Intel 520T User Manual

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Intel® Express 520T

Switch

User Guide

717285-002

Year 2000 capable

An Intel product, when used in accordance with associated documentation, is “Year 2000 Capable” when, upon installation, it accurately stores, displays, processes, provides, and/or receives data from, into, and between the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including leap year calculations, provided that all other technology used in combination with said product properly exchanges date data with it.

Copyright © 1999, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.

Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124-6497

Intel Corporation assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in this manual. Nor does Intel make any commitment to update the information contained herein.

*Other product and corporate names may be trademarks of other companies and are used only for explanation and to the owners’ benefit, without intent to infringe.

Second edition

August 1999

717285-002

Contents

Chapter 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

1

Introduction to the product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Before Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Positioning and Installing the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Installing a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Connecting Other Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Connecting the Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 The Power Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Power up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Other LEDs on the front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Chapter 2 Intel Device View

17

System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Installation and Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Removal of Intel Device View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Using Intel Device View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Before a switch is contacted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 After a Switch or Stack is Contacted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Setting the Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Installing and Managing Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Device Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Device View (Main Display) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Diagnostics Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Trap Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 System Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Errors Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

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C O N T E N T S

Chapter 3 Standard Configuration

41

Changing the Setup of the Switch or Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Internet Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Local Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Permanent Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Link Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Port Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Local Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 TFTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Adaptive Forwarding Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Spanning Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Changing the Setup of the Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 General Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Port Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Port Specific Spanning Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Chapter 4 Advanced Configuration

65

VLANs (Virtual LANs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

IGMP pruning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Chapter 5 Managing the Switch

71

Management using Intel Device View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

72

Information about the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

72

Monitoring the Switch’s Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

73

Monitoring using RMON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

Monitoring the Stack’s Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

78

Monitoring VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

83

Monitoring the Port’s Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

86

Tools for the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

90

Ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

90

Report Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

91

Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

91

Recovery Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

94

DNS IP Conversion Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

94

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C O N T E N T S

Tools for the Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Stack Synchronization Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Switch Position Organizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Color Code Matrix Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Chapter 6 Technical Specifications

99

Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

Power Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Chapter 7 Console Port Use and Troubleshooting

105

Use of the Console Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Recovering from Start-up Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Using Maintenance Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Troubleshooting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Troubleshooting Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Isolating the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Further Evaluation of the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Typical Problems and Causes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Start-up Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Performance Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Communication Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Reporting the Problem to Intel Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Retrieving Information for Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Appendix A Limited Hardware Warranty

119

Limited Hardware Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Limited Hardware Warranty (Europe only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Manufacturer Declaration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 WARNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 WARNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 AVERTISSEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 WARNUNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 AVVERTENZA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 ADVERTENCIAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Automated Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Customer Support Technicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

v

Preface

Information sources for

This User Guide is one of three sources of information delivered with

this switch

this switch.

 

 

 

Information type...

Given in...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting started quickly

Quick Start (printed)

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to customize your switch

User Guide (printed)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Context sensitive help

Help (online)

 

 

Quick Start description

A printed guide that describes these basic steps:

 

Connect the switch

 

 

Start the switch (using the default settings)

 

Start Intel Device View

 

 

Change the setup

 

 

Save a new setup to the memory

 

 

Access Local Management

 

 

And, the legal declarations and warnings

User Guide description

A printed guide containing full instructions on how to install the

(this guide)

switch and operate the switch using Intel Device View.

Help description

Online, context-sensitive help text for each dialog box, providing in-

 

formation about the permitted limits for the parameters used.

vii

P R E F A C E

Warning Electrostatic Sensitive Device

Electrostatic Sensitive Device

Do not handle the printed circuit board unless the working area is static-free!

0887

Products covered

This User Guide gives you instructions on how to use:

 

Intel Express 520T Switch

 

Intel Device View

Prerequisite knowledge

This User Guide is intended for personnel authorized to configure and

 

manage local area networks. We assume that the person has an ad-

 

vanced technical background within data communication and net-

 

works.

 

Opening this product must be done only by a network manager or per-

 

son who is qualified and authorized to install electrical equipment,

 

and who is aware of the hazards to which he/she is exposed. This per-

 

son must have an advanced technical background within data com-

 

munications and networks.

Conventions in this manual

This manual uses the following conventions:

 

File names, commands and examples

All file names, commands and examples are shown in the COURIER typeface.

Menu and submenu names

Menus, for example File or View, are shown in normal typeface with lowercase and uppercase letters displayed as shown on the screen.

viii

P R E F A C E

Access to submenus

You access submenus using a menu hierarchy. These are shown by use of angle brackets and the courier typeface. For example, File>Configuration>Setup shows that to select the Setup submenu you must first click File and then Configuration.

Acronyms

ARP

Address Resolution Protocol

 

ASIC

Application-Specific Integrated Circuit

 

AUI

Attachment Unit Interface

 

BPDU

Bridge Protocol Data Unit

 

CRC

Cyclic Redundancy Check

 

DHCP

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

 

ICMP

Internet Control Message Protocol

 

IGMP

Internet Group Message Protocol (for IP Multicast)

 

IEEE

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers

 

IP

Internet Protocol

 

LAN

Local Area Network

 

MIB

Management Information Base

 

RAM

Random Access Memory

 

RMON

Remote Monitoring

 

RIP

Routing Information Protocol

 

RSVP

Resource Reservation Protocol

 

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol

 

STP

Spanning Tree Protocol

 

TFTP

Trivial File Transfer Protocol

 

ToS

Type of Service

 

UDP

User Datagram Protocol

 

VLAN

Virtual Local Area Network

ix

Intel Express 520T

1 Switch

In this chapter

This chapter covers the following topics.

 

 

Topic

See Page

 

 

 

 

Introduction to the product

2

 

 

 

 

Front Panel

3

 

 

 

 

Rear Panel

5

 

 

 

 

Installation

5

 

 

 

1

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

 

Introduction to the product

Purpose of the switch

The Intel Express 520T Switch uses your existing network cables to

 

integrate switching technology into your computer network.

 

Each device in a workgroup or a network segment can communicate

 

at a full wire-speed of 10Mbps or 100Mbps to provide:

 

High-speed connectivity

 

Simultaneous two-way communication between connected

 

 

devices

 

Increased network throughput and performance

 

Increased server availability

Physical features

This switch offers the following features:

 

Plug-and-play—no need to configure the module to use the basic

 

 

operations

 

12 x 10/100Mbps connections

 

Two option slots for modules

 

Front panel LEDs that show switch, port and traffic status

 

Automatic detection of 110V and 240V power supplies

Hardware features

The switch offers the following features:

 

Each port can operate in one of three switching modes: cut-

 

 

through, fragment-free or store-and-forward

 

Each port supports halfand full-duplex operation

 

Simultaneous full wire-speed switching on all ports

 

RMON support for Statistics, History, Alarm and Events

 

Spanning tree support on all ports

 

Flow control

 

Permanent MAC address entries

2

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Software features The switch offers the following features:

Intel Device View for Windows* 95, Windows* 98 and Windows NT* or Intel Device View for Web

Adaptive forwarding mode

Local Management via a direct terminal connection or via TELNET

SNMP Management support

BOOTP and TFTP support

Control over user access rights

Creation of virtual LANs

Stand-alone (per switch or stack) or distributed (switch network) VLAN

IGMP Pruning

Introduction

View of the front panel

Front Panel

The LEDs on the front panel show the status of the ports, so you should position the switch with the front panel facing you. You can also see which ports the cables are connected to on the switch.

The front panel of the switch is shown below:

 

 

 

 

Slot A

 

 

 

 

 

 

SlotB

LEDsGreenOrange

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off

10Mbps

Halfduplex

®

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solid

100Mbps

Fullduplex

Intel Express

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PortStatus

520T Switch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status

Power

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEDsGreenOrange

 

Temperature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solid

Link

Disable

Reset

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blink

Activity

Collision

RPS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

 

 

 

 

Console

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9600-8-N-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1733

3

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Front panel ports

These ports are on the front panel:

 

Port

Function

 

 

 

 

CONSOLE port

Connects a PC (running a VT100 emula-

 

(DB-9)

tion), a VT100 terminal or a modem to

 

 

access the built-in Local Management pro-

 

 

gram.

 

 

 

 

12 x 10/100Base-

Connects devices using Unshielded Twisted

 

TX ports (RJ-45)

Pair (UTP) cabling complying to EIA 568A

 

 

Category 5 or ISO/IEC 11801 Category 5

 

 

level D.

 

 

Slots for modules

After removing one or both of the cover plates, the modules can be

 

inserted to expand the functionality of the switch.

Front panel LED functions

The LEDs on the front panel have the following functions:

 

LED

Shows the status for...

 

 

 

 

Port LEDs -

The operation of each port.

 

Green and Orange

 

 

 

 

 

Status

The operation of the switch.

 

 

 

 

Power

The internal power supply.

 

 

 

 

Temperature

The internal temperature.

 

 

 

 

RPS (redundant

The external, redundant power supply.

 

power supply)

 

 

 

Buttons

The buttons on the front panel have the following functions:

 

Button name

Function

 

 

 

 

Port Status

Shows the operational status of each port.

 

 

 

 

Reset

Reset or enter Maintenance Mode or Recov-

 

 

ery Mode

 

 

 

4

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Introduction

View of rear panel

Rear panel parts

Rear Panel

The rear panel has a cooling fan outlet and the main supply cable, so you should position the switch with the rear panel facing away from you.

The rear panel of the switch is shown below:

Input

100-120VAC/2A

200-240VAC/1A

47Hz-63Hz

Redundant Power Supply (RPS)

1741

The switch’s rear panel has the following parts:

Part

Function

Fan outlet

Cools the internal circuitry of the switch.

 

 

Power connection

A socket to connect the power cord to the

 

main supply.

 

 

Redundant power

Connects an external redundant power sup-

supply connector

ply. If the internal power supply fails, the

 

redundant power supply starts immediately.

 

 

 

Installation

Important

You must adhere to all local and national regulations governing the

 

installation and connection of electrical devices when installing the

 

switch.

5

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Before Installation

Contents of the pack

Unpack the switch carefully and check that these parts are present:

 

Item

Present?

 

 

 

 

One Intel Express 520T Switch

 

 

 

 

 

One power cord (suitable for your

 

 

power outlet)

 

 

 

 

 

One mounting kit

 

 

 

 

 

One CD-ROM

 

 

 

 

 

One Console cable

 

 

 

 

 

One Quick Start

 

 

 

 

 

One User Guide (you are reading it)

 

 

 

 

 

Late-breaking News

 

 

 

 

 

Intel Support Service papers

 

 

 

Check the package

If you have not received all of the parts, or any of the parts are dam-

contents

aged, contact your dealer immediately.

 

 

Keep all the packaging materials in case you need to repack the

 

switch.

 

Check all labels

Read all labels and rating plates on the switch. If there is anything that

 

you do not understand, or if any of the information provided does not

 

appear to comply with your local or national rules and regulations,

 

consult your dealer before proceeding with the installation.

Essential reading

It is important that you read the following:

 

 

“Late-breaking News”.

 

This contains essential information you should be aware of when installing and using the product; for example, limitations and compatibility issues.

Warnings and the instructions earlier in this guide.

The README.TXT file on the CD-ROM. This gives a general description of the software and specific requirements.

6

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

 

Positioning and Installing the Switch

 

 

 

 

Allow adequate ventilation

The switch contains two fans to air-cool the internal circuitry. The air

 

 

is drawn in from the left of the unit and expelled through the outlet

 

 

grills on the right side and the rear.

 

 

To ensure correct airflow, leave 100 mm (4 inches) free space on both

 

 

sides and behind the switch. Do not allow the intake or outlet grills to

 

 

become blocked.

 

On a desktop

To install the switch in a desktop environment:

 

 

1 Find the four rubber feet in the pack that contains the rack

 

 

mounting kit.

 

 

2 Remove the backing strip from each of the four feet.

 

 

3 Attach the four rubber feet to the underside of the switch (to

 

 

ensure that the switch stands firmly).

 

 

4 Place the switch on a stable, flat surface.

 

 

5 Ensure that the air intake (on the left) and fan outlets (on the

 

 

right side and rear) are not blocked.

 

 

Warning The switch’s lifetime and operational reliability can

 

 

be seriously degraded by inadequate cooling.

 

Rack requirements

Install the switch in a standard rack in accordance with IEC 297 (or

 

 

similar); if the minimum outside measurements of the rack are 600 x

 

 

600 mm (23.5 x 23.5 inches), you must allow 190 mm (7.5 inches) of

 

 

space at the rear.

 

Mounting kit

The switch is delivered with a kit to attach it to a standard 19-inch

 

 

equipment rack (with side support rails). The kit contains two mount-

 

 

ing brackets and four screws (for attaching the brackets to the sides

 

 

of the switch).

 

Tools required for

In addition to the mounting kit, you need the following items to

 

positioning in a rack

mount the switch in a rack:

 

 

Standard 19-inch rack with side support rails.

 

 

3 mm screwdriver.

 

7

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

 

Customer-supplied screws for securing the switch in the rack.

 

Mounting screws are not provided because the required sizes

 

may vary from rack to rack.

In an equipment rack

To mount the switch in a standard equipment rack:

 

1 Attach the mounting bracket marked “Left” to the left-hand side

 

of the switch, and attach the mounting bracket marked “Right”

 

to the right-hand side of the switch, using the four screws pro-

 

vided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slot A

Slot B

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

LEDs

Green

Orange

 

 

Off

10 Mbps

Half duplex

®

 

Solid

100 Mbps

Full duplex

Intel Express

 

 

Port Status

520T Switch

 

 

 

 

Status

Power

LEDs

Green

Orange

Temperature

Reset

Solid

Link

Disable

RPS

Blink

Activity

Collision

 

 

 

 

 

Console

 

 

 

 

9600-8-N-1

1734

Make sure that you attach the mounting brackets to the correct sides. Otherwise the switch will not align correctly in the equipment rack.

 

2

If the four rubber feet prevent the switch from standing firmly

 

 

on the equipment rack’s side support rails, remove them.

 

3

Set the switch in the equipment rack, and make sure there is

 

 

adequate space for air flow around the switch (see “Allow ade-

 

 

quate ventilation” in “Positioning and Installing the Switch”, p.

 

 

7).

 

4

Screw the mounting brackets securely to the equipment rack.

Ambient temperature

If the switch is installed in a closed or multi-rack assembly, the oper-

 

ating ambient temperature of the rack environment may be greater

 

than the ambient temperature of the room. Make sure that the temper-

 

ature of the rack environment does not exceed the recommended op-

 

erating temperature for the switch.

8

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

 

Installing a Module

 

 

 

 

Introduction

You can increase the connectivity options of your switch by installing

 

 

a module.

 

 

Warning Modules are not designed to be installed in, or removed

 

 

 

from, the switch while it is in operation. You must

 

 

 

power off the switch before attempting to install or

 

 

 

remove a module.

 

Static-free working area

The module’s printed circuit board is an Electrostatic Sensitive De-

 

 

vice and should be handled only in a static-free working area; other-

 

 

wise, the printed circuit board may fail or be degraded.

 

Avoiding damage to the

If you remove the plate covering the slot on the front of the switch,

 

circuit board

for example, to install or remove a module, follow this procedure to

 

 

avoid damage to your printed circuit board:

 

 

Warning Do not remove the plate unless the switch is discon-

 

 

 

nected from the main power supply.

 

 

1

Disconnect the switch from the main power supply.

 

 

2

Ground the switch before you handle the printed circuit board.

 

 

3

Connect yourself to a non-painted/non-isolated part of the

 

 

 

grounded switch (for example the back panel) using a wrist

 

 

 

strap with 1MΩ resistance to ensure that you carry the same

 

 

 

electrostatic charge as the enclosure.

 

 

4

Remove the plate covering the slot.

 

Installing a module

To install a module:

 

 

1

If the switch is already operational, disconnect it from the main

 

 

 

power supply.

 

 

2

Follow the instructions in “Avoiding damage to the circuit

 

 

 

board” above.

 

 

3

Unscrew the screws of the plate covering the slot on the front of

 

 

 

the switch. Save these screws and plate.

 

 

4

Insert the module into the slot (following the instructions in the

 

 

 

module’s User Guide). Place your thumbs just beneath the

 

 

 

screws on the front panel of the module and push in the module.

 

 

 

Secure it using the retaining screws.

 

9

C H A P T E R 1

Intel Express 520T Switch

 

 

 

 

Removing the module

To remove a module:

 

 

1 If the switch is already operational, disconnect it from the main

 

power supply.

 

 

2 Follow the instructions in “Avoiding damage to the circuit

 

board” above.

 

 

3 Unscrew the screws securing the module.

 

4 Pull the module gently to disengage the connectors fully from

 

the socket on the motherboard. Slide the module out com-

 

pletely.

 

 

5 Cover the empty module port with the plate and secure using

 

the screws.

 

 

Connecting Other Devices

Introduction

Incorrect cabling is often the cause of network configuration prob-

 

lems

 

Use shielded cables

Shielded cables normally comply with EMC and FCC emission lim-

 

its.

 

 

Only use unshielded cables when it is explicitly specified in the in-

 

stallation manual of the device in question.

Cables for the LAN Ports

Ports on the switch are wired MDI-X, so use the following cable:

 

If you connect the switch to a...

Then use a...

 

 

 

 

Workstation or server

Straight-through cable 1:1

 

 

 

 

Device with MDI-X ports (for exam-

Crossover cable

 

ple another Intel switch or hub)

 

 

 

 

 

Device with MDI ports

Straight-through cable 1:1

 

 

 

10

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

RJ-45 connector pin

The RJ-45 ports on the front of the switch have the following pin as-

 

 

assignments

signments:

 

 

 

 

 

Pin number

Function

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

RX+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

RX-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

TX+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

TX-

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting a device to the

To connect a workstation compatible with IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet Ver-

 

RJ-45 ports

sion 1.0 and 2.0) or a fast access device (such as a server) to the

 

 

switch’s RJ-45 ports using UTP cable (Category 5):

 

 

1 Make sure that the device has a 100Mbps (100Base-FX or 10/

 

 

100Base-TX) network interface card installed.

 

 

If not, use your network interface card’s documentation to

 

 

install and configure it correctly.

 

 

2 If your workstation is fitted with an RJ-45 interface then there is

 

 

no problem. However, it is possible to attach to other connector

 

 

types using an appropriate adapter. For example, use a UTP/

 

 

10Base-FL adapter for fiber connections

 

 

3 Connect one end of the UTP cable to an RJ-45 port on the

 

 

switch.

 

 

 

 

 

According to IEEE 802.3, the cable length must not exceed 100

 

 

meters (approximately 325 feet).

 

 

4 Connect the other end to the 100Base-TX connection on the

 

 

device.

 

 

 

 

Connecting the

To manage the switch from a PC connected directly to the switch, the

 

management PC

PC must not use frame tagging. To manage the switch from a PC with

 

 

IEEE 802.1Q tagged frames, management must be through a device

 

 

which untags the frames.

 

Cable for the Console Port

If you connect a PC (via the Console Port), then use a null-modem ca-

 

 

ble.

 

 

 

 

11

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

 

Connecting the Power

Introduction

After connecting the devices to the switch, connect the power cable.

 

There are certain practical and safety considerations to be made be-

 

fore powering the switch on.

 

 

The Power Cable

 

Ground warning

The switch is delivered with a power cable that fits the power sockets

 

in your country. If this is not the case, contact your dealer immediate-

 

ly and ask for the correct power cable.

Power cable wiring color

The wires in the power cable provided are color coded:

code

 

 

 

Color

Connection

 

 

 

 

Green and yellow

Ground

 

 

 

 

Blue

Neutral

 

 

 

 

Brown

Live

 

 

Important for UK use

If the colors of the wires in the power cable provided do not corre-

 

spond with the markings that identify the terminals in your plug:

 

1 Make sure that the green and yellow wire is connected to the

 

terminal marked with the letter E, or with the ground symbol

 

, or is colored green and yellow.

 

2 Make sure that the blue wire is connected to the terminal

 

marked with the letter N or colored black.

 

3 Make sure that the brown wire is connected to the terminal

 

marked with the letter L or colored red.

Power supply to a rack

If the switch is installed in a rack, make sure the rack’s power supply

 

socket has a ground connection and the rack is connected to a branch

 

supply or a power supply socket with a ground connection.

To avoid overloading the circuit and damaging the wiring of the power supply, the power supply to the rack must be adequate to cover the extra power consumed by the switch.

12

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Power up

Powering up the switch Follow these steps to power up the switch:

1Push the female end of the power cable into the main socket (in the rear panel); plug the other end into the power supply outlet.

2Make sure that the Power LED (on the front panel) is green.

If it isn’t green, make sure that the power outlet is working correctly (switched on). If the power outlet is on and the Power LED is not green, then there is a fault within the switch and you must contact your dealer.

3Verify that an LED is lit for each of the front panel ports where a powered on device is connected.

Start-up procedure

Immediately after power-up, the following should happen during

 

start-up:

 

 

 

 

 

Stage

STATUS LED...

 

Then the switch...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Is red

 

Is starting up

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Turns to steady green

Has started successfully

 

 

 

 

If the Status LED remains red, then the switch has not started success-

 

fully. Try to restart it; if the switch does not start, contact your dealer.

 

Look at the other front panel LEDs during start-up and check that

 

they are operating correctly.

 

Port LED states

The LEDs reflect the state of each port:

 

 

LED

 

Indicates

 

 

 

 

 

 

No lights

Port enabled, no link.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green, blinking

Port enabled, RX/TX traffic, link pulse

 

 

randomly

active.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green, solid

Port enabled, link pulse active.

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

LED

Indicates

Green and Orange both

Collision detected (with half duplex).

blinking randomly

Port enabled, link pulse active.

 

 

Orange, solid

Port disabled by management.

 

 

Green and Orange both

Port disabled by a hardware fault, or no

solid

hardware connected.

 

 

Default settings after start-

Once the switch has started successfully, installation is complete and

up

the switch is using its default setting (also known as default configu-

 

ration):

 

All ports are enabled.

 

All ports operate in auto-negotiation mode.

 

Spanning Tree is disabled on all ports.

 

Addresses that have been silent for more than 15 minutes are

 

purged from the switch’s address table (the MAC Address Aging

 

time).

 

No access restrictions to Local Management (Telnet).

 

No SNMP restrictions.

 

No permanent MAC address entries defined. A permanent entry

 

is a MAC address that is defined as being permitted only on a

 

certain port. This can be a useful security feature.

 

All ports are in the same VLAN (named <System>) and VLAN

 

mode (Stand-alone mode). VLANs allow you to create virtual

 

networks using specific switch ports, IP addresses, IP subnets

 

and MAC addresses.

 

Flow Control is enabled on all ports.

 

The connection with Local Management is timed-out after 10

 

minutes if there has been no input during this period.

After start-up

This default configuration is adequate for simple workgroup environ-

 

ments to operate in basic switching mode.

 

Although the switch continues to operate without problems, we rec-

 

ommend that you change certain parameters to suit your own require-

 

ments.

14

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Follow the instructions in Chapter 2 to change the configuration while the switch is operating.

Other LEDs on the front panel

Introduction

There are three other LEDs and one button on the front panel that

 

show how the switch is operating:

 

Status LED

 

 

 

Temperature LED

 

 

Redundant Power Supply (RPS) LED

 

Port Status button

 

LED colors and their

The LEDs give information about the state of the switch:

meanings

 

 

 

 

 

 

LED

Color

Meaning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status

Green

Solid: The switch is operating normally.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blinking (1 Hz): Updating software or

 

 

 

 

running in recovery mode.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blinking (5 Hz): Running in mainte-

 

 

 

 

nance mode.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red

The switch is resetting, or either hard-

 

 

 

 

ware or software errors are detected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Temperature

Green

Normal operating temperature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orange

Temperature is higher than normal.

 

 

 

 

Check that the area around the air intakes

 

 

 

 

and vents are clear of obstructions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red

Temperature is too high and the switch

 

 

 

 

will shut down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RPS

Green

Off: No RPS connected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solid: RPS connected, but not needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orange

Normal power supply has failed and the

 

 

 

 

RPS has taken over.

 

 

 

 

 

15

C H A P T E R 1 Intel Express 520T Switch

Port Status button

To see the speed and duplex settings of all the ports, press the Port

 

Status button. The function of the port LEDs changes for a period

 

of 5 seconds, where they have the following meaning:

LED

Color

Meaning

Left (Speed)

Green

Off: 10Mbps

 

 

 

 

 

Solid: 100Mbps

 

 

 

Right

Orange

Off: Half duplex

(Duplex)

 

 

 

Solid: Full duplex

 

 

 

 

 

16

2

Intel Device View

 

 

In this chapter

This chapter covers the following topics.

 

 

Topic

See Page

 

 

 

 

System Requirements

18

 

 

 

 

Installation and Removal

19

 

 

 

 

Using Intel Device View

20

 

 

 

 

Installing and Managing Switches

26

 

 

 

 

Device Tree

29

 

 

 

 

Device View (Main Display)

31

 

 

 

 

Explorer

36

 

 

 

 

Diagnostics Window

37

 

 

 

 

Trap Window

38

 

 

 

 

System Window

39

 

 

 

 

Errors Window

39

 

 

 

17

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

System Requirements

Requirements for Intel

You need a PC with the following minimum requirements to run Intel

Device View under

Device View:

Windows

Microsoft Windows NT workstation or server, version 4.0, or

 

 

Microsoft Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98.

 

(Windows NT 4.0 English language version workstation recom-

 

mended.)

 

A network adapter installed.

 

30 MB of free hard disk space.

 

A color display with 800 x 600 resolution and 256 colors.

 

The Microsoft IP protocol must be installed and configured

 

before installation of Intel Device View.

DHCP limitation

Three important things to know:

 

Do not use a PC running Windows NT server (with its DHCP

 

server installed) to run Intel Device View.

 

Ensure the IP address for the PC is not changed by the DHCP

 

server.

 

PCs that use a network management system that uses BootP,

 

DHCP or SNMP Trap Receiving, may have their network man-

 

agement system disabled by Intel Device View.

Management PC

To manage the switch from a PC connected directly to the switch, the

restrictions

PC must not use frame tagging. To manage the switch from a PC with

 

IEEE 802.1Q tagged frames, management must be through a device

 

which untags the frames.

Requirements for Intel Device View on the Web server

You need a PC with the following minimum requirements to run Intel Device View:

One of the following running: Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Server with Internet Information Server (IIS) 2.0 or later; or Windows NT Workstation with Peer Web Services.

30 MB of free hard disk space.

The Microsoft IP protocol must be installed and configured before installation of Intel Device View.

18

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Web server restrictions

Requirements for Intel Device View on the Web client

To manage the switch from a web server connected directly to the switch, the web server must not use frame tagging. To manage the switch from a web server with IEEE 802.1Q tagged frames, management must be through a device which untags the frames.

To run Intel Device View, the client requires:

Microsoft Internet Explorer (4.00) running on Windows 95 or Windows 98 or Windows NT 4.0.

A color display with a minimum of 800 x 600 resolution and 256 colors.

Requirements for Intel

To run Intel Device View with a plugin, the PC must be running HP

Device View with plugin

OpenView* or Intel LANDesk Manager.

Installation and Removal

To start the installation of Intel Device View

Normally, the Setup program for Intel Device View will start automatically after you insert the compact disc (CD) in your CD ROM drive. However, if it does not, use the standard Windows procedures for installing programs. A screen similar to the one below is displayed:

19

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

To install Intel Device View for Windows

To install Intel Device View for Web

To install Intel Device View when using HP OpenView* or Intel LANDesk®Manager

Click Install Windows and follow the on-screen instructions. When the installation is complete, Intel Device View will start automatically when “Launch Intel Device View” is selected.

Click Install Web and follow the on-screen instructions. When the installation is complete, Intel Device View will start automatically when “Launch Intel Device View” is selected.

Click Install Plugin and follow the on-screen instructions. When the installation is complete, Intel Device View starts automatically when “Launch Intel Device View” is selected.

Removal of Intel Device View

Removal under Windows To remove Intel Device View under Windows:

1 Close all Intel Device View programs.

2 Use standard Windows procedures to uninstall Intel Device View.

 

Using Intel Device View

Concept

Intel Device View configures all the parameters on your switch, or

 

group of switches known from here on as a stack, (via SNMP) and

 

monitors their activities.

20

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Navigating through Intel

Many commands are available from within Intel Device View. These

 

Device View

are best accessed using mouse actions. However, Windows users can

 

 

also access most of them through the menu bar.

 

 

 

 

The Intel Device View

There are three sections:

 

window

Device Tree — displays the separate branches on your LAN,

 

 

 

 

including a branch showing all unconfigured devices.

 

 

Interactive picture of the switch, or stack — shows the port state

 

 

or the Explorer, which provides port and VLAN details for the

 

 

switch or stack.

 

 

Information section — provides details about diagnostics, traps,

 

 

errors and the system. Using this window, you can show activity

 

 

statistics for the switch (or the stack) and for individual ports.

 

 

Before a switch is contacted

Basic menu bar

Before a switch or stack is contacted, the following commands are

commands

available through the menu bar. The toolbar buttons are for users us-

 

ing Intel Device View in Windows.

File menu

This contains one command, Exit which enables you to exit the Intel

 

Device View. When a switch or stack is open and the configuration

 

has been changed and not saved to the Flash Memory as the perma-

 

nent configuration, you are asked if you want to save the new config-

 

uration before exiting.

 

Device menu

The Device menu contains the following switch commands:

 

Install — enables you to install a new device, which does not

 

have an IP address, in Intel Device View. Can also be accessed

 

by selecting

.

 

 

Manage — enables a switch or stack that has an IP address

 

already assigned to be managed or configured. Can also be

 

accessed by selecting

.

Discover — enables you to set up how the Device Tree discovers devices and users.

Note: do not leave the Subnet Mask blank or set to 0.0.0.0, as Intel Device View will continually broadcast device discovery messages to all networks and use bandwidth.

21

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

A list of IP addresses — contains the last eight switches successfully contacted from Intel Device View. These can be used to manage the switch.

View menu — for

The View menu allows you to customize the Intel Device View dis-

Windows users only

play to your own preferences: the Toolbar and Status Bar can be

 

switched on and off.

 

 

Monitoring menu

This menu gives access to set the Default Preferences for Intel Device

 

View, see “Setting the Preferences”, p. 24.

 

Tools menu

The Tools menu has the following commands:

 

 

Ping — sends ICMP echo packets to the switch. Can also be

 

 

accessed by selecting

.

 

 

A Report Manager — uploads reports, logs and the parameter

 

block from the switch. Can also be accessed by selecting

.

 

A Recovery Manager — regains control of your switch if you

 

have lost contact. This is described in “Recovery Manager”, p. 94.

A DNS-IP conversion tool converts DNS names to IP addresses.

These are described in detail, together with switch specific tools, in the Chapter “Managing the Switch”, p. 71.

Help menu

The Help menu has the following commands for the switch:

 

Help for Intel Device View. Can also be accessed by selecting the

 

 

Help icon

then clicking on the feature of interest

 

Help for switch specific topics.

22

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

After a Switch or Stack is Contacted

 

 

 

Commands

When Intel Device View contacts a switch, the basic commands are

 

 

supplemented with:

 

 

Local Management access — provides Telnet access to monitor-

 

 

ing functions embedded in the switch.

 

 

RMON facility — gathers information about the network traffic,

 

 

monitors traffic on subnets and enables you to define alarms on

 

 

the individual ports.

 

 

Stack Synchronization Manager (for stacks only) — enables you

 

 

to establish a stack from a group of switches connected via a

 

 

Matrix Module, or add a switch to an existing stack and then syn-

 

 

chronize their configurations.

 

 

Switch Position Organizer (for stacks only) — enables you to

 

 

move the switches displayed on screen around in the stack.

 

 

Color Code Matrix Ports (for stacks only) — colors the individ-

 

 

ual ports on the Matrix Module. This simplifies the task of trac-

 

 

ing cables, as the ports on the Stack Interface Modules become

 

 

the same color as the corresponding Matrix Module port.

 

 

A color coding chart for Intel Device View to show the states of

 

 

switch’s LEDs

 

23

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

Setting the Preferences

Setting the polling

The polling intervals determine how often Intel Device View contacts

intervals

the switch or stack and updates the status and information displayed.

 

To change the polling parameters:

 

1 Select Monitoring>Preferences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2Click Polling or Monitor.

3If you want the polling to happen more frequently than just on opening, click Periodically.

4Move the Interval slider to the required time.

5Click OK.

24

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Setting the timeout

The timeout determines the intervals between polling and the number

 

parameters for SNMP

of times the request is retried if a device is not responding. To change

 

 

the timeout parameters:

 

 

1

Select Monitoring>Preferences.

 

 

 

 

2

Click Timeouts.

 

 

3

Change the values.

 

4

Click OK.

Setting the community for

The community for SNMP polling determines access rights. To

SNMP polling

change the community:

 

1

Select Monitoring>Preferences.

 

2

Click Community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3Type the new community name.

4Click OK.

25

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

Installing and Managing

 

Switches

Following installation of

After installing Intel Device View, you can add new switches, estab-

Intel Device View

lish or expand stacks of switches, and manage existing switches and

 

stacks.

Adding new switches

To add new switches (that have not been assigned an IP address) to

 

Intel Device View, select Device>Install. The Install Wizard

 

will start and guide you through the installation.

The Install Wizard

The Install Wizard requires that you enter a minimum amount of in-

 

formation to set up the switch for management by Intel Device View.

 

To select the correct new device, you need to know the device’s MAC

 

address. You can find this on a label on the rear panel of the device.

 

You must assign an IP address (and subnet mask) to the switch on

 

your Local Area Network (LAN).

Intel Device View uses this address for configuration and management purposes.

26

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Matrix Module connected When the Install wizard detects that a new switch is connected to a to a new switch Matrix Module, a message informs that you must decide how to man-

age the switch.

If you want to manage it separately, the installation is completed and the switch is displayed in the Intel Device View window. If you want to manage it as part of a stack, you have the opportunity to assign consecutive IP addresses in the next dialog.

The Synchronization Wizard completes the installation. The complete stack, including the new switch, then appears in the Intel Device View window. The Synchronization wizard is described in detail in “Stack Synchronization Manager”, p. 95.

Managing an existing

To manage a switch or stack that has an IP address already assigned:

switch or stack

1

Select Device>Manage The Manage dialog box appears.

 

 

2

Type in the switch’s IP Address or MAC address.

27

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

3

Select the box if you want to open the switch in a new Intel

 

 

Device View window.

 

4

Click OK.

Establishing and

If you connect switches that already have IP addresses assigned to-

expanding a stack

gether via a Matrix Module, you can manage them as a stack. To cre-

 

ate or expand an existing stack:

 

1

Select Device>Manage, and the Manage dialog opens.

 

2

Type in the IP Address or MAC address of one of the switches.

 

 

All the switches connected via the Matrix Module are displayed

 

 

in this window, even switches that are already configured as a

 

 

stack.

3If the switches don’t have compatible software, the Upgrade box is checked. If one or more of the switches aren’t configured, the Configure IP address box is check.

4Select Stack Management.

5Select OK. The Upgrade Wizard starts automatically if software needs to be upgraded.

28

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

Device Tree

 

 

 

Introduction

The Device Tree displays the separate subnets on your LAN as

 

 

 

branches in a tree. This includes a branch that shows all the unconfig-

 

 

ured devices on the LAN.

 

Identifying devices

The Device Tree uses several icons to represent the individual devic-

 

es:

 

 

 

Icons

Device Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recognized as a switch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recognized as a router.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recognized as a hub.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Device contacted, but not recognized.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lost contact with device.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Installing and managing

Double clicking the switch’s IP address or MAC address opens exist-

switches

ing switches in the Intel Device View window, or starts the Install

 

Wizard for new switches.

 

Right mouse button

By positioning the mouse pointer in the Device Tree and clicking the

commands

right mouse button, the following functions are available:

 

Functions

Description

 

 

 

 

(without a device selected)

 

 

 

 

 

View

 

 

 

IP Address

Sorts the devices by their IP addresses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name

Sorts the devices by their DNS names.

 

 

 

 

Add Device

If a device has not been auto-detected

 

 

 

then you can add it to the tree. You need

 

 

 

to know its IP address.

 

 

 

 

Find

Locates a specific device by searching for

 

 

 

its IP address.

 

 

 

 

Refresh

Polls the network and redisplays the tree.

 

 

 

If a new device has been connected, it

 

 

 

will appear after a refresh.

 

 

 

(additional functions with a device selected)

 

 

 

 

Launch With

Opens the switch in Intel Device View.

 

 

 

 

Delete

Removes a device from the Device Tree.

 

 

 

 

Edit

Change the name, community settings

 

 

 

(read and write) and polling rate of the

 

 

 

device.

 

 

 

 

RMON

 

 

 

Statistics

Provides subnet management statistics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

Lists monitored traffic on a subnet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alarms

Enables activity alarms to be set.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logs

Sets events defined by Log, Trap or Log

 

 

 

and Trap.

 

 

 

 

30

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

 

Device View (Main Display)

 

 

 

Switch contacted

When Intel Device View contacts the switch or stack, the front (inter-

 

 

 

face side) of the switch or stack is displayed.

 

This view provides a real-time view of the switch, or stack and ports, which behave in the same way as the physical switch. For example, the LEDs change color according to the state of the switch/stack. You can fully manage the switch or stack using this display.

Mouse moves

Using a mouse makes it easier to operate Intel Device View and saves

 

you time:

 

 

Mouse action

Information

 

 

 

 

Right-click switch

Shows the switch-related menus for

 

 

configuration and monitoring.

 

 

 

 

Right-click stack border

Shows the stack-related menus for

 

 

configuration and monitoring.

 

 

 

 

Right-click a port

Shows the port-related menus for

 

 

configuration and monitoring.

 

 

 

 

Double left-click switch

Opens the Device Setup menu.

 

 

 

 

Double left-click a port

Opens that port’s Setup menu.

 

 

 

31

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Right mouse button commands for a single switch

Right click a single switch and Intel Device View offers:

Functions

Description

Device Setup

Displays comprehensive information

 

about the switch’s overall setup.

 

 

VLAN Setup

Provides an overview of existing VLANs

 

and the opportunity to add new ones or

 

change existing ones.

 

 

Device Information

Informs you about the type of switch, its

 

location, who is responsible for it and the

 

amount of time passed since the switch

 

was restarted.

 

 

Port Overview

Gives detailed monitoring information for

 

each port.

 

 

Device Activity

Displays, in a graph format, information

 

about the activity on the ports.

 

 

VLAN

Displays monitoring information and the

 

status of the VLAN links.

 

 

Device

Reboots the switch and provides informa-

 

tion about the firmware in the switch. Also

 

enables the switch’s firmware to be

 

upgraded.

 

 

Configuration

Ensures the switch’s configuration is safe

 

by saving it to the flash memory, by back-

 

ing up to disk and by being able to restore

 

it again should it be lost. If necessary, the

 

switch can be returned to the factory

 

default configuration.

 

 

Monitoring

Provides comprehensive details for Span-

 

ning Tree statistics and RMON facilities,

 

as well as Hardware information and an

 

Access Overview.

 

 

32

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Right mouse button

When managing a stack of switches, right click the stack border and

 

commands for a stack

Intel Device View offers:

 

border

 

 

 

 

 

Functions

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stack Setup

Displays comprehensive information

 

 

 

about the switch’s overall setup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VLAN/Routing Setup

Provides an overview of existing VLANs

 

 

 

and the opportunity to add new ones or

 

 

 

change existing ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IP Filtering Setup

Defines user groups and filters the packets

 

 

 

sent to them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stack Health Monitor

Provides the IP addresses for all the

 

 

 

switches in the stack, the type of switch

 

 

 

and whether they are responding to ping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IntraStack Traffic

Gives information about the traffic

 

 

 

through the Matrix Module.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

System Information

Gives the name and location of the stack,

 

 

 

together with a contact name and the

 

 

 

length of time the stack has been running.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stack Activity

Displays as graphs monitoring information

 

 

 

of traffic on the ports in the stack.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Port Overview

Provides port performance, packet distri-

 

 

 

bution and spanning tree information for

 

 

 

all the ports in the stack.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Device

Enables you to reboot the stack and pro-

 

 

 

vides information about the firmware in

 

 

 

the switches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

C H A P T E R 2 Intel Device View

Right mouse button commands for a switch in a stack

Functions

Description

Configuration

Ensures the stack’s configuration is safe

 

by saving it to the flash memory, by back-

 

ing up to disk and by being able to restore

 

it again should it be lost. If necessary, the

 

stack can be returned to the factory default

 

configuration.

 

 

Monitoring

Provides Hardware information about the

 

separate switches in the stacks and the

 

access rights to the devices on the LAN.

 

 

Tools

Gives access to the Synchronization Man-

 

age, the Switch Position Organizer and

 

Color Code Matrix Ports function.

 

 

When managing a stack of switches, right click a switch and Intel Device View offers:

Functions

Description

IP and Name Setup

Displays the switch’s IP address and Sub-

 

net mask.

 

 

Device Activity

Displays, in a graph format, information

 

about the activity on the ports in the switch

 

selected.

 

 

Spanning Tree

Provides statistics about the Spanning

 

Tree on the selected switch.

 

 

VLAN

Displays monitoring information and the

 

status of the VLAN links.

 

 

Device

Restarts the switch and provides informa-

 

tion about the firmware in the switch.

 

 

Configuration

Ensures the switch’s configuration is safe

 

by saving it to the flash memory.

 

 

Monitoring

Displays, as a graph, the activity on all the

 

ports in the switch and RMON facilities.

 

 

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