loads . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.2 bar (32 psi)

2.2 bar (32 psi)

175/65 TR 14 tyres

 

 

All loads - up to 100 mph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.1 bar (30 psi)

2.1 bar (30 psi)

All loads - over 100 mph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.2 bar (32 psi)

2.2 bar (32 psi)

185/60 HR 14 tyres

 

 

All loads - up to 100 mph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.1 bar (30 psi)

2.1 bar (30 psi)

All loads - over 100 mph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.5 bar (36 psi)

2.5 bar (36 psi)

Note: Pressures apply only to original equipment tyres and may vary if any other make or type is fitted. Check with the tyre manufacturer or supplier for correct pressures if necessary

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

2A•1

Chapter 2 Part A

Engine in-car repair procedures

Contents

Camshaft oil seals - renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Camshafts and hydraulic tappets - removal, inspection and

refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Compression test - description and interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Crankshaft oil seals - renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Crankshaft pulley - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Cylinder head - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Cylinder head cover - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Engine oil and filter - renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Engine/gearbox mountings - inspection and renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Flywheel - removal, inspection and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

General information and precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Oil pump - dismantling, inspection and reassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Oil pump - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Sump - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Timing belt - removal, inspection, refitting and adjustment . . . . . . . 8 Timing belt covers - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Timing belt tensioner and sprockets - removal, inspection and

refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Top Dead Centre (TDC) for number one piston - locating . . . . . . . . 4 Valve clearances - general information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Degrees of difficulty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy, suitable for

1

 

Fairly easy, suitable

2

 

Fairly difficult,

3

 

Difficult, suitable for

4

 

Very difficult,

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

novice with little

 

for beginner with

 

suitable for competent

 

experienced DIY

 

suitable for expert DIY

 

 

 

experience

 

some experience

 

DIY mechanic

 

 

mechanic

 

or professional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specifications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2A

Type

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four-cylinder in-line, four-stroke, liquid-cooled

 

 

 

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

 

 

 

 

Designation:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.4 8-valve sohc . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

K8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.4 16-valve dohc . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

K16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

75.00 mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

79.00 mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

1396 cc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Firing order . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

1-3-4-2 (No 1 cylinder at timing belt end)

 

 

 

 

 

Direction of crankshaft rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

Clockwise (seen from right-hand side of vehicle)

 

 

 

 

Compression ratio:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

9.75 : 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

9.50 : 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum compression pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

10.3 bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximum compression pressure difference between cylinders . . . . . .

1.4 bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximum power (EEC):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

76 ps (56 kW) @ 5700 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K8 (with catalytic converter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

75 ps (55 kW) @ 5500 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

95 ps (70 kW) @ 6250 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K16 (with catalytic converter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

90 ps (66 kW) @ 6250 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximum torque (EEC):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

117 Nm (86 lbf ft) @ 3500 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

124 Nm (91 lbf ft) @ 4000 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K16 (with catalytic converter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

120 Nm (89 lbf ft) @ 4000 rpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cylinder block/crankcase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Service liners are Grade B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Material . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

Aluminium alloy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cylinder liner bore diameter - 60 mm from top of bore:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard - grade A (Red) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

74.975 to 74.985 mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard - grade B (Blue) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

74.986 to 74.995 mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service limit . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . .

75.045 mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

2A•2 Engine in-car repair procedures

Crankshaft

Number of main bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Main bearing journal diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47.979 to 48.000 mm

Main bearing journal size grades:

 

Grade A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47.993 to 48.000 mm

Grade B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47.986 to 47.993 mm

Grade C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47.979 to 47.986 mm

Crankpin journal diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42.986 to 43.007 mm

Crankpin journal size grades:

 

Grade A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43.000 to 43.007 mm

Grade B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42.993 to 43.000 mm

Grade C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42.986 to 42.993 mm

Main bearing and crankpin journal maximum ovality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.010 mm

Main bearing and big-end bearing running clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.021 to 0.049 mm

Crankshaft endfloat:

 

Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.10 to 0.30 mm

Service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.50 mm

Thrustwasher thickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.61 to 2.65 mm

Gudgeon pins

Diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18.0 mm

Fit in connecting rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Interference

Pistons and piston rings

Note: Service pistons are Grade B

 

 

Piston diameter:

Grade A

Grade B

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74.940 to 74.955 mm

74.956 to 74.970 mm

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74.945 to 74.960 mm

74.960 to 74.975 mm

Piston-to-bore clearance:

 

 

K8 - standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.015 to 0.045 mm

 

K16 - standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.010 to 0.040 mm

 

Service limit - all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.080 mm

 

Piston ring end gaps (fitted 20 mm from top of bore):

 

 

Top compression ring:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.25 to 0.45 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.30 to 0.50 mm

 

Second compression ring - all models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.30 to 0.50 mm

 

Oil control ring:

 

 

K8 - standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.25 to 1.00 mm

 

K16:

 

 

standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.25 to 0.50 mm

 

service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.60 mm

 

Piston ring-to-groove clearance:

 

 

Top compression ring:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.04 to 0.09 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.04 to 0.07 mm

 

Second compression ring:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.04 to 0.08 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.04 to 0.07 mm

 

Oil control ring - all models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.02 to 0.06 mm

 

Cylinder head

Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Aluminium alloy

Height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

118.95 to 119.05 mm

Reface limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.20 mm

Maximum acceptable gasket face distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.05 mm

Valve seat angle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45°

Valve seat width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.5 mm

Seat cutter correction angle:

 

Upper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30°

Lower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60°

Valve stem installed height:

 

K8:

 

new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38.95 to 40.81 mm

service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

41.06 mm

K16:

 

new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38.93 to 39.84 mm

service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40.10 mm

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•3

Valves

Seat angle:

 

 

Inlet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45°

 

Exhaust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44° 30’

 

Head diameter:

 

 

Inlet:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34.0 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28.0 mm

 

Exhaust:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31.0 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24.0 mm

 

Stem outside diameter:

 

 

Inlet:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.967 to 6.975 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5.952 to 5.967 mm

 

Exhaust:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.952 to 6.967 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5.947 to 5.962 mm

 

Guide inside diameter:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7.000 to 7.025 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.000 to 6.025 mm

 

Stem-to-guide clearance:

 

 

Inlet:

 

 

standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.03 to 0.04 mm

 

service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.07 mm

 

Exhaust:

 

 

standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.07 to 0.08 mm

 

service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.11 mm

 

Valve timing:

 

 

K8:

 

 

Inlet opens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13° BTDC

 

Inlet closes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47° ABDC

 

Exhaust opens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

53° BBDC

 

Exhaust closes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7° ATDC

 

K16:

 

 

 

 

Inlet opens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15° BTDC

2A

Inlet closes

45° ABDC

 

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Exhaust opens

55° BBDC

 

Exhaust closes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5° ATDC

 

Valve spring free length:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46.2 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50.0 mm

 

Valve guide fitted height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.0 mm

 

Camshaft

 

 

Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Toothed belt

 

Number of bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

 

Bearing journal running clearance:

 

 

Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.060 to 0.094 mm

 

Service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.150 mm

 

Camshaft endfloat:

 

 

Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.060 to 0.190 mm

 

Service limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.500 mm

 

Valve lift:

 

 

K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9.0 mm

 

K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8.2 mm

 

Hydraulic tappet outside diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32.959 to 32.975 mm

 

Lubrication system

 

 

System pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.0 bar @ idle speed

 

Oil pump type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Trochoidal, eccentric-rotor

 

Oil pump clearances:

 

 

Rotor endfloat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.02 to 0.06 mm

 

Outer rotor-to-body clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.28 to 0.36 mm

 

Rotor lobe clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.05 to 0.13 mm

 

Pressure relief valve operating pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.1 bar

 

Oil pressure warning lamp lights at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Below 0.3 to 0.5 bar

 

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

2A•4 Engine in-car repair procedures

Torque wrench settings

Nm

lbf ft

Spark plug (HT) lead clip screws - K8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Air intake duct support bracket-to-cylinder head screws . . . . . . . . . . .

4

3

Spark plug cover screws - K16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

1.5

Cylinder head cover bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Camshaft bearing cap/carrier-to-cylinder head bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Cylinder head bolts:

 

 

1st stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

15

2nd stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tighten through 180°

 

3rd stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tighten through (a further) 180°

Timing belt cover fasteners:

 

 

Upper right-hand (outer) cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

3

Lower and upper left-hand (inner) covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Timing belt tensioner backplate clamp bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

19

Timing belt tensioner pulley Allen screw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

33

Camshaft sprocket bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

24

Crankshaft pulley bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

160

118

Oil pump-to-cylinder block/crankcase bolt and screws . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Alternator mounting bracket-to-cylinder block/crankcase bolts . . . . . .

45

33

Dipstick tube-to-cylinder block/crankcase bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Flywheel bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

63

Transmission-to-engine bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

63

Flywheel cover plate screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Flywheel rear cover plate bolt and nut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38

28

Big-end bearing cap bolts:

 

 

1st stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

15

2nd stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tighten through 45°

 

Main bearing ladder-to-cylinder block/crankcase bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

7

Oil rail-to-main bearing ladder nuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Oil pump pick-up/strainer pipe bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

7

Sump bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

7

Engine oil drain plug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42

31

Engine/transmission right-hand mounting:

 

 

Bracket-to-cylinder block/crankcase bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

33

Mounting-to-bracket nuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100

74

Mounting-to-body through-bolt and nut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

63

Engine/transmission left-hand mounting:

 

 

Mounting-to-body bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

33

Mounting-to-transmission bracket bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60

44

Transmission bracket bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100

74

Engine/transmission rear mounting:

 

 

Mounting bracket-to-transmission bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

63

Connecting link-to- transmission bracket bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60

44

Connecting link-to-body bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

63

Anti-beaming bracket-to-support bracket bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

33

1General information and precautions

How to use this Chapter

This Part of the Chapter describes those repair procedures that can reasonably be carried out on the engine whilst it remains in the vehicle. If the engine has been removed from the vehicle and is being dismantled as described in Part B of this Chapter, any preliminary dismantling procedures can be ignored.

Note that whilst it may be possible physically to overhaul items such as the piston/connecting rod assemblies with the engine in the vehicle, such tasks are not usually carried out as separate operations and usually require the execution of several

additional procedures (not to mention the cleaning of components and of oilways). For this reason, all such tasks are classed as major overhaul procedures and are described in Part B of this Chapter.

Engine information

The engine is of four-cylinder, in-line type, mounted transversely at the front of the vehicle with the clutch and transmission on its left-hand end. The engine is available in two forms - the K8 engine, which is the eight-valve single overhead camshaft engine fitted to the carburettor-equipped 214 S model, and the K16 engine, which is a sixteen-valve double overhead camshaft engine which is fitted to all fuel-injected models. Apart from the different cylinder head designs, both engines are of identical construction.

Apart from the pressed steel sump, the plastic timing belt covers and the aluminium

alloy cylinder head cover, the engine consists of three major castings which are the cylinder head, the cylinder block/crankcase and the crankshaft main bearing ladder. There is also an oil rail underneath the main bearing ladder and the camshaft carrier/bearing caps.

All major castings are of aluminium alloy and are clamped together by ten long through-bolts which perform the dual role of cylinder head bolts and crankshaft main bearing fasteners. Since these bolts pass through the cylinder block/crankcase and the main bearing ladder, the oil rail is secured also to the main bearing ladder (by two nuts) and the main bearing ladder is secured also to the cylinder block/crankcase (by ten smaller bolts) so that the cylinder head can be removed without disturbing the rest of the engine. The passages provided for the bolts in the major castings are used as breather passages or as returns for the oil to the sump.

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•5

The crankshaft runs in five main bearings. Thrustwashers are fitted to the centre main bearing (upper half) to control crankshaft endfloat.

The connecting rods rotate on horizontallysplit bearing shells at their big-ends. The pistons are attached to the connecting rods by gudgeon pins which are an interference fit in the connecting rod small-end eyes. The aluminium alloy pistons are fitted with three piston rings, comprising two compression rings and an oil control ring.

The cylinder bores are formed by replaceable wet liners which are located from their top ends. Two sealing rings are fitted at the base of each liner to prevent the escape of coolant into the sump.

The inlet and exhaust valves are each closed by coil springs and operate in guides pressed into the cylinder head. The valve seat inserts are pressed into the cylinder head and can be renewed separately if worn.

On the K8 engine, the camshaft is driven by a toothed timing belt and operates the eight valves via self-adjusting hydraulic tappets, thus eliminating the need for routine checking and adjustment of the valve clearances. The camshaft rotates in six bearings that are linebored direct in the cylinder head and the (bolted-on) bearing caps. This means that the bearing caps are not available separately from the cylinder head and must not be interchanged with others from another engine. The distributor is driven from the left-hand end of the camshaft and the mechanical fuel pump is operated by an eccentric on the camshaft.

Apart from the fact that it has two camshafts, one inlet and one exhaust, each controlling eight valves and both retained by a single camshaft carrier, the same applies to the K16 engine. On the K16 engine, the distributor is driven from the left-hand end of the inlet camshaft. The fuel pump is electrically-operated.

On both engine types, the coolant pump is driven by the timing belt.

Lubrication is by means of an eccentricrotor trochoidal pump mounted on the crankshaft right-hand end. It draws oil through a strainer located in the sump and then forces it through an externally-mounted full-flow cartridge-type filter into galleries in the oil rail and cylinder block/crankcase, from where it is distributed to the crankshaft (main bearings) and camshaft(s). The big-end bearings are supplied with oil via internal drillings in the crankshaft, while the camshaft bearings and the hydraulic tappets receive a pressurised supply. The camshaft lobes and valves are lubricated by splash, as are all other engine components.

Repair operations possible with the engine in the car

The following work can be carried out with the engine in the vehicle:

a) Compression pressure - testing.

b)Cylinder head cover - removal and refitting.

c)Crankshaft pulley - removal and refitting.

d)Timing belt covers - removal and refitting.

e)Timing belt - removal, refitting and adjustment.

f)Timing belt tensioner and sprockets - removal and refitting.

g)Camshaft oil seal(s) - renewal.

h)Camshaft(s) and hydraulic tappets - removal, inspection and refitting.

i)Cylinder head - removal and refitting.

j)Cylinder head and pistons - decarbonising.

k)Sump - removal and refitting.

l)Oil pump - removal, overhaul and refitting.

m)Crankshaft oil seals - renewal.

n)Engine/transmission mountings - inspection and renewal.

o)Flywheel - removal, inspection and refitting.

Precautions

Note that a side-effect of the above described engine design is that the crankshaft cannot be rotated once the cylinder head and block through-bolts have been slackened. During any servicing or overhaul work the crankshaft always must be rotated to the desired position before the bolts are disturbed.

2 Engine oil and filter - renewal

1 Details of checking the engine oil levels and renewing both the oil and filter are contained in “Weekly Checks” and Chapter 1.

3 Compression test -

2

description and interpretation

1 When engine performance is down, or if misfiring occurs which cannot be attributed to the ignition or fuel systems, a compression test can provide diagnostic clues as to the engine’s condition. If the test is performed regularly it can give warning of trouble before any other symptoms become apparent.

2 The engine must be fully warmed up to normal operating temperature, the battery must be fully charged and the spark plugs must be removed. The aid of an assistant will be required.

3 Disable the ignition system by disconnecting the ignition HT coil lead from the distributor cap and earthing it on the cylinder block. Use a jumper lead or similar wire to make a good connection.

4 Fit a compression tester to the No 1 cylinder spark plug hole. The type of tester which screws into the plug thread is preferred

(see illustration).

5 Have the assistant hold the throttle wide

 

open and crank the engine on the starter

 

motor. After one or two revolutions, the

 

compression pressure should build up to a

 

maximum figure and then stabilise. Record

 

the highest reading obtained.

 

6 Repeat the test on the remaining cylinders,

 

recording the pressure in each.

 

7 All cylinders should produce very similar

 

pressures. Any difference greater than that

 

specified indicates the existence of a fault.

 

Note that the compression should build up

 

quickly in a healthy engine. Low compression

 

on the first stroke, followed by gradually

 

increasing pressure on successive strokes,

 

indicates worn piston rings. A low

 

compression reading on the first stroke, which

 

does not build up during successive strokes,

 

indicates leaking valves or a blown head

 

gasket (a cracked head could also be the

 

cause). Deposits on the undersides of

 

the valve heads can also cause low

 

compression.

 

8 If the pressure in any cylinder is reduced to

 

the specified minimum or less, carry out the

 

following test to isolate the cause. Introduce a

 

teaspoonful of clean oil into that cylinder

 

through its spark plug hole and repeat the

 

test.

 

9 If the addition of oil temporarily improves

 

the compression pressure, this indicates that

 

bore or piston wear is responsible for the

 

pressure loss. No improvement suggests that

 

leaking or burnt valves, or a blown head

 

gasket, may be to blame.

 

10 A low reading from two adjacent cylinders

 

is almost certainly due to the head gasket

2A

having blown between them and the presence

of coolant in the engine oil will confirm this.

11If one cylinder is about 20 percent lower than the others and the engine has a slightly rough idle, a worn camshaft lobe could be the cause.

12If the compression reading is unusually high, the combustion chambers are probably coated with carbon deposits. If this is the case, the cylinder head should be removed and decarbonised.

13On completion of the test, refit the spark plugs and reconnect the ignition system.

3.4 Measuring compression pressure

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

2A•6 Engine in-car repair procedures

4 Top Dead Centre (TDC) for

2

number one piston - locating

General

1 The crankshaft pulley, crankshaft and camshaft sprockets are provided by the factory with clear marks which align only at 90° BTDC. This positions the pistons half-way up the bores so that there is no risk of damage as the engine is reassembled. These marks do not indicate TDC. Use only the ignition timing marks, as described in this Section, to find TDC.

2Top dead centre (TDC) is the highest point in its travel up-and-down the cylinder bore that each piston reaches as the crankshaft rotates. While each piston reaches TDC both at the top of the compression stroke and again at the top of the exhaust stroke, for the purpose of timing the engine, TDC refers to the piston position (usually No 1) at the top of its compression stroke.

3While all engine reassembly procedures use the factory timing marks (90° BTDC), it is useful for several other servicing procedures to be able to position the engine at TDC.

4No 1 piston and cylinder is at the right-hand (timing belt) end of the engine. Note that the crankshaft rotates clockwise when viewed from the right-hand side of the vehicle.

Locating TDC

5Disconnect the battery negative lead and remove all the spark plugs.

6Trace No 1 spark plug (HT) lead from the plug back to the distributor cap and use chalk or similar to mark the distributor body or engine casting nearest to the cap’s No 1 terminal. Undo the distributor cap retaining screws and remove the cap.

7Apply the handbrake and ensure that the transmission is in neutral, then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the right-hand roadwheel.

8From underneath the front of the vehicle, slacken and remove the three bolts securing the bumper flange to the body. Remove the seven bolts securing the front undercover panel to the body and remove the panel to gain access to the crankshaft pulley and ignition timing marks.

9Using a spanner, or socket and extension bar, applied to the crankshaft pulley bolt, rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the notch on the crankshaft pulley’s inboard (left-hand) rim is aligned with the TDC mark on the timing belt lower cover (see Chapter 1 for details of ignition timing marks).

10With the crankshaft in this position, Nos 1 and 4 cylinders are now at TDC, one of them on the compression stroke. If the distributor rotor arm is pointing at (the previously-marked) No 1 terminal, then No 1 cylinder is correctly positioned. If the rotor arm is pointing at No 4 terminal, rotate the crankshaft one full turn (360°) clockwise until the arm points at the

cylinder head cover - K8 engine

marked terminal. No 1 cylinder will then be at TDC on the compression stroke.

11 Once No 1 cylinder has been positioned at TDC on the compression stroke, TDC for any of the other cylinders can then be located by rotating the crankshaft clockwise 180° at a time and following the firing order.

5 Cylinder head cover -

2

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Removal

1Disconnect the battery negative lead.

2Remove the air cleaner assembly and metal intake duct.

3Using a suitable pair of pliers, release the retaining clip(s) and disconnect the breather hose(s) from the cylinder head cover (see illustrations).

K8 engines

4 Undo the bolts securing the HT lead mounting and air intake support brackets to the cylinder head cover, then remove the brackets and position the HT leads clear of the cover.

5 Remove the two uppermost retaining screws securing the timing belt upper righthand/outer cover to the cylinder head cover, then slacken the remaining screws and bolts, as necessary, until the timing belt cover can be prised clear of the cylinder head cover without damaging it.

6 Working progressively and in the reverse of the tightening sequence (see illustration 5.14),

cylinder head cover groove . . .

cylinder head cover - K16 engine

slacken and remove the cylinder head cover retaining bolts.

7 Remove the cover, peel off the rubber seal and check it for cuts, other damage or distortion. Renew the seal if necessary.

K16 engines

8 Undo the two spark plug cover retaining screws and lift off the cover. Disconnect the HT leads from the plugs and withdraw them from the cylinder head, along with the clip plate and the grommet which is fitted to the left-hand end of the cylinder head cover.

9Working progressively and in the reverse of the tightening sequence (see illustration 5.22), slacken and remove the cylinder head cover retaining bolts, noting the correct fitted position of the air intake duct support bracket.

10Carefully lift off the cylinder head cover, taking care not to damage the gasket. Check that the gasket sealing path is undamaged and is attached to the gasket all around its periphery. If the sealing path is undamaged, then the gasket is re-usable and should remain in place on the cover until reassembly, unless its removal is necessary for other servicing work.

Refitting

K8 engines

11 On reassembly, carefully clean the cylinder head mating surfaces and the cover seal’s groove and remove all traces of oil.

12 Seat the seal in its groove in the cover and refit the bolts, pushing each through the seal, then apply a smear of silicone-RTV sealant to each corner of the seal (see illustrations).

at locations arrowed - K8 engine

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•7

5.14 Cylinder head cover bolt tightening sequence - K8 engine

13 Refit the cover to the cylinder head, ensuring that the seal remains seated in its groove. Fit all bolts, finger-tight.

14Tighten the cylinder head cover bolts in the sequence shown to the specified torque wrench setting (see illustration).

15Refit the timing belt upper righthand/outer cover to the cylinder head cover and tighten all the disturbed screws and bolts to the specified torque setting.

16Refit the HT lead mounting clips and air cleaner intake support brackets to the cylinder head, then tighten the retaining bolts to the specified torque. Ensure the HT leads are correctly routed.

17Connect the breather hose to the cylinder head cover and secure it in position with the retaining clip.

18Refit the air cleaner housing and reconnect the battery negative lead.

K16 engines

19On reassembly, carefully clean the mating surfaces, removing all traces of oil. If the gasket has been removed, the oil separator elements can be cleaned by removing them from the cover and washing them in solvent. Use compressed air to blow dry the elements before refitting them to the cover.

20If a new gasket is to be fitted, press it onto the cover locating dowels so that if it were laid on the camshaft carrier its stamped markings would be legible. The TOP mark should be nearest the inlet manifold and the EXH MAN SIDE mark should have its arrows pointing to the exhaust manifold (see illustrations).

21Lower the cover onto the cylinder head, ensuring that the gasket is not damaged or displaced. Install the cover retaining bolts, not forgetting to refit the air intake duct support bracket to its original position, and tighten them finger-tight.

22Working in the sequence shown, tighten the cylinder head cover retaining bolts to the specified torque setting (see illustration).

23Reconnect the HT leads to the spark plugs, then locate the clip plate and grommet in the left-hand end of the cylinder head cover. Ensure the HT leads are correctly routed then refit the spark plug cover and tighten its retaining screws to the specified

dowels (arrowed) so that . . .

torque. Tighten the air intake support bracket screws.

24Connect both the breather hoses to the cylinder head cover and secure them in position with the retaining clips.

25Refit the air cleaner housing and reconnect the battery negative lead.

6 Crankshaft pulley -

2

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Removal

1Apply the handbrake then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the right-hand roadwheel.

2From underneath the front of the vehicle, slacken and remove the three bolts securing the bumper flange to the body. Remove the seven bolts securing the front undercover panel to the body and remove the panel.

3If necessary, rotate the crankshaft until the relevant timing marks align.

4Remove the power steering pump and/or alternator drivebelt(s) (as applicable).

5To prevent crankshaft rotation while the pulley bolt is unscrewed, select top gear and have an assistant apply the brakes firmly. If the engine has been removed from the

5.22 Cylinder head cover bolt tightening sequence - K16 engine

as shown if gasket were placed on camshaft carrier

vehicle, lock the flywheel using the arrangement shown (see illustration 18.2).

6 Unscrew the pulley bolt, noting the special washer behind it, then remove the pulley from the crankshaft.

Refitting

7 Align the crankshaft pulley centre notch with the locating lug on the crankshaft timing belt sprocket then refit the washer, ensuring that its flat surface is facing the pulley. Fit the retaining bolt (see illustration).

8 Lock the crankshaft by the method used on removal and tighten the pulley retaining bolt to the specified torque setting.

9 Refit the power steering pump and/or alternator drivebelt(s) (as applicable) and adjust them as described in Chapter 1.

10 Refit the undercover panel and roadwheel

then lower the vehicle to the ground.

2A

7 Timing belt covers -

4

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Removal

Upper right-hand (outer) cover

1 Slacken the bolt situated at the cover’s bottom corner, immediately behind the engine/gearbox unit right-hand mounting bracket.

centre fits over crankshaft timing belt sprocket locating lug (arrowed)

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2A•8 Engine in-car repair procedures

7.2a Timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover fasteners - K8 engine

1Slacken screw - cover should be slotted

2Remove fasteners

2 Unscrew the remaining cover retaining bolts and withdraw the cover, noting the rubber seal fitted to the mounting bracket edge. Note that if the cover is not slotted at the bottom corner screw’s location, the screw

7.9a Timing belt upper left-hand (inner) cover fasteners (arrowed) - K8 engine

7.9b Timing belt upper left-hand (inner) cover fasteners (arrowed) - K16 engine

7.2b Timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover fasteners (arrowed) - K16 engine, raised for clarity

will have to be removed fully. If this is the case, the cover can be slotted to ease future removal and refitting (see illustrations).

Lower cover

3Remove the crankshaft pulley.

4Remove the cover retaining screws, including the one which also secures the upper cover’s bottom front corner. Remove the cover whilst noting the rubber seal fitted to its mounting bracket edge (see illustration).

Upper left-hand (inner) cover

5Remove the timing belt.

6Remove the camshaft sprocket(s) and the timing belt tensioner.

7Unscrew the bolt securing the cover to the coolant pump.

8On K16 engines, unbolt the engine/gearbox unit right-hand mounting bracket from the cylinder block/crankcase.

9Remove the remaining cover retaining bolts and withdraw the cover (see illustrations).

Lower cover

12 Refitting is the reverse of the removal procedure. Ensure that the seal fits correctly between the cover and the mounting bracket and tighten the cover fasteners to the specified torque setting.

Upper left-hand (inner) cover

13 Refitting is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten all disturbed fasteners to their specified torque wrench settings.

8 Timing belt - removal,

4

inspection, refitting and

adjustment

If the timing belt is to be reused, use white paint or similar to mark the direction of rotation on the belt.

Refitting

Upper right-hand (outer) cover

10Refitting is the reverse of the removal procedure. Ensure that the seal fits correctly between the cover and the mounting bracket and that the cover edges mate correctly with those of the inner cover and (K8 engines only) cylinder head cover (see illustration).

11Tighten the cover fasteners to the specified torque setting.

7.9c Removing timing belt upper left-hand (inner) cover - K16 engine

Removal

1Disconnect the battery negative lead.

2To improve access to the timing belt, remove the expansion tank mounting bolts then free the coolant hose from any relevant retaining clips and position the tank clear of the engine. On models equipped with powerassisted steering, undo all the power steering hose retaining clip bolts then slide the fluid reservoir out of its retaining clip and position it

7.10 Ensure timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover engages correctly with cylinder head cover - K8 engine

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•9

8.6 Crankshaft pulley mark aligned with timing belt lower cover mark at 90° BTDC

clear of the timing belt covers. Take great care not to place any undue strain on hoses and mop up any spilt fluid immediately.

3Remove the timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover.

4Firmly apply the handbrake then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the right-hand roadwheel

5From underneath the front of the vehicle, slacken and remove the three bolts securing the bumper flange to the body. Remove the seven bolts securing the front undercover panel to the body and remove the panel to gain access to the crankshaft pulley bolt.

6Using a suitable spanner or socket on the crankshaft pulley bolt, rotate the crankshaft in a clockwise direction until the long whitepainted mark on the crankshaft pulley’s outboard (right-hand) face is aligned with the single, separate mark on the timing belt lower cover so that the crankshaft is in the 90° BTDC position (see Chapter 1 for details of the pulley/cover marks) (see illustration).

7Check that the camshaft sprocket mark(s) align as described in paragraph 15, showing that Nos 1 and 4 cylinders are at 90° BTDC so that there is no risk of the valves contacting the pistons during dismantling and reassembly. If the camshaft sprocket mark(s) are 180° out, rotate the crankshaft through one complete turn (360°) to align the marks as described (see illustration).

8On K16 engines, use the tool described in Section 9 to lock up the camshaft sprockets

8.7 Camshaft sprocket marks (A) aligned with timing belt upper left-hand (inner) cover mark (B) - K16 engine

so that they cannot move under valve spring pressure when the timing belt is removed.

9Remove the crankshaft sprocket and timing belt lower cover.

10Position a trolley jack with a wooden spacer beneath the sump then gently jack it up to take the weight of the engine.

11Slacken and remove the engine/gearbox unit right-hand mounting through-bolt and nut and the mounting-to-bracket nuts. Remove the mounting, along with the two rubber washers which are fitted on each side of the mounting. On K8 engines only, unscrew the retaining bolts securing the bracket to cylinder block/crankcase and remove it from the engine unit (see illustration).

12Slacken both the timing belt tensioner pulley Allen screw and the tensioner backplate clamp bolt through half a turn each, then push the pulley assembly downwards to remove all the tension from the timing belt. Hold the tensioner pulley in this position and re-tighten the backplate clamp bolt securely

(see illustration).

13Slip the belt off the sprockets (see illustration). Do not rotate the crankshaft until the timing belt has been refitted.

Inspection

14 Check the timing belt carefully for any signs of uneven wear, splitting or oil contamination and renew it if there is the slightest doubt about its condition. If the engine is undergoing an overhaul and has

hand mounting bracket - K8 engine

covered more than 48 000 miles (80 000 km) since the original belt was fitted, renew the belt as a matter of course, regardless of its apparent condition. If signs of oil contamination are found, trace the source of the oil leak and rectify it, then wash down the engine timing belt area and all related components to remove all traces of oil.

Refitting

15 On reassembly, thoroughly clean the timing belt sprockets and check that they are aligned as follows. It is most important that these marks are aligned exactly as this sets valve timing. Note that in this position, Nos 1 and 4 cylinders are at 90° BTDC so that there is no risk of the valves contacting the pistons during dismantling and reassembly.

a) Camshaft sprocket on K8 engine - The EX

line and the mark stamped on the 2A sprocket rim must be at the front (looking

at the sprocket from the right-hand side of the vehicle) and aligned exactly with the cylinder head top surface (see illustration).

b)Camshaft sprockets on K16 engine - Both EXHAUST arrow marks must point to the rear (looking at the sprockets from the right-hand side of the vehicle) with the IN lines and the sprocket rim marks aligned exactly with the line on the timing belt upper left-hand/inner cover (representing the cylinder head top surface). See illustration 8.7.

8.12 Timing belt tensioner pulley bolt (A) and tensioner backplate clamp bolt (B)

8.13 Mark direction of rotation of timing

8.15a Camshaft sprocket marks (A)

belt before removal

aligned with cylinder head top surface (B) -

 

K8 engine

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2A•10 Engine in-car repair procedures

aligned on each side of oil pump raised rib (B)

c)Crankshaft sprocket - The two dots must be positioned on each side of the raised rib on the oil pump body (see illustration).

16If a used belt is being refitted, ensure that the arrow mark made on removal points in the normal direction of rotation. Fit the timing belt over the crankshaft and camshaft sprockets, ensuring that the belt front run (and, on K16 engines, the top run) is taut, ie: all slack is on the tensioner pulley side of the belt, then fit the belt over the coolant pump sprocket and tensioner pulley. Do not twist the belt sharply during refitting and ensure that the belt teeth are correctly seated centrally in the sprockets and that the timing marks remain in alignment

(see illustration)..

17Slacken the tensioner backplate clamp bolt and check that the tensioner pulley moves to tension the belt. If the tensioner assembly is not free to move under spring tension, rectify the fault or the timing belt will not be correctly tensioned.

18On K16 engines, remove the camshaft sprocket locking tool.

19On K8 engines, refit the engine/gearbox unit right-hand mounting bracket, tightening its bolts to the specified torque wrench setting.

20On all engines, refit the timing belt lower cover and the crankshaft pulley.

21Using a suitable spanner or socket, rotate the crankshaft two full turns clockwise to settle and tension the belt. Realign the crankshaft pulley (90° BTDC) mark and check that the sprocket timing mark(s) are still correctly aligned.

22If all is well, first tighten the tensioner pulley backplate clamp bolt to the specified torque, then tighten the tensioner pulley Allen screw to the specified torque.

23Reassemble the engine/gearbox unit right-hand mounting, ensuring that the rubber washers are correctly located, then tighten the mounting nuts and bolts to their specified torque settings. Remove the jack from underneath the engine unit.

24Refit the front undercover panel and roadwheel, then lower the vehicle to the ground.

25Refit the timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover.

K16 engine

26Where necessary, refit the power steering fluid reservoir to the mounting bracket and secure the hydraulic hose clamps in position with the retaining bolts.

27Refit the coolant expansion tank and tighten the mounting bolts securely. Secure the coolant hose in position with any necessary retaining clips and reconnect the battery negative lead.

Adjustment

28 As the timing belt is a ‘fit-and-forget’ type, the manufacturer states that tensioning need only be carried out when a belt is (re)fitted. No

re-tensioning is recommended once a belt has been fitted and therefore this operation is not included in the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule.

29 If the timing belt is thought to be incorrectly tensioned, then adjust the tension as described in paragraphs 1 to 7, 17, 21, 22 and 24 to 27 above.

30 If the timing belt has been disturbed, adjust its tension following the same procedure, omitting as appropriate the irrelevant preliminary dismantling/reassembly steps.

9 Timing belt tensioner and

4

sprockets - removal,

inspection and refitting

If both camshaft sprockets on K16 engines are to be

removed, it is good practice to mark them (inlet or

exhaust) so that they can be returned to their original locations on reassembly.

Note: This Section describes as individual operations the removal and refitting of the components concerned. If more than one

 

9.2a Timing belt, sprockets and covers - K8 engine

1

Timing belt upper right-

12

Crankshaft pulley

20

Pillar bolt

 

hand (outer) cover

13

Washer

21

Timing belt

2

Seal

14

Crankshaft pulley bolt

22

Crankshaft sprocket

3

Bolt

15

Timing belt tensioner

23

Camshaft sprocket

4

Bolt

 

pulley assembly

24

Camshaft sprocket bolt

5

Bolt

16

Tensioner pulley Allen

25

Washer

6

Shouldered bolt

 

screw

26

Timing belt upper left-

7

Timing belt lower cover

17

Tensioner backplate

 

hand (inner) cover

8

Seal

 

clamp bolt

27

Bolt - cover to water

9

Seal

18

Tensioner pulley spring

 

pump

10

Bolt

19

Sleeve

28

Bolt

11

Bolt

 

 

 

 

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•11

 

9.2b Timing belt, sprockets and covers - K16 engine

1

Timing belt upper right-

10

Washer

18

Tensioner pulley spring

 

hand (outer) cover

11

Crankshaft pulley bolt

19

Sleeve

2

Bolt

12

Timing belt

20

Pillar bolt

3

Seal

13

Camshaft sprockets

21

Tensioner backplate

4

Bolt

14

Bolt

 

clamp bolt

5

Timing belt lower cover

15

Washer

22

Crankshaft sprocket

6

Seal

16

Timing belt tensioner

23

Timing belt upper left-

7

Bolt

 

pulley assembly

 

hand (inner) cover

8

Bolt

17

Tensioner pulley Allen

24

Bolt

9

Crankshaft pulley

 

screw

 

 

component needs to be removed at the same time, start by removing the timing belt, then remove each component as described below whilst ignoring the preliminary dismantling steps.

Removal

1Disconnect the battery negative lead.

2To improve access to the timing belt components (see illustrations), remove the expansion tank mounting bolts then free the coolant hose from any relevant retaining clips and position the tank clear of the engine. On models equipped with power-assisted steering, undo all the power steering hose retaining clip bolts then slide the fluid

reservoir out of its retaining clip and position it clear of the timing belt covers. Take great care not to place any undue strain on hoses and mop up any spilt fluid immediately.

3Remove the timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover.

4Apply the handbrake then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the right-hand roadwheel.

5From underneath the front of the vehicle, slacken and remove the three bolts securing the bumper flange to the body. Remove the seven bolts securing the front undercover panel to the body and remove the panel.

6Using a suitable spanner or socket on the crankshaft pulley bolt, rotate the crankshaft in

a clockwise direction until the long whitepainted mark on the crankshaft pulley’s outboard (right-hand) face is aligned with the single, separate mark on the timing belt lower cover so that the crankshaft is in the 90° BTDC position (see Chapter 1 for details of the pulley/cover marks).

7 Check that the camshaft sprocket mark(s) align as described in Section 8, paragraph 15 then proceed as described under the relevant sub-heading.

Camshaft sprocket(s)

8Slacken through half a turn each, the timing belt tensioner pulley Allen screw and the tensioner backplate clamp bolt. Push the pulley assembly down to release all tension from the timing belt, then re-tighten the backplate clamp bolt securely.

9Remove the belt from the camshaft sprocket(s), taking care not to twist it too sharply. Use fingers only to handle the belt. Do not rotate the crankshaft until the timing belt is refitted.

10On K8 engines, slacken the camshaft sprocket retaining bolt and remove it, along with its washer. To prevent the camshaft from rotating, use Rover service tool 18G 1521 to retain the sprocket. If the tool is not available, then an acceptable substitute can be fabricated from two lengths of steel strip (one long, the other short) and three nuts and bolts. One nut and bolt should form the pivot of a forked tool with the remaining two nuts and bolts at the tips of the forks to engage with the sprocket spokes, as shown in illus-

tration 9.23a.

11 On K16 engines, unscrew the appropriate 2A camshaft sprocket retaining bolt and remove it,

along with its washer. To prevent a camshaft from rotating, lock together both sprockets using Rover service tool 18G 1570. This tool is a metal sprag shaped on both sides to fit the sprocket teeth and is inserted between the sprockets. If the tool is not available, then an acceptable substitute can be cut from a length of square-section steel tube or similar to fit as closely as possible around the sprocket spokes (see illustrations).

12 On all engines, remove the sprocket(s) from the camshaft end(s), noting the locating roll pin(s) (see illustration). If a roll pin is a

9.11a Camshaft locking tool cut from steel section . . .

9.11b . . . to fit sprocket spokes as closely as possible - K16 engine

9.12 Removing camshaft sprocket (roll pin arrowed) - K8 engine

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2A•12 Engine in-car repair procedures

loose fit in the camshaft end, remove it and store it with the sprocket for safe-keeping.

Crankshaft sprocket

13On K16 engines, use the tool described in paragraph 11 to lock together the camshaft sprockets so that they cannot move under valve spring pressure when the timing belt is removed.

14Remove the crankshaft pulley and timing belt lower cover.

15Slacken through half a turn each the timing belt tensioner pulley Allen screw and the tensioner backplate clamp bolt, push the pulley assembly down to release all the tension from the timing belt, then re-tighten the backplate clamp bolt securely.

16Work the belt clear of the crankshaft sprocket, taking care not to twist it too sharply. Use fingers only to handle the belt. Do not rotate the crankshaft until the timing belt is refitted.

17Remove the sprocket from the crankshaft.

Tensioner assembly

18On K16 engines, use the tool described in paragraph 11 to lock together the camshaft sprockets so that they cannot move under valve spring pressure when the timing belt is removed.

19Using a suitable pair of pliers, unhook the tensioner spring from the pillar bolt. Unscrew the tensioner pulley Allen screw and the tensioner backplate clamp bolt then withdraw the tensioner assembly from the engine unit. Do not rotate the crankshaft until the timing belt is re-tensioned.

Inspection

20Clean thoroughly the camshaft/crankshaft sprockets and renew any that show signs of wear, damage or cracks.

21Clean the tensioner assembly but do not use any strong solvent which may enter the pulley bearing. Check that the pulley rotates freely on the backplate, with no sign of stiffness or of free play. Renew the assembly if there is any doubt about its condition or if

9.22 Camshaft sprockets have two keyways. Engage EX keyway with exhaust camshaft roll pin and IN keyway with inlet camshaft roll pin - K16 engine

there are any obvious signs of wear or damage. The same applies to the tensioner spring, which should be checked with great care as its condition is critical for the correct tensioning of the timing belt.

Refitting

Camshaft sprocket(s)

22 If removed, refit the roll pin to the camshaft end, ensuring that its split is facing the centre of the camshaft, then refit the sprocket so that the timing marks are facing outwards (to the right). On K16 engines, ensure that the appropriate sprocket keyway engages with the camshaft locating pin (ie: if refitting the inlet camshaft sprocket, engage its IN keyway with the roll pin and so on) then refit the sprocket retaining bolt and washer (see illustration). Where necessary, repeat the procedure for the second sprocket.

23Prevent the sprocket(s) from rotating by using the method employed on removal, then tighten the sprocket retaining bolt(s) to the specified torque setting. Check that the sprocket timing marks align as described in Section 8, paragraph 15 (see illustrations).

24Fit the timing belt over the camshaft sprockets, ensuring that the belt front run (and, on K16 engines, the top run) is taut, that is, all slack is on the tensioner pulley side of the belt. Do not twist the belt sharply while refitting it and ensure that the belt teeth are correctly seated centrally in the sprockets and that the timing marks remain in alignment.

25Slacken the tensioner backplate clamp bolt and check that the tensioner pulley moves to tension the belt. If the tensioner assembly is not free to move under spring tension, rectify the fault or the timing belt will not be correctly tensioned.

26On K16 engines, remove the camshaft sprocket locking tool.

27Using a suitable spanner or socket, rotate the crankshaft two full turns clockwise to settle and tension the belt. Realign the crankshaft pulley (90° BTDC) mark and check that the sprocket timing mark(s) are still correctly aligned.

camshaft pulley in position - K8 engine

28If all is well, first tighten the tensioner pulley backplate clamp bolt to the specified torque, then tighten the tensioner pulley Allen screw to the specified torque.

29Refit the front undercover panel and roadwheel, then lower the vehicle to the ground.

30Refit the timing belt upper right-hand (outer) cover.

31Where necessary, refit the power steering fluid reservoir to the mounting bracket and secure the hydraulic hose clamps in position with the retaining bolts.

32Refit the coolant expansion tank and tighten the mounting bolts securely. Secure the coolant hose in position with any necessary retaining clips and reconnect the battery negative lead.

Crankshaft sprocket

33Refit the sprocket to the crankshaft so that it locates correctly on the crankshaft’s flattened section, noting that the sprocket flange must be innermost so that the two timing marks are on the outside (right-hand side) of the sprocket. Check that the sprocket timing marks align as described in Section 8, paragraph 15.

34Fit the timing belt over the crankshaft sprocket, ensuring that the belt front run (and, on K16 engines, the top run) is taut, that is, all slack is on the tensioner pulley side of the

belt. Do not twist the belt sharply while refitting it and ensure that the belt teeth are correctly seated centrally in the sprockets and that the timing marks remain in alignment.

35Slacken the tensioner backplate clamp bolt and check that the tensioner pulley moves to tension the belt. If the tensioner assembly is not free to move under spring tension, rectify the fault or the timing belt will not be correctly tensioned.

36On K16 engines, remove the camshaft sprocket locking tool.

37Refit the lower timing belt cover and the crankshaft pulley.

38Carry out the operations described in paragraphs 27 to 32.

9.23b Locking camshafts in position with fabricated tool - K16 engine

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•13

correctly hooked onto pillar bolt

Tensioner pulley

39Refit the tensioner pulley assembly and tighten the pulley Allen screw and the backplate clamp bolt lightly. Hook the tensioner spring over the pillar bolt and check that the tensioner is free to move under spring tension and that the pulley bears correctly against the timing belt (see illustration).

40On K16 engines, remove the camshaft sprocket locking tool.

41Carry out the operations described above in paragraphs 27 to 32.

10 Camshaft oil seals - renewal 4

Note: If a right-hand oil seal is to be renewed with the timing belt still in place, then check that the belt is free from oil contamination. Renew the belt if signs of oil contamination are found. Cover the belt to protect it from contamination while work is in progress and ensure that all traces of oil are removed from the area before the belt is refitted.

Right-hand seal(s)

1Remove the camshaft sprocket(s).

2Punch or drill two small holes opposite each other in the oil seal. Screw a self-tapping screw into each and pull on the screws with pliers to extract the seal.

3Clean the seal housing and polish off any burrs or raised edges which may have caused the seal to fail in the first place.

4Lubricate the lips of the new seal with clean engine oil and drive it into position until it seats on its locating shoulder. Use a suitable tubular drift, such as a socket, which bears only on the hard outer edge of the seal (see illustration). Take care not to damage the seal lips during fitting and note that the seal lips should face inwards.

5Refit the camshaft sprocket(s).

Left-hand seals - K16 engines

6Disconnect the battery negative lead.

7To reach the inlet camshaft seal, remove the distributor.

8To reach the exhaust camshaft seal,

10.4 Fitting a new camshaft right-hand oil seal - K16 engine

unfasten the rubber strap securing the air intake duct to its support bracket, disconnect the vacuum pipe from the air temperature control valve and unclip the pipe from the support bracket. Undo the bracket’s retaining bolts and remove the bracket from the cylinder head (see illustration).

9Remove the old seal and install the new one as described above in paragraphs 2 to 4.

10On the inlet camshaft, refit the distributor.

11On the exhaust camshaft, refit the air intake duct support bracket, tightening its screws to the specified torque wrench setting. Reconnect and secure the air temperature control valve vacuum pipe and refit the rubber strap to secure the air intake duct.

12Connect the battery negative lead.

11 Camshafts and hydraulic

4

tappets - removal, inspection

and refitting

If faulty tappets are diagnosed and the engine’s

service history is unknown, it is always worth trying the

effect of renewing the engine oil and filter (using only good quality engine oil of the recommended viscosity and specification) before going to the expense of renewing any of the tappets.

Note: Prior to removing the camshaft(s), obtain Rover sealant kit LVV 10002 which also contains a plastic scraper. Read the instructions supplied with the kit and take care not to allow the sealant to contact the fingers, as it will bond the skin. If difficulty is experienced with the removal of hardened sealant from mating surfaces, it will be necessary to use a foam action gasket remover.

Removal

K8 engines

1 Remove the cylinder head cover (see illustration 11.0a overleaf).

2Remove the distributor.

3Remove the camshaft sprocket.

10.8 Remove air intake duct support bracket to reach exhaust camshaft lefthand oil seal - K16 engine

4Carefully prise the oil feed tube away from the camshaft bearing caps and remove it from the head assembly. Remove the O-rings from the oil rail and discard them. The O-rings must be renewed whenever they are disturbed.

5The camshaft right and left-hand end bearing caps are noticeably different and cannot be confused. The intermediate bearing caps (which are all similar) are marked by the manufacturer with a number (1, 2, 3, or 4) stamped in the boss next to the oil feed hole. Before unbolting any of the caps, make written notes to ensure that each can be easily identified and refitted in its original location.

6Working in the reverse of the tightening sequence (see illustration 11.29), slacken the camshaft bearing cap bolts progressively, by

one turn at a time. Work only as described to 2A release the pressure of the valve springs on

the bearing caps gradually and evenly.

7 Withdraw the bearing caps, noting the presence of the locating dowels on the end caps, then remove the camshaft and withdraw the oil seal.

8 Obtain eight small, clean plastic containers, number them 1 to 8, and then fill them with clean engine oil. Using a rubber sucker, withdraw each hydraulic tappet in turn (see illustration), and place it in its respective container, to prevent oil loss. Do not interchange the hydraulic tappets or the rate of wear will be much increased and do not allow them to lose oil or they will take a long

11.8Use a valve-grinding sucker to extract hydraulic tappets

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2A•14 Engine in-car repair procedures

1

Cylinder head cover

23

Oil feed tube

2

Seal

24

O-ring

3

Engine oil filler cap

25

Cylinder head bolt

4

Seal

26

Cylinder head

5

Bolt

27

Cylinder head gasket

6

HT lead retaining clip

28

Hydraulic tappet

 

bracket

29

Split collets

7

Screw

30

Spring retainer

8

HT lead retaining clip

31

Valve spring

9

HT lead retaining clip

32

Valve stem seal/ spring

10

HT lead retaining clip

 

lower seat

 

bracket

33

Valve guide

11

Air intake duct support

34

Inlet valve

 

bracket

35

Valve seat insert

12

Fastener insert

36

Exhaust valve

13

Bolt

37

Valve seat insert

14

Oil seal

38

Gasket

15

Roll pin

39

Coolant outlet elbow

16

Camshaft

40

Bolt

17

Camshaft right-hand

41

Coolant temperature

 

bearing cap*

 

gauge sender unit

18

Dowel

42

Spark plug

19

Bolt

 

 

20

Camshaft intermediate

* Note: Camshaft bearing

 

bearing cap*

caps shown for reference

21

Bolt

only - not available

22

Camshaft left-hand

separately from cylinder

 

bearing cap*

head

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11.0a Top end components - K8 engine

 

 

 

 

1

Spark plug cover

24

Valve spring

2

Screw

25

Valve stem seal/spring

3

Retaining washer

 

lower seat

4

Engine oil filler cap

26

Cylinder head

5

Seal

27

Dowel

6

Spark plug

28

Cylinder head gasket

7

Pillar bolt

29

Valve guide

8

HT lead grommet

30

Inlet valves

9

HT lead clip plate

31

Valve seat insert

10

Bolt

32

Exhaust valves

11

Cylinder head cover

33

Valve seat insert

12

Gasket

34 Air intake duct support

13

Camshaft carrier*

 

bracket

14

Bolt

35

Bolt

15

Cylinder head bolt

36

Gasket

16

Inlet camshaft

37

Coolant outlet elbow

17

Exhaust camshaft

38

Bolt

18

Roll pin

39

Coolant temperature

19

Rotor arm drive

 

gauge sender unit

 

spindle

 

 

20

Oil seal

* Note: Camshaft carrier

21

Hydraulic tappet

shown for reference only -

22

Split collets

not available separately

23

Spring retainer

from cylinder head

 

 

 

 

11.0b Top end components - K16 engine

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•15

11.9 Secure partly-removed timing belt upper left-hand (inner) cover clear of cylinder head - K16 engine

time to refill with oil on restarting the engine, resulting in incorrect valve clearances.

K16 engines

9 Remove both camshaft sprockets, then unscrew the inner cover’s upper retaining bolts so that the cover can be pulled away from the cylinder head just far enough for adequate working clearance. Take care not to distort or damage the cover or the timing belt

(see illustration).

10 Remove the cylinder head cover (see illustration 11.0b).

11Remove the distributor.

12Unclip the air temperature control valve vacuum pipe from the air intake duct support bracket, then unbolt the bracket from the cylinder head.

13Working in the reverse of the tightening sequence (see illustration 11.36), evenly and progressively slacken the camshaft carrier bolts by one turn at a time. Once all valve spring pressure has been relieved, remove the bolts.

14Withdraw the camshaft carrier, noting the presence of the locating dowels, then remove the camshafts and slide off the oil seals. The inlet camshaft can be identified by the distributor rotor arm drive spindle (or its location), therefore there is no need to mark the camshafts.

15Obtain sixteen small, clean plastic containers, number them 1 to 16, and then fill them with clean engine oil. Using a rubber

sucker, withdraw each hydraulic tappet in turn

(see illustration 11.8), and place it in its respective container, to prevent oil loss. Do not interchange the hydraulic tappets or the rate of wear will be much increased and do not allow them to lose oil or they will take a long time to refill with oil on restarting the engine, resulting in incorrect valve clearances.

Inspection

16Check each hydraulic tappet for signs of obvious wear (scoring, pitting, etc) and for ovality. Renew if necessary.

17If the engine’s valve clearances have sounded noisy, particularly if the noise persists after initial start-up from cold, then there is reason to suspect a faulty hydraulic tappet. Only a good mechanic experienced in these engines can tell whether the noise level is typical, or if renewal is warranted of one or more of the tappets.

18If any tappet’s operation is faulty, then it must be renewed.

19Carefully remove all traces of old sealant from the mating surfaces of the bearing caps or camshaft carrier and cylinder head by using a plastic scraper. Examine the camshaft bearing journals and the cylinder head bearing surfaces for signs of obvious wear or pitting. If any such signs are evident, renew the component concerned.

20To check the bearing journal running clearance, remove the hydraulic tappets, carefully clean the bearing surfaces and refit the camshaft(s) and carrier/bearing caps with a strand of Plastigauge across each journal. Tighten the carrier/bearing cap bolts to the specified torque wrench setting whilst taking great care not to rotate the camshaft(s), then remove the carrier/bearing caps and use the scale provided with the Plastigauge kit to measure the width of each compressed strand.

21If the running clearance of any bearing is found to be worn to the specified service limit or beyond, fit a new camshaft and repeat the check. If the clearance is still excessive, then the cylinder head must be renewed.

22To check camshaft endfloat, remove the hydraulic tappets, carefully clean the bearing surfaces and refit the camshaft(s) and carrier/bearing caps. Tighten to the specified

torque wrench setting the carrier/bearing cap bolts, then measure the endfloat using a Dial Test Indicator (DTI) or dial gauge mounted on the cylinder head so that its tip bears on the camshaft right-hand end.

23Tap the camshaft fully towards the gauge, zero the gauge, then tap the camshaft fully away from the gauge and note the gauge reading. If the endfloat measured is found to be worn to the specified service limit or beyond, fit a new camshaft and repeat the check. If the clearance is still excessive, then the cylinder head must be renewed.

24The camshaft itself should show no signs of marks, pitting or scoring on the lobe surfaces. If such marks are evident, renew the camshaft.

25If a camshaft is renewed, extract the roll pin from the old one and fit the pin to the new camshaft with its split towards the camshaft’s centre.

Refitting

K8 engines

26Liberally oil the cylinder head hydraulic tappet bores and the tappets (see illustration). Note that if new tappets are being fitted, they must be charged with clean engine oil before installation. Carefully refit the tappets to the cylinder head, ensuring that each tappet is refitted to its original bore and is the correct way up. Some care will be required to enter the tappets squarely into their bores.

27Liberally oil the camshaft bearings and lobes then refit the camshaft. Position the shaft so that its No 1 cylinder lobes are pointing away from their valves and the roll

pin in the camshaft’s right-hand end is in the 2A 4 o’clock position when viewed from the right-

hand end of the engine (see illustration).

28 Ensure that the locating dowels are pressed firmly into their recesses. Check that the mating surfaces are completely clean, unmarked and free from oil, then apply a thin bead of special Rover sealant to the mating surfaces of the front and rear bearing caps as shown (see illustration 11.29). Carefully follow the instructions supplied with the sealant kit. Refit the bearing caps, using the notes made on removal, to ensure that each is installed correctly and in its original location

(see illustration).

11.26 Lubricate hydraulic tappets

11.27 Camshaft roll pin location at TDC

11.28 Apply sealant (arrowed) and fit

thoroughly and refit correct way up -

position (for refitting camshaft bearing

camshaft bearing caps - K8 engine

K8 engine

caps) - K8 engine

 

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2A•16 Engine in-car repair procedures

11.29 Camshaft bearing cap bolt tightening sequence - K8 engine

Note: Apply thin bead of sealant to end bearing cap mating surfaces along paths shown by heavy black lines

29 Working in the sequence shown (see illustration), progressively tighten the camshaft bearing cap bolts by one turn at a time until the caps touch the cylinder head evenly. Now go round again, working in the same sequence, and tighten all the bolts to the specified torque setting. Work only as described to impose the pressure of the valve springs gradually and evenly on the bearing caps. Wipe off all surplus sealant so

oil seal - K8 engine

position for refitting camshaft carrier (arrowed) - K16 engine

K8 engine

that none is left to find its way into any oilways.

30Squirt clean engine oil into each camshaft bearing cap oil hole, then fit new O-rings to each of the oil feed tube stubs (see illustration). Refit the oil feed tube to the cylinder head and press it firmly into position in the camshaft bearing caps.

31Fit a new camshaft oil seal (see illustration), then refit the cylinder head cover and camshaft sprocket.

32Refit the distributor.

K16 engines

33Liberally oil the cylinder head hydraulic tappet bores and the tappets. Note that if new tappets are being fitted, they must be charged with clean engine oil before installation. Carefully refit the tappets to the cylinder head, ensuring that each tappet is refitted to its original bore and is the correct way up. Some care will be required to enter the tappets squarely into their bores.

34Liberally oil the camshaft bearings and lobes and refit them to the cylinder head. Position each shaft so that its No 1 cylinder lobes are pointing away from their valves. With the shafts in this position, the roll pin in the inlet camshaft’s right-hand end will be in the 4 o’clock position when viewed from the right-hand end of the engine, while that of the

11.35 Apply thin bead of sealant to camshaft carrier mating surfaces along paths shown by heavy black lines - K16 engine

refitting oil feed tube - K8 engine

exhaust camshaft will be in the 8 o’clock position (see illustration).

35 Ensure that the locating dowels are pressed firmly into their recesses, check that the mating surfaces are completely clean, unmarked and free from oil, then apply a thin bead of special Rover sealant to the mating surfaces of the camshaft carrier as shown (see illustration). Carefully follow the instructions supplied with the sealant kit. Refit the carrier.

36 Working in the sequence shown (see illustration), progressively tighten the camshaft carrier bolts by one turn at a time until the carrier touches the cylinder head evenly. Now go round again, working in the same sequence, tightening all bolts to the specified torque setting. Work only as described to impose the pressure of the valve springs gradually and evenly on the carrier. Wipe off all surplus sealant so that none is left to find its way into any oilways.

37Fit new camshaft oil seals, then refit the cylinder head cover, inner timing cover retaining bolts and camshaft sprockets.

38Refit the distributor.

39Refit the air intake duct support bracket, tightening its screws to their specified torque wrench setting, then reconnect and secure the air temperature control valve vacuum pipe and refit the rubber strap to secure the air intake duct.

11.36Camshaft carrier bolt tightening sequence - K16 engine

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•17

12Valve clearances - general information

1 It is necessary for a clearance to exist between the tip of each valve stem and the valve operating mechanism. This allows for expansion of the various engine components as the engine reaches normal operating temperature.

2On most older engine designs, this meant that the valve clearances (also known as ‘tappet’ clearances) had to be checked and adjusted regularly. If the clearances were too slack, the engine would be very noisy, its power output would suffer and its fuel consumption would increase. Conversely, if the clearances were too tight, the engine’s power output would be reduced and the valves and their seats could be severely damaged.

3The engines covered in this Manual employ hydraulic tappets which use engine oil pressure to automatically take up the clearance between each camshaft lobe and its respective valve stem. This means that there is no need for regular checking and inspection of the valve clearances, but it is essential that only good quality oil of the recommended viscosity and specification is used in the engine and that this oil is scrupulously changed at the recommended intervals. If this advice is not followed, the oilways and tappets may become clogged with particles of dirt or deposits of burnt engine oil, so that the system cannot work properly. Ultimately, one or more of the tappets may fail and expensive repairs may be required.

4On starting the engine from cold, there will be a slight delay while full oil pressure builds up in all parts of the engine, especially in the tappets. The valve clearances, therefore, may well rattle for about 10 seconds or so and then quieten. This is a normal state of affairs and is nothing to worry about, provided that all tappets quieten quickly and stay quiet.

5After the vehicle has been standing for several days, the valve clearances may rattle for longer than usual as nearly all the oil will have drained away from the engine’s top end components and bearing surfaces. While this is only to be expected, care must be taken not to damage the engine by running it at high speed until all the tappets are refilled with oil and operating normally. With the vehicle stationary, hold the engine at no more than a fast idle speed (maximum 2000 to 2500 rpm) for 10 to 15 minutes or until the noise ceases. Do not run the engine at more than 3000 rpm until all tappets are fully recharged with oil and all noise has ceased.

6If the valve clearances are thought to be noisy, or if a light rattle persists from the engine’s top end after it has reached normal operating temperature, take the vehicle to a Rover dealer for expert advice. Depending on

the mileage covered and the usage to which each vehicle has been put, some vehicles may be noisier than others. Only a good mechanic experienced in these engines can tell if the noise level is typical for the vehicle’s mileage or if a genuine fault exists. If any tappet’s operation is faulty, then it must be renewed.

13 Cylinder head -

4

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Note: Due to engine design, it will become very difficult, almost impossible, to turn the crankshaft once the cylinder head bolts have been slackened. The manufacturer states that the crankshaft will be ‘tight’ and should not be rotated more than absolutely necessary once the head has been removed. If the crankshaft cannot be rotated, then it must be removed for overhaul work to proceed. With this in mind, the crankshaft always must be rotated to the desired position before the bolts are disturbed.

Removal

1Disconnect the battery negative lead.

2Drain the cooling system.

3Remove the camshaft sprocket(s).

4Unscrew the bolts securing the timing belt upper left-hand (inner) cover to the cylinder head, so that the cover can be pulled away from the cylinder head just far enough for adequate working clearance. Take care not to distort or damage the cover or the timing belt.

5Remove the cylinder head cover.

6Disconnect the exhaust system front pipe from the manifold and, where fitted, disconnect or release the lambda sensor wiring so that it is not strained by the weight of the exhaust.

7Note that the following text assumes that the cylinder head will be removed with both inlet and exhaust manifolds attached. This is easier but makes it a bulky and heavy assembly to handle. If it is wished first to remove the manifolds, proceed as described in the relevant Sections of Chapter 4.

8On carburettor engines, disconnect the following from the carburettor and inlet manifold as described in the relevant Sections of Chapter 4A:

a)Fuel pump feed hose - plug both openings to prevent loss of fuel and entry of dirt into system.

b)Carburettor idle bypass solenoid wires.

c)Accelerator cable.

d)Choke cable.

e)Vacuum servo unit vacuum hose.

f)Inlet manifold PTC heater wire.

g)Inlet manifold heater temperature switch

wiring.

9 On fuel-injected engines, refer to the relevant Sections of Chapter 4B or C, and disconnect or remove all throttle body/fuel rail components appertaining to cylinder head removal, noting the following:

a)The fuel system must be depressurised before any component is disconnected.

b)Plug the open ends of all disconnected pipes to prevent loss of fuel and entry of dirt into system.

c)Discard all sealing washers and O-rings, these must be renewed.

10 Working as described in Chapter 3, disconnect the connector plug from the coolant temperature sensor screwed into the coolant outlet elbow, then disconnect the coolant hoses from the (three) inlet manifold unions and from the coolant outlet elbow.

11Unclip the engine wiring harness from the inlet manifold or its support stays. Slacken the bolts securing the stays to the manifold, then unbolt the support stays and the carburettor metal overflow pipes from the cylinder block/crankcase.

12Remove the distributor cap, complete with the spark plug HT leads. Remove the spark plugs.

13On K16 engines equipped with air conditioning, undo the nuts and bolts securing the heat shields to the rear of the alternator and air conditioning compressor and remove both heat shields. Slacken the two lower alternator mounting bolts then remove the upper mounting bolt and pivot the alternator away from the cylinder head.

14Working in the reverse of the tightening sequence (see illustrations 13.29a or 13.29b), progressively slacken the ten cylinder head bolts by one turn at a time. A female Torx-type socket (No 12 size) will be required. Remove each bolt in turn and store

it in its correct fitted order by pushing it through a clearly-marked cardboard template. 2A

15The joint between the cylinder head and

gasket and the cylinder block/crankcase must now be broken without disturbing the wet liners. Although these liners are better located and sealed than some wet liner engines, there is still a risk of coolant and foreign matter leaking into the sump if the cylinder head is lifted carelessly. If care is not taken and the liners are moved, there is also a possibility of the bottom seals being disturbed, causing leakage after refitting the head.

16 To break the joint, obtain two L-shaped metal bars which fit into the cylinder head bolt holes and gently rock the cylinder head free towards the front of the vehicle (see illustration). Do not try to swivel the head on

13.16 Using two cranked bars to break cylinder head joint

1689 Rover 214 & 414 Updated Version 09/97

2A•18 Engine in-car repair procedures

bolt threads - cylinder head removed

the cylinder block/crankcase as it is located by dowels as well as by the tops of the liners.

17With the joint broken, lift the cylinder head away, using assistance if possible as it is a heavy assembly, especially if complete with the manifolds. Remove the gasket, noting the two locating dowels, and discard it.

18Further to the warnings given in the note at the beginning of this Section, do not attempt to rotate the crankshaft with the cylinder head removed, otherwise the wet liners may be displaced. Operations that would normally require the rotation of the crankshaft (eg: cleaning the piston crowns) must be carried out with great care to ensure that no particles of dirt or foreign matter are left behind. If cylinder liner clamps are to be used, they must be clamped in place using

13.27 Refitting the cylinder head

13.29a Cylinder head bolt tightening sequence - K8 engine

two locating dowels (arrowed) . . .

spacers fitted under the heads of the cylinder head bolts.

19 If the cylinder head is to be dismantled, remove the camshaft(s) then refer to the relevant Sections of Part B of this Chapter.

Refitting

20Check the condition of the cylinder head bolts, particularly their threads. Keeping all bolts in their correct fitted order, wash them and wipe dry. Check each bolt for any sign of visible wear or damage, renewing as necessary. Lightly oil the threads of each bolt, carefully enter it into its original hole and screw it in, by hand only until finger-tight. Measure the distance from the cylinder block/crankcase gasket surface to under the bolt’s head (see illustration).

21If the distance measured is under 97 mm, the bolt may be re-used. If the distance measured is more than 97 mm, the bolt must be renewed. Considering the task these bolts perform and the pressures they must withstand, owners should consider renewing all the bolts as a matched set if more than one of the originals fail inspection or are close to the limit set.

22The mating faces of the cylinder head and cylinder block/crankcase must be perfectly clean before refitting the head. Use a hard plastic or wood scraper to remove all traces of gasket and carbon.

23Check the mating surfaces of the cylinder block/crankcase and the cylinder head for

sequence - K16 engine

13.26b . . . so that TOP mark is upwards and FRONT arrow points to timing belt end

nicks, deep scratches and other damage. If slight, they may be removed carefully with a file, but if excessive, machining may be the only alternative to renewal.

24If warpage of the cylinder head gasket surface is suspected, use a straight-edge to check it for distortion. Refer to Part B of this Chapter if necessary.

25Wipe clean the mating surfaces of the cylinder head and cylinder block/crankcase. Check that the two locating dowels are in position at each end of the cylinder block/crankcase surface.

26Position a new gasket on the cylinder block/crankcase surface so that its TOP mark is uppermost and the FRONT arrow points to the timing belt end (see illustrations).

27Refit the cylinder head, locating it on the dowels (see illustration).

28Keeping all the cylinder head bolts in their correct fitted order, wash them and wipe dry. Lightly oil under the head and on the threads of each bolt, carefully enter it into its original hole and screw it in, by hand only, until fingertight.

29Working progressively and in the sequence shown (see illustrations), use first a torque wrench, then an ordinary socket extension bar to tighten the cylinder head bolts through the specified stages. To tighten the bolts through the specified angles, simply use a felt-tip pen or similar to mark the position on the cylinder head of each bolt head’s radial mark. The second stage then

marks with cylinder head to establish tightening angles (arrowed)

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•19

tightens each bolt through half a turn so that the marks face away from each other and the third stage tightens them through another half-turn so that all the bolt-head marks will then align again with their cylinder head counterparts. If any bolt is overtightened past its mark, slacken it through 90°, then retighten until the marks align (see illustration). 30 Refit and tighten the inlet manifold support stay bolts, then secure the engine wiring harness using the clips provided.

31 On K16 engines equipped with air conditioning, refit the alternator mounting bolts and tighten them to the specified torque setting. Refit the compressor and alternator heatshields, tightening their retaining bolts and nuts securely.

32 Connect all disturbed coolant hoses, securing them in position with their retaining clips. Reconnect the coolant temperature sensor wiring.

33 Working as described in Chapter 4, connect or refit all disturbed wiring, hoses and control cable(s) to the inlet manifold and fuel system components, then adjust the choke and or accelerator cable(s).

34Reconnect the exhaust system front pipe to the manifold and (if applicable) reconnect the lambda sensor wiring.

35Refit the cylinder head cover, inner timing cover retaining bolts and camshaft sprocket(s).

36Refit the spark plugs and distributor cap then reconnect the battery negative lead.

37Refill the cooling system.

14 Sump -

2

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Note: It is essential that new bolts of the Patchlok type are used when refitting the sump.

Removal

1Disconnect the battery negative lead.

2Drain the engine oil then clean and refit the engine oil drain plug, tightening it to the specified torque wrench setting. If the engine is nearing its service interval when the oil and filter are due for renewal, it is recommended that the filter is also removed and a new one fitted. After reassembly, the engine can then be replenished with fresh engine oil.

3Apply the handbrake, then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the right-hand roadwheel.

4From underneath the front of the vehicle, slacken and remove the three bolts securing the bumper flange to the body. Remove the seven bolts securing the front undercover panel to the body and remove the panel.

5Working as described in Chapter 4, disconnect the exhaust system front pipe from the manifold and, where fitted, disconnect or release the lambda sensor

reach sump bolts

wiring so that it is not strained by the weight of the exhaust.

6 Unscrew the three retaining bolts and remove the flywheel lower cover plate (see illustration).

7Slacken and remove the bolts securing the anti-beaming bracket to the engine and transmission and remove the bracket.

8Progressively slacken the sump retaining bolts then remove them along with the antibeaming bracket support. Make a note of the correct fitted position of the support and of the longer bolts at positions 4, 8 and 12 (see illustration 14.14) to ensure correct refitment on reassembly.

9Break the joint by striking the sump with the palm of the hand, then lower the sump and withdraw it (see illustration).

10While the sump is removed, take the opportunity to unbolt the oil pump pickup/strainer pipe and clean it using a suitable solvent. Inspect the strainer mesh for signs of clogging or splitting and renew if necessary.

surface so that its 7 locating pegs fit into the sump holes (see illustration).

13 Offer up the sump to the cylinder block/crankcase then fit the new sump retaining bolts, not forgetting the antibeaming bracket support. Tighten the bolts finger-tight only.

14 Working in the sequence shown (see illustration), tighten the sump bolts to the specified torque setting.

15Refit the anti-beaming bracket and tighten the mounting bolts to the specified torque setting.

16Install the flywheel lower cover plate and tighten the retaining bolts to the specified torque wrench setting.

17Reconnect the exhaust system front pipe to the manifold and, where necessary, reconnect the lambda sensor wiring.

18Refit the undercover panel and wheel,

then lower the vehicle to the ground and

2A

reconnect the battery negative lead.

 

19 Replenish the engine oil.

Refitting

11Clean all traces of gasket from the mating surfaces of the cylinder block/crankcase and sump, then use a clean rag to wipe out the sump and the engine’s interior. If the oil pump pick-up/strainer pipe was removed, fit a new sealing O-ring to its end and refit the pipe, tightening its retaining bolts to the specified torque setting.

12If the sump gasket is damaged or shows signs of deterioration, then it must be renewed. Fit the gasket to the sump mating

with sump mating surface holes

15 Oil pump -

4

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Note: The oil pressure relief valve can be dismantled without removing the oil pump from the vehicle. See Section 16 for details.

Removal

1 Remove the crankshaft sprocket and secure the timing belt clear of the working

14.14 Sump bolt tightening sequence

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2A•20 Engine in-car repair procedures

15.4 Alternator adjuster link nut (A) wiring guide screws (B) oil pump bolts (C) and special oil pump bolt (D)

area so that it cannot be contaminated with oil.

2Drain the engine oil, then clean and refit the engine oil drain plug, tightening it to the specified torque wrench setting. If the engine is nearing its service interval when the oil and filter are due for renewal, it is recommended that the filter is also removed and a new one fitted. After reassembly, the engine can then be replenished with fresh engine oil.

3Where necessary, unscrew the alternator adjuster link retaining nut and unbolt the engine wiring harness guide retaining screws, then move the link and guide clear of the oil pump.

4Unscrew the oil pump retaining bolts, noting the fitted position of the special bolt, and withdraw the oil pump (see illustration). Recover the pump gasket and discard it, then carefully lever the crankshaft right-hand oil seal out of the oil pump. The oil seal should be renewed whenever it is disturbed.

Refitting

5Thoroughly clean the mating faces of the oil pump and cylinder block/crankcase. Use grease to stick a new gasket in place.

6Prime the pump before installation by injecting clean engine oil into it and turning it by hand.

7Offer up the pump, ensuring that its inner

threaded plug

15.8 Oil pump bolt tightening sequence

gear engages fully on the crankshaft flats, then push the pump fully into position.

8Refit the pump retaining bolts, ensuring that the special bolt is refitted to its original position. Tighten the retaining bolts to the specified torque setting in the order shown

(see illustration).

9If removed, refit the alternator adjuster link and the engine wiring harness guide, then tighten securely the retaining nut and screws.

10Fit a new crankshaft right-hand oil seal.

11Remove all traces of surplus oil then refit the crankshaft sprocket.

12Replenish the engine oil.

16 Oil pump - dismantling,

4

inspection and reassembly

Note: If oil pump wear is suspected, check the cost and availability of new parts (only available in the form of repair kit LQX 10001) against the cost of a new pump. Examine the pump as described in this Section and then decide whether renewal or repair is the best course of action.

Dismantling

1Remove the oil pump.

2Unscrew the Torx screws (size T25) and remove the pump cover plate. Discard the sealing ring.

3Note the identification marks on the outer rotor then remove both the rotors from the body.

16.5 Oil pressure relief valve assembly

1Threaded plug

2Valve spring and plunger

4 The oil pressure relief valve can be dismantled, if required, without disturbing the pump. If this is to be done with the pump in position and the engine still installed in the vehicle, it will first be necessary to jack up the front of the vehicle and remove the right-hand roadwheel to gain access to the valve (see illustration).

5 To dismantle the valve, unscrew the threaded plug and recover the valve spring and plunger (see illustration). Discard the plug sealing washer.

Inspection

6Inspect the rotors for obvious signs of wear or damage and renew if necessary. If the pump body or cover plate is scored or damaged, then the complete oil pump assembly must be renewed.

7Using feeler gauge blades of the appropriate thickness, measure the clearance between the outer rotor and the pump body, then between the tips of the inner and outer rotor lobes (a and b respectively) (see illustration).

8Using feeler gauge blades and a straightedge placed across the top of the pump body and the rotors, measure the rotor endfloat (c).

9If any measurement is outside the specified limits, the complete pump assembly must be renewed.

10If the pressure relief valve plunger is scored, or if it does not slide freely in the pump body bore, then it must be renewed, using all the components from the repair kit.

11To complete a thorough inspection of the oil pump components, the sump should be removed and the oil pump pick-up/strainer pipe removed and cleaned.

Reassembly

12 Lubricate the pump rotors with clean engine oil and refit them to the pump body,

16.7 Checking oil pump rotors for wear - see text for details

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•21

16.12Oil pump outer rotor outside face identifying mark (arrowed)

ensuring that the outer rotor’s identification mark faces outwards (see illustration).

13Fit a new sealing ring to the pump body and refit the cover plate. Apply thread-locking compound to the threads of the cover plate Torx screws and tighten them securely.

14Check that the pump rotates freely, then prime it by injecting oil into its passages and rotating it. If a long time elapses before the pump is refitted to the engine, prime it again before installation.

15Refit the oil pressure relief valve plunger, ensuring that it is the correct way up, then install the spring. Fit a new sealing washer to the threaded plug and tighten the plug securely.

17 Crankshaft oil seals -

4

renewal

 

 

 

Right-hand seal

1 Remove the crankshaft sprocket and secure the timing belt clear of the working area so that it cannot be contaminated with oil.

2 Punch or drill two small holes opposite each other in the seal. Screw a self-tapping screw into each and pull on the screws with pliers to extract the seal.

3Clean the seal housing and polish off any burrs or raised edges which may have caused the seal to fail in the first place.

4Lubricate the lips of the new seal with clean engine oil and drive it into position until it seats on its locating shoulder. Use a suitable tubular drift, such as a socket, which bears only on the hard outer edge of the seal. Take care not to damage the seal lips during fitting. Use either grease or a thin layer of insulating tape to protect the seal lips from the edges of the crankshaft flats but be careful to remove all traces of tape and to lubricate the seal lips if the second method is used. Note that the seal lips should face inwards.

5Wash off any traces of oil, then refit the crankshaft sprocket.

Left-hand seal

6 Remove the flywheel.

in position

7 Taking care not to mark either the crankshaft or any part of the cylinder block/crankcase, lever the seal evenly out of its housing.

8Clean the seal housing and polish off any burrs or raised edges which may have caused the seal to fail in the first place.

9Lubricate with grease the lips of the new seal and the crankshaft shoulder, then offer up the seal to the cylinder block/crankcase.

10Ease the sealing lip of the seal over the crankshaft shoulder by hand only, then press the seal evenly into its housing until its outer flange seats evenly on the housing lip. If necessary, a soft-faced mallet can be used to tap the seal gently into place.

11Wash off any traces of oil, then refit the flywheel.

18 Flywheel - removal,

5

inspection and refitting

 

 

 

Removal

1 Remove the gearbox and the clutch assembly.

2Prevent the flywheel from turning by locking the ring gear teeth (see illustration) or by bolting a strap between the flywheel and the cylinder block/crankcase.

3Slacken and remove the flywheel retaining bolts and discard them The bolts must be renewed whenever they are disturbed.

4Remove the flywheel. Do not drop it, as it is very heavy.

Inspection

5 If the flywheel’s clutch mating surface is deeply scored, cracked or otherwise damaged, then the flywheel must be renewed, unless it is possible to have it surface ground. Seek the advice of a Rover dealer or engine reconditioning specialist.

6 If the ring gear is badly worn or has missing teeth, then it must be renewed. This job is best left to a Rover dealer or engine reconditioning specialist. The temperature to which the new ring gear must be heated for installation (350°C - shown by an even light blue colour) is critical and, if not done

accurately, the hardness of the teeth will be destroyed.

7 Examine the reluctor ring (fitted to the rear of the flywheel) for signs of damage and check that it is securely fastened by the two retaining screws. If the reluctor ring is damaged, then it must be renewed.

Refitting

8Clean the mating surfaces of the flywheel and crankshaft. Clean any remaining adhesive from the threads of the crankshaft threaded holes by making two saw cuts at opposite points along the (carefully-cleaned) threads of one of the original flywheel bolts and screwing it into each hole in turn. Do not use a tap to clean the threads in this way.

9Position the flywheel over the crankshaft’s locating dowel, press it into place and fit six new bolts.

10Lock the flywheel using the method employed on dismantling, then tighten the retaining bolts to the specified torque wrench setting.

11Refit the clutch, then remove the locking tool and refit the gearbox.

19 Engine/gearbox mountings - 2 inspection and renewal

Inspection

1 If improved access is required, raise the front of the vehicle and support it securely on axle stands.

2 Check the mounting rubber to see if it is 2A cracked, hardened or separated from the

metal at any point. Renew the mounting if any such damage or deterioration is evident.

3 Check that all mounting fasteners are securely tightened. Use a torque wrench to check, if possible.

4 Using a large screwdriver or a pry bar, check for wear in the mounting by carefully levering against it to check for free play. Where this is not possible, enlist the aid of an assistant to move the engine/gearbox unit back and forth or from side to side while you watch the mounting. While some free play is to be expected even from new components, excessive wear should be obvious. If excessive free play is found, check first that the fasteners are correctly secured, then renew any worn components as described below.

Renewal

Right-hand mounting

5Disconnect the battery negative lead.

6To improve access to the mounting, remove the expansion tank mounting bolts then free the coolant hose from any relevant retaining clips and position the tank clear of the engine. On models equipped with powerassisted steering, undo all the power steering hose retaining clamp bolts then slide the fluid

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2A•22 Engine in-car repair procedures

to adjust height of engine/gearbox unit

reservoir out of its retaining clip and position it clear of the timing belt covers. Take great care not to place any undue strain on hoses and mop up any spilt fluid immediately.

7Support the weight of the engine/gearbox unit by using a trolley jack, with a wooden spacer to prevent damage to the sump. Unscrew the mounting through-bolt and nut and the mounting to bracket nuts. Remove the mounting, noting the two rubber washers

(see illustrations).

8Where necessary, unscrew the retaining bolts and remove the bracket from the cylinder block/crankcase.

9Check carefully for signs of wear or damage on all components and renew them where necessary.

10On reassembly, refit the bracket to the

19.18 Slacken and remove gearbox bracket-to-mounting bolts . . .

four left-hand mounting-to-body bolts (arrowed) . . .

bolt (A), mounting-to-bracket nuts (B), bracket-to-cylinder block/crankcase bolts (two arrowed - C)

cylinder block/crankcase and tighten the retaining bolts to the specified torque setting. 11 Locate the rubber washers on the mounting, one on each side of its centre boss, then refit the mounting to the bracket and tighten the retaining nuts, finger-tight only.

12 Using the trolley jack to position the engine unit at the correct height, refit from rear to front the mounting-to-body throughbolt, ensuring that the rubber washers are correctly seated, then refit the nut (see illustration).

13Tighten the mounting to bracket nuts and the through-bolt to the specified torque wrench settings, then lower and remove the jack.

14Where necessary, refit the power steering fluid reservoir to its mounting bracket and secure the hydraulic hose clamps in position with the retaining bolts.

15Refit the coolant expansion tank and tighten the mounting bolts securely. Secure the coolant hose in position with any necessary retaining clips and reconnect the battery negative lead.

Left-hand mounting

16Disconnect the battery negative lead then disconnect the clutch cable.

17To improve access to the mounting, unclip the engine wiring harness and position it clear of the mounting.

18Support the weight of the engine/gearbox

installed before tightening through-bolt nut

unit by using a trolley jack, with a wooden spacer to prevent damage to the gearbox casing. Slacken and remove the two bolts securing the gearbox bracket to the mounting

(see illustration).

19 Lower the engine/gearbox unit, then remove the four bolts securing the mounting to the body and manoeuvre the mounting out of position. If required, slacken and remove the two bolts which secure the bracket to the gearbox and remove the bracket (see illustrations).

20Although the mounting rubber is secured by two nuts to a metal outer section, the two parts can be renewed only as a complete assembly. Check all components carefully for signs of wear or damage and renew where necessary.

21On reassembly, refit the bracket to the gearbox and tighten the retaining bolts to the specified torque setting.

22Manoeuvre the mounting into position then refit the retaining bolts and tighten them to the specified torque setting.

23Use the trolley jack to raise the gearbox to the correct height, then refit the mounting bracket to mounting bolts and tighten them to the specified torque setting. Refit the wiring harness to its retaining clip.

24Refit the clutch cable and reconnect the battery negative lead.

Rear mounting

25 Apply the handbrake then jack up the

19.19c Gearbox bracket is retained by two bolts (one arrowed)

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Engine in-car repair procedures 2A•23

front of the vehicle and support it securely on axle stands.

26Support the weight of the engine/gearbox unit by using a trolley jack, with a wooden spacer to prevent damage to the transmission casing. Unbolt the mounting bracket from the gearbox and the connecting link from the underbody bracket, then remove the mounting (see illustrations).

27Unscrew the through-bolt to separate the connecting link from the bracket. Check carefully for signs of wear or damage, paying particular attention to the connecting link rubber bushes. Renew as necessary.

28Reassembly is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten all mounting bolts to the specified torque setting.

bolts (arrowed) . . .

underbody bracket bolt and remove mounting

2A

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2B•1

Chapter 2 Part B Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

Contents

Crankshaft - inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Crankshaft - refitting and main bearing running clearance check . . 18 Crankshaft - removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Cylinder block/crankcase, bearing ladder and oil rail - cleaning

and inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Cylinder head - dismantling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Cylinder head - reassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Cylinder head and valves - cleaning and inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Cylinder liners - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Engine - initial start-up after overhaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Engine overhaul - dismantling sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Engine overhaul - general information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Engine overhaul - reassembly sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Engine/gearbox - removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Engine/gearbox removal - methods and precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Main and big-end bearings - inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Piston rings - refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Piston/connecting rod assembly - inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Piston/connecting rod assembly - refitting and big-end bearing

running clearance check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Piston/connecting rod assembly - removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Degrees of difficulty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy, suitable for

1

 

Fairly easy, suitable

2

 

Fairly difficult,

3

 

Difficult, suitable for

4

 

Very difficult,

5

 

 

2B

 

 

 

 

 

 

novice with little

 

for beginner with

 

suitable for competent

 

experienced DIY

 

suitable for expert DIY

 

 

 

experience

 

some experience

 

DIY mechanic

 

mechanic

 

or professional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specifications

Refer to Part A of this Chapter

1 General information

Included in this part of the Chapter are details of removing the engine/gearbox unit from the vehicle and general overhaul procedures for the cylinder head, cylinder block/crankcase and all other engine internal components.

The information given ranges from advice concerning preparation for an overhaul and the purchase of replacement parts to detailed step-by-step procedures covering removal, inspection, renovation and refitting of engine internal components.

After Section 5, all instructions are based on the assumption that the engine has been removed from the vehicle. For information concerning in-car engine repair, as well as the

removal and refitting of those external components necessary for full overhaul, refer to Part A of this Chapter and to Section 5. Ignore any preliminary dismantling operations described in Part A that are no longer relevant once the engine has been removed from the vehicle.

2Engine overhaul - general information

It is not always easy to determine when, or if, an engine should be completely overhauled, as a number of factors must be considered.

High mileage is not necessarily an indication that an overhaul is needed, while low mileage does not preclude the need for an overhaul. Frequency of servicing is probably

the most important consideration. An engine which has had regular and frequent oil and filter changes, as well as other required maintenance, should give many thousands of miles of reliable service. Conversely, a neglected engine may require an overhaul very early in its life. If a complete service does not remedy any problems, major mechanical work is the only solution.

Excessive oil consumption is an indication that piston rings, valve seals and/or valve guides are in need of attention. Make sure that oil leaks are not responsible before deciding that the rings and/or guides are worn. Perform a compression test to determine the likely cause of the problem.

Check the oil pressure with a gauge fitted in place of the oil pressure switch and compare it with that specified. If it is extremely low, the main and big-end bearings and/or the oil pump are probably worn out.

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2B•2 Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

Loss of power, rough running, knocking or metallic engine noises, excessive valve gear noise and high fuel consumption may also point to the need for an overhaul, especially if they are all present at the same time.

An engine overhaul involves restoring all internal parts to the specification of a new engine. During an overhaul, the cylinder liners, the pistons and the piston rings are renewed. New main and big-end bearings are generally fitted and, if necessary, the crankshaft may be renewed to restore the journals. The valves are serviced as well, since they are usually in less than perfect condition at this point. While the engine is being overhauled, other components, such as the distributor, starter and alternator, can be overhauled as well. The end result should be an as-new engine that will give many trouble-free miles.

Critical cooling system components such as the hoses, thermostat and coolant pump should be renewed when an engine is overhauled. The radiator should be checked carefully to ensure that it is not clogged or leaking. Also it is a good idea to renew the oil pump whenever the engine is overhauled.

Before beginning the engine overhaul, read through the entire procedure to familiarize yourself with the scope and requirements of the job. Overhauling an engine is not difficult if you follow carefully all of the instructions, have the necessary tools and equipment and pay close attention to all specifications. However, it can be time-consuming. Plan on the vehicle being off the road for a minimum of two weeks, especially if parts must be taken to an engineering works for repair or reconditioning. Check on the availability of parts and make sure that any necessary special tools and equipment are obtained in advance. Most work can be done with typical hand tools, although a number of precision measuring tools are required for inspecting parts to determine if they must be renewed. Often the engineering works will handle the inspection of parts and offer advice concerning reconditioning and renewal.

Always wait until the engine has been completely dismantled and all components, especially the cylinder block/crankcase, the cylinder liners and the crankshaft have been inspected before deciding what service and repair operations must be performed by an engineering works. Since the condition of these components will be the major factor to consider when determining whether to overhaul the original engine or buy a reconditioned unit, do not purchase parts or have overhaul work done on other components until they have been thoroughly inspected. As a general rule, time is the primary cost of an overhaul, so it does not pay to fit worn or substandard parts.

As a final note, to ensure maximum life and minimum trouble from a reconditioned engine, everything must be assembled with care in a spotlessly clean environment.

3Engine/gearbox removal - methods and precautions

If you have decided that the engine must be removed for overhaul or major repair work, several preliminary steps should be taken.

Locating a suitable place to work is extremely important. Adequate work space, along with storage space for the vehicle, will be needed. If a shop or garage is not available, at the very least a flat, level, clean work surface is required.

Cleaning the engine compartment and engine/gearbox before beginning the removal procedure will help keep things clean and organised.

An engine hoist or A-frame will also be necessary. Make sure the equipment is rated in excess of the combined weight of the engine and gearbox (290 lb/130 kg approximately). Safety is of primary importance, considering the potential hazards involved in lifting the engine/gearbox unit out of the vehicle.

If the engine/gearbox unit is being removed by a novice, a helper should be available. Advice and aid from someone more experienced would also be helpful. There are many instances when one person cannot simultaneously perform all of the operations required when lifting the unit out of the vehicle.

Plan the operation ahead of time. Before starting work, arrange for the hire of or obtain all of the tools and equipment you will need. Some of the equipment necessary to perform engine/gearbox removal and installation safely and with relative ease are (in addition to an engine hoist) a heavy duty trolley jack, complete sets of spanners and sockets as described at the front of this Manual, wooden blocks and plenty of rags and cleaning solvent for mopping up spilled oil, coolant and fuel. If the hoist must be hired, make sure that you arrange for it in advance and perform all of the operations possible without it beforehand. This will save you money and time.

Plan for the vehicle to be out of use for quite a while. An engineering works will be required to perform some of the work which the do-it-yourselfer cannot accomplish without special equipment. These places often have a busy schedule, so it would be a good idea to consult them before removing the engine in order to accurately estimate the amount of time required to rebuild or repair components that may need work.

Always be extremely careful when removing and refitting the engine/gearbox unit. Serious injury can result from careless actions. Plan ahead, take your time and a job of this nature, although major, can be accomplished successfully.

4 Engine/gearbox -

3

removal and refitting

 

 

 

Note: The engine can be removed from the vehicle only as a complete unit with the gearbox.

Removal

1Park the vehicle on firm, level ground then remove the bonnet.

2If the engine is to be dismantled, drain the oil and remove the oil filter, then clean and refit the drain plug, tightening it to its specified torque setting.

3Firmly apply the handbrake then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it securely on axle stands. Remove both front roadwheels.

4From underneath the front of the vehicle, slacken and remove the three bolts securing the bumper flange to the body. Remove the seven bolts securing the front undercover panel to the body and remove the panel.

5Drain the gearbox oil, then clean and refit the drain plug, tightening it to its specified torque setting.

6Drain the cooling system.

7Remove the battery, followed by the battery tray and support bracket.

8Remove the complete air cleaner assembly, including the intake duct and mounting bracket, intake hose and resonator.

9Disconnect the ignition coil HT lead from the distributor cap.

10Undo the nut and disconnect the battery positive lead from the main starter motor solenoid terminal, then carefully disconnect the spade connector from the solenoid.

11Undo the two bolts securing the engine compartment fusebox to the body, then disconnect the two engine wiring harness block connectors from the underside of the fusebox. Undo the bolt securing the wiring harness earth lead to the bonnet platform, then disconnect the LT wiring connector from the ignition coil. On fuel-injected engines, also disconnect the wiring connector and vacuum pipe from the engine management ECU. Free the engine wiring harness from any relevant clips or ties so that it is free to be removed with the engine/gearbox unit (see illustrations).

4.11a Disconnecting engine harness wiring connectors from underside of fusebox . . .

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Engine removal and general overhaul procedures 2B•3

4.11b . . . and ignition coil LT wiring connector

12 Trace the clutch cable back from the clutch release lever to the bulkhead and remove the C-clip which retains the outer cable spring in position. Unhook the inner cable from the release lever and free the outer cable from its mounting bracket and position it clear of the gearbox.

13From underneath the vehicle, pull out the rubber retaining pin which secures the lower end of the speedometer cable to the gearbox housing. Withdraw the cable from the speedometer drive and remove the O-rings from the cable lower end. Renew the O-rings, regardless of their condition.

14In the absence of the special gearchange linkage balljoint separator (Rover service tool number 18G 1592), use a suitable flat-bladed screwdriver to carefully lever the link rod balljoints off the gearbox upper and lower selector levers, taking care not to damage the balljoint gaiters.

15Unscrew the reverse interlock cable nut from the top of the gearbox housing. In the absence of the special spanner (Rover service tool number 18G 1591), use a close-fitting spanner to unscrew the plastic nut, noting that it is easily damaged. Plug the gearbox orifice to prevent the entry of dirt.

16Disconnect the coolant hose from the bottom of the expansion tank, the expansion tank hose from the inlet manifold union, both heater hoses from the heater matrix unions and the radiator top hose from the coolant outlet elbow. Either remove the radiator bottom hose or secure it so that it will not hinder engine/gearbox removal.

17Slacken and remove the union bolt which secures the vacuum servo unit vacuum hose to the inlet manifold. Discard the sealing washers as they must be renewed whenever they are disturbed.

18On carburettor engines, disconnect the feed hose from the fuel pump, then disconnect the accelerator and choke cables from the carburettor.

19On fuel-injected engines, depressurise the fuel system and disconnect the fuel feed and return hoses from the throttle body/fuel rail. Disconnect the accelerator cable from the throttle housing.

4.11c Disconnecting vacuum pipe from engine management ECU - fuel-injected engines

20 Remove the expansion tank mounting bolts and position the tank clear of the engine unit.

21Remove the alternator.

22On models equipped with power-assisted steering, remove the power steering pump.

23On models equipped with air conditioning, slacken and remove the two compressor heatshield retaining bolts then remove the heatshield and disconnect the compressor wiring connector. Undo the four bolts securing the compressor to the mounting bracket and the single bolt securing the air conditioning pipe to the mounting bracket. Position the compressor clear of the engine unit. Secure it to the body to avoid placing any strain on the air conditioning pipes and hoses.

24Disconnect the exhaust system front pipe from the manifold and, where necessary, disconnect the lambda sensor wiring connector.

25Slacken and remove the bolt and washer securing the anti-roll bar connecting link to the left-hand lower suspension arm, then the two bolts securing the tie bar to the lower suspension arm.

26Extract the split pins and undo the nuts securing the steering gear track rod end balljoint and the left-hand lower suspension arm balljoint to the swivel hub. Remove the nuts and release the balljoint tapered shanks using a universal balljoint separator.

4.29a Right-hand engine lifting bracket . . .

27 Insert a suitable flat bar in between the

 

left-hand inner constant velocity joint and

 

gearbox housing, then carefully lever the joint

 

out of position, whilst taking great care not to

 

damage the gearbox housing.

 

28 Withdraw the left-hand inner constant

 

velocity joint from the gearbox and support

 

the driveshaft to avoid damaging the constant

 

velocity joints or gaiters. Repeat the

 

operations described in paragraphs 25 to 28

 

for the right-hand driveshaft.

 

29 On K8 engines, the cylinder head has a

 

tapped hole provided at the right-hand rear

 

end (above the dipstick tube) and at the left-

 

hand front end (behind the spark plug lead

 

clips). On K16 engine cylinder heads, the

 

right-hand end hole is in the same place but at

 

the left-hand end, the air intake duct support

 

bracket mounting points must be used.

 

Attach lifting brackets to the engine at these

 

points (see illustrations). Take the weight of

 

the engine/gearbox unit on the engine hoist.

 

30 From underneath the vehicle, unscrew the

 

two bolts securing the rear engine/gearbox

 

mounting bracket to the gearbox, then

 

slacken the connecting link-to-body through-

 

bolt and pivot the mounting away from the

 

gearbox.

 

31 Slacken and remove the two bolts

 

securing the left-hand gearbox bracket to the

 

mounting. Lower the gearbox slightly then

 

undo the four bolts securing the mounting to

 

the body and manoeuvre the mounting out of

 

position.

 

32 Raise the gearbox again then slacken and

 

remove the right-hand engine/gearbox

 

mounting through-bolt and nut. Unscrew the

2B

two nuts securing the mounting to the engine

bracket and remove it, noting the rubber washers which are fitted on each side of the bracket.

33Make a final check that all components have been removed or disconnected that will prevent removal of the engine/gearbox unit from the vehicle and ensure that components such as the gearchange linkage link rods are secured so that they cannot be damaged on removal.

34Lift the engine/gearbox unit out of the vehicle, ensuring that nothing is trapped or damaged. Once the unit is high enough, lift it

4.29b . . . and left-hand engine lifting bracket - K16 engine

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2B•4 Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

out over the front of the body and lower the unit to the ground (see illustration).

35To separate the engine and gearbox, first remove the starter motor.

36Unbolt the flywheel front, lower and rear cover plates, then unscrew the four bolts securing the gearbox to the engine and gently prise the gearbox off the two locating dowels (at the front and rear of the main bearing ladder). Move the gearbox squarely away from the engine, ensuring that the clutch components are not damaged.

37If the engine is to be overhauled, remove the clutch.

Refitting

38 Refitting is the reverse of removal, following where necessary the instructions given in the other Chapters of this Manual. Note the following additional points:

a)Overhaul and lubricate the clutch components before refitting.

b)When the gearbox, starter motor and flywheel cover plates have been refitted, lift the engine/gearbox unit and lower it into the engine compartment so that it is slightly tilted (gearbox down). Engage both driveshafts then return the unit to the horizontal and refit the engine/gearbox mountings.

c)Remove the lifting brackets and refit any components removed to enable them to be fitted.

d)Tighten all nuts and bolts to the specified torque wrench settings.

e)Adjust the choke and/or accelerator cable(s).

f)Refill the engine and gearbox with oil.

g)Refill the cooling system.

5Engine overhaul - dismantling sequence

Note: When removing external components from the engine, pay close attention to details that may be helpful or important during refitting. Note the fitted position of gaskets, seals, spacers, pins, washers, bolts and other small items.

1It is much easier to work on the engine if it is mounted on a portable engine stand. These stands can often be hired from a tool hire shop. Before the engine is mounted on a stand, the flywheel should be removed so that the stand bolts can be tightened into the end of the cylinder block/crankcase (not the main bearing ladder).

2If a stand is not available, it is possible to dismantle the engine with it blocked up on a sturdy workbench or on the floor. Be extra careful not to tip or drop the engine when working without a stand.

3If you are going to obtain a reconditioned engine, all external components must be removed for transference to the replacement engine (just as if you are doing a complete

engine overhaul yourself). These components include the following:

a)Alternator mounting brackets.

b)Power steering pump and air conditioning compressor brackets (where fitted).

c)Distributor, HT leads and spark plugs.

d)Thermostat and housing, coolant rail, coolant outlet elbow.

e)Dipstick tube.

f)Carburettor/fuel injection system components.

g)All electrical switches and sensors.

h)Inlet and exhaust manifolds.

i)Oil filter.

j)Fuel pump.

k)Engine mountings.

l)Flywheel.

4 If you are obtaining a short motor (which consists of the engine cylinder block/crankcase and main bearing ladder, crankshaft, pistons and connecting rods all assembled), then the cylinder head, sump, oil pump, and timing belt will have to be removed also.

5 If you are planning a complete overhaul, the engine can be dismantled and the internal components removed in the following order:

a)Inlet and exhaust manifolds.

b)Timing belt, sprockets, tensioner and timing belt inner cover.

c)Cylinder head.

d)Flywheel.

e)Sump.

f)Oil pump.

g)Piston/connecting rod assemblies.

h)Crankshaft.

release split collets

6 Before beginning the dismantling and overhaul procedures, make sure that you have all of the correct tools necessary. Refer to the introductory pages at the beginning of this Manual for further information.

6 Cylinder head - dismantling 3

Note: New and reconditioned cylinder heads are available from the manufacturer and from engine overhaul specialists. Due to the fact that some specialist tools are required for dismantling and inspection, and new components may not be readily available, it may be more practical and economical for the home mechanic to purchase a reconditioned head rather than dismantle, inspect and recondition the original.

1 Remove the camshaft(s) and hydraulic tappets.

2Remove the cylinder head.

3Using a valve spring compressor, compress each valve spring in turn until the split collets can be removed. Release the compressor and lift off the spring retainer and spring, then use a pair of pliers to extract the spring bottom seat/stem seal (see illustrations).

If, when the valve spring compressor is screwed

down, the spring retainer refuses to free and expose

the split collets, gently tap the top of the tool directly over the retainer with a light hammer. This will free the retainer.

4Withdraw the valve through the combustion chamber.

5It is essential that each valve is stored together with its collets, retainer and spring, and that all valves are kept in their correct sequence, unless they are so badly worn that they are to be renewed. If they are going to be kept and used again, place each valve assembly in a labelled polythene bag or

seat/stem seal

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Engine removal and general overhaul procedures 2B•5

6.5 Use a labelled plastic bag to keep together and identify valve components

similar small container (see illustration). Note that No 1 valve is nearest to the timing belt end of the engine.

7 Cylinder head and valves -

4

cleaning and inspection

 

 

 

Note: If the engine has been severely overheated, it is best to assume that the cylinder head is warped and to check carefully for signs of this.

Note: Be sure to perform all the following inspection procedures before concluding that the services of a machine shop or engine overhaul specialist are required. Make a list of all items that require attention.

1 Thorough cleaning of the cylinder head and valve components, followed by a detailed inspection, will enable you to decide how much valve service work must be carried out during the engine overhaul.

Cleaning

2 Scrape away all traces of old gasket material and sealing compound from the cylinder head.

3 Scrape away all carbon from the combustion chambers and ports, then wash the cylinder head thoroughly with paraffin or a suitable solvent.

4 Scrape off any heavy carbon deposits that may have formed on the valves, then use a power-operated wire brush to remove deposits from the valve heads and stems.

Inspection

Cylinder head

5Inspect the head very carefully for cracks, evidence of coolant leakage and other damage. If cracks are found, a new cylinder head should be obtained.

6Use a straight-edge and feeler gauge blade to check that the cylinder head surface is not distorted (see illustrations). If it is, it may be possible to resurface it, provided that the specified reface limit is not exceeded in so doing, or that the cylinder head is not reduced to less than the specified height.

7Examine the valve seats in each of the combustion chambers. If they are severely

surface for warpage

pitted, cracked or burned, then they will need to be renewed or re-cut by an engine overhaul specialist. If they are only slightly pitted, this can be removed by grinding-in the valve heads and seats with fine valve-grinding compound as described below. To check for excessive wear, refit each valve and measure the installed height of the stem tip above the cylinder head upper surface (see illustration). If the measurement is above the specified limit, repeat the test using a new valve. If the measurement is still excessive, renew the seat insert.

8If the valve guides are worn, indicated by a side to side motion of the valve, new guides must be fitted. Measure the diameter of the existing valve stems (see below) and the bore of the guides, then calculate the clearance and compare the result with the specified value. If the clearance is excessive, renew the valves or guides as necessary.

9Valve guide renewal is best carried out by an engine overhaul specialist. If the work is to be carried out at home, then use a stepped, double-diameter drift to drive out the worn guide towards the combustion chamber. On fitting the new guide, place it first in a deepfreeze for one hour, then drive it into the cylinder head bore from the camshaft side until it projects the specified amount above the spring bottom seat/stem seal surface.

7.7 Check valve seat wear by measuring valve stem installed height (A)

7.6b Check cylinder head gasket surface for warpage along paths shown

A K16 engine B K8 engine

10 If the valve seats are to be re-cut, this must be done only after the guides have been renewed.

Valves

11 Examine the head of each valve for pitting, burning, cracks and general wear, then check the valve stem for scoring and wear ridges. Rotate the valve and check for any obvious indication that it is bent. Look for pits and excessive wear on the tip of each valve stem. Renew any valve that shows any such signs of wear or damage.

12 If the valve appears satisfactory at this stage, measure the valve stem diameter at several points by using a micrometer (see

illustration). Any significant difference in the 2B readings obtained indicates wear of the valve

stem. Should any of these conditions be apparent, the valve(s) must be renewed.

13 If the valves are in satisfactory condition they should be ground (lapped) into their respective seats to ensure a smooth gas-tight seal. If the seat is only lightly pitted, or if it has been re-cut, fine grinding compound only should be used to produce the required finish. Coarse valve-grinding compound should not be used unless a seat is badly burned or deeply pitted. If this is the case, the cylinder head and valves should be inspected by an expert to decide whether seat re-cutting or

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2B•6 Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

even the renewal of the valve or seat insert is required.

14Valve grinding is carried out as follows. Place the cylinder head upside down on a bench.

15Smear a trace of (the appropriate grade of) valve-grinding compound on the seat face and press a suction grinding tool onto the valve head. With a semi-rotary action, grind the valve head to its seat, lifting the valve occasionally to redistribute the grinding compound (see illustration). A light spring placed under the valve head will greatly ease this operation.

16If coarse grinding compound is being used, work only until a dull, matt even surface is produced on both the valve seat and the valve, then wipe off the used compound and repeat the process with fine compound. When a smooth unbroken ring of light grey matt finish is produced on both the valve and seat, the grinding operation is complete. Do not grind in the valves any further than absolutely necessary, or the seat will be prematurely sunk into the cylinder head.

17To check that the seat has not been overground, measure the valve stem installed height, as described in paragraph 7.

18When all the valves have been ground-in, carefully wash off all traces of grinding compound using paraffin or a suitable solvent.

Valve components

19 Examine the valve springs for signs of

seal

7.19 Measuring valve spring free length

damage and discoloration and also measure their free length using vernier calipers or by comparing each existing spring with a new component (see illustration).

20Stand each spring on a flat surface and check it for squareness. If any of the springs are damaged, distorted or have lost their tension, then obtain a complete new set of springs.

21Check the hydraulic tappets as described in Part A of this Chapter.

Use a little grease to hold the collets in place. Release the compressor, then repeat the procedure on the remaining valves.

5 With all the valves installed, place the cylinder head flat on the bench and, using a hammer and interposed block of wood, tap the end of each valve stem to settle the components.

6 Refit the hydraulic tappets and camshaft(s) as described in Part A of this Chapter.

8 Cylinder head - reassembly

4

 

 

1Lubricate the valve stems with clean engine oil and insert each valve into its original location. If new valves are being fitted, insert them into the locations to which they have been ground.

2Working on the first valve, dip the spring bottom seat/stem seal in clean engine oil then carefully locate it over the valve and onto the guide. Take care not to damage the seal as it is passed over the valve stem. Use a suitable socket or metal tube to press the seal firmly onto the guide (see illustration).

3Locate the spring on the seat, followed by the spring retainer.

4Compress the valve spring and locate the split collets in the recess in the valve stem.

(arrowed)

9 Piston/connecting rod

assembly - removal 4

Note: Due to the design of the engine, it will become very difficult, almost impossible, to turn the crankshaft once the cylinder head bolts have been slackened. The manufacturer accordingly states that the crankshaft will be ‘tight’ and should not be rotated more than absolutely necessary once the head has been removed. If the crankshaft cannot be rotated, then it must be removed for overhaul work to proceed. With this in mind, during any servicing or overhaul work the crankshaft must always be rotated to the desired position before the bolts are disturbed.

Removal - without removing crankshaft

1 Remove the timing belt, the camshaft sprocket(s) and tensioner, and the timing belt inner cover.

2 Remove the camshaft(s) and hydraulic tappets, being careful to store the hydraulic tappets correctly.

3 If the flywheel has been removed, temporarily refit the crankshaft pulley and apply a spanner to the bolt to rotate the crankshaft.

4 Rotate the crankshaft until Nos 1 and 4 cylinder pistons are at the top of their stroke.

5Remove the cylinder head. The crankshaft cannot now be rotated.

6Slacken and remove the two dipstick tube retaining bolts and remove the tube from the cylinder block/crankcase (see illustrations).

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Rover 214 1989 1995 Workshop Manual

Engine removal and general overhaul procedures 2B•7

 

 

9.6b Engine bottom end components

 

1

Oil pump

27

Sealing washer

51

Stud

2

Gasket

28

Liner

52

Oil rail

3

Bolt

29

O-rings

53

Bolt

4

Bolt

30

Cylinder block/crankcase

54

Nut

5

Oil seal

31

Dowel

55

O-ring

6

Engine oil level dipstick

32

Top compression ring

56

Oil pump pick-up/

7

Dipstick tube

33

Second compression

 

strainer pipe

8

Bolt

 

ring

57

Bolt

9

Bolt

34

Oil control ring

58

Sump

10

Gasket

35

Piston

59

Gasket

11

Coolant pump

36

Gudgeon pin *

60

Bolt

12

O-ring

37

Connecting rod

61

Engine oil drain plug

13

Pillar bolt

38

Big-end bearing shell

62

Sealing washer

14

Bolt

39

Big-end bearing cap

63

Oil filter

15

Dowel pin

40

Big-end bearing cap bolt

64

Oil filter adaptor

16

O-ring

41

Crankshaft

65

Bolt

17

Thermostat housing

42

Crankshaft thrustwasher

66

Gasket

18

Gasket

43

Crankshaft main bearing

67

Oil pressure switch

19

Thermostat

 

shell

68

Blanking plate -

20

Thermostat housing

44

Dowel

 

carburettor engines

21

Bolt

45

Oil seal

69

Screw

22

Coolant hose

46

Flywheel (with reluctor

 

 

23

Hose clip

 

ring)

* Note: Main bearing ladder is

24

Coolant rail

47

Flywheel bolt

supplied only with cylinder

25

Screw

48

Main bearing ladder *

block/crankcase assembly.

26

Cooling system bleed

49

Bolt

Gudgeon pin is supplied only

 

screw

50

Dowel

with piston assembly

7Remove the sump and unbolt the oil pump pick-up/strainer pipe from the oil rail. Discard the sealing ring (see illustration).

8Unscrew the two retaining nuts and remove the oil rail (see illustration).

9Using a hammer and centre punch, paint or similar, mark each connecting rod big-end bearing cap with its respective cylinder number on the flat, machined surface provided. If the engine has been dismantled before, note carefully any identifying marks made previously (see illustration). Note that No 1 cylinder is at the timing belt end of the engine.

10Unscrew and remove the big-end bearing cap bolts and withdraw the cap, complete with bearing shell, from the connecting rod. If only the bearing shells are being attended to,

9.7 Removing oil pump pick-up/strainer pipe from oil rail - renew O-ring (arrowed)

2B

9.8 Removing oil rail to reach big-end bearings

removal - No 4 cylinder cap shown

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2B•8 Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

push the connecting rod up and off the crankpin, ensuring that the connecting rod big-ends do not mark the cylinder bore walls, then remove the upper bearing shell. Keep the cap, bolts and (if they are to be refitted) the bearing shells together in their correct sequence.

11With Nos 2 and 3 cylinder big-ends disconnected, repeat the procedure (exercising great care to prevent damage to any of the components) to remove Nos 1 and

4cylinder bearing caps.

12Remove the ridge of carbon from the top of each cylinder bore. Push each piston/connecting rod assembly up and remove it from the top of the bore, and ensure that the connecting rod big-ends do not mark the cylinder bore walls.

13Note that the number stamped by you on each bearing cap should match the cylinder number stamped on the front (alternator bracket side) of each connecting rod. If any connecting rod number does not match its correct cylinder, mark or label it immediately so that each piston/connecting rod assembly can be refitted to its original bore.

Fit the bearing cap, shells and bolts to each removed piston/connecting rod assembly, so that they are all kept together as a matched set.

Removal - alternative methods

14 If the engine is being completely dismantled and the cylinder head has been removed, either unbolt the main bearing ladder so that the crankshaft can be rotated with care, or remove the crankshaft completely and then remove the connecting rods and pistons.

Cylinder head bolts - condition check

15 Check the condition of the cylinder head

10.8a Crankshaft main bearing ladder bolt slackening sequence

ABolts hidden in ladder flanges

BLocation of single longer bolt

9.16 Checking length of cylinder head bolts

bolts and particularly their threads whenever they are removed. If the cylinder head only is removed, check the bolts as described in Part A of this Chapter. If the cylinder head and the oil rail are removed, check as follows.

16Keeping all the bolts in their correct fitted order, wash them and wipe dry, then check each for any sign of visible wear or damage. Renew any bolt if necessary. Lightly oil the threads of each bolt, carefully enter it into the original hole and screw it in, by hand only until finger-tight. If the full length of thread is engaged, the bolt may be re-used. If the full length of thread is not engaged, measure the distance from the oil rail gasket surface to under the bolt head (see illustration).

17If the distance measured is less than 378 mm, then the bolt may be re-used. If the distance measured is more than 378 mm, the bolt must be renewed. Considering the task these bolts perform and the pressures they must withstand, owners should consider renewing all the bolts as a matched set if more than one of the originals fail inspection or are close to the limit set.

18Note that if any of the cylinder head bolt threads in the oil rail are found to be damaged, then the oil rail must be renewed. Thread inserts are not an acceptable repair in this instance.

locating dowels arrowed)

10 Crankshaft - removal

4

 

Note: The following procedure assumes that the crankshaft alone is being removed and therefore uses a slightly different sequence of operations to that given in Section 9. Depending on the reason for dismantling, either sequence may be adapted as necessary. If the crankshaft endfloat is to be checked, this must be done when the crankshaft is free to move. If a dial gauge is to be used, check after paragraph 1, but if feeler gauges are to be used, check after paragraph 9.

1 Remove the timing belt, sprocket(s) and tensioner, and the timing belt inner cover.

2Slacken and remove the two dipstick tube retaining bolts and remove it from the cylinder block/crankcase.

3Remove the cylinder head. The crankshaft cannot now be rotated.

4Remove the oil pump.

5Remove the crankshaft left-hand oil seal.

6Remove the sump and unbolt the oil pump pick-up/strainer pipe from the oil rail. Discard the sealing ring.

7Unscrew the two retaining nuts and remove the oil rail.

8Working in the sequence shown (see illustration), progressively unscrew the main bearing ladder retaining bolts by a turn at a time, then withdraw the ladder. Note the two locating dowels and the main bearing shells, which should be removed from the ladder and stored in their correct fitted order (see illustration).

9Mark the big-end bearing caps, then unscrew and remove the big-end bearing cap bolts and withdraw the cap, complete with the lower bearing shell, from each of the four connecting rods (see illustration). Push the connecting rods up and off their crankpins, then remove the upper bearing shell. Keep the cap, bolts and (if they are to be refitted) the bearing shells together in their correct sequence.

bearing cap and lower bearing shell

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Engine removal and general overhaul procedures 2B•9

10Remove the crankshaft (see illustration).

11Withdraw the two thrustwashers from the No 3 main bearing upper location. Noting the position of the grooved shells, remove the upper main bearing shells, which must be kept with their correct respective partners from the main bearing ladder so that all shells can be identified and (if necessary) refitted in their original locations.

12Check the condition of the cylinder head bolts, as described in Section 9.

11 Cylinder block/crankcase -

4

cleaning and inspection

 

 

 

Warning: Wear eye protection when using compressed air!

Note: During any cleaning operations, take care not to score the mating surfaces of the cylinder block/crankcase, bearing ladder and oil rail. It may be necessary to use a foam action gasket remover.

Cleaning

1For complete cleaning, remove the cylinder liners, all external components and all electrical switches/sensors.

2Scrape all traces of gasket from the cylinder block/crankcase, bearing ladder and oil rail, taking care not to damage the gasket/sealing surfaces.

3Remove all oil gallery plugs (where fitted). The plugs are usually very tight and may have to be drilled out and the holes re-tapped. Use new plugs when the engine is reassembled.

4If any of the castings are extremely dirty, all should be steam cleaned.

5After the castings are returned, clean all oil holes and oil galleries one more time. Flush all internal passages with warm water until the water runs clear, then dry thoroughly and apply a light film of oil to all liner surfaces to prevent rusting. If you have access to compressed air, use it to speed up the drying process and to blow out all the oil holes and galleries.

6If the castings are not very dirty, you can do an adequate cleaning job with hot soapy water and a stiff brush. Take plenty of time

and do a thorough job. Regardless of the cleaning method used, be sure to clean all oil holes and galleries very thoroughly and to dry all components well. Protect the liners as described above to prevent rusting.

7All threaded holes must be clean to ensure accurate torque readings during reassembly. To clean all threads except those of the flywheel retaining bolts, run the proper size tap into each of the holes to remove rust, corrosion, thread sealant or sludge and to restore damaged threads. If possible, use compressed air to clear the holes of debris produced by this operation. A good alternative is to inject aerosol-applied waterdispersant lubricant into each hole, using the long spout usually supplied. Always wear eye protection when cleaning out holes in this way. The flywheel retaining bolt threads must be cleaned by using the procedure described in Section 18, in Part A of this Chapter. Now is a good time to check the condition of the cylinder head bolts.

8Apply suitable sealant to the new oil gallery plugs and insert them into the holes in the block. Tighten them securely.

9If the engine is not going to be reassembled right away, cover it with a large plastic bag to keep it clean. Protect the liners as described above to prevent rusting.

Inspection

10 Inspect all castings for cracks and corrosion. Look for stripped threads. If there has been any history of internal coolant leakage, it may be worthwhile having an engine overhaul specialist check the cylinder block/crankcase with special equipment. If defects are found, have them repaired, if possible, or renew the assembly.

11Check the bore of each cylinder liner for scuffing and scoring.

12Measure the diameter of each cylinder liner bore 60 mm from the top of the bore, both parallel to the crankshaft axis and at right angles to it.

13Compare the diameter with that specified. If any measurement exceeds the service limit then the liner must be renewed.

14Measure the piston diameter at right angles to the gudgeon pin axis, 16 mm up from the bottom of the skirt. Compare the results with those specified.

15To measure the piston-to-bore clearance, either measure the bore and piston skirt as described above and subtract the skirt diameter from the bore measurement, or insert each piston into the original bore, select a feeler gauge and slip it into the bore along with the piston. The piston must be aligned exactly in its normal attitude and the feeler gauge must be between the piston and bore on one of the thrust faces, 20 mm up from the bottom of the bore.

16If the clearance is excessive, then a new piston will be required. If the piston binds at the lower end of the bore and is loose towards the top, then the bore is tapered. If

tight spots are encountered as the piston/feeler gauge is rotated in the bore, then the bore is out-of-round.

17Repeat this procedure for the remaining pistons and cylinder liners.

18If the cylinder liner walls are badly scuffed or scored, or if they are excessively worn, out- of-round or tapered, obtain new cylinder liners. New pistons will also be required.

19If the bores are in reasonably good condition and not worn to the specified limits, and if the piston-to-bore clearances can be maintained properly, then it may only be necessary to renew the piston rings.

20If this is the case, the bores should be honed to allow the new rings to bed in correctly and provide the best possible seal. The conventional type of hone has springloaded stones and is used with a power drill. You will also need some paraffin, or honing oil, and rags. The hone should be moved up and down the bore to produce a crosshatch pattern and plenty of honing oil should be used. Ideally the crosshatch lines should intersect at approximately a 60° angle. Do not take off more material than is necessary to produce the required finish. If new pistons are being fitted, the piston manufacturers may specify a finish with a different angle, so their instructions should be followed. Do not withdraw the hone from the bore while it is still being turned, but stop it first. After honing a bore, wipe out all traces of the honing oil. If equipment of this type is not available, or if you are not sure whether you are competent to undertake the task yourself, an engine

overhaul specialist will carry out the work at 2B moderate cost.

12Cylinder liners - removal and refitting

Removal

1 Invert the cylinder block/crankcase and support it on blocks of wood, then use a hard wood drift to tap out each liner from the crankshaft side. When all the liners are released, tip the cylinder block/crankcase on its side and remove each liner from the cylinder head side. Discard the two sealing rings from the base of each. If the liners are to be re-used, mark each one by sticking masking tape on its right-hand (timing belt) face and writing the cylinder number on the tape.

Refitting

2 To install the liners, thoroughly clean the liner mating surfaces in the cylinder block/crankcase and use fine abrasive paper to polish away any burrs or sharp edges which might damage the liner sealing rings. Clean the liners and wipe dry, then fit new sealing rings to the two grooves at the base of each liner and apply a thin film of oil to the

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2B•10 Engine removal and general overhaul procedures

12.2 Renew liner O-rings

rings and to the liner surface on each side of the rings (see illustration).

3 If the original liners are being refitted, use the marks made on removal to ensure that each is refitted the same way round into its original bore. Insert each liner into the cylinder block/crankcase, taking great care not to displace or damage the sealing rings, and press it home as far as possible by hand. Using a hammer and a block of wood, tap each liner lightly but fully onto its locating shoulder (see illustration). Wipe clean, then lightly oil all exposed liner surfaces to prevent rusting.

13 Piston/connecting rod

3

assembly - inspection

 

 

 

1Examine all pistons for ovality, scoring and scratches, and for wear of the piston ring grooves. Use a micrometer to measure the pistons (see illustration).

2If the pistons or connecting rods are to be renewed, it is necessary to have this work carried out by a Rover dealer or suitable engine overhaul specialist who will have the necessary tooling to remove and install the gudgeon pins.

3If new rings are to be fitted to the original pistons, expand the old rings over the top of the pistons. The use of two or three old feeler gauge blades will be helpful in preventing the

blades

ensuring O-rings are not displaced

rings dropping into empty grooves (see illustration).

4When the original piston rings have been removed, ensure that the ring grooves in the piston are free of carbon by cleaning them with a ring cleaning tool or an old ring. Break a ring in half to do this.

5When measuring new rings, lay out each piston set with a piston/connecting rod assembly and keep them together as a matched set from now on.

6Check the ring-to-groove clearance by inserting each ring from the outside together with a feeler gauge blade between the ring’s top surface and the piston land. Check the ring end gaps by inserting each ring into the cylinder bore and pushing it in with the piston crown to ensure that it is square in the bore,

20mm from the top. Use feeler gauges to measure the gap (see illustrations).

7If the end gap of a new ring is found to be too large or too small, double-check to ensure that you have the correct rings. If the end gap is still too small, it must be opened up by careful filing of the ring ends using a fine file. If it is too large, this is not as serious unless the specified service limit is exceeded, in which case very careful checking is required of the dimensions of all components as well as of the new parts.

8Note that each piston should be considered as being matched to its respective liner and they must not be interchanged.

clearance

14 Crankshaft - inspection

3

 

 

 

Warning: Wear eye protection when using compressed air! Be sure to clean oil holes with a pipe cleaner or similar probe.

Checking endfloat

1If crankshaft endfloat is to be checked, this must be done when the crankshaft is still installed in the cylinder block/crankcase but is free to move.

2Check endfloat by using a dial gauge in contact with the end of the crankshaft. Push the crankshaft fully one way and then zero the gauge. Push the crankshaft fully the other way and check the endfloat. The result can be compared with the specified amount and will give an indication as to whether new thrustwashers are required.

3If a dial gauge is not available, feeler gauges can be used. First push the crankshaft fully towards the flywheel end of the engine, then use feeler gauges to measure the gap between the web of No 3 crankpin and the thrustwasher.

Inspection

4 Clean the crankshaft and dry it with compressed air, if available.

5 Check the main and crankpin (big-end)

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