Q-Logic 16-Feb User Manual

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S i m p l i f y

SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch

Installation Guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

59021-04 C

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Installation Guide

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Information furnished in this manual is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, QLogic Corporation assumes no responsibility for its use, nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties which may result from its use. QLogic Corporation reserves the right to change product specifications at any time without notice. Applications described in this document for any of these products are for illustrative purposes only. QLogic Corporation makes no representation nor warranty that such applications are suitable for the specified use without further testing or modification. QLogic Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.

QLogic, SANbox, SANbox2, SANblade, and SANsurfer are trademarks or registered trademarks of QLogic Corporation.

Solaris is a registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Microsoft, Windows NT, and Windows 2000, and Internet Explorer are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

Netscape Navigator is a registered trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation.

All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Document Revision History

Revision A, Release, August 2002

Revision B, Update, November 2002

Revision C, Update, February 2003

Changes

Sections Affected

 

 

Corrected omissions to the table of contents

iii

Reorganized Logged-In LED Indications to include

5.1.2, 5.1.2.1, 5.1.2.2

Excessive Port Errors

 

ThresholdMonitoringEnabled default changed to

page B-20

False

 

 

 

© 2000–2003 QLogic Corporation

First Printed: March 2002

All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

Printed in U.S.A.

QLogic Corporation, 6321 Bury Drive, Eden Prairie, MN 55346 (800) 342-7379 or (952) 932-4000

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59021-04 C

Table of Contents

Section 1

Introduction

 

1.1

Intended Audience .............................................................................................

1-1

1.2

Related Materials ...............................................................................................

1-2

1.3

Safety Notices ....................................................................................................

1-3

1.4

Sicherheitshinweise............................................................................................

1-3

1.5

Notes informatives relatives à la sécurité...........................................................

1-3

1.6

Communications Statements..............................................................................

1-4

1.6.1

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A Statement ............

1-4

1.6.2

Canadian Department of Communications Class A

 

 

Compliance Statement ..............................................................................

1-4

1.6.3

Avis de conformité aux normes du ministère des

 

 

Communications du Canada .....................................................................

1-5

1.6.4

CE Statement ............................................................................................

1-5

1.6.5

VCCI Class A Statement ...........................................................................

1-6

1.6.6

BSMI Class A Statement ...........................................................................

1-6

1.7

Laser Safety Information ....................................................................................

1-7

1.8

Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity (ESDS) Precautions ....................................

1-7

1.9

Accessible Parts.................................................................................................

1-8

1.10

Pièces Accessibles.............................................................................................

1-8

1.11

Zugängliche Teile ...............................................................................................

1-8

1.12

Technical Support...............................................................................................

1-9

1.12.1

Availability..................................................................................................

1-9

1.12.2

Training......................................................................................................

1-9

1.12.3

Contact Information ...................................................................................

1-9

Section 2

General Description

 

2.1

Chassis Controls and LEDs ...............................................................................

2-2

2.1.1

Power Switches .........................................................................................

2-2

2.1.2

Force PROM Button ..................................................................................

2-2

2.1.3

Chassis LEDs ............................................................................................

2-3

2.1.3.1

Over Temperature LED (Yellow) .......................................................

2-3

2.1.3.2

Fan Fail LED (Yellow) .......................................................................

2-3

2.1.3.3

Heartbeat LED (Yellow) ....................................................................

2-3

2.1.3.4

Input Power LED (Green) .................................................................

2-4

2.2

Fibre Channel Ports ...........................................................................................

2-4

2.2.1

Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) Transceivers....................................

2-4

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2.2.2

..................................................................................................Port LEDs

2-5

2.2.2.1

Logged-In LED .................................................................................

2-5

2.2.2.2

Activity LED ......................................................................................

2-6

2.2.3

Port Modes ................................................................................................

2-6

2.2.3.1

Fabric Ports ......................................................................................

2-6

2.2.3.2

Translated Loop Port ........................................................................

2-7

2.2.3.3

Expansion Port .................................................................................

2-7

2.3

Ethernet Port ......................................................................................................

2-8

2.4

Serial Port...........................................................................................................

2-8

2.5

Power Supplies ..................................................................................................

2-9

2.6

Fans .................................................................................................................

2-10

2.7

Switch Management.........................................................................................

2-11

Section 3

Planning

 

3.1

Devices...............................................................................................................

3-1

3.2

Multiple Chassis Fabrics ....................................................................................

3-2

3.2.1

Domain ID, Principal Priority, and Domain ID Lock ...................................

3-2

3.2.2

Common Topologies..................................................................................

3-3

3.2.2.1

Cascade Topology ............................................................................

3-3

3.2.2.2

Mesh Topology .................................................................................

3-4

3.2.2.3

Multistage Topology ..........................................................................

3-5

3.3

Performance.......................................................................................................

3-6

3.3.1

Distance.....................................................................................................

3-6

3.3.2

Bandwidth..................................................................................................

3-7

3.3.3

Latency......................................................................................................

3-7

3.4

Device Access....................................................................................................

3-8

3.4.1

Soft Zones .................................................................................................

3-9

3.4.2

Access Control List Hard Zones ................................................................

3-9

3.4.3

Virtual Private Fabric Hard Zones ...........................................................

3-10

3.5

Fabric Management .........................................................................................

3-10

3.6

Fabric Security .................................................................................................

3-11

Section 4

Installation

 

4.1

Site Requirements..............................................................................................

4-1

4.1.1

Fabric Management Workstation...............................................................

4-1

4.1.2

Switch Power Requirements .....................................................................

4-1

4.1.3

Environmental Conditions..........................................................................

4-2

4.2

Installing a Switch...............................................................................................

4-2

4.2.1

Mount the Switch .......................................................................................

4-3

4.2.2

Install SFP Transceivers............................................................................

4-4

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SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch

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4.2.3

..............................................................Connect the Switch to AC Power

4-5

4.2.4

Connect the Management Workstation to the Switch

................................ 4-8

4.2.4.1

Ethernet Connection.........................................................................

4-9

4.2.4.2

Serial Connection .............................................................................

4-9

4.2.5

Install SANbox Manager..........................................................................

4-10

4.2.5.1

SANbox Manager Installation for Windows ....................................

4-11

4.2.5.2

SANbox Manager Installation for Linux ..........................................

4-11

4.2.5.3

SANbox Manager Installation for Solaris ........................................

4-12

4.2.6

Configure the Switch ...............................................................................

4-13

4.2.7

Configure the Ports..................................................................................

4-14

4.2.8

Cable Devices to the Switch....................................................................

4-14

4.3

Installing Firmware ...........................................................................................

4-15

4.3.1

Using SANbox Manager to Install Firmware............................................

4-15

4.3.2

Using the CLI to Install Firmware ............................................................

4-16

4.3.3

Using FTP and the CLI to Install Firmware..............................................

4-17

4.4

Powering Down a Switch..................................................................................

4-18

Section 5

Diagnostics/Troubleshooting

 

5.1

POST Diagnostics ..............................................................................................

5-1

5.1.1

Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns....................................................................

5-1

5.1.1.1

Normal (all pass)...............................................................................

5-1

5.1.1.2

Force PROM Mode Pattern ..............................................................

5-2

5.1.1.3

Internal Firmware Failure Blink Pattern ............................................

5-2

5.1.1.4

Fatal Error Blink Pattern ...................................................................

5-2

5.1.1.5

Configuration File System Error Blink Pattern ..................................

5-2

5.1.2

Logged-In LED Indications ........................................................................

5-5

5.1.2.1

E_Port Isolation ................................................................................

5-6

5.1.2.2

Excessive Port Errors .......................................................................

5-7

5.2

Chassis Diagnostics ...........................................................................................

5-9

5.2.1

Chassis Over Temperature LED is Illuminated........................................

5-10

5.2.2

Input Power LED Is Extinguished ............................................................

5-10

5.2.3

Fan Fail LED is Illuminated......................................................................

5-10

5.2.4

Output Power LED Is Extinguished .........................................................

5-11

5.2.5

Power Supply Over Temperature LED is Illuminated ..............................

5-11

5.3

Recovering a Switch.........................................................................................

5-12

5.3.1

Force PROM – Exit..................................................................................

5-13

5.3.2

Force PROM – Image Unpack ................................................................

5-13

5.3.3

Force PROM – Reset Network Config.....................................................

5-14

5.3.4

Force PROM – Reset Password File.......................................................

5-14

5.3.5

Force PROM – Copy Log Files................................................................

5-14

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5.3.6

...................................................Force PROM – Remove Switch Config

5-14

5.3.7

Force PROM – Remake Filesystem ........................................................

5-14

5.3.8

Force PROM – Reset Switch...................................................................

5-14

Section 6

Removal/Replacement

 

6.1

SFP Transceivers...............................................................................................

6-2

6.2

Power Supplies ..................................................................................................

6-3

6.3

Fans ...................................................................................................................

6-4

Appendix A Specifications

 

A.1

Switch Specifications..........................................................................................

A-1

A.2

Switch Maintainability .........................................................................................

A-2

A.3

Fabric Management ...........................................................................................

A-3

A.4

Switch Dimensions .............................................................................................

A-3

A.5

Switch Electrical .................................................................................................

A-3

A.6

Switch Environmental.........................................................................................

A-4

A.7

Switch Regulatory Certifications.........................................................................

A-4

A.8

Shortwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (multi-mode)........................................................

A-5

A.9

Longwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (single-mode) ......................................................

A-6

Appendix B Command Line Interface

 

B.1

Logging On to a Switch ......................................................................................

B-1

B.2

Command Syntax...............................................................................................

B-2

B.3

Commands .........................................................................................................

B-3

 

Admin Command.......................................................................................

B-4

 

Alias Command .........................................................................................

B-5

 

Config Command.......................................................................................

B-7

 

Date Command .........................................................................................

B-9

 

Fallback Command..................................................................................

B-10

 

Help Command........................................................................................

B-11

 

History Command....................................................................................

B-12

 

Image Command .....................................................................................

B-13

 

Lip Command ..........................................................................................

B-14

 

Passwd Command ..................................................................................

B-15

 

Ps Command...........................................................................................

B-16

 

Quit Command ........................................................................................

B-17

 

Reset Command......................................................................................

B-18

 

Set Command..........................................................................................

B-23

 

Set Config Command ..............................................................................

B-25

 

Set Log Command...................................................................................

B-33

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SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch

Installation Guide

 

 

..................................................................................Set Port Command

B-36

Set Setup Command ...............................................................................

B-37

Show Command......................................................................................

B-41

Show Config Command...........................................................................

B-54

Show Log Command ...............................................................................

B-57

Show Perf Command ..............................................................................

B-59

Show Setup Command............................................................................

B-61

Shutdown Command ...............................................................................

B-64

Test Command ........................................................................................

B-65

Uptime Command....................................................................................

B-68

User Command .......................................................................................

B-69

Whoami Command..................................................................................

B-71

Zone Command.......................................................................................

B-72

Zoneset Command ..................................................................................

B-76

Zoning Command....................................................................................

B-79

Glossary

Index

Figure

Figures

Page

 

2-1

SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch................................................................................

2-1

2-2

Chassis Controls and LEDS...........................................................................................

2-2

2-3

Chassis LEDs.................................................................................................................

2-3

2-4

Fibre Channel Ports .......................................................................................................

2-4

2-5

SFP Transceiver ............................................................................................................

2-5

2-6

Port LEDs.......................................................................................................................

2-5

2-7

Ethernet Port ..................................................................................................................

2-8

2-8

Serial Port ......................................................................................................................

2-8

2-9

Power Supply Components............................................................................................

2-9

2-10

Fans .............................................................................................................................

2-10

3-1

Cascade-with-a-Loop Topology .....................................................................................

3-3

3-2

Mesh Topology...............................................................................................................

3-4

3-3

Multistage Topology .......................................................................................................

3-5

4-1

SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch................................................................................

4-2

4-2

Installing Rack Mount Brackets......................................................................................

4-4

4-3

Ethernet and Serial Cable Connections .........................................................................

4-8

5-1

Port Logged-In LED .......................................................................................................

5-5

5-2

Logged-In LED Indications.............................................................................................

5-5

5-3

Chassis and Power Supply LEDs ..................................................................................

5-9

6-1

SFP Transceiver Installation ..........................................................................................

6-2

6-2

Power Supply Removal..................................................................................................

6-3

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6-3

..................................................................................................................Fan Removal

6-4

6-4

Fan Installation for Switch Model SB2A-16B .................................................................

6-5

Tables

Table

 

Page

2-1

Serial Port Pin Identification ...........................................................................................

2-9

3-1

Port-to-Port Transmission Combinations .......................................................................

3-7

3-2

Port-to-Port Latency .......................................................................................................

3-7

4-1

Management Workstation Requirements.......................................................................

4-1

B-1

Commands Listed by Authority Level.............................................................................

B-3

B-2

Switch Configuration Defaults ......................................................................................

B-19

B-3

Port Configuration Defaults ..........................................................................................

B-19

B-4

Alarm Threshold Configuration Defaults ......................................................................

B-20

B-5

SNMP Configuration Defaults ......................................................................................

B-21

B-6

System Configuration Defaults.....................................................................................

B-22

B-7

Set Config Port Parameters .........................................................................................

B-25

B-8

Set Config Switch Parameters .....................................................................................

B-27

B-9

Set Config Threshold Parameters................................................................................

B-28

B-10

Set Config Zoning Parameters.....................................................................................

B-29

B-11

SNMP Configuration Settings ......................................................................................

B-37

B-12

System Configuration Settings.....................................................................................

B-38

B-13

Show Port Parameters .................................................................................................

B-43

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Section 1

Introduction

This manual describes the features and installation of the SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel switch, firmware version 1.4. This manual is organized as follows:

Section 1 describes the intended audience, related materials, safety notices, communications statements, laser safety information, electrostatic discharge sensitivity precautions, accessible parts, and technical support.

Section 2 is an overview of the switch. It describes indicator LEDs and all user controls and connections.

Section 3 describes the factors to consider when planning a fabric.

Section 4 explains how to install and configure the switch.

Section 5 describes the diagnostic methods and troubleshooting procedures.

Section 6 describes the removal/replacement procedures for all field replaceable units (FRUs).

Appendix A lists the switch specifications.

Appendix B describes the Command Line Interface.

Please read the communications statements and laser safety information later in this section. Use this manual in conjunction with the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide.

1.1

Intended Audience

This manual introduces users to the switch and explains its installation and service. It is intended for users who are responsible for the installation and servicing of network equipment.

59021-04 C

1-1

1 – Introduction

Related Materials

Q

1.2

Related Materials

The following manuals and materials are referenced in the text and/or provide additional information.

SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide, Publication Number 59022-04.

Fibre Channel-Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL-2) Rev. 6.8.

Fibre Channel-Private Loop SCSI Direct Attach (FC-PLDA) NCITS TR-19:1998

Fibre Channel-10-bit Interface Rev. 2.3.

Definitions of Managed Objects for the Fabric Element in Fibre Channel Standard (draft-ietf-ipfc-fabric-element-mib-04.txt).

The Fibre Channel Standards are available from:

Global Engineering Documents, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112-5776 Phone: (800) 854-7179 or (303) 397-7956 Fax: (303) 397-2740.

1-2

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1 – Introduction

Safety Notices

1.3

Safety Notices

A Warning notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing personal injury.

4-3, 4-5, 6-1

A Caution notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing damage to the equipment.

4-3, 6-4

1.4

Sicherheitshinweise

Ein Warnhinweis weist auf das Vorhandensein einer Gefahr hin, die möglicherweise Verletzungen zur Folge hat.

4-3, 4-6, 6-1

Ein Vorsichtshinweis weist auf das Vorhandensein einer Gefahr hin, die möglicherweise Geräteschäden zur Folge hat.

4-3, 6-4

1.5

Notes informatives relatives à la sécurité

Une note informative Avertissement indique la présence d’un risque pouvant entraîner des blessures.

4-3, 4-5, 6-1

Une note informative Attention indique la présence d’un risque pouvant entraîner des dégâts matériels.

4-3, 6-4

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1-3

1 – Introduction

Communications Statements

Q

1.6

Communications Statements

The following statements apply to this product. The statements for other products intended for use with this product appear in their accompanying manuals.

1.6.1

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A Statement

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy, and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause unacceptable interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at their own expense

Neither the provider nor the manufacturer is responsible for any radio or television interference caused by unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment. Unauthorized changes or modifications could void the user's authority to operate the equipment.

This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:

This device may not cause harmful interference, and

This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

1.6.2

Canadian Department of Communications Class A Compliance Statement

This equipment does not exceed Class A limits for radio emissions for digital apparatus, set out in Radio Interference Regulation of the Canadian Department of Communications. Operation in a residential area may cause unacceptable interference to radio and TV reception requiring the owner or operator to take whatever steps necessary to correct the interference.

1-4

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1 – Introduction

Communications Statements

1.6.3

Avis de conformité aux normes du ministère des Communications du Canada

Cet équipement ne dépasse pas les limites de Classe A d'émission de bruits radioélectriques por les appareils numériques, telles que prescrites par le Réglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique établi par le ministère des Communications du Canada. L'exploitation faite en milieu résidentiel peut entraîner le brouillage des réceptions radio et télé, ce qui obligerait le propriétaire ou l'opérateur à prendre les dispositions nécwssaires pour en éliminer les causes.

1.6.4

CE Statement

The CE symbol on the equipment indicates that this system complies with the EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) directive of the European Community (89/336/EEC) and to the Low Voltage (Safety) Directive (73/23/EEC). Such marking indicates that this system meets or exceeds the following technical standards:

EN60950/A11:1997 – “Safety of Information Technology Equipment, Including Electrical Business Equipment”.

EN60825-1/A11:1996 –“Safety of Laser Products, Part 1.

EN55022:1998 – “Limits and Methods of Measurement of Radio Interference Characteristics of Information Technology Equipment”.

EN 55024-1:1998 – “Electromagnetic compatibility - Generic immunity standard Part 1: Residential commercial, and light industry.”

IEC1000-4-2:1995 – “Electrostatic Discharge Immunity Test”

IEC1000-4-3:1995 – “Radiated, Radio-Frequency, Electromagnetic Field Immunity Test”

IEC1000-4-4:1995 – “Electrical Fast Transient/Burst Immunity Test”

IEC1000-4-5:1995 – “Surge Immunity Test”

IEC1000-4-6:1996 – “Immunity To Conducted Disturbances, Induced By Radio-Frequency Fields”

IEC1000-4-8:1993 – Power Frequency Magnetic Field Immunity Test”

IEC1000-4-11:1994 – “Voltage Dips, Short Interruptions And Voltage Variations Immunity Tests”

EN61000-3-2:1995 – “Limits For Harmonic Current Emissions (Equipment Input Current Less Than/Equal To 16 A Per Phase)” Class A

EN61000-3-3:1995 – “Limitation Of Voltage Fluctuations And Flicker In Low-Voltage Supply Systems For Equipment With Rated Current Less Than Or Equal To 16 A”

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1 – Introduction

Communications Statements

Q

1.6.5

VCCI Class A Statement

Translation:

This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council For Interference by Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used in a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. When such trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective actions.

1.6.6

BSMI Class A Statement

Translation:

Warning:

This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference in which case the user will be required to take adequate measures.

1-6

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1 – Introduction

Laser Safety Information

1.7

Laser Safety Information

This product may use Class 1 laser optical transceivers to communicate over the fiber optic conductors. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) does not consider Class 1 lasers to be hazardous. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825 Laser Safety Standard requires labeling in English, German, Finnish, and French stating that the product uses Class 1 lasers. Because it is impractical to label the transceivers, the following label is provided in this manual.

1.8

Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity (ESDS) Precautions

The assemblies used in the switch chassis are ESD sensitive. Observe ESD handling procedures when handling any assembly used in the switch chassis.

59021-04 C

1-7

1 – Introduction

Accessible Parts

Q

1.9

Accessible Parts

The only Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) in the SANbox2-16 switch are:

Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) optical transceivers

Power supplies

Fans

Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement for more information.

1.10

Pièces Accessibles

Les pièces remplaçables, Field Replaceable Units (FRU), du commutateur SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch sont les suivantes:

Interfaces aux media d’interconnexion appelés SFP transceivers.

Alimentation(s) de courant

Ventilateurs

Se reporter à la Section 6 (Procédures de retrait et remplacement) pour plus de renseignements.

1.11

Zugängliche Teile

Nur die folgenden Teile im SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch können kundenseitig ersetzt werden:

Schnittstellen für die Zwischenverbindungsträger, SFP transceivers genannt.

Netzteil(e)

Gehäuselüfte

Weitere Informationen finden Sie im Abshcnitt 6 (Ausbauen der ersetzbaren Teile).

1-8

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1 – Introduction

Technical Support

1.12

Technical Support

Customers should contact their authorized maintenance provider for technical support of their QLogic switch products. QLogic-direct customers may contact QLogic Technical Support; others will be redirected to their authorized maintenance provider.

Visit the QLogic switch support Web site listed in Contact Information for the latest firmware and software updates.

1.12.1

Availability

QLogic Technical Support is available from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM Central Standard Time, Monday through Friday, excluding QLogic-observed holidays.

1.12.2

Training

QLogic offers the following technical training courses:

Switch Certification

HBA Certification

Each course is available at the training facility in Eden Prairie, MN or at your local facility. All courses include a Fibre Channel overview and sections on installation, maintenance, and topology solutions. Each student receives a set of manuals and a CD-ROM containing course training materials. Upon successful completion of the training, Qlogic awards a certificate identifying the student as a Certified SANbox® or SANblade® Professional.

1.12.3

Contact Information

Address:

QLogic Switch Products Inc.

 

6321 Bury Drive

 

Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55346

 

USA

Telephone:

+1 952-932-4040

Fax:

+1 952-932-4018

Email:

 

Technical Service

support@qlogic.com

Technical Training

tech.training@qlogic.com

Switch Support Web Site:

www.qlogic.com/support/home_support.asp

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1-9

1 – Introduction

Technical Support

Notes

Q

1-10

59021-04 C

Section 2

General Description

This section describes the features and capabilities of the SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel switch. The following topics are described:

Chassis controls and LEDs

Fibre channel ports

Ethernet port

Serial port

Power supplies

Fans

Fabric management

Fabrics are managed with the SANbox Manager switch management application and the Command Line Interface (CLI). Refer to Appendix B Command Line Interface for more information. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for information about using the SANbox Manager application.

Figure 2-1. SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch

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Chassis Controls and LEDs

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2.1

Chassis Controls and LEDs

Chassis controls include the power supply On/Off switches and the force PROM button as shown in Figure 2-2. The chassis LEDs include the Over Temperature LED, Fan Fail LED, Heartbeat LED, and the Input Power LED.

Chassis LEDs

Force PROM

 

Button

Left Power

Right Power

Switch

Switch

Figure 2-2. Chassis Controls and LEDS

2.1.1

 

Power Switches

Each power supply has an On/Off switch that controls power to the switch logic circuitry. To apply power to the switch, place both switches in the On position.

2.1.2

Force PROM Button

The force PROM button is a momentary switch on the front panel. It is used to recover a disabled switch. Force PROM mode causes the switch to access PROM when flash memory or the resident configuration file is corrupted. Placing the switch in force PROM mode forces the default IP address of 10.0.0.1. Refer to ”Recovering a Switch” on page 5-12 for information about force PROM mode.

To place the switch in force PROM mode, do the following:

1.Isolate the switch from the fabric. Open a Telnet session, and enter the Shutdown command. Refer to ”Shutdown Command” on page B-64.

2.Place both power supply switches in the Off position.

3.Press and hold the force PROM button with a pointed tool for a few seconds, then place one of the power supply switches in the On position. You can release the force PROM button after the Input Power LED illuminates. When the switch is in force PROM mode, the Heartbeat LED illuminates continuously. Refer to ”Chassis LEDs” on page 2-3 for information about the Input Power LED and the Heartbeat LED.

To return to normal operation, turn both power supplies off, and then back on.

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Chassis Controls and LEDs

2.1.3

Chassis LEDs

The chassis LEDs shown in Figure 2-3 provide status information about switch operation. Refer to ”Power Supplies” on page 2-9 for information about power supply LEDs and to ”Port LEDs” on page 2-5 for information about port LEDs.

Over Temperature LED

Fan Fail LED

Heartbeat LED

Input Power LED

(Yellow)

(Yellow)

(Yellow)

(Green)

 

Figure 2-3. Chassis LEDs

 

2.1.3.1

 

 

 

Over Temperature LED (Yellow)

The Over Temperature LED provides status information about the air temperature inside the switch. This LED illuminates to indicate that the switch logic circuitry is overheating. Refer to Section 5 Diagnostics/Troubleshooting for information about troubleshooting over temperature conditions.

2.1.3.2

Fan Fail LED (Yellow)

The Fan Fail LED indicates operational status of both fans. This LED illuminates if the speed of either fan falls below the normal range. Refer to

Section 5 Diagnostics/Troubleshooting for information about troubleshooting fan failure conditions.

2.1.3.3

Heartbeat LED (Yellow)

The Heartbeat LED indicates the status of the internal switch processor and the results of Power On Self Tests (POSTs). Following a normal power-up, the Heartbeat LED blinks about once per second to indicate that the switch passed the POST and that the internal switch processor is running. In force PROM mode, the Heartbeat LED illuminates continuously. Refer to ”Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns” on page 5-1 for more information about Heartbeat LED blink patterns.

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Fibre Channel Ports

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2.1.3.4

Input Power LED (Green)

The Input Power LED indicates the voltage status at the switch logic circuitry. This LED illuminates when the switch logic circuitry is receiving the proper DC voltages.

2.2

Fibre Channel Ports

Each SANbox2-16 switch has 16 Fibre Channel ports numbered 0 - 15 as shown in Figure 2-4. Each of these ports is served by a Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) transceiver. The port LEDs are located to the right of their respective ports and provide port login and activity status information. Port modes configure the ports to communicate with public devices, private devices, and inter-switch connections.

Port

Port LEDs

 

Figure 2-4. Fibre Channel Ports

2.2.1

 

Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) Transceivers

An SFP transceiver, like the one shown in Figure 2-5, converts electrical signals to and from optical laser signals to transmit and receive data. SFP transceivers plug into the ports; duplex fiber optic cables plug into the transceivers which then connect to the devices. A port is capable of transmitting at 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps; however, the transceiver must be capable of 2 Gbps for the port to deliver at that rate.

The SFP transceivers are hot swappable. This means that you can remove or install an SFP transceiver while the switch is operating without harming the switch or the transceiver. However, communication with the connected device will be interrupted. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement for information about installing and removing SFP optical transceivers.

2-4

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Fibre Channel Ports

Figure 2-5. SFP Transceiver

2.2.2

Port LEDs

Each data port has its own Logged-In LED and Activity LED as shown in Figure 2-6. The Logged-In LED indicates whether the port and its connected device are logged into the fabric, or if it is connected to another switch and they are segmented. The Activity LED indicates the frequency at which the port receives or transmits frames.

Logged-In LED

Activity LED

(Green)

(Yellow)

Figure 2-6. Port LEDs

2.2.2.1

 

Logged-In LED

The Logged-in LED indicates the logged-in or initialization status of the connected devices. After successful completion of the POST, the switch extinguishes all Logged-In LEDs. Following a successful loop initialization or port login, the switch illuminates the corresponding logged-in LED. This shows that the port is properly connected and able to communicate with its attached devices. The Logged-In LED remains illuminated as long as the port is initialized or logged in. If the port connection is broken or an error occurs that disables the port, the Logged-In LED will flash. Refer to ”Logged-In LED Indications” on page 5-5 for more information about the Logged-In LED.

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Fibre Channel Ports

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2.2.2.2

Activity LED

The Activity LED indicates that data is passing through the port. Each frame that enters or leaves the port causes this LED to illuminate for 50 milliseconds. This makes it possible to observe the transmission of a single frame. When extending credits, an Activity LED for a donor port will reflect the traffic of the recipient port. Refer to ”Distance” on page 3-6 for more information about extended credits and donor ports.

2.2.3

Port Modes

SANbox2-16 switches support the following port modes:

Generic ports (GL_Port and G_Port)

Fabric ports (FL_Port and F_Port)

Translated loop ports (TL_Port)

Expansion ports (E_Port)

Switches come from the factory with all ports configured as GL_Ports. GL_Ports self-configure in the following ways:

FL_Port when connected to a loop of public devices

F_Port when connected to a single public device. If the device is a single device on a loop, the GL_Port will attempt to configure first as an F_Port, then if that fails, as an FL_Port.

E_Port when connected to another FC-SW-2 compliant switch

G_Ports self-configure in the following ways:

F_Port when connected to a public device

E_Port when connected to another FC-SW-2 compliant switch

A TL_Port supports private loop devices and must be configured explicitly. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for more information about defining port modes.

2.2.3.1

Fabric Ports

An FL_Port can support a loop of up to 126 public devices. An FL_Port can also configure itself during the fabric login process as an F_Port when connected to a single public device (N_Port).

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Fibre Channel Ports

2.2.3.2

Translated Loop Port

A TL_Port supports a loop of up to 125 private initiator devices or up to 124 private target devices with the ability to communicate with “off-loop” devices. This includes public fabric devices and private devices on other TL_Ports. TL_Ports connect to devices that conform to the Fibre Channel-Private Loop SCSI Direct Attach (FC-PLDA) standard. Devices connected to TL_Ports are registered with the Name Server.

A TL_Port acts as a proxy for the off-loop device translating private frames into and from public frames. Each TL_Port can proxy up to 63 off-loop initiator devices or up to 64 off-loop target and initiator devices. The set of off-loop devices are maintained in the TL_Port’s translation entries list.

For a TL_Port connected to private target devices, the switch firmware automatically creates an entry in the translation entries list for each off-loop initiator device that attempts to establish communication. Soft or ACL zoning can be used to limit the number of potential initiators to 63. Zone membership must be done by worldwide name, or domain ID and port ID.

For a TL_Port connected to private initiator devices, the switch firmware automatically creates an entry in the translation entries list for up to 64 target and initiator devices that are members of the same soft or ACL zone. Zone membership must be done by worldwide name, or domain ID and port ID.

2.2.3.3

Expansion Port

E_Ports enable you to expand the fabric by connecting SANbox2-16 switches with other FC-SW-2 compliant switches. SANbox2-16 switches self-discover all inter-switch connections. Refer to ”Multiple Chassis Fabrics” on page 3-2 for more information about multiple chassis fabrics.

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Ethernet Port

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2.3

Ethernet Port

The Ethernet port shown in Figure 2-7 is an RJ-45 Ethernet connector that provides a connection to a management workstation. A management workstation can be a PC, a Solaris™ workstation, or a Linux® workstation that is used to configure and manage the switch fabric. You can manage the switch over an Ethernet connection using SANbox Manager, the Command Line Interface (CLI), or SNMP. The switch through which the fabric is managed is called the fabric management switch.

RJ-45 Ethernet Port

Figure 2-7. Ethernet Port

2.4

Serial Port

The SANbox2-16 switch is equipped with an RS-232 serial port for maintenance purposes. The serial port is located on the back of the switch under a small cover as shown in Figure 2-8.

1 5

6 9

Serial Port

Figure 2-8. Serial Port

The serial port connector requires a null-modem F/F DB9 cable. The pins on the switch RS-232 connector are shown in Figure 2-8 and identified in Table 2-1. Refer to ”Connect the Management Workstation to the Switch” on page 4-8 for information about connecting the management workstation through the serial port.

2-8

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Power Supplies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2-1. Serial Port Pin Identification

 

 

 

 

 

Pin Number

 

Description

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

Carrier Detect (DCD)

 

2

 

Receive Data (RxD)

 

3

 

Transmit Data (TxD)

 

4

 

Data Terminal Ready (DTR)

 

5

 

Signal Ground (GND)

 

6

 

Data Set Ready (DSR)

 

7

 

Request to Send (RTS)

 

8

 

Clear to Send (CTS)

 

9

 

Ring Indicator (RI)

 

 

 

 

 

2.5

Power Supplies

The power supplies convert standard 110 or 230 VAC to DC voltages for the various switch circuits. Each power supply has an AC power receptacle, an On/Off switch, and two status LEDs as shown in Figure 2-9. After connecting a power supply to an AC voltage source and placing the power switch in the On position, the power supply is energized and DC voltage is delivered to the switch logic circuitry. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement for information about replacing a power supply.

Over Temperature LED

Output Power LED

(Amber)

(Green)

AC Power

On/Off Switch

Receptacle

 

Figure 2-9. Power Supply Components

Each power supply is capable of providing all of the switch’s power needs. During normal operation, each power supply provides half of the demand. If one power supply goes offline, the second power supply steps up and provides the difference.

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Fans

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The power supplies are hot swappable and interchangeable. Hot swappable means that you can remove and replace one power supply while the switch is in operation without disrupting service.

Each power supply has two status LEDs: an Output Power LED (green) and an Over Temperature LED (amber):

The Output Power LED illuminates to indicate that the power supply is producing DC voltage at the proper levels.

The Over Temperature LED illuminates to indicate that the power supply is overheating. When a power supply overheats, the switch extinguishes the Output Power LED and shuts down the power supply. Refer to

Section 5 Diagnostics/Troubleshooting for information about troubleshooting over temperature conditions.

2.6

Fans

The switch is equipped with two fans as shown in Figure 2-10. If one fan should fail, replace the failed fan immediately. The fans are hot swappable and interchangeable. Refer to ”Fans” on page 6-4 for information about removing and replacing the fans. Air flow can be front-to-back or back-to-front depending on the switch model.

Fans

Figure 2-10. Fans

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Switch Management

2.7

Switch Management

The SANbox Manager application provides a graphical user interface for fabric management. This application runs on a Windows®, Solaris, or Linux workstation. The management workstation connects to the fabric directly through one switch’s Ethernet port and provides in-band management for all other switches in the fabric. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for information about the SANbox Manager application and its use.

In addition to SANbox Manager, the switch supports the following management tools:

Command Line Interface

File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

The Command Line Interface provides monitoring and configuration functions by which the administrator can manage the fabric and its switches. Refer to Appendix B Command Line Interface for more information.

FTP provides the Command Line Interface for loading and retrieving firmware and log files.

SNMP provides monitoring and trap functions for the fabric. SANbox2 firmware supports SNMP Versions 1, 2, and 3, the Fibre Alliance Management Information Base (FA-MIB) version 4.0, and the Fabric Element Management Information Base (FE-MIB) RFC 2837. Traps are formatted using SNMP version 2.

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Switch Management

Notes

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Section 3

Planning

Consider the following when planning a fabric:

Devices

Multiple chassis fabrics

Performance

Device access

Fabric management

Fabric security

3.1

Devices

When planning a fabric, consider the number of devices and the anticipated demand. This will determine the number of ports that are needed and in turn the number of switches. Consider how many and what types of switches are needed.

Consider the distribution of public and private devices as well as targets and initiators. Public devices have full Fibre Channel addressing capability, and therefore can communicate with any other public device on the fabric. An F_Port supports a single public device. An FL_Port can support up to 126 public devices in an arbitrated loop.

Private devices do not have full Fibre Channel addressing capability, only the Arbitrated Loop Physical Address (ALPA) portion. A TL_Port provides a proxy for a loop of private initiator or target devices allowing communication with off-loop public and private devices. Consider the number of private devices in the fabric and the number of off-loop devices with which the private devices must communicate.

A TL_Port can support up to 125 private initiator devices and maintain communications with up to 64 off-loop target devices.

A TL_Port can support up to 124 private target devices and maintain communications with up to 63 off-loop initiator devices.

The SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel switch uses SFP optical transceivers, but the device host bus adapters you are using may not. Consider whether the device adapters use SFP transceivers or Gigabit Interface Converters (GBIC), and choose fiber optic cable accordingly. Use LC-type cable connectors for SFP transceivers and SC-type cable connectors for GBIC transceivers.

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Multiple Chassis Fabrics

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3.2

Multiple Chassis Fabrics

By connecting switches together you can expand the number of available ports for devices. Each switch in the fabric is identified by a unique domain ID, and the fabric will automatically resolve domain ID conflicts. Because the ports are self-configuring, you can connect SANbox2-16 and other FC-SW-2 compliant switches together in a wide variety of topologies.

3.2.1

Domain ID, Principal Priority, and Domain ID Lock

The following switch configuration settings affect multiple chassis fabrics:

Domain ID

Principal priority

Domain ID lock

The domain ID is a unique number from 1– 239 that identifies each switch in a fabric. The principal priority is a number (1 – 255) that determines the principal switch which manages domain ID assignments for the fabric. The switch with the highest principal priority (1 is high, 255 is low) becomes the principal switch. If the principal priority is the same for all switches in a fabric, the switch with the lowest WWN becomes the principal switch.

The domain ID lock allows (FALSE) or prevents (TRUE) the reassignment of the domain ID on that switch. Switches come from the factory with the domain ID set to 1, the domain ID lock set to FALSE, and the principal priority set to 254. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for information about changing the domain ID using SANbox Manager. Refer to ”Set Config Command” on page B-25 for information about changing the default domain ID, domain ID lock, and principal priority parameters.

An unresolved domain ID conflict means that the switch with the higher WWN will isolate as a separate fabric, and the Logged-In LEDs on both switches will flash to show the affected ports. If you connect a new switch to an existing fabric with its domain ID unlocked, and a domain ID conflict occurs, the new switch will isolate as a separate fabric. However, you can remedy this by resetting the new switch or taking it offline then back online. The principal switch will reassign the domain ID and the switch will join the fabric.

Note: Domain ID reassignment is not reflected in zoning that is defined by domain ID/port number pair or Fibre Channel address. You must reconfigure zones that are affected by domain ID reassignment. To prevent zoning definitions from becoming invalid when the membership is defined by domain ID/port number or Fibre Channel address, lock the domain IDs.

3-2

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Multiple Chassis Fabrics

3.2.2

Common Topologies

This section describes three commonly used topologies:

Cascade

Mesh

Multistage®

3.2.2.1

Cascade Topology

A cascade topology describes a fabric in which the switches are connected in a linear fashion. If you connect the last switch back to the first switch, you create a cascade-with-a-loop topology as shown in Figure 3-1. The loop reduces latency because any switch can route traffic in the shortest direction to any switch in the loop. The loop also provides failover should a switch fail.

The cascade fabric shown in Figure 3-1 has the following characteristics:

Each chassis link contributes up to 200 MB/s of bandwidth between chassis, 400 MB/s in full duplex. However, because of the structure of the cascade topology, the bandwidth will be shared between devices on other chassis.

Latency between any two ports is no more than three hops.

48 Fibre Channel ports are available for devices.

Figure 3-1. Cascade-with-a-Loop Topology

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3.2.2.2

Mesh Topology

A mesh topology describes a fabric in which each chassis has at least one port directly connected to every chassis in the fabric. The mesh fabric shown in Figure 3-2 has the following characteristics:

Each link contributes up to 200 MB/s of bandwidth between switches, 400 MB/s in full duplex. Because of multiple parallel paths, there is less competition for this bandwidth than with a cascade or a Multistage topology.

Latency between any two device ports is no more than two hops.

40 Fibre Channel ports are available for devices

Figure 3-2. Mesh Topology

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Multiple Chassis Fabrics

3.2.2.3

Multistage Topology

A Multistage topology describes a fabric in which two or more edge switches connect to one or more core switches. Each additional core switch increases the bandwidth to each edge switch by 200 MB/s. The Multistage fabric shown in Figure 3-3 has the following characteristics:

Each link contributes up to 200 MB/s of bandwidth between chassis. Competition for this bandwidth is less than that of a Cascade topology, but greater than that of the Mesh topology.

Latency between any two device ports is three hops.

52 Fibre Channel ports are available for devices

 

Core Switch

Edge Switch

Edge Switch

 

Edge Switch

 

Figure 3-3. Multistage Topology

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Performance

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3.3

Performance

The SANbox2-16 switch supports class 2 and class 3 Fibre Channel service at transmission rates of 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps with a maximum frame size of 2148 bytes. A port can transmit or receive at 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps depending on the device to which it is connected. The port discovers the transmission speed prior to login when the connected device powers up. Related performance characteristics include the following:

Distance

Bandwidth

Latency

3.3.1

Distance

Consider the physical distribution of devices and switches in the fabric. Choose SFP transceivers that are compatible with the cable type, distance, Fibre Channel revision level, and the device host bus adapter. Refer to

Appendix A Specifications for more information about cable types and SFP transceivers.

Each port is supported by a data buffer with a 12 credit capacity; that is, 12 maximum sized frames. For fibre optic cables, this enables full bandwidth over a distance of 20 kilometers at 1 Gbps (0.6 credits/Km), or 10 kilometers at 2 Gbps Gbps (1.2 credits/Km). Beyond this distance, however, there is some loss of efficiency because the transmitting port must wait for an acknowledgement before sending the next frame.

Longer distances can be spanned at full bandwidth by extending credits on G_Ports and F_Ports. Each port can donate up to 11 credits to a pool from which a recipient port can borrow. For example, you can configure a recipient port to borrow up to 66 credits from 6 ports for a total of 78 credits. This will support communication over approximately 130 Km at 1 Gbps (78÷0.6) or 65 Km at 2 Gbps (78÷1.2).

You configure recipient and donor ports using SANbox Manager or the Set Config command. Refer to ”Set Config Command” on page B-25 for more information.

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Performance

3.3.2

Bandwidth

Bandwidth is a measure of the volume of data that can be transmitted at a given transmission rate. A port can transmit or receive at 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps depending on the device to which it is connected. The switch supports all transmission rate combinations as shown in Table 3-1.

Table 3-1. Port-to-Port Transmission Combinations

Source Port Rate

Destination Port Rate

Maximum Bandwdith

 

 

 

1 Gbps

1 Gbps

100 MB

1 Gbps

2 Gbps

100 MB

1 Gbps x 2 ports

2 Gbps

200 MB

2 Gbps

1 Gbps x 2 ports

100 MB each port1

2 Gbps

2 Gbps

200 MB

 

 

 

1Bandwidth will be less for larger sequence sizes.

In multiple chassis fabrics, each link between chassis contributes 100 or 200 megabytes of bandwidth between those chassis. When additional bandwidth is needed between devices, increase the number of links between the connecting switches. The switch guarantees in-order-delivery with any number of links between chassis.

3.3.3

Latency

Latency is a measure of how fast a frame travels from one port to another. The factors that affect latency include transmission rate and the source/destination port relationship as shown in Table 3-2.

Table 3-2. Port-to-Port Latency

Source/Destination Rates

Same Switch

 

 

1 Gbps - 1 Gbps

< 1 µsec

2 Gbps - 2 Gbps

< 0.5 µsec

 

 

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Device Access

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3.4

Device Access

Consider device access needs within the fabric. Access is controlled by the use of zones and zone sets. Some zoning strategies include the following:

Separate devices that use different operating systems.

Separate devices that have no need to communicate with other devices in the fabric or have classified data.

Separate devices into department, administrative, or other functional grouping.

Group TL_Port devices with targets and initiators to allow automatic discovery.

Reserve a path and its bandwidth from one port to another.

A zone is a named group of devices that can communicate with each other. Membership in a zone can be defined by switch port number, port Fibre Channel address, or by device worldwide name (WWN). Devices can communicate only with devices that are members of the same zone. A zone can be a member of more than one zone set. Several zone sets can be defined for a fabric, but only one zone set can be active at one time. The active zone set determines the current fabric zoning.

A zoning database is maintained on each switch consisting of all inactive zone sets, the active zone set, all zones, aliases, and their membership. The SANbox2-16 switch supports the following maximum limits:

256 zone sets

256 zones

1000 total zone set members

2000 members per zone

256 aliases

2000 members per alias

2000 total number of alias and zone members Three types of zones are supported:

Soft zone

Access Control List (ACL) - hard zone

Virtual Private Fabric (VPF) - hard zone

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Device Access

3.4.1

Soft Zones

Soft zoning divides the fabric for purposes of controlling discovery. Members of the same soft zone automatically discover and communicate freely with all other members of the same zone. The soft zone boundary is not secure; traffic across soft zones can occur if addressed correctly. The following rules apply to soft zones:

Soft zones that include members from multiple switches need not include the ports of the inter-switch links.

Soft zone boundaries yield to ACL and VPF zone boundaries.

Soft zones can overlap; that is, a port can be a member of more than one soft zone.

Membership can be defined by Fibre Channel address, port ID and domain ID, or worldwide name.

Soft zoning supports all port modes.

3.4.2

Access Control List Hard Zones

Access Control List (ACL) zoning divides the fabric for purposes of controlling discovery and inbound traffic. ACL zoning is a type of hard zoning that is hardware enforced. This type of zoning is useful for controlling access to certain devices without totally isolating them from the fabric. Members can communicate with each other and transmit outside the ACL zone, but cannot receive inbound traffic from outside the zone. The following rules apply to ACL zones:

The ACL zone boundary is secure against inbound traffic.

ACL zones can overlap; that is, a port can be a member of more than one ACL zone.

ACL zones that include members from multiple switches need not include the ports of the inter-switch links.

ACL zone boundaries supersede soft zone boundaries, but yield to VPF zone boundaries.

Membership can be defined only by domain ID and port ID.

ACL zoning supports all port modes except TL_Port.

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Fabric Management

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3.4.3

Virtual Private Fabric Hard Zones

Virtual Private Fabric (VPF) zoning divides the fabric for purposes of controlling discovery and both inbound and outbound traffic. This type of zoning is useful for providing security and reserving paths between devices to guarantee bandwidth. VPF zoning is a type of hard zoning that is hardware enforced. Members can only transmit to and receive from members of the same VPF zone. The VPF zone boundary is secure against both inbound and outbound traffic. The following rules apply to VPF zones:

VPF zones that include members from multiple switches must include the ports of the inter-switch links.

VPF zones cannot overlap; that is, a port can be a member of only one VPF zone.

VPF zone boundaries supersede both soft and ACL zone boundaries.

Membership can be defined only by domain ID and port ID.

VPF zoning supports all port modes.

3.5

Fabric Management

The SANbox Manager application and CLI execute on a management workstation that provides for the configuration, control, maintenance of the fabric. Supported platforms include Windows, Windows NT, Solaris, and Linux. The SANbox Manager application can manage multiple fabrics. Consider how many fabrics will be managed, how many management workstations are needed, and whether the fabrics will be managed with the CLI or SANbox Manager.

The switch supports a maximum of 15 user logins. This includes SANbox Manager inband and out-of-band logins, Telnet out-of-band logins, and SNMP out-of-band logins. Of this 15, a maximum of 10 SANbox Manager logins are allowed.

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Fabric Security

3.6

Fabric Security

You manage fabric security on a switch basis through the creation of user accounts. Each account consists of an account name, a password, and an authority level. There are two authority levels: User and Admin. These authority levels apply to SANbox Manager and to the CLI. User authority permits only monitoring and display tasks. Admin authority permits all management tasks including user administration. Consider your fabric security needs, who the system administrators will be, and authority levels they should have.

Refer to ”Commands” on page B-3 for more information about authority levels.

Refer to the ”User Command” on page B-69 for information about creating user accounts.

Refer to the ”Set Setup Command” on page B-37 and the System keyword for information about fabric security and the enforcement of user accounts.

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Fabric Security

Notes

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Section 4

Installation

This section describes how to install and configure the SANbox2-16 switch. It also describes how to load new firmware and how to recover a disabled switch.

4.1

Site Requirements

The following items are required for the installation of a SANbox2-16 switch:

Fabric management workstation

Power requirements

Environmental conditions

4.1.1

Fabric Management Workstation

The requirements for fabric management workstations running SANbox Manager are described in Table 4-1:

Table 4-1. Management Workstation Requirements

Operating System

Windows® NT, 2000, 95/98

 

Linux® 6.2 Red Hat®

 

Solaris™

Memory

128 MB or more

Disk Space

150

MB per installation

Processor

300

MHz or faster

Hardware

CD-ROM drive, RS-232 serial port, RJ-45 Ethernet port

Internet Browser

Microsoft® Internet Explorer® or Netscape Navigator®

 

 

 

Telnet workstations require an RJ-45 Ethernet port and an operating system with a Telnet client.

4.1.2

Switch Power Requirements

Operating voltage requirements are as follows: 90 to 137 Vac; 47 to 63 Hz

180 to 265 Vac; 47 to 63 Hz

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Installing a Switch

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4.1.3

Environmental Conditions

Consider the factors that affect the climate in your facility such as equipment heat dissipation and ventilation. The switch requires the following operating conditions:

Operating temperature range: 10° to 40° C (50°- 104°F)

Relative humidity: 25 - 80%, non-condensing

4.2

Installing a Switch

Unpack the switch and accessories. The SANbox2-16 product is shipped with the components shown in Figure 4-1:

SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch (1) with firmware installed

Power cords (2)

Rubber feet (4)

Rack mount brackets (2)

CD containing the SANbox Manager switch management application, release notes, and documentation

 

Figure 4-1. SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch

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Installing a SANbox2-16 switch involves the following steps:

1.Mount the switch.

2.Install SFP transceivers.

3.Connect the switch to the AC power source.

4.Connect the management workstation to the switch.

5.Install the SANbox Manager application.

6.Configure the switch.

7.Configure the ports.

8.Cable devices to the switch.

4.2.1

Mount the Switch

The switch can be placed on a flat surface and stacked or mounted in a 19” EIA rack. The top of each chassis has dimples to receive the rubber feet of a second chassis stacked on top. Without the rubber feet, the switch occupies 1U of space in an EIA rack. Mounting rails are required and available through QLogic Corporation.

WARNING!! Mount switches in the rack so that the weight is distributed evenly. An unevenly loaded rack can become unstable possibly resulting in equipment damage or personal injury.

CAUTION! If the switch is mounted in a closed or multi-unit rack assembly, make sure that the operating temperature inside the rack enclosure does not exceed the maximum rated ambient temperature. Refer to ”Switch Environmental” on page A-4.

The switch must rest on rails or a shelf in the rack or cabinet. Allow 16 cm (6.5 in) minimum clearance at the front and rear of the rack for service access and ventilation.

Do not restrict chassis air flow. Allow 16 cm (6.5 in) minimum clearance at the front and rear of the rack for service access and ventilation.

Multiple rack-mounted units connected to the AC supply circuit may overload that circuit or overload the AC supply wiring. Consider the power source capacity and the total power usage of all switches on the circuit. Refer to ”Switch Electrical” on page A-3.

Reliable grounding in the rack must be maintained from the switch chassis to the AC power source.

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To mount the switch in a rack, do the following:

1.Ensure that the19-inch rack meets the following standard specifications:

ANSI/EIA RS-230 Standard, entitled Cabinets, Racks, Panels, and Associated Equipment

MIL-STD- 189, entitled Racks, Electrical Equipment, 19-Inch and Associated Panels

2.Mount the brackets on the front or rear corners of the chassis as shown in Figure 4-2.

3.Place the switch in the rack and secure it with four 10-32 x .625” machine screws (not supplied).

Figure 4-2. Installing Rack Mount Brackets

4.2.2

Install SFP Transceivers

The switch will support a variety of interconnection media. Refer to ”SFP Transceivers” on page 6-2 for information about removing and installing SFP transceivers.

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4.2.3

Connect the Switch to AC Power

WARNING!! This product is supplied with a 3-wire power cable and plug for the user’s safety. Use this power cable in conjunction with a properly grounded outlet to avoid electrical shock. An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage on metal parts of the switch chassis. It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and grounded to prevent electrical shock.

You may require a different power cable in some countries because the plug on the cable supplied with the equipment will not fit your electrical outlet. In this case, you must supply your own power cable. The cable you use must meet the following requirements:

For 125 Volt electrical service, the cable must be rated at 10 Amps and be approved by UL and CSA.

For 250 Volt electrical service: The cable must be rated at 10 Amps, meet the requirements of H05VV-F, and be approved by VDE, SEMKO, and DEMKO.

AVERTISSEMENT!!

Pour la sécurité de l’utilisateur, l’appareil est livré avec un câble d’alimentation trifilaire et une fiche. Pour éviter toute secousse électrique, enficher ce câble à une prise correctement mise à la terre.Une prise électrique dont les fils sont mal branchés peut créer une tension dangereuse dans les pièces métalliques du châssis switch. Pour éviter toute secousse électrique, s’assurer que les fils sont correctement branchés et que la prise est bien mise à la terre.

Dans certains pays les prises électriques sont de modèle différent; on ne peut y enficher le câble de l’appareil. On doit donc en utiliser un autre ayant les caractéristiques suivantes:

Alimentation 125 V: Câble pour courant nominal de 10 A, agréé LAC et CSA.

Alimentation 250 V: Câble pour courant nominal de 10 A, conforme au H05VV-F, et agréé VDE, SEMKO et DEMKO.

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WARNUNG!!

Dieses Produkt wird mit einem 3-adrigen Netzkabel mit Stecker geliefert. Dieses Kabel erfüllt die Sicherheitsanforderungen und sollte an einer vorschriftsmäßigen Schukosteckdose angeschlossen werden, um die Gefahr eines elektrischen Schlages zu vermeiden.Elektrosteckdosen, die nicht richtig verdrahtet sind, können gefährliche Hochspannung an den Metallteilen des switch-Gehäuses verursachen. Der Kunde trägt die Verantwortung für eine vorschriftsmäßige Verdrahtung und Erdung der Steckdose zur Vermeidung eines elektrischen Schlages.

In manchen Ländern ist eventuell die Verwendung eines anderen Kabels erforderlich, da der Stecker des mitgelieferten Kabels nicht in die landesüblichen Steckdosen paßt. In diesem Fall müssen Sie sich ein Kabel besorgen, daß die folgenden Anforderungen erfüllt:

Für 125 Volt-Netze: 10 Ampere Kabel mit ULund CSA-Zulassung.

Für 250 Volt-Netze: 10 Ampere Kabel gemäß den Anforderungen der H05VV-F und VDE-, SEMKOund DEMKO-Zulassung.

To connect the switch to an AC power source and energize the switch, do the following:

1.Connect the power cords to the AC power receptacles on the front of the switch chassis.

2.Connect each power cord to a 3-wire, grounded, AC outlet that delivers power in accordance with the power requirements in

Appendix A Specifications.

Note: To provide redundancy in the event of an AC power circuit failure, connect the switch power supplies to separate AC circuits.

3.Place both power On/Off switches in the On position to energize the switch logic circuitry. Confirm that the Input Power LED on the switch chassis is illuminated indicating that the switch logic circuitry is receiving DC voltage. If not, contact your authorized maintenance provider.

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4.Confirm that the Output Power LEDs on both power supplies are illuminated. If not, do the following:

a.Check voltage at the AC power source.

b.Inspect the power cord.

c.Replace the power supply.

5.Observe the Heartbeat LED to determine the results of the Power On Self Test (POST). The POST tests the condition of firmware, memories, data-paths, and switch logic circuitry and passes a blink code to the Heartbeat LED. If the Heartbeat LED blinks steadily about once per second, the POST was successful, and you can continue with the installation process. Any other blink pattern appears indicates that an error has occurred. Refer to ”Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns” on page 5-1 for more information about the error blink pattern.

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4.2.4

Connect the Management Workstation to the Switch

Connect the management workstation to the switch in one of three ways:

Indirect Ethernet connection from the management workstation to the switch RJ-45 Ethernet connector through an Ethernet switch or a hub. This requires a 10/100 Base-T straight cable as shown in Figure 4-3. With this method, you can manage the switch with the SANbox Manager application or Command Line Interface.

Direct Ethernet connection from the management workstation to the switch RJ-45 Ethernet connector. This requires a 10/100 Base-T cross-over cable as shown in Figure 4-3. With this method, you can manage the switch with the SANbox Manager application or Command Line Interface.

Serial port connection from the management workstation to the switch RS-232 serial port connector. This requires a null modem F/F DB9 cable as shown in Figure 4-3. With this method, you can manage the switch with Command Line Interface.

Indirect Ethernet

Direct Ethernet

Serial RS-232

RJ-45 Connection

RJ-45 Connection

Connection

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Figure 4-3. Ethernet and Serial Cable Connections

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