Lenovo A50 User Manual.pdf

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ThinkCentre

 

User Guide

Types 8084, 8085, 8126, 8147

Types 8148, 8149, 8174, 8175

Types 8176, 8177, 8178, 8179

ThinkCentre

 

User Guide

Types 8084, 8085, 8126, 8147

Types 8148, 8149, 8174, 8175

Types 8176, 8177, 8178, 8179

Note

Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the “Important safety information” on page v and Appendix E, “Notices,” on page 95.

Third Edition (May 2004)

© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2004. All rights reserved.

US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

Contents

Important safety information . . . . .

. v

Handling static-sensitive devices . . . . . .

.

29

Conditions that require immediate action . . . .

. v

Installing external options . . . . . . . .

.

30

General safety guidelines . . . . . . . . .

. vi

Locating the connectors on the front of your

 

 

Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. vi

computer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

31

Power cords and power adapters . . . . .

. vi

Locating the connectors on the rear of your

 

 

Extension cords and related devices . . . .

 

. vii

computer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

32

Plugs and outlets . . . . . . . . . .

 

. vii

Obtaining device drivers . . . . . . . .

.

33

Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

. vii

Removing the cover . . . . . . . . . .

.

34

Heat and product ventilation . . . . . .

 

. viii

Locating components . . . . . . . . . .

.

35

CD and DVD drive safety . . . . . . .

 

. viii

Identifying parts on the system board . . . .

. 35

Additional safety information . . . . . . .

. ix

Installing memory . . . . . . . . . . .

.

36

Lithium battery notice . . . . . . . . . .

. x

Installing adapters . . . . . . . . . . .

.

38

Modem safety information. . . . . . . . .

. x

Installing internal drives . . . . . . . . .

.

39

Laser compliance statement . . . . . . . .

. xi

Drive specifications. . . . . . . . . .

.

40

 

 

 

 

Installing a drive . . . . . . . . . .

.

41

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . .

. xiii

Installing security features . . . . . . . .

.

43

Information resources. . . . . . . . . .

 

. xiii

Identifying security locks . . . . . . . .

.

44

 

Rope clip . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

44

Identifying your computer . . . . . . . .

 

. xiv

 

Integrated cable lock . . . . . . . . .

.

46

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178

 

. 1

Password protection . . . . . . . . .

.

46

 

Changing the battery . . . . . . . . . .

.

46

Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing

 

 

Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

 

 

CMOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

47

Available options . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

5

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables. . . 48

Tools required . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

5

 

 

 

Handling static-sensitive devices. . . . . . .

.

5

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147,

 

 

Installing external options . . . . . . . . .

.

6

 

 

8148, and 8179 . . . . . . . . . .

.

51

Locating the connectors on the front of your

 

 

 

 

 

 

Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

51

computer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

6

Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

54

Locating the connectors on the rear of your

 

 

 

 

 

 

Available options . . . . . . . . . . .

.

55

computer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

7

Tools required . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

55

Obtaining device drivers . . . . . . . .

.

8

Handling static-sensitive devices . . . . . .

.

55

Removing the cover . . . . . . . . . . .

.

9

Installing external options . . . . . . . .

.

56

Locating components . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

10

 

Locating the connectors on the front of your

 

 

Identifying parts on the system board . . . .

 

. 10

 

 

 

computer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

57

Installing memory . . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

11

 

Locating the connectors on the rear of your

 

 

Installing adapters . . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

12

 

 

 

computer . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

58

Installing internal drives . . . . . . . . .

 

.

14

 

Obtaining device drivers . . . . . . . .

.

59

Drive specifications. . . . . . . . . .

 

.

14

 

Removing the cover . . . . . . . . . .

.

60

Installing a drive . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

15

 

Locating components . . . . . . . . . .

.

61

Installing security features . . . . . . . .

 

.

18

 

Identifying parts on the system board . . . .

. 61

Identifying security locks . . . . . . . .

 

.

19

 

Installing memory . . . . . . . . . . .

.

62

Rope clip . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

19

 

Installing adapters . . . . . . . . . . .

.

63

Integrated cable lock . . . . . . . . .

 

.

21

 

Installing internal drives . . . . . . . . .

.

65

Password protection . . . . . . . . .

 

.

21

 

Drive specifications. . . . . . . . . .

.

65

Changing the battery . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

21

 

Installing a drive . . . . . . . . . .

.

66

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing security features . . . . . . . .

.

69

CMOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

Identifying security locks . . . . . . . .

.

70

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables. . . 23

Rope clip . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

70

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and

 

 

Integrated cable lock . . . . . . . . .

.

72

 

 

Password protection . . . . . . . . .

.

72

8176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. 25

Changing the battery . . . . . . . . . .

.

72

Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

25

 

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing

 

 

Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28

 

 

CMOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

73

Available options . . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

29

 

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables. . . 74

Tools required . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

.

29

 

 

 

 

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

 

 

 

 

 

iii

Chapter 4. Using the IBM Setup Utility

 

 

Appendix B. Cleaning the mouse

.

.

. 83

program . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

77

Cleaning an optical mouse . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 83

Starting the IBM Setup Utility program . . . .

 

. 77

Cleaning a mouse with a ball . . . . .

.

.

 

. 83

Viewing and changing settings . . . . . . .

 

. 77

Appendix C. Manual modem

 

 

 

 

Exiting from the IBM Setup Utility program . .

 

. 77

 

 

 

 

Using passwords . . . . . . . . . . .

 

. 77

commands . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

85

User password . . . . . . . . . . .

 

. 77

Basic AT commands . . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 85

Administrator password . . . . . . . .

 

. 78

 

 

Extended AT commands . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 87

Setting, changing, and deleting a password . . . 78

 

MNP/V.42/V.42bis/V.44 commands . . .

.

.

 

. 88

Using Security Profile by Device . . . . . .

 

. 78

 

 

Fax Class 1 commands . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 89

Selecting a startup device. . . . . . . . .

 

. 78

 

 

Fax Class 2 commands . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 89

Selecting a temporary startup device . . . .

 

. 79

 

 

Voice commands. . . . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 90

Changing the startup sequence . . . . . .

 

. 79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced settings . . . . . . . . . . .

 

. 79

Appendix D. Customer replaceable unit

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A. Updating system

 

 

(CRU) parts list . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

programs . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

81

Appendix E. Notices . . . . . .

.

.

.

95

System programs . . . . . . . . . . .

 

. 81

 

Television output notice . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 96

Updating (flashing) BIOS from a diskette . .

 

. 81

 

 

Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

 

. 96

Updating (flashing) BIOS from your operating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

system . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. 81

Index . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

97

Recovering from a POST/BIOS update failure . .

 

. 82

 

 

 

 

 

 

iv User Guide

Important safety information

This information can help you safely use your IBM® personal computer. Follow and retain all information included with your IBM computer. The information in this document does not alter the terms of your purchase agreement or the IBM Statement of Limited Warranty.

Customer safety is important to IBM. Our products are developed to be safe and effective. However, personal computers are electronic devices. Power cords, power adapters, and other features can create potential safety risks that can result in physical injury or property damage, especially if misused. To reduce these risks, follow the instructions included with your product, observe all warnings on the product and in the operating instructions, and review the information included in this document carefully. By carefully following the information contained in this document and provided with your product, you can help protect yourself from hazards and create a safer computer work environment.

Note: This information includes references to power adapters and batteries. In addition to mobile personal computers, IBM ships some products (such as speakers or monitors) with external power adapters. If you have such a product, this information applies to your product. In addition, your computer product may contain a coin-sized internal battery that provides power to your system clock even when the machine is unplugged, so the battery safety information applies to all computers.

Conditions that require immediate action

Products can become damaged due to misuse or neglect. Some product damage is serious enough that the product should not be used again until it has been inspected and, if necessary, repaired by an authorized servicer.

As with any electronic device, pay close attention to the product when it is turned on. On very rare occasions, you might notice an odor or see a puff of smoke or sparks vent from your machine. Or you might hear sounds like popping, cracking or hissing. These conditions might merely mean that an internal electronic component has failed in a safe and controlled manner. Or, they might indicate a potential safety issue. However, do not take risks or attempt to diagnose the situation yourself.

Frequently inspect your computer and its components for damage or wear or signs of danger. If you have any question about the condition of a component, do not use the product. Contact the IBM Support Center or the product manufacturer for instructions on how to inspect the product and have it repaired, if necessary.

In the unlikely event that you notice any of the conditions listed below, or if you have any safety concerns with your product, stop using the product and unplug it from the power source and telecommunication lines until you can speak to the IBM Support Center for further guidance.

vPower cords, plugs, power adapters, extension cords, surge protectors, or power supplies that are cracked, broken or damaged.

vSigns of overheating, smoke, sparks or fire.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

v

vDamage to a battery (such as cracks, dents, creases), discharge from a battery, or a buildup of foreign substances on the battery.

vA cracking, hissing or popping sound, or strong odor that comes from the product.

vSigns that liquid has been spilled or an object has fallen onto the computer product, the power cord or power adapter.

vThe computer product, the power cord or power adapter has been exposed to water.

vThe product has been dropped or damaged in any way.

vThe product does not operate normally when you follow the operating instructions.

Note: If you notice these conditions with a non-IBM product (such as an extension cord), stop using that product until you can contact the product manufacturer for further instructions, or until you get a suitable replacement.

General safety guidelines

Always observe the following precautions to reduce the risk of injury and property damage.

Service

Do not attempt to service a product yourself unless instructed to do so by the IBM Support Center. Use only an IBM authorized service provider who is approved to repair your particular product.

Note: Some parts can be upgraded or replaced by the customer. These parts are referred to as Customer Replaceable Units, or CRUs. IBM expressly identifies CRUs as such, and provides documentation with instructions when it is appropriate for customers to replace those parts. You must closely follow all instructions when performing such replacements. Always make sure that the power is turned off and that the product is unplugged from any power source before you attempt the replacement. If you have any questions or concerns, contact the IBM Support Center.

Power cords and power adapters

Use only the power cords and power adapters supplied by the product manufacturer.

Never wrap a power cord around the power adapter or other object. Doing so can stress the cord in ways that can cause the cord to fray, crack or crimp. This can present a safety hazard.

Always route power cords so that they will not be walked on, tripped over, or pinched by objects.

Protect the cord and power adapters from liquids. For instance, do not leave your cord or power adapter near sinks, tubs, toilets, or on floors that are cleaned with liquid cleansers. Liquids can cause a short circuit, particularly if the cord or power adapter has been stressed by misuse. Liquids can also cause gradual corrosion of the power cord terminals and/or the connector terminals on the adapter which can eventually result in overheating.

vi User Guide

Always connect power cords and signal cables in the correct order and ensure that all power cord connectors are securely and completely plugged into receptacles.

Do not use any power adapter that shows corrosion at the ac input pins and/or shows signs of overheating (such as deformed plastic) at the ac input or anywhere on the power adapter.

Do not use any power cords where the electrical contacts on either end show signs of corrosion or overheating or where the power cord appears to have been damaged in any way.

Extension cords and related devices

Ensure that extension cords, surge protectors, uninterruptible power supplies, and power strips that you use are rated to handle the electrical requirements of the product. Never overload these devices. If power strips are used, the load should not exceed the power strip input rating. Consult an electrician for more information if you have questions about power loads, power requirements, and input ratings.

Plugs and outlets

If a receptacle (power outlet) that you intend to use with your computer equipment appears to be damaged or corroded, do not use the outlet until it is replaced by a qualified electrician.

Do not bend or modify the plug. If the plug is damaged, contact the manufacturer to obtain a replacement.

Some products are equipped with a three-pronged plug. This plug fits only into a grounded electrical outlet. This is a safety feature. Do not defeat this safety feature by trying to insert it into a non-grounded outlet. If you cannot insert the plug into the outlet, contact an electrician for an approved outlet adapter or to replace the outlet with one that enables this safety feature. Never overload an electrical outlet. The overall system load should not exceed 80 percent of the branch circuit rating. Consult an electrician for more information if you have questions about power loads and branch circuit ratings.

Be sure that the power outlet you are using is properly wired, easily accessible, and located close to the equipment. Do not fully extend power cords in a way that will stress the cords.

Connect and disconnect the equipment from the electrical outlet carefully

Batteries

All IBM personal computers contain a non-rechargeable coin cell battery to provide power to the system clock. In addition many mobile products such as Thinkpad notebook PCs utilize a rechargeable battery pack to provide system power when in portable mode. Batteries supplied by IBM for use with your product have been tested for compatibility and should only be replaced with IBM approved parts.

Never attempt to open or service any battery. Do not crush, puncture, or incinerate batteries or short circuit the metal contacts. Do not expose the battery to water or other liquids. Only recharge the battery pack strictly according to instructions included in the product documentation.

Important safety information vii

Battery abuse or mishandling can cause the battery to overheat, which can cause gasses or flame to “vent” from the battery pack or coin cell. If your battery is damaged, or if you notice any discharge from your battery or the buildup of foreign materials on the battery leads, stop using the battery and obtain a replacement from the battery manufacturer.

Batteries can degrade when they are left unused for long periods of time. For some rechargeable batteries (particularly Lithium Ion batteries), leaving a battery unused in a discharged state could increase the risk of a battery short circuit, which could shorten the life of the battery and can also pose a safety hazard. Do not let rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries completely discharge or store these batteries in a discharged state.

Heat and product ventilation

Computers generate heat when turned on and when batteries are charging. Notebook PCs can generate a significant amount of heat due to their compact size. Always follow these basic precautions:

vDo not leave the base of your computer in contact with your lap or any part of your body for an extended period when the computer is functioning or when the battery is charging. Your computer produces some heat during normal operation. Extended contact with the body could cause discomfort or, potentially, a skin burn.

vDo not operate your computer or charge the battery near flammable materials or in explosive environments.

vVentilation slots, fans and/or heat sinks are provided with the product for safety, comfort, and reliable operation. These features might inadvertently become blocked by placing the product on a bed, sofa, carpet, or other flexible surface. Never block, cover or disable these features.

CD and DVD drive safety

CD and DVD drives spin discs at a high speed. If a CD or DVD is cracked or otherwise physically damaged, it is possible for the disc to break apart or even shatter when the CD drive is in use. To protect against possible injury due to this situation, and to reduce the risk of damage to your machine, do the following:

vAlways store CD/DVD discs in their original packaging

vAlways store CD/DVD discs out of direct sunlight and away from direct heat sources

vRemove CD/DVD discs from the computer when not in use

vDo not bend or flex CD/DVD discs, or force them into the computer or their packaging

vCheck CD/DVD discs for cracks before each use. Do not use cracked or damaged discs

viii User Guide

Additional safety information

DANGER

Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication cables is hazardous.

To avoid a shock hazard:

vDo not connect or disconnect any cables or perform installation, maintenance, or reconfiguration of this product during an electrical storm.

vConnect all power cords to a properly wired and grounded electrical outlet.

vConnect to properly wired outlets any equipment that will be attached to this product.

vWhen possible, use one hand only to connect or disconnect signal cables.

vNever turn on any equipment when there is evidence of fire, water, or structural damage.

vDisconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications systems, networks, and modems before you open the device covers, unless instructed otherwise in the installation and configuration procedures.

vConnect and disconnect cables as described in the following table when installing, moving, or opening covers on this product or attached devices.

To connect:

To disconnect:

1.

Turn everything OFF.

1.

Turn everything OFF.

2.

First, attach all cables to devices.

2.

First, remove power cords from outlet.

3.

Attach signal cables to connectors.

3.

Remove signal cables from connectors.

4.

Attach power cords to outlet.

4.

Remove all cables from devices.

5.

Turn device ON.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DANGER

Le courant électrique provenant de l’alimentation, du téléphone et des câbles de transmission peut présenter un danger.

Pour éviter tout risque de choc électrique :

vNe manipulez aucun câble et n’effectuez aucune opération d’installation, d’entretien ou de reconfiguration de ce produit au cours d’un orage.

vBranchez tous les cordons d’alimentation sur un socle de prise de courant correctement câblé et mis à la terre.

vBranchez sur des socles de prise de courant correctement câblés tout équipement connecté à ce produit.

vLorsque cela est possible, n’utilisez qu’une seule main pour connecter ou déconnecter les câbles d’interface.;

vNe mettez jamais un équipement sous tension en cas d’incendie ou d’inondation, ou en présence de dommages matériels.

vAvant de retirer les carters de l’unité, mettez celle-ci hors tension et déconnectez ses cordons d’alimentation, ainsi que les câbles qui la relient aux réseaux, aux systèmes de té lécommunication et aux modems (sauf instruction contraire mentionnée dans les procédures d’installation et de configuration).

Important safety information

ix

vLorsque vous installez, que vous déplacez, ou que vous manipulez le présent produit ou des périphériques qui lui sont raccordés, reportez-vous aux instructions ci-dessous pour connecter et déconnecter les différents cordons.

Connexion:

Déconnexion:

1.

Mettez les unités hors tension.

1.

Mettez les unités hors tension.

2.

Commencez par brancher tous les

2.

Débranchez les cordons d’alimentation

 

cordons sur les unités.

 

des prises.

3.

Branchez les câbles d’interface sur des

3.

Débranchez les câbles d’interface des

 

connecteurs.

 

connecteurs.

4.

Branchez les cordons d’alimentation sur

4.

Débranchez tous les câbles des unités.

 

des prises.

 

 

5.

Mettez les unités sous tension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lithium battery notice

CAUTION:

Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced.

When replacing the battery, use only IBM Part Number 33F8354 or an equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. The battery contains lithium and can explode if not properly used, handled, or disposed of.

Do not:

vThrow or immerse into water

vHeat to more than 100°C (212°F)

vRepair or disassemble

Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.

ATTENTION

Danger d’explosion en cas de remplacement incorrect de la batterie.

Remplacer uniquement par une batterie IBM de type ou d’un type équivalent recommandé par le fabricant. La batterie contient du lithium et peut exploser en cas de mauvaise utilisation, de mauvaise manipulation ou de mise au rebut inappropriée.

Ne pas :

vLancer ou plonger dans l’eau

vChauffer à plus de 100°C (212°F)

vRéparer ou désassembler

Mettre au rebut les batteries usagées conformément aux règlements locaux.

Modem safety information

To reduce the risk of fire, electrical shock, or injury when using telephone equipment, always follow basic safety precautions, such as:

vNever install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

vNever install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.

x User Guide

vNever touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.

vUse caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

vAvoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type) during an electrical storm. There may be a remote risk of electric shock from lightning.

vDo not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the vicinity of the leak.

Consignes de sécurité relatives au modem

Lors de l’utilisation de votre matériel téléphonique, il est important de respecter les consignes ci-après afin de réduire les risques d’incendie, d’électrocution et d’autres blessures :

vN’installez jamais de cordons téléphoniques durant un orage.

vLes prises téléphoniques ne doivent pas être installées dans des endroits humides, excepté si le modèle a été conçu à cet effet.

vNe touchez jamais un cordon téléphonique ou un terminal non isolé avant que la ligne ait été déconnectée du réseau téléphonique.

vSoyez toujours prudent lorsque vous procédez à l’installation ou à la modification de lignes téléphoniques.

vSi vous devez téléphoner pendant un orage, pour éviter tout risque de choc électrique, utilisez toujours un téléphone sans fil.

vEn cas de fuite de gaz, n’utilisez jamais un téléphone situé à proximité de la fuite.

Laser compliance statement

Some IBM Personal Computer models are equipped from the factory with a CD-ROM drive or a DVD-ROM drive. CD-ROM drives and DVD-ROM drives are also sold separately as options. CD-ROM drives and DVD-ROM drives are laser products. These drives are certified in the U.S. to conform to the requirements of the Department of Health and Human Services 21 Code of Federal Regulations (DHHS 21 CFR) Subchapter J for Class 1 laser products. Elsewhere, these drives are certified to conform to the requirements of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825 and CENELEC EN 60 825 for Class 1 laser products.

When a CD-ROM drive or a DVD-ROM drive is installed, note the following handling instructions.

CAUTION:

Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those specified herein might result in hazardous radiation exposure.

Removing the covers of the CD-ROM drive or DVD-ROM drive could result in exposure to hazardous laser radiation. There are no serviceable parts inside the CD-ROM drive or DVD-ROM drive. Do not remove the drive covers.

Some CD-ROM drives and DVD-ROM drives contain an embedded Class 3A or Class 3B laser diode. Note the following statement.

DANGER

Laser radiation when open. Do not stare into the beam, do not view directly with optical instruments, and avoid direct exposure to the beam.

Important safety information

xi

DANGER:

Certains modèles d’ordinateurs personnels sont équipés d’origine d’une unité de CD-ROM ou de DVD-ROM. Mais ces unités sont également vendues séparément en tant qu’options. L’unité de CD-ROM/DVD-ROM est un appareil à laser. Aux État-Unis, l’unité de CD-ROM/DVD-ROM est certifiée conforme aux normes indiquées dans le sous-chapitre J du DHHS 21 CFR relatif aux produits à laser de classe 1. Dans les autres pays, elle est certifiée être un produit à laser de classe 1 conforme aux normes CEI 825 et CENELEC EN 60 825.

Lorsqu’une unité de CD-ROM/DVD-ROM est installée, tenez compte des remarques suivantes:

ATTENTION: Pour éviter tout risque d’exposition au rayon laser, respectez les consignes de réglage et d’utilisation des commandes, ainsi que les procédures décrites.

L’ouverture de l’unité de CD-ROM/DVD-ROM peut entraîner un risque d’exposition au rayon laser. Pour toute intervention, faites appel à du personnel qualifié.

Certaines unités de CD-ROM/DVD-ROM peuvent contenir une diode à laser de classe 3A ou 3B. Tenez compte de la consigne qui suit:

DANGER

Rayonnement laser lorsque le carter est ouvert. Évitez toute exposition directe des yeux au rayon laser. Évitez de regarder fixement le faisceau ou de l’observer à l’aide d’instruments optiques.

xii User Guide

Overview

Thank you for selecting an IBM® computer. Your computer incorporates many of the latest advances in computer technology and can be upgraded as your needs change.

This publication supports several computer models. Information in this section will help you identify your computer and help you find the chapter that contains information specific to your computer.

Adding hardware options to your computer is an easy way to increase its capabilities. Instructions for installing external and internal options are included in this publication. When adding an option, use these instructions along with the instructions that come along with the option.

Information resources

The Quick Reference that comes with your computer provides information for installing your computer and starting the operating system. It also includes basic troubleshooting information, software recovery procedures, help and service information, and warranty information.

Access IBM, on your desktop, provides a link to more information about your computer.

If you have Internet access, the most up-to-date manuals for your computer are available from the World Wide Web. To access this information, point your browser to

http://www.ibm.com/pc/support

Type your machine type and model number in the Quick Path field, and click Go.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

xiii

Identifying your computer

See Chapter 1, “Types 8149, 8177, and 8178,” on page 1.

See Chapter 2, “Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176,” on page 25.

See Chapter 3, “Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179,” on page 51.

xiv User Guide

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178

This chapter provides an introduction to the features and options that are available for your computer. You can expand the capabilities of your computer by adding memory, adapters, or drives. When installing an option, use these instructions along with the instructions that come with the option.

Important

Before you install or remove any option, read “Important safety information” on page v. These precautions and guidelines will help you work safely.

Features

This section provides an overview of the computer features and preinstalled software.

System information

The following information covers a variety of models. For information for your specific model, use the IBM Setup Utility. See Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Microprocessor (varies by model type)

vIntel® Pentium® 4 processor with HyperThreading Technology

vIntel Pentium 4 processor

vIntel Celeron® processor

vInternal cache (size varies by model type)

Memory

vSupport for four dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

v512 KB flash memory for system programs

Internal drives

v3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskette drive

vInternal hard disk drive

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

1

v EIDE CD drive or DVD drive (some models)

Video subsystem

vAn integrated graphics controller for a Video Graphics Array (VGA) monitor

vAccelerated graphics port (AGP) video adapter slot on the system board (some models)

Audio subsystem

vAC’97 with ADI 1981B Audio Codec

vLine in, line out, and microphone connectors on the rear panel

Connectivity

v10/100 Mbps integrated Intel Ethernet controller that supports the Wake on LAN® feature

vSoft modem V.90/V.44 (some models)

System management features

vRemote Program Load (RPL) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

vWake on LAN

vWake on Ring (in the IBM Setup Utility program, this feature is called Serial Port Ring Detect for an external modem and Modem Ring Detect for an internal modem)

vRemote Administration

vAutomatic power-on startup

vSystem Management (SM) BIOS and SM software

vAbility to store POST hardware test results

Input/output features

v25-pin, Extended Capabilities Port (ECP)/Extended Parallel Port (EPP)

v9-pin serial connector

vSix 4-pin, USB connectors (two on front panel and four on rear panel)

vPS/2® mouse connector

vPS/2 keyboard connector

vEthernet connector

vVGA monitor connector

vThree audio connectors (line in, line out, and microphone)

Expansion

vFour drive bays

vThree 32-bit peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapter slots

Note: See “Installing adapters” on page 12 for supported card lengths.

vOne accelerated graphics port (AGP) expansion slot (some models)

Power

v230 W power supply with manual voltage selection switch

vAutomatic 50/60 Hz input frequency switching

vAdvanced Power Management support

vAdvanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) support

2 User Guide

Security features

vUser and administrator passwords

vSupport for the addition of a rope clip and lockable cable

vSupport for the addition of an integrated cable lock

vStartup sequence control

vStartup without diskette drive, keyboard, or mouse

vUnattended start mode

vDiskette and hard disk I/O control

vSerial and parallel port I/O control

vSecurity profile by device

IBM preinstalled software

Your computer might come with preinstalled software. If it does, an operating system, device drivers to support built-in features, and other support programs are included.

Operating systems (preinstalled) (varies by model type)

Note: Not all countries or regions will have these operating systems.

vMicrosoft® Windows® XP Home

vMicrosoft Windows XP Professional

Operating systems (certified or tested for compatibility)1

vMicrosoft Windows 2000

vLinux2

1.The operating systems listed here are being certified or tested for compatibility at the time this publication goes to press. Additional operating systems might be identified by IBM as compatible with your computer following the publication of this booklet. Corrections and additions to this list are subject to change. To determine if an operating system has been certified or tested for compatibility, check the Web site of the operating system vendor.

2.Linux certification http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/migr-48nt8d.html

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 3

Specifications

This section lists the physical specifications for your computer.

Dimensions

Height: 140 mm (5.5 in.)

Width: 425 mm (16.7 in.)

Depth: 425 mm (16.7 in)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 10.0 kg (22 lb)

Maximum configuration: 11.4 kg (25.0 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 100 V ac

Maximum: 127 V ac

Input frequency range: 50-60 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 200 V ac

Maximum: 240 V ac

Input frequency range: 50-60 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.3 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 785 Btu/hr (230 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.51 cubic meters per minute (18 cubic feet per minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 30 dBA

Operating: 32 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 26 dBA

Operating: 30 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.0 bels

Operating: 4.3 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296. Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

4 User Guide

Available options

The following are some available options:

vExternal options

Parallel port devices, such as printers and external drives

Serial port devices, such as external modems and digital cameras

Audio devices, such as external speakers for the sound system

USB devices, such as printers, joysticks, and scanners

Security device, such as a rope clip

Monitors

vInternal options

System memory, called dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

Peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapters

Accelerated graphics port (AGP) adapters (some models)

Internal drives, such as:

-CD drive or DVD drive (some models)

-Hard disk drive

-Diskette drives and other removable media drives

For the latest information about available options, see the following World Wide Web pages:

vhttp://www.ibm.com/pc/us/options/

vhttp://www.ibm.com/pc/support/

You can also obtain information by calling the following telephone numbers:

vWithin the United States, call 1-800-IBM-2YOU (1-800-426-2968), your IBM reseller, or IBM marketing representative.

vWithin Canada, call 1-800-565-3344 or 1-800-IBM-4YOU.

vOutside the United States and Canada, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.

Tools required

To install some options in your computer, you might need a flat-blade or Phillips screwdriver. Additional tools might be needed for certain options. See the instructions that come with the option.

Handling static-sensitive devices

Static electricity, although harmless to you, can seriously damage computer components and options.

When you add an option, do not open the static-protective package containing the option until you are instructed to do so.

When you handle options and other computer components, take these precautions to avoid static electricity damage:

vLimit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around you.

vAlways handle components carefully. Handle adapters and memory modules by the edges. Never touch any exposed circuitry.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 5

vPrevent others from touching components.

vWhen you install a new option, touch the static-protective package containing the option to a metal expansion-slot cover or other unpainted metal surface on the computer for at least two seconds. This reduces static electricity in the package and your body.

vWhen possible, remove the option and install it directly in the computer without setting the option down. When this is not possible, place the static-protective package that the option came in on a smooth, level surface and place the option on it.

vDo not place the option on the computer cover or other metal surface.

Installing external options

This section shows the various external connectors on your computer to which you can attach external options, such as external speakers, a printer, or a scanner. For some external options, you must install additional software in addition to making the physical connection. When adding an external option, use the information in this section to identify the required connector, and then use the instructions that come with the option to help you make the connection and install any software or device drivers that are required for the option.

Locating the connectors on the front of your computer

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the front of the computer.

1USB connector 2USB connector

6 User Guide

Locating the connectors on the rear of your computer

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the rear of the computer.

1Power connector 2Mouse connector 3Parallel connector 4Ethernet connector 5Audio line in connector 6PCI slots

7AGP slot (some models)

8 Audio line out connector 9 Microphone connector 10USB connectors 11VGA monitor connector 12Serial connector 13USB connectors 14Keyboard connector

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on your computer.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 7

Connector

Description

Mouse connector

Used to attach a mouse, trackball, or other pointing device that

 

uses a standard mouse connector.

Parallel connector

Used to attach a parallel printer, parallel scanner, or other

 

devices that use a 25-pin parallel connector.

Ethernet connector

Used to attach an Ethernet cable for a local area network

 

(LAN).

 

Note: To operate the computer within FCC Class B limits, use

 

a Category 5 Ethernet cable.

Audio line in connector

Used to receive audio signals from an external audio device,

 

such as a stereo system. When you attach an external audio

 

device, a cable is connected between the audio line out

 

connector of the device and the audio line in connector of the

 

computer.

Audio line out connector

Used to send audio signals from the computer to external

 

devices, such as powered stereo speakers (speakers with

 

built-in amplifiers), headphones, multimedia keyboards, or the

 

audio line in connector on a stereo system or other external

 

recording device.

Microphone connector

Used to attach a microphone to your computer when you want

 

to record voice or other sounds on the hard disk if you use

 

speech-recognition software.

USB connectors

Used to attach a device that requires a Universal Serial Bus

 

(USB) connection, such as a USB scanner or USB printer. If you

 

have more than six USB devices, you can purchase a USB hub,

 

which you can use to connect additional USB devices.

Serial connector

Used to attach an external modem, serial printer, or other

 

devices that use a 9-pin serial connector.

Keyboard connector

Used to attach a keyboard that uses a standard keyboard

 

connector.

Obtaining device drivers

You can obtain device drivers for operating systems that are not preinstalled at http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ on the World Wide Web. Installation instructions are provided in README files with the device-driver files.

8 User Guide

Removing the cover

Important:

Read “Important safety information” on page v and “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page 5 before removing the cover.

To remove the cover:

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Press the buttons on the sides of the computer and pivot the rear end of the cover up toward the front of the computer.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 9

Locating components

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in your computer.

1CD drive or DVD drive 2USB connector

3USB connector 4Optional drive bay 5Hard disk drive 6Diskette drive

7 DIMMs

8 Microprocessor and heat sink 9 AGP slot (some models) 10Battery

11PCI slots

Identifying parts on the system board

The system board (sometimes called the planar or motherboard) is the main circuit board in your computer. It provides basic computer functions and supports a variety of devices that are IBM-installed or that you can install later.

10 User Guide

The following illustration shows the locations of parts on the system board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Microprocessor

 

11 SATA0 connector

2 DIMM connector 1

 

12 Front panel connector

3 DIMM connector 2

 

13 Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper

4 DIMM connector 3

 

14 Battery

5 DIMM connector 4

 

15 Front panel audio connector

6 Power connector

 

16 PCI slot 3

7 Diskette drive connector

 

17 PCI slot 2

8 Primary IDE connector

 

18 PCI slot 1

9 Secondary IDE connector

 

19 AGP slot (some models)

10SATA1 connector

 

20 12v power connector

Installing memory

Your computer has four connectors for installing dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) that provide up to a maximum of 4.0 GB of system memory.

When installing DIMMs, the following rules apply:

vSystem memory is divided into two channels (channel A and B). DIMM connectors 1 and 2 are channel A, and DIMM connectors 3 and 4 are channel B.

vIf DIMM connectors 1 and 3 (or 2 and 4) are filled with the same technology and size of memory, the system operates in dual channel mode.

vUse 2.5 V, 184-pin, double data rate synchronous dynamic random access memory (DDR SDRAM).

vUse 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB or 1.0 GB DIMMs in any combination.

vDIMMs are 38.1 mm (1.5 inches) in height.

Note: Only DDR SDRAM DIMMs can be used.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 11

To install a DIMM:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 9.

2.You might have to remove an adapter to gain access to the DIMM slots. See “Installing adapters” on page 12.

3.To locate the DIMM connectors. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 10.

4.Open the retaining clips.

5.Make sure the notches in the DIMM align with the tabs on the connector. Push or insert the DIMM straight down into the connector until the retaining clips close.

What to do next:

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 23.

Installing adapters

This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing adapters. Your computer has three expansion slots for PCI adapters. One slot, used for an AGP adapter, is available on some models. You can install an adapter up to 340 mm (13.4 inches) long in the AGP slot, PCI slot 2, or PCI slot 3. You can install an adapter up to 200 mm (7.9 inches) long in PCI slot 1.

To install an adapter:

1. Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 9.

12 User Guide

2.Remove the adapter-slot-cover latch and the slot cover for the appropriate expansion slot.

3.Remove the adapter from its static-protective package.

4.Install the adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

5.Install the adapter-slot-cover latch.

What to do next:

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 23.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 13

Installing internal drives

This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing internal drives.

Internal drives are devices that your computer uses to read and store data. You can add drives to your computer to increase storage capacity and to enable your computer to read other types of media. Some of the different drives that are available for your computer are:

vParallel Advanced Technology Attachment (PATA) hard disk drives

vSerial ATA hard disk drives

vCD drives or DVD drives

vTape drives

vRemovable media drives

Note: These different drives are also referred to as integrated drive electronics (IDE) drives.

Internal drives are installed in bays. In this book, the bays are referred to as bay 1, bay 2, and so on.

When you install an internal drive, it is important to note what type and size of drive that you can install in each bay. Also, it is important to correctly connect the internal drive cables to the installed drive.

Drive specifications

Your computer comes with the following IBM-installed drives:

vA CD drive or DVD drive in bay 1 (some models)

vA 3.5-inch hard disk drive in bay 3

vA 3.5-inch diskette drive in bay 4

Any bay that does not have a drive installed has a static shield and bay panel installed.

14 User Guide

The following illustration shows the locations of the drive bays.

The following list describes some of the drives that you can install in each bay and their height requirements:

1 Bay 1 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

CD drive or DVD drive (preinstalled in

 

some models)

 

5.25-inch hard disk drive

2 Bay 2 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

5.25-inch hard disk drive

 

3.5-inch hard disk drive (requires a

 

mounting bracket)

 

CD drive

 

DVD drive

3 Bay 3 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

3.5-inch hard disk drive (preinstalled)

4 Bay 4 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

3.5-inch diskette drive (preinstalled)

Notes:

1.Drives that are greater than 43.0 mm (1.7 in.) high cannot be installed.

2.Install removable media (tape or CD) drives in the accessible bay (bay 1 or 2).

Installing a drive

To install an internal drive, follow these steps:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 9.

2.If your computer has a CD drive or DVD drive, you might need to remove the signal and power cables from the drive.

3.If the drive you are installing is a removable-media drive, remove the bay panel from the front bezel.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 15

4.Remove the metal shield from the drive bay by inserting a flat-blade screwdriver into one of the slots and gently prying it loose.

5.Pivot the drive-bay latch handle toward the front of the computer and then pivot the drive-bay cage upward, as shown, until it is latched in the upright position.

6.Make sure the drive that you are installing is set correctly as either a master or a slave device.

Note: A serial ATA hard disk drive does not need to be set as either a master or a slave device.

vIf it is the first CD drive or DVD drive, set it as a master device.

vIf it is an additional CD drive or DVD drive, set it as a slave device.

vIf it is an additional parallel ATA hard disk drive, set it as a slave device.

Refer to the documentation that comes with your drive for master/slave jumper information.

16 User Guide

7. Install the drive into the bay. Align the screw holes and insert the two screws.

8.Pivot the drive-bay cage back into place.

9.A hard disk drive requires two cables; a power cable that connects to the power supply and a signal cable that connects to the system board.

v A parallel ATA hard disk drive requires a four-wire power cable.

v A serial ATA hard disk drive requires a five-wire power cable.

The steps to connect a drive are different depending on the type of drive you are connecting. Use one of the following procedure for your drive connection.

Connecting the first CD drive or DVD drive

1.Locate the three-connector signal cable that comes with your computer or with the new drive.

2.Locate the secondary IDE connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 10.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 17

3.Connect one end of the signal cable to the drive and the other to the secondary IDE connector on the system board. To reduce electronic noise, use the connectors at the end of the cable only.

4.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

Connecting an additional CD drive, DVD drive, or parallel ATA hard disk drive

1.Locate the secondary IDE connector on the system board and the three-connector signal cable. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 10.

2.Connect the extra connector in the signal cable to the new drive.

3.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

Connecting a serial ATA hard disk drive

A serial hard disk drive can be connected to any available SATA connector.

1.Locate the signal cable that comes with the new drive.

2.Locate an available SATA connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 10.

3.Connect one end of the signal cable to the drive and the other to an available SATA connector on the system board.

4.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 23.

Installing security features

To help prevent hardware theft and unauthorized access to your computer, several security lock options are available. The following sections will help you identify and install the various types of locks that might be available for your computer. In addition to physical locks, unauthorized use of your computer can be prevented by a software lock that locks the keyboard until a correct password is typed in.

Make sure that any security cables you install do not interfere with other computer cables.

18 User Guide

Identifying security locks

The following illustration shows the locations of the security features on the rear of the computer.

1 Rope clip

2 Integrated cable lock

Rope clip

Using a 3/16-inch or 5-mm rope clip (sometimes referred to as a U-bolt), a steel security cable, and a padlock can secure your computer to a desk, table, or other non-permanent fixture. For computers designed to accommodate the rope clip, knockouts at the rear of the chassis are provided.

To install a rope clip:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 9.

2.Use a tool, such as a screwdriver, to remove the two metal knockouts.

3.Insert the rope clip through the rear panel; then attach and tighten the nuts with an appropriately sized or adjustable wrench.

4.Replace the computer cover. For more information, see “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 23.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 19

5.Thread the cable through the rope clip and around an object that is not a part of or permanently secured to the building structure or foundation, and from which it cannot be removed; then fasten the cable ends together with a lock.

®

20 User Guide

Integrated cable lock

With an integrated cable lock (sometimes referred to as a Kensington lock), you can secure your computer to a desk, table, or other non-permanent fixture. The cable lock attaches to a security slot at the rear of your computer and is operated with a key. This is the same type of lock used with many laptop computers. You can order a cable lock directly from IBM. Go to http://www.pc.ibm.com/support and search on Kensington.

Password protection

To deter unauthorized use of your computer, you can use the IBM Setup Utility program to set a password. When you turn on your computer you are prompted to type the password to unlock the keyboard for normal use.

What to do next:

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 23.

Changing the battery

Your computer has a special type of memory that maintains the date, time, and settings for built-in features, such as parallel-port assignments (configuration). A battery keeps this information active when you turn off the computer.

The battery normally requires no charging or maintenance throughout its life; however, no battery lasts forever. If the battery fails, the date, time, and configuration information (including passwords) are lost. An error message is displayed when you turn on the computer.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 21

Refer to “Lithium battery notice” on page x for information about replacing and disposing of the battery.

To change the battery:

1.Turn off the computer and all attached devices.

2.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 9.

3.Locate the battery. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 10.

4.If necessary, remove any adapters that impede access to the battery. See “Installing adapters” on page 12 for more information.

5.Remove the old battery.

6. Install the new battery.

7.Replace any adapters that were removed to gain access to the battery. See “Installing adapters” on page 12 for instructions for replacing adapters.

8.Replace the cover, and plug in the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 23.

Note: When the computer is turned on for the first time after battery replacement, an error message might be displayed. This is normal after replacing the battery.

9.Turn on the computer and all attached devices.

10.Use the IBM Setup Utility program to set the date and time and any passwords. See Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing CMOS)

This section applies to lost or forgotten passwords. For more information about lost or forgotten passwords, see Access IBM on your desktop.

To erase a forgotten password:

1.Turn off the computer and all attached devices.

2.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 9.

3.Locate the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 10.

4.If necessary, see “Installing adapters” on page 12 to remove any adapters that impede access to the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper.

5.Move the jumper from the standard position (pins 1 and 2) to the maintenance or configure position (pins 2 and 3).

22 User Guide

6.Replace the cover and connect the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables.”

7.Restart the computer, leave it on for approximately 10 seconds. Turn off the computer by holding the power switch for approximately 5 seconds. The computer will turn off.

8.Repeat steps 2 through 4 on page 22.

9.Move the jumper back to the standard (pins 1 and 2).

10.Replace the cover and connect the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables.”

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables

After working with options, you need to install any removed parts, replace the cover, and reconnect any cables, including telephone lines and power cords. Also, depending on the option that is installed, you might need to confirm the updated information in the IBM Setup Utility program.

To replace the cover and connect cables to your computer:

1.Ensure that all components have been reassembled correctly and that no tools or loose screws are left inside your computer.

2.Clear any cables that might impede the replacement of the cover.

3.Position the cover over the chassis and pivot it down over the computer until it snaps into place.

4.Reconnect the external cables and power cords to the computer. See “Installing external options” on page 6.

5.To update the configuration, see Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Chapter 1. Types 8149, 8177, and 8178 23

24 User Guide

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176

This chapter provides an introduction to the features and options that are available for your computer. You can expand the capabilities of your computer by adding memory, adapters, or drives. When installing an option, use these instructions along with the instructions that come with the option.

Important

Before you install or remove any option, read “Important safety information” on page v. These precautions and guidelines will help you work safely.

Features

This section provides an overview of the computer features and preinstalled software.

System information

The following information covers a variety of models. For information for your specific model, use the IBM Setup Utility. See Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Microprocessor (varies by model type)

vIntel® Pentium® 4 processor with HyperThreading Technology

vIntel Pentium 4 processor

vIntel Celeron® processor

vInternal cache (size varies by model type)

Memory

vSupport for four dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

v512 KB flash memory for system programs

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

25

Internal drives

v3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskette drive

vInternal hard disk drive

vEIDE CD drive or DVD drive (some models)

Video subsystem

vAn integrated graphics controller for a Video Graphics Array (VGA) monitor

vAccelerated graphics port (AGP) video adapter slot on the system board (some models)

Audio subsystem

vAC’97 with ADI 1981B Audio Codec

vLine in, line out, and microphone connectors on the rear panel

Connectivity

v10/100 Mbps integrated Intel Ethernet controller that supports the Wake on LAN® feature

vSoft modem V.90/V.44 (some models)

System management features

vRemote Program Load (RPL) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

vWake on LAN

vWake on Ring (in the IBM Setup Utility program, this feature is called Serial Port Ring Detect for an external modem and Modem Ring Detect for an internal modem)

vRemote Administration

vAutomatic power-on startup

vSystem Management (SM) BIOS and SM software

vAbility to store POST hardware test results

Input/output features

v25-pin, Extended Capabilities Port (ECP)/Extended Parallel Port (EPP)

v9-pin serial connector

vSix 4-pin, USB connectors (two on front panel and four on rear panel)

vPS/2® mouse connector

vPS/2 keyboard connector

vEthernet connector

vVGA monitor connector

vThree audio connectors (line in, line out, and microphone)

Expansion

vFour drive bays

vThree 32-bit peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapter slots

Note: See “Installing adapters” on page 38 for supported card lengths.

vOne accelerated graphics port (AGP) expansion slot (some models)

Power

v 230 W power supply with manual voltage selection switch

26 User Guide

vAutomatic 50/60 Hz input frequency switching

vAdvanced Power Management support

vAdvanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) support

Security features

vUser and administrator passwords

vSupport for the addition of a rope clip and lockable cable

vSupport for the addition of an integrated cable lock (see Access IBM)

vSupport for a padlock on the chassis

vStartup sequence control

vStartup without diskette drive, keyboard, or mouse

vUnattended start mode

vDiskette and hard disk I/O control

vSerial and parallel port I/O control

vSecurity profile by device

IBM preinstalled software

Your computer might come with preinstalled software. If it does, an operating system, device drivers to support built-in features, and other support programs are included.

Operating systems preinstalled (varies by model type)

Note: Not all countries or regions will have these operating systems.

vMicrosoft® Windows® XP Home

vMicrosoft Windows XP Professional

Operating systems (certified or tested for compatibility)3

vMicrosoft Windows 2000

vLinux4

3.The operating systems listed here are being certified or tested for compatibility at the time this publication goes to press. Additional operating systems might be identified by IBM as compatible with your computer following the publication of this booklet. Corrections and additions to this list are subject to change. To determine if an operating system has been certified or tested for compatibility, check the Web site of the operating system vendor.

4.Linux certification http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/migr-48nt8d.html

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 27

Specifications

This section lists the physical specifications for your computer.

Dimensions

Height: 398 mm (15.67 in.)

Width: 180 mm (7.08 in.)

Depth: 402 mm (15.82 in.)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 7.6 kg (16.8 lb)

Maximum configuration: 9.97 kg (22 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 100 V ac

Maximum: 127 V ac

Input frequency range: 50–60 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 200 V ac

Maximum: 240 V ac

Input frequency range: 50–60 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.30 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 785 Btu/hr (230 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.68 cubic meters every minute (24 cubic feet every minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

For microprocessors less than 2.8 GHz:

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 28 dBA

Operating: 35 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 25 dBA

Operating: 33 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.0 bels

Operating: 4.7 bels

For microprocessors greater than or equal to 2.8 GHz:

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 33 dBA

Operating: 35 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 30 dBA

Operating: 33 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.4 bels

Operating: 4.7 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296. Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

28 User Guide

Available options

The following are some available options:

vExternal options

Parallel port devices, such as printers and external drives

Serial port devices, such as external modems and digital cameras

Audio devices, such as external speakers for the sound system

USB devices, such as printers, joysticks, and scanners

Security device, such as a rope clip

Monitors

vInternal options

System memory, called dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

Peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapters

Accelerated graphics port (AGP) adapters (some models)

Internal drives, such as:

-CD drive or DVD drive

-Hard disk

-Diskette drives and other removable media drives

For the latest information about available options, see the following World Wide Web pages:

vhttp://www.ibm.com/pc/us/options/

vhttp://www.ibm.com/pc/support/

You can also obtain information by calling the following telephone numbers:

vWithin the United States, call 1-800-IBM-2YOU (1-800-426-2968), your IBM reseller, or IBM marketing representative.

vWithin Canada, call 1-800-565-3344 or 1-800-IBM-4YOU.

vOutside the United States and Canada, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.

Tools required

To install some options in your computer, you might need a flat-blade or Phillips screwdriver. Additional tools might be needed for certain options. See the instructions that come with the option.

Handling static-sensitive devices

Static electricity, although harmless to you, can seriously damage computer components and options.

When you add an option, do not open the static-protective package containing the option until you are instructed to do so.

When you handle options and other computer components, take these precautions to avoid static electricity damage:

vLimit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around you.

vAlways handle components carefully. Handle adapters and memory modules by the edges. Never touch any exposed circuitry.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 29

vPrevent others from touching components.

vWhen you install a new option, touch the static-protective package containing the option to a metal expansion-slot cover or other unpainted metal surface on the computer for at least two seconds. This reduces static electricity in the package and your body.

vWhen possible, remove the option and install it directly in the computer without setting the option down. When this is not possible, place the static-protective package that the option came in on a smooth, level surface and place the option on it.

vDo not place the option on the computer cover or other metal surface.

Installing external options

This section shows the various external connectors on your computer to which you can attach external options, such as external speakers, a printer, or a scanner. For some external options, you must install additional software in addition to making the physical connection. When adding an external option, use the information in this section to identify the required connector, and then use the instructions that come with the option to help you make the connection and install any software or device drivers that are required for the option.

30 User Guide

Locating the connectors on the front of your computer

The following illustration shows the locations of the USB connectors on the front of the computer.

1USB connector 2USB connector

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 31

Locating the connectors on the rear of your computer

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the back of the computer.

1 Power connector 2 Mouse connector 3 Keyboard connector 4 USB connectors 5 Serial connector 6 Parallel connector

7 VGA monitor connector

8 USB connectors 9 Ethernet connector

10Microphone connector 11Audio line out connector 12Audio line in connector 13AGP slot (some models) 14PCI slots

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on your computer.

32 User Guide

Connector

Description

Mouse connector

Used to attach a mouse, trackball, or other pointing device that

 

uses a standard mouse connector.

Keyboard connector

Used to attach a keyboard that uses a standard keyboard

 

connector.

USB connectors

Used to attach a device that requires a Universal Serial Bus

 

(USB) connection, such as a USB scanner or USB printer. If you

 

have more than six USB devices, you can purchase a USB hub,

 

which you can use to connect additional USB devices.

Serial connector

Used to attach an external modem, serial printer, or other

 

devices that use a 9-pin serial connector.

Parallel connector

Used to attach a parallel printer, parallel scanner, or other

 

devices that use a 25-pin parallel connector.

Ethernet connector

Used to attach an Ethernet cable for a local area network

 

(LAN).

 

Note: To operate the computer within FCC Class B limits, use

 

a Category 5 Ethernet cable.

Microphone connector

Used to attach a microphone to your computer when you want

 

to record voice or other sounds on the hard disk if you use

 

speech-recognition software.

Audio line out connector

Used to send audio signals from the computer to external

 

devices, such as powered stereo speakers (speakers with

 

built-in amplifiers), headphones, multimedia keyboards, or the

 

audio line in connector on a stereo system or other external

 

recording device.

Audio line in connector

Used to receive audio signals from an external audio device,

 

such as a stereo system. When you attach an external audio

 

device, a cable is connected between the audio line out

 

connector of the device and the audio line in connector of the

 

computer.

Obtaining device drivers

You can obtain device drivers for operating systems that are not preinstalled at http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ on the World Wide Web. Installation instructions are provided in README files with the device-driver files.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 33

Removing the cover

Important

Read “Important safety information” on page v and “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page 29 before removing the cover.

To remove the cover:

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Remove the two screws at the rear of the left side cover and slide the cover to the rear to remove.

34 User Guide

Locating components

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in your computer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Microprocessor and heat sink

4PCI slots

 

2DIMMs

5PCI adapter

 

3AGP slot (some models)

6Power supply

 

Identifying parts on the system board

The system board (sometimes called the planar or motherboard) is the main circuit board in your computer. It provides basic computer functions and supports a variety of devices that are IBM-installed or that you can install later.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 35

The following illustration shows the locations of parts on the system board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Microprocessor

 

11 SATA0 connector

2 DIMM connector 1

 

12 Front panel connector

3 DIMM connector 2

 

13 Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper

4 DIMM connector 3

 

14 Battery

5 DIMM connector 4

 

15 Front panel audio connector

6 Power connector

 

16 PCI slot 3

7 Diskette drive connector

 

17 PCI slot 2

8 Primary IDE connector

 

18 PCI slot 1

9 Secondary IDE connector

 

19 AGP slot (some models)

10SATA1 connector

 

20 12v power connector

Installing memory

Your computer has four connectors for installing dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) that provide up to a maximum of 4.0 GB of system memory.

When installing DIMMs, the following rules apply:

vSystem memory is divided into two channels (channel A and B). DIMM connectors 1 and 2 are channel A, and DIMM connectors 3 and 4 are channel B.

vIf DIMM connectors 1 and 3 (or 2 and 4) are filled with the same technology and size of memory, the system operates in dual channel mode.

vUse 2.5 V, 184-pin, double data rate synchronous dynamic random access memory (DDR SDRAM).

vUse 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB or 1.0 GB DIMMs in any combination.

vDIMMs are 38.1 mm (1.5 inches) in height.

Note: Only DDR SDRAM DIMMs can be used.

36 User Guide

To install a DIMM:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 34.

2.You might have to remove an adapter to gain access to the DIMM slots. See “Installing adapters” on page 38.

3.Locate the DIMM connectors. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 35.

4.Open the retaining clips.

5.Make sure the notches in the DIMM align with the tabs on the connector. Push or insert the DIMM straight down into the connector until the retaining clips close.

What to do next:

vReplace any adapters that were removed.

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 48.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 37

Installing adapters

This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing adapters. Your computer has three expansion slots for PCI adapters. One slot, used for an AGP adapter, is available on some models. You can install an adapter up to 228 mm (9 inches) long in the AGP slot, PCI slot 2, or PCI slot 3. You can install an adapter up to 200 mm (7.9 inches) long in PCI slot 1.

To install an adapter:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 34.

2.Remove the adapter slot cover for the appropriate expansion slot.

3.Remove the adapter from its static-protective package.

4.Install the adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

38 User Guide

5. Secure the adapter with the screw as shown.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 48.

Installing internal drives

This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing internal drives.

Internal drives are devices that your computer uses to read and store data. You can add drives to your computer to increase storage capacity and to enable your computer to read other types of media. Some of the different drives that are available for your computer are:

vParallel Advanced Technology Attachment (PATA) hard disk drives

vSerial ATA hard disk drives

vCD drives or DVD drives

vRemovable media drives

Note: These different drives are also referred to as integrated drive electronics (IDE) drives.

Internal drives are installed in bays. In this book, the bays are referred to as bay 1, bay 2, and so on.

When you install an internal drive, it is important to note what type and size of drive that you can install in each bay. Also, it is important to correctly connect the internal drive cables to the installed drive.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 39

Drive specifications

Your computer comes with the following IBM-installed drives:

vA CD drive or DVD drive in bay 1

vA 3.5-inch diskette disk drive in bay 3

vA 3.5-inch hard drive in bay 4

Any bay that does not have a drive installed has a static shield and bay panel installed.

The following illustration shows the locations of the drive bays.

The following table describes some of the drives you can install in each bay and their height requirements.

1Bay 1 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

CD drive or DVD drive (preinstalled in

 

some models)

 

5.25-inch hard disk drive

2Bay 2 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

5.25-inch hard disk drive

 

3.5-inch hard disk drive (requires a

 

mounting bracket)

 

CD drive

 

DVD drive

3Bay 3 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

3.5-inch diskette drive (preinstalled)

4Bay 4 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

3.5-inch hard disk drive (preinstalled)

Notes:

1.Drives that are greater than 43.0 mm (1.7 in.) high cannot be installed.

2.Install removable media (tape or CD) drives in the accessible bays (bay 1 or 2).

40 User Guide

Installing a drive

To install an internal drive, follow these steps:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 34.

2.If your computer has a CD drive or DVD drive, you might need to remove the signal and power cables from the drive.

3.Remove the bay panel from the drive bay by inserting a flat-blade screwdriver at the end and gently prying it loose.

4.Remove the metal shield from the drive bay by inserting a flat-blade screwdriver into one of the slots and gently prying it loose.

5.Make sure the drive that you are installing is set correctly as either a master or a slave device.

Note: A serial ATA hard disk drive does not need to be set as either a master or a slave device.

vIf it is the first CD drive or DVD drive, set it as a master device.

vIf it is an additional CD drive or DVD drive, set it as a slave device.

vIf it is an additional parallel ATA hard disk drive, set it as a slave device.

Refer to the documentation that comes with your drive for master/slave jumper information.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 41

6.Install the drive into the bay. Align the screw holes and install two screws to secure the drive.

7.A hard disk drive requires two cables; a power cable that connects to the power supply and a signal cable that connects to the system board.

v A parallel ATA hard disk drive requires a four-wire power cable.

v A serial ATA hard disk drive requires a five-wire power cable.

The steps to connect a drive are different depending on the type of drive you are connecting. Use one of the following procedures for your drive connection.

Connecting the first CD drive or DVD drive

1.Locate the three-connector signal cable that comes with your computer or with the new drive.

2.Locate the secondary IDE connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 35.

3.Connect one end of the signal cable to the drive and the other to the secondary IDE connector on the system board. To reduce electronic noise, use the connectors at the end of the cable only.

4.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

42 User Guide

Connecting an additional CD drive, DVD drive, or parallel ATA hard disk drive

An additional drive can be connected to either the primary IDE or secondary IDE connector.

1.Locate an available IDE connector on the three-connector signal cable attached to either the primary IDE or secondary IDE connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 35.

2.Connect the extra connector in the signal cable to the new drive.

3.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

Connecting a serial ATA hard disk drive

A serial hard disk drive can be connected to any available SATA connector.

1.Locate the signal cable that comes with the new drive.

2.Locate an available SATA connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 35.

3.Connect one end of the signal cable to the drive and the other to an available SATA connector on the system board.

4.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 48.

Installing security features

To help prevent hardware theft and unauthorized access to your computer, several security lock options are available. The following sections will help you identify and install the various types of locks that might be available for your computer. In addition to physical locks, unauthorized use of your computer can be prevented by a software lock that locks the keyboard until a correct password is typed in.

Make sure that any security cables you install do not interfere with other computer cables.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 43

Identifying security locks

The following illustration shows the locations of the security features on the rear of the computer.

1 Rope clip

2 Integrated cable lock 3 Padlock loop

Rope clip

Using a 3/16-inch or 5-mm rope clip (sometimes referred to as a U-bolt), a steel security cable, and a padlock can secure your computer to a desk, table, or other non-permanent fixture. For computers designed to accommodate the rope clip, knockouts at the rear of the chassis are provided.

To install a rope clip:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 34.

2.Use a tool, such as a screwdriver, to remove the two metal knockouts.

3.Insert the rope clip through the rear panel; then attach and tighten the nuts with an appropriately sized or adjustable wrench.

4.Replace the computer cover. For more information, see “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 48.

44 User Guide

5.Thread the cable through the rope clip and around an object that is not a part of or permanently secured to the building structure or foundation, and from which it cannot be removed; then fasten the cable ends together with a lock.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 45

Integrated cable lock

With an integrated cable lock (sometimes referred to as a Kensington lock), you can secure your computer to a desk, table, or other non-permanent fixture. The cable lock attaches to a security slot at the rear of your computer and is operated with a key. This is the same type of lock used with many laptop computers. You can order a cable lock directly from IBM. Go to http://www.pc.ibm.com/support and search on Kensington.

Password protection

To deter unauthorized use of your computer, you can use the IBM Setup Utility program to set a password. When you turn on your computer you are prompted to type the password to unlock the keyboard for normal use.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 48.

Changing the battery

Your computer has a special type of memory that maintains the date, time, and settings for built-in features, such as parallel-port assignments (configuration). A battery keeps this information active when you turn off the computer.

The battery normally requires no charging or maintenance throughout its life; however, no battery lasts forever. If the battery fails, the date, time, and

46 User Guide

configuration information (including passwords) are lost. An error message is displayed when you turn on the computer.

Refer to “Lithium battery notice” on page x for information about replacing and disposing of the battery.

To change the battery:

1.Turn off the computer and all attached devices.

2.Unplug the power cord and remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 34.

3.Locate the battery. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 35.

4.If necessary, remove any adapters that impede access to the battery. See “Installing adapters” on page 38 for more information.

5.Remove the old battery.

6. Install the new battery.

7.Replace any adapters that were removed to gain access to the battery. See “Installing adapters” on page 38 for instructions for replacing adapters.

8.Replace the cover, and plug in the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 48.

Note: When the computer is turned on for the first time after battery replacement, an error message might be displayed. This is normal after replacing the battery.

9.Turn on the computer and all attached devices.

10.Use the IBM Setup Utility program to set the date and time and any passwords.

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing CMOS)

This section applies to lost or forgotten passwords. For more information about lost or forgotten passwords, go to Access IBM.

To erase a forgotten password:

1.Turn off the computer and all attached devices.

2.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 34.

3.Locate the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 35.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 47

4.If necessary, see “Installing adapters” on page 38 to remove any adapters that impede access to the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper.

5.Move the jumper from the standard position (pins 1 and 2) to the maintenance or configure position (pins 2 and 3).

6.Replace the cover and connect the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables.”

7.Restart the computer, leave it on for approximately 10 seconds. Turn off the computer by holding the power switch for approximately 5 seconds. The computer will turn off.

8.Repeat steps 2 through 4 on page 47..

9.Move the jumper back to the standard (pins 1 and 2).

10.Replace the cover and connect the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables.”

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables

After working with options, you need to install any removed parts, replace the cover, and reconnect any cables, including telephone lines and power cords. Also, depending on the option that is installed, you might need to confirm the updated information in the IBM Setup Utility program.

To replace the cover and connect cables to your computer:

1.Ensure that all components have been reassembled correctly and that no tools or loose screws are left inside your computer.

2.Clear any cables that might impede the replacement of the cover.

3.Position the cover on the chassis so that the guides on the top and bottom of the cover engage the chassis and push the cover to the closed position. Insert the screws that secure the cover.

4.Reconnect the external cables and power cords to the computer. See “Installing external options” on page 30.

48 User Guide

5.To update the configuration, see Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Chapter 2. Types 8126, 8174, 8175, and 8176 49

50 User Guide

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179

This chapter provides an introduction to the features and options that are available for your computer. You can expand the capabilities of your computer by adding memory, adapters, or drives. When installing an option, use these instructions along with the instructions that come with the option.

Important

Before you install or remove any option, read “Important safety information” on page v. These precautions and guidelines will help you work safely.

Features

This section provides an overview of the computer features and preinstalled software.

System information

The following information covers a variety of models. For information for your specific model, use the IBM Setup Utility. See Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Microprocessor (varies by model type)

vIntel® Pentium® 4 processor with HyperThreading Technology

vIntel Pentium 4 processor

vIntel Celeron® processor

vInternal cache (size varies by model type)

Memory

v Support for four dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

51

v 512 KB flash memory for system programs

Internal drives

v3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskette drive

vInternal hard disk drive

vEIDE CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive (some models)

Video subsystem

vAn integrated graphics controller for a Video Graphics Array (VGA) monitor

vAccelerated graphics port (AGP) video adapter slot on the system board (some models)

Audio subsystem

vAC’97 with ADI 1981B Audio Codec

vLine in, line out, and microphone connectors on the rear panel

Connectivity

v10/100 Mbps integrated Intel Ethernet controller that supports the Wake on LAN® feature

vSoft modem V.90/V.44 (some models)

System management features

vRemote Program Load (RPL) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

vWake on LAN

vWake on Ring (in the IBM Setup Utility program, this feature is called Serial Port Ring Detect for an external modem and Modem Ring Detect for an internal modem)

vRemote Administration

vAutomatic power-on startup

vSystem Management (SM) BIOS and SM software

vAbility to store POST hardware test results

Input/output features

v25-pin, Extended Capabilities Port (ECP)/Extended Parallel Port (EPP)

v9-pin serial connector

vSix 4-pin, USB connectors (two on front panel and four on rear panel)

vPS/2® mouse connector

vPS/2 keyboard connector

vEthernet connector

vVGA monitor connector

vThree audio connectors (line in, line out, and microphone)

Expansion

vFive drive bays

vThree 32-bit peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapter slots

Note: See “Installing adapters” on page 63 for supported card lengths.

vOne accelerated graphics port (AGP) expansion slot (some models)

52 User Guide

Power

v230 W power supply with manual voltage selection switch

vAutomatic 50/60 Hz input frequency switching

vAdvanced Power Management support

vAdvanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) support

Security features

vUser and administrator passwords

vSupport for the addition of a rope clip and lockable cable

vSupport for the addition of an integrated cable lock

vSupport for a padlock on the chassis

vStartup sequence control

vStartup without diskette drive, keyboard, or mouse

vUnattended start mode

vDiskette and hard disk I/O control

vSerial and parallel port I/O control

vSecurity profile by device

IBM preinstalled software

Your computer might come with preinstalled software. If it does, an operating system, device drivers to support built-in features, and other support programs are included.

Operating systems preinstalled (varies by model type)

Note: Not all countries or regions will have these operating systems.

vMicrosoft® Windows® XP Home

vMicrosoft Windows XP Professional

Operating systems (certified or tested for compatibility)5

vMicrosoft Windows 2000

vLinux6

5.The operating systems listed here are being certified or tested for compatibility at the time this publication goes to press. Additional operating systems might be identified by IBM as compatible with your computer following the publication of this booklet. Corrections and additions to this list are subject to change. To determine if an operating system has been certified or tested for compatibility, check the Web site of the operating system vendor.

6.Linux certification http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/migr-48nt8d.html

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 53

Specifications

This section lists the physical specifications for your computer.

Dimensions

Height: 413 mm (16.25 in.)

Width: 191 mm (7.5 in.)

Depth: 406 mm (16 in.)

Weight

Minimum configuration as shipped: 9.1 kg (20 lb)

Maximum configuration: 11.4 kg (25.0 lb)

Environment

Air temperature:

System on: 10° to 35°C (50° to 95° F)

System off: 10° to 43°C (50° to 110° F)

Maximum altitude: 2134 m (7000 ft)

Note: The maximum altitude, 2134 m (7000 ft), is the maximum altitude at which the specified air temperatures apply. At higher altitudes, the maximum air temperatures are lower than those specified.

Humidity:

System on: 8% to 80%

System off: 8% to 80%

Electrical input

Input voltage:

Low range:

Minimum: 100 V ac

Maximum: 127 V ac

Input frequency range: 50–60 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 115 V ac

High range:

Minimum: 200 V ac

Maximum: 240 V ac

Input frequency range: 50–60 Hz

Voltage switch setting: 230 V ac

Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) (approximate):

Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA

Maximum configuration: 0.3 kVA

Note: Power consumption and heat output vary depending on the number and type of optional features installed and the power-management optional features in use.

Heat output (approximate) in British thermal units (Btu) per hour:

Minimum configuration: 257 Btu/hr (75 watts)

Maximum configuration: 785 Btu/hr (230 watts)

Airflow

Approximately 0.68 cubic meters per minute (24 cubic feet per minute) maximum

Acoustical noise-emission values

Average sound-pressure levels:

At operator position:

Idle: 28 dBA

Operating: 30 dBA

At bystander position - 1 meter (3.3 ft):

Idle: 26 dBA

Operating: 29 dBA

Declared (upper limit) sound-power levels:

Idle: 4.1 bels

Operating: 4.3 bels

Note: These levels were measured in controlled acoustical environments according to the procedures specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.10 and ISO 7779 and are reported in accordance with ISO 9296. Actual sound-pressure levels in a given location might exceed the average values stated because of room reflections and other nearby noise sources. The declared sound-power levels indicate an upper limit, below which a large number of computers will operate.

54 User Guide

Available options

The following are some available options:

vExternal options

Parallel port devices, such as printers and external drives

Serial port devices, such as external modems and digital cameras

Audio devices, such as external speakers for the sound system

USB devices, such as printers, joysticks, and scanners

Security device, such as a rope clip

Monitors

IEEE 1394 devices (requires an IEEE 1394 adapter)

vInternal options

System memory, called dual inline memory modules (DIMMs)

Peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapters

Accelerated graphics port (AGP) adapters (some models)

Internal drives, such as:

-CD drive and DVD drive

-Hard disk drive

-Diskette drives and other removable media drives

For the latest information about available options, see the following World Wide Web pages:

vhttp://www.ibm.com/pc/us/options/

vhttp://www.ibm.com/pc/support/

You can also obtain information by calling the following telephone numbers:

vWithin the United States, call 1-800-IBM-2YOU (1-800-426-2968), your IBM reseller, or IBM marketing representative.

vWithin Canada, call 1-800-565-3344 or 1-800-IBM-4YOU.

vOutside the United States and Canada, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.

Tools required

To install some options in your computer, you might need a flat-blade or Phillips screwdriver. Additional tools might be needed for certain options. See the instructions that come with the option.

Handling static-sensitive devices

Static electricity, although harmless to you, can seriously damage computer components and options.

When you add an option, do not open the static-protective package containing the option until you are instructed to do so.

When you handle options and other computer components, take these precautions to avoid static electricity damage:

vLimit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around you.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 55

vAlways handle components carefully. Handle adapters and memory modules by the edges. Never touch any exposed circuitry.

vPrevent others from touching components.

vWhen you install a new option, touch the static-protective package containing the option to a metal expansion-slot cover or other unpainted metal surface on the computer for at least two seconds. This reduces static electricity in the package and your body.

vWhen possible, remove the option and install it directly in the computer without setting the option down. When this is not possible, place the static-protective package that the option came in on a smooth, level surface and place the option on it.

vDo not place the option on the computer cover or other metal surface.

Installing external options

This section shows the various external connectors on your computer to which you can attach external options, such as external speakers, a printer, or a scanner. For some external options, you must install additional software in addition to making the physical connection. When adding an external option, use the information in this section to identify the required connector, and then use the instructions that come with the option to help you make the connection and install any software or device drivers that are required for the option.

56 User Guide

Locating the connectors on the front of your computer

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the front of the computer.

Note: Not all computer models will have the following connectors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1IEEE 1394 connector

4USB connector

 

2Microphone connector

5USB connector

 

3Headphone connector

 

 

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 57

Locating the connectors on the rear of your computer

The following illustration shows the locations of the connectors on the back of the computer.

1Power connector 2Mouse connector 3Keyboard connector 4USB connectors 5Serial connector 6Parallel connector 7VGA monitor connector

8 USB connectors 9 Ethernet connector

10Microphone connector 11Audio line out connector 12Audio line in connector 13AGP slot (some models) 14PCI slots

Note: Some connectors on the rear of the computer are color-coded to help you to determine where to connect the cables on your computer.

58 User Guide

Connector

Description

Mouse connector

Used to attach a mouse, trackball, or other pointing device that

 

uses a standard mouse connector.

Keyboard connector

Used to attach a keyboard that uses a standard keyboard

 

connector.

USB connectors

Used to attach a device that requires a Universal Serial Bus

 

(USB) connection, such as a USB scanner or USB printer. If you

 

have more than six USB devices, you can purchase a USB hub,

 

which you can use to connect additional USB devices.

Serial connector

Used to attach an external modem, serial printer, or other

 

devices that use a 9-pin serial connector.

Parallel connector

Used to attach a parallel printer, parallel scanner, or other

 

devices that use a 25-pin parallel connector.

Ethernet connector

Used to attach an Ethernet cable for a local area network

 

(LAN).

 

Note: To operate the computer within FCC Class B limits, use

 

a Category 5 Ethernet cable.

Microphone connector

Used to attach a microphone to your computer when you want

 

to record voice or other sounds on the hard disk if you use

 

speech-recognition software.

Audio line out connector

Used to send audio signals from the computer to external

 

devices, such as powered stereo speakers (speakers with

 

built-in amplifiers), headphones, multimedia keyboards, or the

 

audio line in connector on a stereo system or other external

 

recording device.

Audio line in connector

Used to receive audio signals from an external audio device,

 

such as a stereo system. When you attach an external audio

 

device, a cable is connected between the audio line out

 

connector of the device and the audio line in connector of the

 

computer.

Obtaining device drivers

You can obtain device drivers for operating systems that are not preinstalled at http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ on the World Wide Web. Installation instructions are provided in README files with the device-driver files.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 59

Removing the cover

Important

Read “Important safety information” on page v and “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page 55 before removing the cover.

To remove the cover:

1.Shut down your operating system, remove any media (diskettes, CDs, or tapes) from the drives, and turn off all attached devices and the computer.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets.

3.Disconnect all cables attached to the computer. This includes power cords, input/output (I/O) cables, and any other cables that are connected to the computer.

4.Press the cover-release button on the left side cover and remove the cover.

60 User Guide

Locating components

The following illustration will help you locate the various components in your computer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Microprocessor and heat sink

 

 

4PCI adapter

 

 

 

 

2DIMMs

 

 

5Power supply

3AGP slot (some models)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identifying parts on the system board

The system board (sometimes called the planar or motherboard) is the main circuit board in your computer. It provides basic computer functions and supports a variety of devices that are IBM-installed or that you can install later.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 61

The following illustration shows the locations of parts on the system board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Microprocessor

 

11 SATA0 connector

2 DIMM connector 1

 

12 Front panel connector

3 DIMM connector 2

 

13 Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper

4 DIMM connector 3

 

14 Battery

5 DIMM connector 4

 

15 Front panel audio connector

6 Power connector

 

16 PCI slot 3

7 Diskette drive connector

 

17 PCI slot 2

8 Primary IDE connector

 

18 PCI slot 1

9 Secondary IDE connector

 

19 AGP slot (some models)

10SATA1 connector

 

20 12v power connector

Installing memory

Your computer has four connectors for installing dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) that provide up to a maximum of 4.0 GB of system memory.

When installing DIMMs, the following rules apply:

vSystem memory is divided into two channels (channel A and B). DIMM connectors 1 and 2 are channel A, and DIMM connectors 3 and 4 are channel B.

vIf DIMM connectors 1 and 3 (or 2 and 4) are filled with the same technology and size of memory, the system operates in dual channel mode.

vUse 2.5 V, 184-pin, double data rate synchronous dynamic random access memory (DDR SDRAM).

vUse 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB or 1.0 GB DIMMs in any combination.

vDIMMs are 38.1 mm (1.5 inches) in height.

Note: Only DDR SDRAM DIMMs can be used.

62 User Guide

To install a DIMM:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 60.

2.You might have to remove an adapter to gain access to the DIMM slots. See “Installing adapters.”

3.Locate the DIMM connectors. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 61.

4.Open the retaining clips.

5.Make sure the notches in the DIMM align with the tabs on the connector. Push or insert the DIMM straight down into the connector until the retaining clips close.

What to do next:

vReplace any adapters that were removed.

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 74.

Installing adapters

This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing adapters. Your computer has three expansion slots for PCI adapters. One slot, used for an AGP adapter, is available on some models. You can install an adapter up to 228 mm (9 inches) long in the AGP slot, PCI slot 2, or PCI slot 3. You can install an adapter up to 200 mm (7.9 inches) long in PCI slot 1.

To install an adapter:

1. Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 60.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 63

2.Remove the adapter-slot-cover latch and the slot cover for the appropriate expansion slot.

3.Remove the adapter from its static-protective package.

4.Install the adapter into the appropriate slot on the system board.

5.Install the adapter-slot-cover latch.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 74.

64 User Guide

Installing internal drives

This section provides information and instructions for installing and removing internal drives.

Internal drives are devices that your computer uses to read and store data. You can add drives to your computer to increase storage capacity and to enable your computer to read other types of media. Some of the different drives that are available for your computer are:

vParallel Advanced Technology Attachment (PATA) hard disk drives

vSerial ATA hard disk drives

vCD drives or DVD drives

vRemovable media drives

Note: These different drives are also referred to as integrated drive electronics (IDE) drives.

Internal drives are installed in bays. In this book, the bays are referred to as bay 1, bay 2, and so on.

When you install an internal drive, it is important to note what type and size of drive that you can install in each bay. Also, it is important to correctly connect the internal drive cables to the installed drive.

Drive specifications

Your computer comes with the following IBM-installed drives:

vA CD drive or DVD drive in bay 1 (some models)

vA 3.5-inch diskette disk drive in bay 4

vA 3.5-inch hard drive in bay 5

Any bay that does not have a drive installed has a static shield and bay panel installed.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 65

The following illustration shows the locations of the drive bays.

The following list describes some of the drives you can install in each bay and their height requirements:

1Bay 1 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

CD drive or DVD drive (preinstalled in

 

some models)

 

5.25-inch hard disk drive

2Bay 2 - Maximum height: 43.0 mm (1.7 in.)

5.25-inch hard disk drive

 

3.5-inch hard disk drive (requires a

 

mounting bracket)

 

CD drive

 

DVD drive

3Bay 3 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

3.5-inch hard disk drive

4Bay 4 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

3.5-inch diskette drive (preinstalled)

5Bay 5 - Maximum height: 25.8 mm (1.0 in.)

Hard disk drive (preinstalled)

Notes:

1.Drives that are greater than 43.0 mm (1.7 in.) high cannot be installed.

2.Install removable media (tape or CD) drives in the accessible bays (bay 1 or 2).

Installing a drive

To install an internal drive, follow these steps:

1.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 60.

2.If your computer has a CD drive or DVD drive, you might need to remove the signal and power cables from the drive.

3.Remove the bay panel from the drive bay by inserting a flat-blade screwdriver at the end and gently prying it loose.

66 User Guide

4.Remove the metal shield from the drive bay by inserting a flat-blade screwdriver into one of the slots and gently prying it loose.

5.Make sure the drive that you are installing is set correctly as either a master or a slave device.

Note: A serial ATA hard disk drive does not need to be set as either a master or a slave device.

vIf it is the first CD drive or DVD drive, set it as a master device.

vIf it is an additional CD drive or DVD drive, set it as a slave device.

vIf it is an additional parallel ATA hard disk drive, set it as a slave device.

Refer to the documentation that comes with your drive for master/slave jumper information.

6.You might have to remove the bezel to install some drives. Remove the front bezel by pushing in on the blue plastic tab at the rear of the computer.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 67

7.Install the drive into the bay and lock it into position.

Note: Some drives might require screws to secure the drive into the bay. If this is the case, align the screw holes, and insert the screws to secure the drive.

8.A hard disk drive requires two cables; a power cable that connects to the power supply and a signal cable that connects to the system board.

v A parallel ATA hard disk drive requires a four-wire power cable.

v A serial ATA hard disk drive requires a five-wire power cable.

The steps to connect a drive are different depending on the type of drive you are connecting. Use one of the following procedures for your drive connection.

Connecting the first CD drive or DVD drive

1.Locate the three-connector signal cable that comes with your computer or with the new drive.

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2.Locate the secondary IDE connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 61.

3.Connect one end of the signal cable to the drive and the other to the secondary IDE connector on the system board. To reduce electronic noise, use the connectors at the end of the cable only.

4.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

Connecting an additional CD drive, DVD drive, or parallel ATA hard disk drive

An additional drive can be connected to either the primary IDE or secondary IDE connector.

1.Locate an available IDE connector on the three-connector signal cable attached to either the primary IDE or secondary IDE connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 61.

2.Connect the extra connector in the signal cable to the new drive.

3.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

Connecting a serial ATA hard disk drive

A serial hard disk drive can be connected to any available SATA connector.

1.Locate the signal cable that comes with the new drive.

2.Locate an available SATA connector on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 61.

3.Connect one end of the signal cable to the drive and the other to an available SATA connector on the system board.

4.Your computer has extra power connectors for additional drives. Connect a power connector to the drive.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 74.

Installing security features

To help prevent hardware theft and unauthorized access to your computer, several security lock options are available. The following sections will help you identify and install the various types of locks that might be available for your computer. In addition to physical locks, unauthorized use of your computer can be prevented by a software lock that locks the keyboard until a correct password is typed in.

Make sure that any security cables you install do not interfere with other computer cables.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 69

Identifying security locks

The following illustration shows the locations of the security features on the rear of the computer.

1 Rope clip

2 Integrated cable lock

Rope clip

Using a 3/16-inch or 5-mm rope clip (sometimes referred to as a U-bolt), a steel security cable, and a padlock can secure your computer to a desk, table, or other non-permanent fixture. For computers designed to accommodate the rope clip, knockouts at the rear of the chassis are provided.

To install a rope clip:

1.Remove cover (see “Removing the cover” on page 60).

2.Use a tool, such as a screwdriver, to remove the two metal knockouts.

3.Insert the rope clip through the rear panel; then attach and tighten the nuts with an appropriately sized or adjustable wrench.

4.Replace the computer cover. For more information, see “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 74.

70 User Guide

5.Thread the cable through the rope clip and around an object that is not a part of or permanently secured to the building structure or foundation, and from which it cannot be removed; then fasten the cable ends together with a lock.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 71

Integrated cable lock

With an integrated cable lock (sometimes referred to as a Kensington lock), you can secure your computer to a desk, table, or other non-permanent fixture. The cable lock attaches to a security slot at the rear of your computer and is operated with a key. This is the same type of lock used with many laptop computers. You can order a cable lock directly from IBM. Go to http://www.pc.ibm.com/support and search on Kensington.

Password protection

To deter unauthorized use of your computer, you can use the IBM Setup Utility program to set a password. When you turn on your computer you are prompted to type the password to unlock the keyboard for normal use.

What to do next

vTo work with another option, go to the appropriate section.

vTo complete the installation, go to “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 74.

Changing the battery

Your computer has a special type of memory that maintains the date, time, and settings for built-in features, such as parallel-port assignments (configuration). A battery keeps this information active when you turn off the computer.

72 User Guide

The battery normally requires no charging or maintenance throughout its life; however, no battery lasts forever. If the battery fails, the date, time, and configuration information (including passwords) are lost. An error message is displayed when you turn on the computer.

Refer to “Lithium battery notice” on page x for information about replacing and disposing of the battery.

To change the battery:

1.Turn off the computer and all attached devices.

2.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 60.

3.Locate the battery. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 61.

4.If necessary, remove any adapters that impede access to the battery. See “Installing adapters” on page 63 for more information.

5.Remove the old battery.

6. Install the new battery.

7.Replace any adapters that were removed to gain access to the battery. See “Installing adapters” on page 63 for instructions for replacing adapters.

8.Replace the cover, and plug in the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables” on page 74.

Note: When the computer is turned on for the first time after battery replacement, an error message might be displayed. This is normal after replacing the battery.

9.Turn on the computer and all attached devices.

10.Use the IBM Setup Utility program to set the date and time and any passwords. See Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Erasing a lost or forgotten password (clearing CMOS)

This section applies to lost or forgotten passwords. For more information about lost or forgotten passwords, see Access IBM on your desktop.

To erase a forgotten password:

1.Turn off the computer and all attached devices.

2.Remove the cover. See “Removing the cover” on page 60.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 73

3.Locate the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper on the system board. See “Identifying parts on the system board” on page 61.

4.If necessary, see “Installing adapters” on page 63 to remove any adapters that impede access to the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper.

5.Move the jumper from the standard position (pins 1 and 2) to the maintenance or configure position (pins 2 and 3).

6.Replace the cover and connect the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables.”

7.Restart the computer, leave it on for approximately 10 seconds. Turn off the computer by holding the power switch for approximately 5 seconds. The computer will turn off.

8.Repeat steps 2 through 4 on page 73.

9.Move the jumper back to the standard (pins 1 and 2).

10.Replace the cover and connect the power cord. See “Replacing the cover and connecting the cables.”

Replacing the cover and connecting the cables

After working with options, you need to install any removed parts, replace the cover, and reconnect any cables, including telephone lines and power cords. Also, depending on the option that is installed, you might need to confirm the updated information in the IBM Setup Utility program.

To replace the cover and connect cables to your computer:

1.Ensure that all components have been reassembled correctly and that no tools or loose screws are left inside your computer.

2.Clear any cables that might impede the replacement of the cover.

3.Position the cover on the chassis so that the rail guides on the bottom of the cover engage the rails and push the cover closed until it latches.

74 User Guide

4.Reconnect the external cables and power cords to the computer. See “Installing external options” on page 56.

5.To update the configuration, see Chapter 4, “Using the IBM Setup Utility program,” on page 77.

Chapter 3. Types 8084, 8085, 8147, 8148, and 8179 75

76 User Guide

Chapter 4. Using the IBM Setup Utility program

The IBM Setup Utility program is stored in the electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) of your computer. The IBM Setup Utility program is used to view and change the configuration settings of your computer, regardless of which operating system you are using. However, the operating-system settings might override any similar settings in the IBM Setup Utility program.

Starting the IBM Setup Utility program

To start the IBM Setup Utility program, do the following:

1.If your computer is already on when you start this procedure, shut down the operating system and turn off the computer.

2.Press and hold the F1 key then turn on the computer. When you hear the multiple beeps, release the F1 key.

Note: If an administrator password has been set, the IBM Setup Utility program menu is not displayed until you type your password. See “Using passwords” for more information.

The IBM Setup Utility might start automatically when POST detects that hardware has been removed or new hardware has been installed in your computer.

Viewing and changing settings

The IBM Setup Utility program menu lists items that identify system configuration topics.

When working with the IBM Setup Utility program menu, you must use the keyboard. The keys used to perform various tasks are displayed at the bottom of each screen.

Exiting from the IBM Setup Utility program

When you finish viewing or changing settings, press Esc to return to the IBM Setup Utility program menu (you might have to press Esc several times). If you want to save the new settings, select Save Settings before you exit. Otherwise, your changes will not be saved.

Using passwords

You can use passwords to provide security for your computer and data. There are two kinds of passwords: a user password and an administrator password. You do not have to set a password of either type to use your computer. However, if you decide to set either one, read the following sections.

User password

The user password feature deters unauthorized persons from gaining access to your computer.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

77

Administrator password

Setting an administrator password deters unauthorized persons from changing configuration settings. If you are responsible for maintaining the settings of several computers, you might want to set an administrator password.

After you set an administrator password, a password prompt is displayed each time you try to access the IBM Setup Utility program. If you type the wrong password, you will see an error message. If you type the wrong password three times, you must turn the computer off and start again.

If both the user and administrator passwords are set, you can type either password. However, to change any configuration settings, you must use your administrator password.

Setting, changing, and deleting a password

To set, change, or delete a password, do the following:

Note: A password can be any combination of up to seven characters (A- Z, a-z, and 0-9).

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 77).

2.From the IBM Setup Utility program menu, select Security.

3.Select Set Passwords. Read the information displayed on the right side of the screen.

Using Security Profile by Device

Security Profile by Device is used to enable or disable user access to the following devices:

IDE controller

When this feature is set to Disable, all devices connected to the

 

IDE controller (such as hard disk drives or the CD-ROM drive)

 

are disabled and will not be displayed in the system

 

configuration.

Diskette Drive Access

When this feature is set to Disable, the diskette drive cannot be

 

accessed.

Diskette Write Protect

When this feature is set to Enable, all diskettes are treated as if

 

they are write-protected.

To set Security Profile by Device, do the following:

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 77).

2.From the IBM Setup Utility program menu, select Security.

3.Select Security Profile by Device.

4.Select the desired devices and settings and press Enter.

5.Return to the IBM Setup Utility program menu and select Exit and then Save Settings.

Selecting a startup device

If your computer does not start up (boot) from a device such as the CD-ROM, diskette, or hard disk as expected, use one of the following procedures to select a startup device.

78 User Guide

Selecting a temporary startup device

Use this procedure to startup from any boot device.

Note: Not all CDs, hard disks, and diskettes are startable (bootable).

1.Turn off your computer.

2.Press and hold the F12 key then turn on your computer. When the Startup Device Menu displays, release the F12 key.

3.Select the desired startup device from the Startup Devices Menu and press Enter to begin.

Note: Selecting a startup device from the Startup Devices Menu does not permanently change the startup sequence.

Changing the startup sequence

To view or change the primary or automatic power-on startup sequence, do the following:

1.Start the IBM Setup Utility program (see “Starting the IBM Setup Utility program” on page 77).

2.Select Startup.

3.Select Startup Sequence. See the information displayed on the right side of the screen.

4.Select the sequence of devices for the Primary Startup Sequence, the Automatic Startup Sequence, and the Error Startup Sequence.

5.Select Exit from the IBM Setup Utility menu and then Save Settings.

If you have changed these settings and want to return to the default settings, select

Load Default Settings on the Exit menu.

Advanced settings

On some computer models, the Advanced settings menu includes a setting to Enable/Disable HyperThreading. This feature works only with HyperThreading-aware operating systems such as Microsoft Windows XP. The default setting for HyperThreading is Enabled. However, if you select Set Defaults (HyperThreading is Enabled) and are using an operating system other than Windows XP, your computer performance might be degraded. Therefore, you should always set HyperThreading to disabled unless you are sure your operating system supports hyperthreading.

Chapter 4. Using the IBM Setup Utility program 79

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Appendix A. Updating system programs

This appendix contains information about updating system programs and how to recover from a POST/BIOS update failure.

System programs

System programs are the basic layer of software that is built into your computer. They include the power-on self-test (POST), the basic input/output system (BIOS) code, and the IBM Setup Utility program. POST is a set of tests and procedures that is performed each time you turn on your computer. BIOS is a layer of software that translates instructions from other layers of software into electrical signals that the computer hardware can understand. You can use the IBM Setup Utility program to view and change the configuration and setup of your computer.

Your computer system board has a module called electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM, also referred to as flash memory). You can easily update POST, BIOS, and the IBM Setup Utility program by starting your computer using a flash update diskette or by running a special update program from your operating system.

IBM might make changes and enhancements to the system programs. When updates are released, they are available as downloadable files on the World Wide Web (see the Quick Reference). Instructions for using the system program updates are available in a .txt file that is included with the update files. For most models, you can download either an update program to create a system-program-update (flash) diskette or an update program that can be run from the operating system.

Updating (flashing) BIOS from a diskette

1.Insert a system program update (flash) diskette into the diskette drive (drive A) in your computer. System program updates are available at http://www.ibm.com/pc/support/ on the World Wide Web.

2.Turn on the computer. If it is on already, you must turn it off and back on again. The update begins.

Updating (flashing) BIOS from your operating system

Note: Due to constant improvements being made to the IBM Web site, Web page content (including the links referenced in the following procedure) is subject to change.

1.From your browser, type http://www.pc.ibm.com/support in the address field and press Enter.

2.Locate the Downloadable files for your machine type.

3.Under Select your product, choose your machine type and click Go.

4.In Downloadable file by category, click BIOS.

5.Under Download files - BIOS by date, click your machine type.

6.Scroll down and look for a .txt file that has instructions for Flash BIOS update from the operating system. Click the .txt file.

7.Print these instructions. This is very important since they are not on the screen after the download begins.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

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8.From your browser, Click Back to return to the list of files. Carefully follow the printed instructions to download, extract, and install the update.

Recovering from a POST/BIOS update failure

If power to your computer is interrupted while POST/BIOS is being updated (flash update), your computer might not restart correctly. If this happens, perform the following procedure (also known as a Boot-block Recovery):

1.Turn off the computer and any attached devices, such as printers, monitors, and external drives.

2.Unplug all power cords from electrical outlets, and remove the cover. See Removing the cover in the chapter for your model.

3.Locate the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper on the system board. See Identifying parts on the system board in the chapter for your model type.

4.If necessary, refer to Installing adapters to remove any adapters that impede access to the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper.

5.Move the jumper from the standard position (pins 1 and 2) to pins 2 and 3.

6.Replace the cover. See Replacing the cover and connecting the cables in the chapter for your model type.

7.Reconnect the power cords for the computer and monitor to electrical outlets.

8.Insert the POST/BIOS update (flash) diskette into drive A, and turn on the computer and the monitor.

9.After the update session is completed, there will be no video and the series of beeps will end. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive, and turn off the computer and monitor.

10.Unplug the power cords from electrical outlets.

11.Remove the cover. See Removing the cover in the chapter for your model type.

12.Remove any adapters that impede access to the BIOS Configuration jumper.

13.Replace the Clear CMOS/Recovery jumper to its original position.

14.Replace any adapters that were removed.

15.Replace the cover and reconnect any cables that were disconnected.

16.Turn on the computer to restart the operating system.

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Appendix B. Cleaning the mouse

This appendix provides instructions on how to clean your mouse. The procedure will be different depending on which type of mouse you have.

Cleaning an optical mouse

If you experience some problems with your optical mouse, check the following:

1.Turn the mouse over and look carefully at the lens area.

a.If there is a smudge on the lens, gently clean the area with a plain cotton swab or plain q-tip.

b.If there is some debris in the lens, gently blow the debris away from the area.

2.Check the surface you are using the mouse on. If you have a very intricate picture or pattern beneath the mouse it is difficult for the digital signal processor (DSP) to determine changes in the mouse position.

Cleaning a mouse with a ball

If the pointer on the screen does not move smoothly with the mouse, you might need to clean the mouse.

Note: The following illustration might be slightly different from your mouse.

1 Retainer ring 2 Ball

3 Plastic rollers 4 Ball cage

To clean a mouse with a ball:

1.Turn off your computer.

2.Turn the mouse over, with the top side down, and look carefully at the bottom. Twist the retainer ring1to the unlocked position to remove the ball.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004

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3.Place your hand over the retainer ring and ball2, and then turn the mouse over, top side up, so that the retainer ring and ball fall out into your hand.

4.Wash the ball in warm, soapy water then dry it with a clean cloth. Blow air carefully into the ball cage4to dislodge dust and lint.

5.Look for a build up of dirt on the plastic rollers3inside the ball cage. This build up usually appears as a stripe running across the middle of the rollers.

6.If the rollers are dirty, clean them by using a cotton swab soaked in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol. Turn the rollers with your finger and continue swabbing them until all the dirt is removed. Be sure the rollers are still centered in their channels after you clean them.

7.Remove any fibers from the swab that might be remaining on the rollers.

8.Replace the ball and the retainer ring.

9.Turn your computer back on.

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