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RS/6000 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

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User's Guide

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SA38-0559-01

RS/6000 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

IBM

User's Guide

SA38-0559-01

Second Edition (October 2000)

Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in ªSafety Noticesº on page xi,

ªAppendix A. Environmental Noticesº on page 161, and ªAppendix B. Noticesº on page 163.

© International Business Machines Corporation 2000. All rights reserved.

Note to U.S. Government Users - Documentation related to restricted rights - Use, duplication, or disclosure is subject to the restrictions set forth in the GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp..

Contents

Safety Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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xi

Electrical Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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xi

Unit Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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xii

Laser Safety Information . . . . . . . . . .

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xii

Data Integrity and Verification . . . . . . . .

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xiii

About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . .

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xv

ISO 9000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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xv

Online Publications . . . . . . . . . . .

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xv

Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv

Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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xv

Chapter 1. Introducing the 44P Model 170 . . . . . . . . . .

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1

System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1

Bus Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Microprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1

Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1

Media Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1

Other Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2

Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2

Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2

Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2

Operator Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Input/Output Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2

Security Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2

Front View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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3

Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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4

Operator Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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6

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 . . . . . . . . . .

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7

Starting the System Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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7

Stopping the System Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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7

Reading the Operator Panel Display . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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8

Operator Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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8

Using the Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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9

Using the Three-Button Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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10

Handling the Mouse Correctly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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10

Caring for the Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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10

Cleaning the Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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11

Using the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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12

Write-Protecting 3.5-Inch Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . .

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13

Loading and Unloading the 3.5-Inch Diskette . . . . . . . . .

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14

Using the CD-ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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14

Front View of CD-ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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15

Understanding the Status Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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15

Handling Compact Discs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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16

iii

Other Handling Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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16

Loading a Compact Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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17

Opening the Tray Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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18

Playing an Audio CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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18

General Information for the 8mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . .

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18

Front View of the 8mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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19

Operating Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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20

8 mm Tape Cartridge Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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20

Tape Cartridge Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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21

Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 8 mm Tape Cartridges . . . . . . .

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21

Environmental Considerations for 8 mm Data Cartridges . . . . . . .

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22

Operating the 8mm Tape Drive in Harsh Environments . . . . . . .

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22

Erasing 8 mm Data Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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22

Using the 8mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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23

Status Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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23

Liquid Crystal Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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24

Changing the Display Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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24

Loading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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25

Unloading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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26

Cleaning the Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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27

Obtaining Additional Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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29

General information for the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . .

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29

Front View of the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . .

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30

Using the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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30

Operating Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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30

12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridge Types . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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31

Tape Cartridge Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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31

4 mm Tape Write Density Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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31

Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridges . . . . . . 32

Erasing 12/24 GB 4 mm Data Cartridge . . . . . . . . .

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32

Environmental Considerations for 12/24 GB 4 mm Data Cartridges

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32

Operating the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive in Harsh Environments .

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33

Status Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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33

Status Light States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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34

Loading the 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . .

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35

Unloading the 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . .

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36

Cleaning the Tape Path on the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive . . .

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37

Obtaining Additional Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . .

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38

Using the Service Processor and Service Director Features . . . .

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38

Service Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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38

Service Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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39

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor. . . . . . . . . .

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41

Service Processor Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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42

Service Processor Menu Inactivity . . . . . . . . . . .

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42

Accessing Service Processor Menus Locally . . . . . . . .

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42

Accessing Service Processor Menus Remotely . . . . . . .

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42

General User Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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43

Privileged User Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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44

Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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44

iv 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Service Processor Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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45

Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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45

Serial Port Snoop Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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47

System Power Control Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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48

System Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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50

Language Selection Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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53

Call-In/Call-Out Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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54

Modem Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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54

Serial Port Selection Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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55

Serial Port Speed Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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55

Telephone Number Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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56

Call-Out Policy Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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57

Customer Account Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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58

Reboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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59

Service Processor Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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60

System Power-On Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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61

Service Processor Call-In Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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62

Service Processor Reboot/Restart Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . .

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63

Boot (IPL) Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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63

Failure During Boot Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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63

Failure During Normal System Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .

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63

Service Processor Reboot/Restart Policy Controls . . . . . . . . .

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63

Processor Boot-Time Deconfiguration (CPU Repeat-Gard) . . . . . .

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63

Processor Run-Time Deconfiguration (CPU-Gard) . . . . . . . . .

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64

Memory Boot-Time Deconfiguration (Memory Repeat-Gard) . . . . . .

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64

Service Processor System Monitoring - Surveillance . . . . . . . . .

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65

System Firmware Surveillance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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65

Operating System Surveillance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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65

Call Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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66

Console Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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67

Service Processor Firmware Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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67

Service Processor Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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68

System POST Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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69

Service Processor Operational Phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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69

Pre-Standby Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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69

Standby Phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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70

Bring-Up Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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70

Run-time Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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71

Service Processor Procedures in Service Mode . . . . . . . . . . .

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71

Chapter 4. System Management Services . . . . . . . . . . . .

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73

Graphical System Management Services . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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73

Config. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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75

Multiboot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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76

Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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79

Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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80

Power-On Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Privileged-Access Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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ErrorLog . . . . . . . .

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85

RIPL . . . . . . . . .

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86

Contents v

Set Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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87

Ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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88

Config. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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90

SCSI ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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91

Firmware Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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92

Firmware Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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93

Text-Based System Management Services . . . . . . . . . . . .

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94

Display Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Multiboot Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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95

Select Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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96

Configure Nth Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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97

Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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98

Set Password and Unattended Start Mode . . . . . . . . . . .

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98

SCSI Spin Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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100

Display Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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100

Remote Initial Program Load Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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100

Change SCSI ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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103

Update System or Service Processor Firmware . . . . . . . . .

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103

Firmware Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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104

Select Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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104

Select Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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104

Open Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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105

Chapter 5. Using the Standalone and Online Diagnostics . . . . . .

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107

Standalone and Online Diagnostics Operating Considerations . . . . . .

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107

Selecting a Console Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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107

Identifying the Terminal Type to the Diagnostics Programs . . . . . .

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107

Undefined Terminal Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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108

Resetting the Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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.

108

Running Standalone Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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108

Running Online Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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108

Running Diagnostics from a TTY Terminal . . . . . . . . . . .

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109

Online Diagnostics Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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109

Service Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Concurrent Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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110

Running the Online Diagnostics in Concurrent Mode . . . . . . . .

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111

Maintenance Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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111

Running the Online Diagnostics in Maintenance Mode . . . . . . .

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111

Standalone Diagnostic Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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112

Running the Standalone Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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112

Chapter 6. Introducing Tasks and Service Aids . . . . . . . . . .

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113

Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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113

Add Resource to Resource List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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114

AIX Shell Prompt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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115

Analyze Adapter Internal Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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115

Backup and Restore Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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115

Certify Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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115

Change Hardware Vital Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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116

Configure Dials and LPFKeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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116

vi 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Configure ISA Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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117

Configure Reboot Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

117

Configure Remote Maintenance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

118

Configure Ring Indicate Power On Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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120

Configure Ring Indicate Power On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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120

Configure Service Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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120

Surveillance Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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121

Modem Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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121

Call In/Out Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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121

Site-Specific Call In/Out Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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121

Reboot/Restart Policy Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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122

Configure Surveillance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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123

Create Customized Configuration Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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123

Delete Resource from Resource List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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123

Disk Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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124

Disk to Disk Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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124

Display/Alter Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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125

Display Configuration and Resource List . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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125

Display Firmware Device Node Information . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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125

Display Hardware Error Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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125

Display Hardware Vital Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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125

Display Machine Check Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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125

Display Microcode Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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126

Display or Change Bootlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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126

Display or Change Diagnostic Run-Time Options . . . . . . . . . . .

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126

Display Previous Diagnostic Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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127

Display Resource Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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127

Display Service Hints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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128

Display Software Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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128

Display System Environmental Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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128

Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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129

Display Test Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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130

Download Microcode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

Download Microcode to PCI SCSI RAID Adapter . . . . . . . . . .

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130

Download Microcode to Disk Drive Attached to a PCI SCSI RAID Adapter

 

130

Download Microcode to a PCI FC-AL Adapter . . . . . . . . . . .

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130

Download Microcode to Other Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

131

Fiber Channel RAID Service Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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131

Flash SK-NET FDDI Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

132

Format Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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132

Hardfile Attached to SCSI Adapter (non-RAID) . . . . . . . . . . .

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132

Hardfile Attached to PCI SCSI RAID Adapter . . . . . . . . . . .

.

133

Optical Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

134

Diskette Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

134

Generic Microcode Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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134

Local Area Network Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

135

Log Repair Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

135

Periodic Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

135

PCI RAID Physical Disk Identify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

136

Process Supplemental Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

136

Contents vii

Run Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

136

Run Error Log Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

136

Run Exercisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

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.

136

Exerciser Commands (Cmd) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

136

Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

137

Memory Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

137

Save or Restore Hardware Management Policies . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

138

Save or Restore Service Processor Configuration . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

138

SCSI BUS Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

138

SCSI Device Identification and Removal . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

139

SCSI Tape Drive Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

139

Spare Sector Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

141

SSA Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

141

Update Disk-Based Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

141

Update System or Service Processor Flash . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

141

Update System Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

142

7135 RAIDiant Array Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

1432

7318 Serial Communications Network Server Service Aid . . . .

.

. .

.

.

143

Chapter 7. Using the System Verification Procedure . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

145

Step 1. Considerations before Running This Procedure . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

145

Step 2. Loading the Diagnostics. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

145

Step 3. Running System Verification . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

146

Step 4. Additional System Verification . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

146

Step 5. Stopping the Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

147

Chapter 8. Hardware Problem Determination . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

149

Problem Determination Using the Stand-alone or Online Diagnostics

.

. .

.

.

149

Step 1. Considerations before Running This Procedure . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

149

Step 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

149

Step 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

150

Step 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

150

Step 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

150

Step 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

151

Step 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

151

Step 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

151

Step 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

152

Step 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

152

Step 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

152

Step 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

153

Step 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

153

Step 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

154

Step 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

154

Step 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

154

Step 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

155

Problem Determination When Unable to Load Diagnostics . . . .

.

. .

.

.

156

Step 1. Considerations before Running This Procedure . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

156

Step 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

156

Step 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

156

Step 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

.

157

viii 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Step 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

157

Step 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

159

Step 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

159

Appendix A. Environmental Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

161

Product Recycling and Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

161

Environmental Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161

Appendix B. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

163

Appendix C. Checking the Current Firmware Levels . . . . . . .

.

.

.

165

Appendix D. General Attributes Required When Using a TTY Terminal

.

.

.

167

Additional Communication Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

168

Additional Keyboard Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

169

Additional Printer Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

170

Appendix E. Modem Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

171

Sample Modem Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

171

Configuration File Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

171

Examples for Using the Generic Sample Modem Configuration Files .

.

.

.

173

Customizing the Modem Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

173

IBM 7852-400 DIP Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

174

Xon/Xoff Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

174

Ring Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

175

Terminal Emulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

Recovery Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

175

Transfer of a Modem Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

175

Recovery Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

Prevention Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

177

Modem Configuration Samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

177

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

191

Reader's Comments Ð We'd Like to Hear From You . . . . . . .

.

.

.

195

Contents ix

x 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Safety Notices

Danger notices appear on the following pages:

vxi

vxii

A caution notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing moderate or minor personal injury.

Caution notices appear on the following pages:

vxii

vxii

Note: For a translation of these notices, see System Unit Safety Information, order number SA23-2652

Electrical Safety

Observe the following safety instructions any time you are connecting or disconnecting devices attached to the workstation.

DANGER

An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage on metal parts of the system or the devices that attach to the system. It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and grounded to prevent an electrical shock.

Before installing or removing signal cables, ensure that the power cables for the system unit and all attached devices are unplugged.

When adding or removing any additional devices to or from the system, ensure that the power cables for those devices are unplugged before the signal cables are connected. If possible, disconnect all power cables from the existing system before you add a device.

Use one hand, when possible, to connect or disconnect signal cables to prevent a possible shock from touching two surfaces with different electrical potentials.

During an electrical storm, do not connect cables for display stations, printers, telephones, or station protectors for communication lines.

xi

CAUTION:

This product is equipped with a three±wire power cable and plug for the user's safety. Use this power cable with a properly grounded electrical outlet to avoid electrical shock.

DANGER

To prevent electrical shock hazard, disconnect the power cable

Unit Emissions

The unit-related emission value is equal to or lower than 70dB(A).

Der Geräuschpegel der Einheit ist kleiner oder gleich 70 db(A).

Laser Safety Information

The optical drive in this system unit is a laser product. The optical drive has a label that identifies its classification. The label, located on the drive, is shown below.

CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT

LASER KLASSE 1

LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE

APPAREIL A LASER DE CLASSE 1

IEC 825:1984 CENELEC EN 60 825:1991

The optical drive in this system unit is certified in the U.S. to conform to the requirements of the Department of Health and Human Services 21 Code of Federal Regulations (DHHS 21 CFR) Subchapter J for Class 1 laser products. Elsewhere, the drive is certified to conform to the requirements of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825 (1st edition 1984) and CENELEC EN 60 825:1991 for Class 1 laser products.

CAUTION:

A class 3 laser is contained in the device. Do not attempt to operate the drive while it is disassembled. Do not attempt to open the covers of the drive as it is not serviceable and is to be replaced as a unit.

Class 1 laser products are not considered to be hazardous. The optical drive contains internally a Class 3B gallium-arsenide laser that is nominally 30 milliwatts at 830 nanometers. The design incorporates a combination of enclosures, electronics, and redundant interlocks such that there is no exposure to laser radiation above a Class 1 level during normal operation, user maintenance, or servicing conditions.

xii 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Data Integrity and Verification

IBM computer systems contain mechanisms designed to reduce the possibility of undetected data corruption or loss. This risk, however, cannot be eliminated. Users who experience unplanned outages, system failures, power fluctuations or outages, or component failures must verify the accuracy of operations performed and data saved or transmitted by the system at or near the time of the outage or failure. In addition, users must establish procedures to ensure that there is independent data verification before relying on such data in sensitive or critical operations. Users should periodically check the IBM support websites for updated information and fixes applicable to the system and related software.

xiii

xiv 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

About This Book

This book provides information on how to use the system, use diagnostics, use service aids, and verify system operation. This book also provides information to help you solve some of the simpler problems that might occur.

ISO 9000

ISO 9000 registered quality systems were used in the development and manufacturing of this product.

Online Publications

RS/6000 publications are available online. To access the online books, visit our Web site at: http://www.rs6000.ibm.com/resource/hardware_docs/

Related Publications

The following publications provide additional information about your system unit:

vThe RS/6000 44P Series Model 170 Installation Guide, order number SA38-0561,contains reference information, maintenance analysis procedures (MAPs), error codes, removal and replacement procedured, and a parts catalog.

vThe RS/6000 44P Series Model 170 Service Guide, order number SA38-0560,contains reference information, maintenance analysis procedures (MAPs), error codes, removal and replacement procedured, and a parts catalog.

vThe Diagnostic Information for Multiple Bus Systems, order number SA38-0509 , contains diagnostic information, service request numbers (SRNs), and failing function codes (FFCs).

vThe Adapter, Device, and Cable Information for Multiple Bus Systems, order number SA38-0516, contains information about adapters, devices, and cables for your system. This manual is intended to supplement the service information found in the

Diagnostic Information for Multiple Bus Systems.

vThe Site and Hardware Planning Guide, order number SA38-0508, contains information to help you plan your installation.

Trademarks

The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both:

vAIX

vIBM

vRS/6000

vPowerPC

xv

Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

xvi 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Chapter 1. Introducing the 44P Model 170

The 7044 Model 170 servers combine PowerPC 604e microprocessor performance and system expandability, ensuring that your server adapts to handle ever-changing operating requirements. The 7044 Model 170 servers are specifically designed to support the demands of network environments.

The 7044 Model 170 servers incorporate the peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus, which is faster than the industry standard architecture (ISA) bus.

This book helps you use the system, use diagnostics, use service aids, and verify system operation. This book also provides information to help you solve some of the simpler problems that might occur, and how to obtain assistance and service.

System Features

Bus Architecture

Six PCI slots are available:

vTwo 64-bit PCI full-size slots at 50 MHz (can also run at 33MHz), 3.3 volts

vFour 32-bit PCI full-size slots at 33 MHz, 5 volts

Microprocessor

vOne 333 MHz Power3+ microprocessor with 32KB instruction, 64KB data and 1MB L2 cache, OR

vOne 400 MHz Power3+ microprocessor with 32KB instruction, 64KB data and 4MB L2 cache

vOne 450 MHz Power3+ microprocessor with 32KB instruction, 64KB data and 8MB 4-way L2 cache

Memory

v256 MB (minimum) - 2 GB (maximum).

Up to four dual inline memory-modules, installed in pairs, to support 128MB, 256MB or 512MB (must be installed in matched pairs).

Media Drives

v3.5-inch, 1.44 MB Diskette Drive (standard)

vInternal Hard Disk Drives:

±9.1 GB Ultra SCSI Drive (standard)

±18.2 GB Ultra SCSI Drive

Note: Larger sizes may be available. Contact your representative for additional information.

±Two media bays available

1

v 32x speed CD-ROM drive with sliding tray.

Other Drives

Drive bays can accommodate 5.25-inch or 3.5-inch drives such as hard disk drives, CD-ROM drives, tape drives, or other removable media drives.

Power Supply

v 390-watt, usable with 100-127 V ac (low voltage) or 200-240 V ac (high voltage).

Keyboard

vStandard: 101-key Enhanced Keyboard

v101/102 or 106-key Enhanced Keyboard

Mouse

v 3-button

Operator Panel

v32-character LED diagnostics display

vPower and Reset buttons

Input/Output Ports

v25-pin Parallel

v9-pin Serial (2)

v8-pin Tablet

vKeyboard

vMouse

vUltra2 SCSI - LVD

v10Base5 Ethernet

v10BaseT or 100BaseTX Ethernet

vAudio Line-in

vAudio Line-out

vMicrophone

vHeadphone

Security Features

vPower-on password

vPrivileged-access password

vSecurity Bolt (optional)

vKey lock

vUnattended start mode

2 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Front View

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

System Type and Model Number Identification Tag

 

 

2

CD-ROM Drive

 

 

3

Optional Media Bay

 

 

4

Diskette Drive

 

 

5

Operator Panel

 

 

6

System Serial Number

 

 

Chapter 1. Introducing the 44P Model 170 3

Rear View

20

 

1

19

 

18

2

17

3

16

4

15

 

14

 

13

 

12

 

11

 

10

 

9

5

8

 

7

6

1Serial Number Label: For machine identification.

2and 3 9-Pin Serial Ports ( 1 2 ) : For a TTY terminal, modem, or other serial devices.

4Keylock: For security.

5Security Bolt: Optional security measure.

6Adapter Slots (6): For adding PCI adapters.

7Empty Slot: This slot is not used.

8Ethernet Connector ( ) : For attaching your computer to an Ethernet/Twisted pair connection through a 10baseT connector.

9Headphones: For connecting headphones.

10Microphone: For connecting a microphone.

4 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

11 and 12 Audio Ports:

Audio line out

Audio line in

13External SCSI Port ( ) : For connecting external SCSI devices.

14Parallel Port ( ) : For connecting a parallel printer or other parallel devices.

15Tablet Port ( ) : For attaching a digitizing tablet to your computer.

16Mouse Port ( ) : For mouse connection.

17Keyboard Port ( ) : For keyboard connection.

1810Base5 Ethernet Port ( ) : For attaching your computer to an Ethernet thick connection (or Ethernet thin connection, using an optional transceiver) through a 10base5 connector.

19Status Light: For indicating power supply status.

20Power Connector: For connecting the power cable.

Chapter 1. Introducing the 44P Model 170 5

Operator Panel

12

3

4

5

6

7

1Power On Switch: Turns system unit power on and off.

2Reset Switch: Function depends upon the operating system.

3Power-On LED: Glows when system unit is on.

4Hard Disk Drive Status LED: Glows when system unit is reading from or writing to the disk drive.

5Operator Panel Display: Displays current status of system unit startup, or diagnostic information in the event of a hardware problem.

6Headphone Jack: For connecting audio headphones.

7Microphone Receptacle: For connecting audio microphone.

6 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170

This chapter provides information on how to start and use the system unit.

Starting the System Unit

1.Set the power switches of the attached devices to On.

Note: When the system is plugged in but not powered on, the Power-On LED flashes slowly.

2.If the LED is not flashing and OK is not displayed, ensure that the power cord, located at the back of the system unit, is plugged into a grounded electrical outlet.

3.If this does not solve the problem, go to ªChapter 8. Hardware Problem Determinationº on page 149.

4.Press the Power-On switch (1).

1

2

When you press the Power-On switch (1), the Power-On LED (2) comes on, and the system starts a POST (power-on self test).

During POST, progress codes display in the operator panel display.

5.If the Power-On LED does not come on and there is no indication of power when you press the Power-On switch, go to ªChapter 8. Hardware Problem Determinationº on page 149.

Stopping the System Unit

Attention: When you use the shutdown procedure for your system, follow the correct shutdown procedure before you stop the system unit. Failure to do so can result in the loss of data. The System unit is powered down by the shutdown procedure.

1.At a command line, enter shutdown command to stop the operating system.

2.After you shut down the operating system, set the power switches of any attached devices to Off.

3.If you will be servicing the system unit, unplug the system-unit power cable from the electrical outlet.

7

Reading the Operator Panel Display

The operator panel display is used to:

vTrack the progress of the system unit self-tests and configuration program

vDisplay codes when the operating system comes to an abnormal end

vDisplay system messages

Operator Panel

12

3

4

5

6

7

1Power On Switch: Turns system unit power on and off.

2Reset Switch: Function depends upon the operating system.

3Power-On LED: Glows when system unit is on.

4Hard Disk Drive Status LED: Glows when system unit is reading from or writing to the disk drive.

5Operator Panel Display: Displays current status of system unit startup, or diagnostic information in the event of a hardware problem.

6Headphone Jack: For connecting audio headphones.

7Microphone Receptacle: For connecting audio microphone.

8 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Using the Keyboards

There are several keyboards available for the system unit. The keyboards have various keys that enter data and control the cursor location. The keyboards can be engraved for the languages of different countries.

The functions of each keyboard depend on the software used. The character sets for the keyboards are contained and explained in the documentation for your operating system.

Function Keys

E s c

F1

F 2

F 3

F4

F 5

F 6

F 7

F 8

F 9

F10

!

@

 

#

$

%

 

 

&

*

(

)

_

+

1

2

 

3

4

5

6

 

7

8

9

0

-

=

Tab

Q

W

E

R

T

Y

 

U

 

I

O

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caps

A

 

S

D

F

G

H

J

 

K

L

:

"

Lock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

;

,

Shift

Z

 

X

C

V

B

 

N

 

M

<

>

?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

,

.

/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ctrl

 

Alt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alt

 

 

 

Print

Scroll

 

Num

Caps

 

Scroll

F11

F12

Pause

Lock

Lock

 

Lock

Screen

Lock

 

 

 

SysRq

 

Break

 

 

 

 

 

Backspace

I n s e r t

Home

Page

Num

/

*

-

 

Up

Lock

 

 

Delete

End

Page

7

8

9

 

 

 

Down

Home

 

Pg Up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

+

 

 

 

 

 

4

5

6

 

 

Enter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shift

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

End

 

Pg Dn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enter

 

Ctrl

 

 

 

0

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I n s

 

Del

 

Typewriter Keys

Control

Numeric

Keys

Keypad

 

The keyboard is divided into four sections:

vFunction keys are multipurpose keys and their function is controlled by the operating system.

vTypewriter keys are similar to a standard typewriter. Their function is controlled by the software.

vControl keys move the cursor on the screen and do programmed control functions. The movement and functions depend upon the application used.

vNumeric keypad is arranged like a calculator to help when typing numbers.

On all of the keyboards, you can adjust the tilt position for typing comfort. To tilt the keyboard, pull out on the keyboard legs. The legs snap into position. To decrease the tilt of the keyboard, rotate the keyboard legs until they snap into the bottom of the keyboard case.

The keyboard cable plugs into the keyboard connector at the rear of the system unit.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 9

Using the Three-Button Mouse

The mouse is a hand-operated locating device. A three-button mouse is available for use with the system unit. Consult your application publication for the exact use of the three-button mouse.

You can use the mouse to perform such functions as positioning a cursor, selecting items from a menu, or moving around in your document much easier and faster than if you used only the keyboard. The cursor moves exactly as you move the mouse on a flat surface, such as a desktop.

With the mouse buttons, you can perform functions such as selecting and deselecting options, extending your selection, or choosing a command. The precise function of your mouse depends on the software you are using.

The mouse has a cable that plugs into the mouse connector at the rear of the system unit.

Handling the Mouse Correctly

For best operation, handle the mouse with care. Incorrect handling can damage the mouse.

Do not:

vOperate the mouse on cloth, unfinished wood, newspaper, or carpet.

vDrop or hit the mouse.

vCarry the mouse by holding onto the cable.

vExpose the mouse to extreme temperatures or direct sunlight.

vPlace the mouse in liquid spills.

Caring for the Mouse

The operating surface for the mouse should be smooth, clean, and flat. For example, you can operate the mouse on the following surfaces:

vFinished wood

vGlass

vEnamel

vPlastic

vPaper (except newspaper)

vMetal

10 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Rough surfaces collect contaminants that can be transferred to the interior of the mouse by the ball.

Rough surfaces can also cause the pads located on the bottom of the mouse to prematurely wear. A deeply pitted surface could cause erratic operation of the mouse.

The surface you use should be free from spills, dirt, dust, lint, wax, eraser dust, and other foreign matter.

To care for the mouse:

vInspect the work surface for spills or other contaminants.

vDust the work surface.

vIf you are using a paper pad, inspect it for wear and replace it if necessary.

Cleaning the Mouse

Use the following steps to clean the mMouse:

1.Remove the retaining ring by turning it counterclockwise, in the direction of the arrow, as shown in the illustration.

Retaining Ring

Ball

Cavity

2.Remove the ball.

3.Inspect the ball for contaminants. Wipe it clean with a dry, lint-free cloth.

4.If the ball is dirty, wash it in warm, soapy water. Rinse and wipe the ball with a lint-free cloth until dry.

5.Inspect the ball cavity in the mouse for foreign materials. If there are any foreign materials, remove them.

6.Replace the ball.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 11

7.Replace the retaining ring on the mouse and align it with the open slots in the ball cavity.

8.Turn the retaining ring clockwise until the open slots are covered and you hear the ring snap into place.

Using the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive

The system unit has a 1.44 MB diskette drive installed vertically in the front.

The 1.44 MB diskette drive can format, read, and write diskettes compatible with the following diskette drives:

v1.0 MB diskettes with 720 KB formatted data capacity

v2.0 MB diskettes with 1.44 MB formatted data capacity (HD)

Format the diskette according to its specified capacity.

12 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Write-Protecting 3.5-Inch Diskettes

Write-protecting diskettes is necessary so that important information is not accidentally lost. When diskettes are write-protected, you can read information from the diskettes, but you cannot write information to them.

There is a write-protect tab on the 3.5-inch diskette. To locate the write-protect tab, turn the diskette over with the label facing down.

To prevent writing onto a diskette, slide the write-protect tab to open the protect slot, as shown in the illustration.

(Slot Open)

Write-Protect Tab

To allow writing onto a diskette, slide the write-protect tab to cover the protect slot, as shown in the illustration.

(Slot Closed)

Write-Protect Tab

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 13

Loading and Unloading the 3.5-Inch Diskette

To load a diskette into the drive, insert the diskette in the diskette drive with the labeled metal shutter first. Push the diskette into the drive until you hear a click. The click indicates that the diskette is securely in position in the drive.

To unload the diskette, push the diskette-unload button. The diskette unloads partially from the drive. Remove the diskette.

Using the CD-ROM Drive

CAUTION:

A Class 1 laser is contained in the device. Do not attempt to operate the device while it is disassembled. Do not attempt to open the covers of the device, as it is not serviceable and is to be replaced as a unit.

This section describes the features of the 32X SCSI-2 CD-ROM Drive and provides instructions for handling the drive and CD-ROM discs. The CD-ROM is a half-high, 5.25", 8-bit, single-ended, tray-loading drive. Its features include the following:

vSCSI-2 interface supports both synchronous and asynchronous data transfer

vHigh-speed data transfer rate of 2100 KB per second (14X) at inner diameter and 4800 KB per second (32X) at outer diameter due to constant RPM spin rate

vHigh-speed synchronous burst rate of 10 MB per second

vAverage random access time of 90 ms

vLoading tray accommodates both 8 cm discs (in the horizontal orientation only) and 12 cm discs

vReads multi-session discs

vReads CD-recordable discs

vReads CD-RW discs

vSupports all major CD-ROM formats: Mode 1, Mode 2, XA, CDDA, and audio

vContains headphone output and line output for audio

14 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Front View of CD-ROM Drive

1

2

3

4

5

6

1Compact Disc Tray

2Emergency Eject Hole

3Headphone Jack

4Volume Control

5Status Light

6Load/Unload Button

Understanding the Status Lights

The status lights indicate the operational status of the drive. The various conditions are explained below.

If light is:

Condition is:

 

 

Off

Drive is in standby mode with or without a disc loaded.

 

 

Blinking (green)

Any of the following:

 

v Drive tray is inserted. The light blinks while the drive

 

completes the initialization checkout.

 

v Drive is reading data. The light blinks while data is being

 

read.

 

v Drive is in Play Audio Mode. The light blinks while the audio

 

is playing.

 

 

On (amber)

Hardware error condition found during initialization.

 

Note: If this occurs, contact your service representative.

 

 

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 15

Handling Compact Discs

Compact discs are high-density media that must be handled with care and kept clean to ensure that they remain readable. Use the following precautions to ensure reliability:

vHold the compact disc by the edges. Do not touch the surface of the compact disc.

vTo remove dust or fingerprints, wipe the compact disc from the center to the outside of the compact disc as shown, using a lint-free cloth.

Attention: Wiping the compact disc in a circular direction can cause loss of data.

vDo not write on the surface.

vDo not store or place the compact disc in direct sunlight.

vDo not use benzene, thinners, or other cleaners to clean the compact disc.

vDo not bend the compact disc.

Other Handling Considerations

Be sure to take the following additional precautions when you use the 32X SCSI-2 CD-ROM Drive:

vRemove compact discs from the tray before you move the drive anywhere.

vDo not place the drive where any of the following conditions exist:

vHigh temperature

vHigh humidity

vExcessive dust

vExcessive vibration or sudden shock

vInclined surface

vDirect sunlight

vDo not insert foreign objects into the drive.

vDo not remove the drive covers or attempt to service the drive yourself.

16 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Loading a Compact Disc

To load a compact disc into the drive, do the following:

1.Press the Load/Unload button to open the tray. The tray slides out of the drive.

2.Place the compact disc in the tray with the label facing up.

3.Press the Load/Unload button, or gently push in the tray, to close the tray.

Note: Be sure that none of the vertical retaining tabs are extended when you use the drive in the horizontal position.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 17

Opening the Tray Manually

The compact disc tray automatically opens when you press the Load/Unload button. If it does not automatically open, follow these steps to force it open manually:

1.Shut down and turn off the power to your system unit.

2.Insert the straightened end of a paper clip into the emergency eject hole until you feel some resistance. See ªFront View of CD-ROM Driveº on page 15 if you are not sure where the emergency eject hole is located.

3.Continue to push in the paper clip while you pull out the tray with your fingernail.

4.Pull the tray completely open and remove the disc. It is normal for the tray to make a clicking sound while you are pulling it open.

Playing an Audio CD

To play an audio CD, you must have headphones connected to the headphone jack located on the front of the drive, or connected to the line-out connector located on the back of the system. You must also have an audio software application installed.

The headphone jack provides the connection for headphones using a 3.5 mm (1/8") stereo mini-plug. The volume control adjusts the audio output level for the headphones.

General Information for the 8mm Tape Drive

The 8mm Tape Drive is an internal streaming tape drive that provides medium to high-capacity backup and archival capability, as well as a high data-transfer rate. The 8mm Tape Drive uses wide bus architecture. Communications on the SCSI bus can be either asynchronous or synchronous. The 8mm Tape Drive is read only compatible with existing 2.3 GB, 5.0 GB, and 7.0 GB 8 mm tape drives. The 8mm Tape Drive is a boot device.

The tape drive is used primarily for:

vSaving and restoring system data files

vArchiving important records

vDistributing operating system software upgrades

The drive conforms to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) SCSI-2 standard.

Features of the 8mm Tape Drive include:

vUse of 8 mm data cartridges.

vCompression capability, effectively doubling the native capacity and data rate. The actual capacity per cartridge varies depending on the application and the type of data cartridge being used.

18 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Note: The factory default setting is Activated. Data compression is usually controlled by the application software.

vA half-high 5.25-inch form-factor.

vAn LCD display that provides operating and error messages.

vStatus lights that indicate:

±When it is time to clean the tape drive

±When the tape is in motion

±When the drive is ready to accept tape motion commands

Front View of the 8mm Tape Drive

1Disturbance (amber)

2Ready (green)

3Activity (green)

4Status lights

5LCD display

6Tape drive door

7Unload button

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 19

Operating Recommendations

Attention: Be sure to read ²Handling Static-Sensitive Devices² in the RS/6000 44P Series Model 170 Installation Guide, order number SA38-0561, Installing and Removing devices chapter before you remove the 8mm Tape Drive from its anti static bag or any time you handle it. For optimum performance, always follow the recommendations listed below:

vHandle the drive carefully and by its external metal chassis. Keep your hands away from the printed circuit boards, components, and printed circuit (flex) cables.

vIf possible, work on a cushioned surface, and do not drop the tape drive onto the work surface.

vIf you move the tape drive to an environment that is colder or warmer than its previous environment, keep the drive in its package and allow the package to reach the current room temperature. This prevents potential data loss or damage to the tape drive. Allow one hour of acclimation for each 10 degrees C (18 degrees F) difference between the shipping and/or storage temperature and the room temperature.

vUse only high-quality data grade 8 mm tape cartridges recommended by the manufacturer (see ªObtaining Additional Tape Cartridgesº on page 29).

vRemove the tape cartridge from the tape drive when it is not in use, and store the cartridge in the cartridge case.

vDo not open the door on the data tape cartridge. This door covers and protects the magnetic tape material from dirt, dust, and damage.

vAvoid touching the tape, as doing so can cause loss of data.

vBack up any tape cartridge that repeatedly produces error messages, then discard the old tape cartridge. Error information is saved in the system error log.

vClean the tape path regularly according to the cleaning procedure described in ªCleaning the Tape Driveº on page 27. Use only recommended cleaning cartridges. Other cleaning cartridges can permanently damage the tape drive.

8 mm Tape Cartridge Types

There are different types of 8 mm tape cartridges that you can use for the following purposes:

Type

Purpose

 

 

Test Tape Cartridge

Checks the operation of the drive or to run

 

diagnostics. Do not use it to save programs or

 

data. This cartridge, which is specially labeled,

 

is included with the 8mm Tape Drive.

 

 

Data Tape Cartridge

Saves your programs or data. This cartridge is

 

included with the 8mm Tape Drive.

 

 

Cleaning Tape Cartridge

Cleans the 8 mm tape drive. See ªCleaning the

 

Tape Driveº on page 27. This cartridge is

 

included with the 8mm Tape Drive.

 

 

20 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Tape Cartridge Compatibility

The 8mm Tape Drive is compatible with existing 8 mm tape subsystems that comply to the American National Standard (ANSI) X3B5±89-136, Rev. 6, Helical-scan Digital Computer Tape Cartridge, 8 mm for Information Exchange. Refer to the following table for information about specific tape compatibility.

Format Modes (C=compression mode)

8mm Tape

2.3GB

2.3 GB (C)

5.0 GB

5.0 GB (C)

7.0 GB

7.0 GB (C)

20.0 GB

20.0 GB

Drive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(C)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.3 GB

Read /

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Write

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.0 GB

Read /

Read /

Read /

Read /

-

-

-

-

 

Write

Write

Write

Write

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.0 GB

Read /

Read /

Read /

Read /

Read /

Read /

-

-

 

Write

Write

Write

Write

Write

Write

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20.0 GB

Read Only

-

Read Only

Read Only

Read Only

Read Only

Read /

Read /

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Write

Write

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 8 mm Tape Cartridges

Set the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge so that you do not accidentally lose information. The window on the tape cartridge controls write-protection. When the window on a tape cartridge is closed, write-protection is set and information can be read from the tape, but not written to it. When the window on a tape cartridge is open, write-protection is not set and information can be read from the tape and written to it.

1Window open: Write-protect tab not set

2Window closed: Write-protect tab set

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 21

Environmental Considerations for 8 mm Data Cartridges

This section describes operating and storage conditions including temperature, relative humidity, and maximum wet bulb data.

Attention: The manufacturer specifies a set of temperature and humidity ranges in which the 8 mm data cartridge can operate with ease. Only regular cleaning procedures are required when operating the cartridge within this range. The risk of possible data loss is increased if 8 mm tape cartridges are operated, stored, or shipped outside the temperature or humidity ranges shown in the following table.

Condition

Operating Ranges

Storage

Shipping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Temperature

60°F-90°F (16°C-32°C)

41°F-90°F (5°C

-32°C)

-40°F-

126°F

 

 

 

(-40°C-52°C)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relative Humidity

20%-80%

20%-80%

20%-80%

 

(non-condensing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximum Wet Bulb

73°F (23°C)

79°F (26°C)

 

79°F (26°C)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Always let a cartridge acclimate to the operating environment before you use it. Acclimation is necessary for any data cartridge that has been exposed to a different humidity environment or to a temperature change of 11°C or 20°F or more. Place the cartridge, with its container, in the operating environment for as long as it has been away from the operating environment or for 24 hours, whichever is less.

Operating the 8mm Tape Drive in Harsh Environments

The 8mm Tape Drive is ideally suited to streaming operations rather than tape movement operations involving multiple stops and starts as well as random searches. You should use streaming movement whenever possible.

Do not use for archiving any tape that was previously used outside the ranges specified in ªEnvironmental Considerations for 8 mm Data Cartridgesº for an extended period of time. Exposure to the new environment deteriorates the magnetic and physical strength of the tape. Do not store important data on a tape that was used outside the specified ranges. For reliable archiving, transfer the data to a new tape.

Erasing 8 mm Data Cartridge

Most bulk eraser devices cannot erase 8 mm data cartridges. To properly erase an 8 mm data cartridge with a bulk eraser device, the erasure rating must be at least 1500 oersted.

22 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Using the 8mm Tape Drive

This section provides information about operating, using, and maintaining your 8mm Tape Drive.

Status Lights

The 8mm Tape Drive has two green status lights and one amber status light. The on and off combinations of the status lights indicate the current condition of the tape drive.

Each of the International Organization for Standards (IOS) symbols located next to a status light indicates a specific condition of the tape drive as follows:

1

20.0

2

3

4

1Disturbance (amber)

2Ready (green)

3Activity (green)

4Status lights

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 23

Status

Disturbance

Ready (green)

Activity

 

(amber)

 

(green)

 

 

 

 

The power-on self-test (POST) is running or

On

On

On

the system has issued a Reset to the drive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the following has occurred:

Off/On

Off

Off

v The power is off.

 

 

 

v The POST has completed successfully, but

 

 

 

no tape cartridge has been inserted.

 

 

 

See note 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A tape cartridge has been inserted, and the

Off/On

On

Off

8mm Tape Drive is ready to receive

 

 

 

commands from the system. See note 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A tape cartridge has been inserted, and the

Off/On

Off

Flashing

8mm Tape Drive is performing a tape load or

 

 

 

unload operation. See note 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tape is in motion, and the 8mm Tape

Off/On

On

Flashing

Drive is busy running a device operation. See

 

 

 

note 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 8mm Tape Drive has detected an internal

Flashing

Off

Off

fault that requires corrective action. See note

 

 

 

1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tape path requires cleaning. Refer to

On

Off or On

Off or Flashing

ªCleaning the Tape Driveº on page 27.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.If a fault or an error condition occurs, press the unload button for approximately 15 seconds to reset the drive. If the disturbance light still flashes after the reset, contact your service representative for assistance.

2.If the disturbance light is on, cleaning is required. See ªCleaning the Tape Driveº on page 27.

Liquid Crystal Display

The 8mm Tape Drive features a liquid crystal display (LCD), which is located on the front panel. The LCD displays operating and error messages.

Changing the Display Language

The text on the 8mm Tape Drive LCD is available in several languages. To change the language:

1.Press and hold the unload button after you turn the power on to the 8mm Tape

Drive or, if your system unit is already running, press and hold the unload button for approximately 15 seconds until the LCD displays RESET. Release the unload button for approximately one second, then press and hold the unload button again.

2.After the LCD cycles through all the reset messages, it cycles through the available languages. When the desired language displays, release the unload button.

24 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Loading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge

Before loading the tape cartridge, make sure the system unit power is on and that the write-protect tab on the tape cartridge is properly set. Refer to ªSetting the Write-Protect Tab on 8 mm Tape Cartridgesº on page 21. The tape drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it for reading and writing.

1Window side of tape cartridge

28 mm tape cartridge

3Write-protect tab

To load the 8 mm tape cartridge:

1.Grasp the edges of the 8 mm tape cartridge with the write-protect tab toward you and the window side of the cartridge facing up.

2.Slide the tape cartridge into the opening on the front of the 8 mm tape drive until the loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive and the drive door closes. The ready status light (green) comes on if the load operation was successful.

The service processor is ready for data operations when the tape cartridge is inserted. After the cartridge is inserted into the tape drive, the tape takes about 25 seconds to load.

Commands can be entered while the tape is loading. Any commands to the tape drive start running once the tape has finished loading. Commands not requiring the tape cartridge are run immediately.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 25

Unloading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge

Before you perform the unload operation, make sure the power to the system unit is on.

1Window side of tape cartridge

28 mm tape cartridge

3Write-protect tab

4Unload button

To unload and eject the tape cartridge, press the unload button. The service processor rewinds the tape, then ejects the tape cartridge from the tape drive. After you press the unload button, the following actions occur:

vThe ready status light goes off.

vThe read/write status light flashes during the unload operation.

vThe read/write status light goes off when the cartridge is ejected from the tape drive.

The time required for a tape to rewind and unload is between 18 seconds and 3 minutes, depending on the position of the tape when you push the unload button.

If a fault or an error condition occurs and you cannot eject the tape, press the unload button for approximately 15 seconds to reset the drive. If the tape cartridge cannot unload and has to be removed manually from the drive, contact your service representative.

26 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Cleaning the Tape Drive

Attention: Do not use video-cleaning cartridges in the 8mm Tape Drive. Video-cleaning cartridges can damage the system drive.

Clean the tape drive:

vAfter you use a metal particle (MP) tape and before you use an advanced metal evaporative (AME) tape

vWhen error rates exceed an acceptable level as indicated by the LED and message

vEvery 72 hours of tape motion as indicated by the LED and message

The 8mm Tape Drive counts the number of hours of tape motion. When it is time to clean the tape path, it displays the message * * CLEAN SOON and turns on the top

status light.

You must clean the tape after using metal particle (MP) media and before using

advanced metal evaporative (AME) tapes. If you use MP media, the LCD prompts you to clean the tape path by displaying the message MUST CLEAN.

More frequent cleaning may be required if you operate the drive in a dusty environment or in humid conditions. If you allow dust to accumulate, the drive has to perform more reads and writes. This can damage the drive or cause data loss, which can be prevented by regular cleaning.

The cleaning cartridge cleans the 8mm Tape Drive 18 times before you must discard it. If you attempt to use an 8 mm cleaning cartridge more than 18 times, the tape drive

automatically detects the error, ejects the cleaning cartridge with the amber disturbance status light remaining on, and displays the message DEPLETED.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 27

Before you load the cleaning cartridge, make sure the power to the tape drive is on.

1Window side of tape cartridge

28 mm cleaning cartridge

3Write-protect tab

To clean the tape path:

1.Grasp the edges of the 8 mm cleaning cartridge with the window side of the cartridge facing up. Slide the cartridge into the opening on the front of the 8mm Tape Drive until the loading mechanism pulls it into the drive.

2.After you fully insert the 8 mm cleaning cartridge into the 8mm Tape Drive, the following cleaning operations are automatically performed:

vThe cleaning tape loads into the tape path. The message CLEANING... displays. The cleaning cycles take approximately two minutes.

vThe tape unloads and the cleaning cartridge ejects from the tape drive upon completion of the cleaning operation.

vThe amber disturbance status light goes off if the cleaning operation was successful.

3.Record the use of the cleaning cartridge on the cartridge.

28 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Obtaining Additional Tape Cartridges

Use only tape cartridges recommended by the manufacturer in the 8mm Tape Drive. Contact your customer service representative or the place of purchase to obtain the recommended tape cartridges.

General information for the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive

The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive is an internal streaming tape drive that provides medium to high-capacity backup and archival capability as well as high data transfer rate. The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive uses NARROW bus (8-bit) architecture. Communications on the SCSI bus can be either asynchronous or synchronous. The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive is compatible with existing 2.0 GB and 4.0 GB 4 mm tape drives. The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive can be used as a boot device.

The tape drive is used primarily for:

vSaving and restoring system data files

vArchiving important records

vDistributing operating system software upgrades.

The drive conforms to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) SCSI-2 standard.

The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive's features include:

vUse of 12/24 GB 4 mm data cartridges.

vData rate of 1.1 MB/second.

vCapacity of 12 GB.

vCompression capability, which effectively doubles the native capacity of 12 GB and the effective data rate. The actual capacity per cartridge varies depending on the application and the type of data cartridge being used. The default is compressed. Use SMIT to change the default.

Note: The factory default setting is Activated. Data compression is usually controlled by the application software.

vA half-high 5.25-inch form-factor.

vStatus lights that indicate:

±When it is time to clean the tape drive

±When the tape is in motion

±When the drive is ready to accept tape motion commands.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 29

Front View of the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive

1

3

24

5

6

 

1Tape Drive Door

2Status lights

3Ready (green)

4Tape Motion (green)

5Disturbance (amber)

6Unload/Reset button

Using the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive

This chapter provides information about operating, using, and maintaining your 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive.

Operating Recommendations

Attention: For optimum performance, always follow the recommendations listed below:

vUse only high-quality data grade 12/24 GB 4 mm tape cartridges recommended by the manufacturer (see ªObtaining Additional Tape Cartridgesº on page 38). Tape cartridges that do not carry the proper DDS symbol cannot be written to, and their use causes the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive to report an error.

vRemove the tape cartridge from the tape drive when it is not in use, and store the cartridge in the cartridge case.

vDo not open the door on the data tape cartridge. This door covers and protects the magnetic tape material from dirt, dust, and damage.

vAvoid touching the tape, as doing so can cause loss of data.

vBack up any tape cartridge that repeatedly produces error messages, then discard the old tape cartridge. Error information is saved in the system error log.

vClean the tape path regularly according to the cleaning procedure described in ªCleaning the Tape Path on the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Driveº on page 37. Use only recommended cleaning cartridges. Other cleaning cartridges can permanently damage the tape drive.

30 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridge Types

There are different types of 12/24 GB 4 mm tape cartridges that you can use for the following purposes:

Type

Purpose

 

 

Test Tape Cartridge

Checks the operation of the drive or to run

 

diagnostics. Do not use it to save programs or

 

data. This cartridge, which is specially labeled,

 

is included with the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive.

 

 

Data Tape Cartridge

Saves your programs or data. This cartridge is

 

included with the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive.

 

 

Cleaning Tape Cartridge

Cleans the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive. See

 

ªCleaning the Tape Path on the 12/24GB 4mm

 

Tape Driveº on page 37. This cartridge is

 

included with the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive.

 

 

Tape Cartridge Compatibility

The tape drive is compatible with existing 12/24 GB 4 mm tape subsystems that are designed to operate with Digital Data Storage approved media (DDS-1, DDS||||, DDS-2, or DDS-3), which meet the following European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA) standards:

vECMA±139 ª3.81 Wide Magnetic Tape Cartridge for Information Interchangeº ± Helical Scan Recording ± DDS Format.

vECMA±139 ª3.81 Wide Magnetic Tape Cartridge for Information Interchangeº ± Helical Scan Recording ± DDS±2 Format.

vECMA±139 ª3.81 Wide Magnetic Tape Cartridge for Information Interchangeº ± Helical Scan Recording ± DDS±3 Format.

4 mm Tape Write Density Setting

When reading a tape, the drive automatically determines which format is written on the tape.

When writing to a tape, use SMIT (System Management Interface Tool) to change the density setting of the tape drive to correspond to the type of media installed. Refer to the following table for information about the specific density setting:

Density Settings for 4 mm Media

Media Type

Device Compatibility

SMIT Density Setting

 

 

 

DDS1

Read Only

N/A

 

 

 

DDS||||

Read / Write (2.0 GB Mode Only)

19

 

 

 

DDS2

Read / Write (4.0 GB Mode Only)

36

 

 

 

DDS3

Read / Write (12.0 GB Mode Only)

37

 

 

 

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 31

Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridges

Set the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge so that you do not accidentally lose information. The write-protect tab on the tape cartridge controls write-protection. When the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge is closed, information can be read from the tape and written to it. When the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge is open, information can be read from the tape, but not written to it.

1Write-protect tab closed: Write enabled

2Write-protect tab open: Write disabled

Erasing 12/24 GB 4 mm Data Cartridge

Most bulk eraser devices cannot erase 12/24 GB 4 mm data cartridges. To properly erase an 12/24 GB 4 mm data cartridge with a bulk eraser device, the erasure rating must be at least 3900 oersted.

Environmental Considerations for 12/24 GB 4 mm Data Cartridges

This section describes operating and storage conditions including temperature, relative humidity, and maximum wet bulb data.

Attention: The manufacturer specifies a set of temperature and humidity ranges in which the 12/24 GB 4 mm data cartridge can operate with ease. Only regular cleaning procedures are required when operating the cartridge within this range. The risk of possible data loss is increased if 12/24 GB 4 mm tape cartridges are operated, stored, or shipped outside the temperature or humidity ranges shown in the following table.

Condition

Operating Ranges

Storage

Shipping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Temperature

60°F-90°F (16°C-32°C)

41°F-90°F (5°C

-32°C)

-40°F-

126°F

 

 

 

(-40°C-52°C)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relative Humidity

20%-80%

20%-80%

20%-80%

 

(non-condensing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximum Wet Bulb

79°F (26°C)

79°F (26°C)

 

79°F (26°C)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Always let a cartridge acclimate to the operating environment before you use it. Acclimation is necessary for any data cartridge that has been exposed to a different humidity environment or to a temperature change of 11°C (20°F) or more. Place the cartridge, with its container, in the operating environment for as long as it has been away from the operating environment or for 24 hours, whichever is less.

Operating the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive in Harsh Environments

The tape drive is ideally suited to streaming operations rather than tape movement operations involving multiple stops and starts and random searches. You should use streaming movement whenever possible.

Do not use for archiving any tape that was previously used outside the ranges specified in ªEnvironmental Considerations for 12/24 GB 4 mm Data Cartridgesº on page 32 for an extended period of time. Exposure to the new environment deteriorates the magnetic and physical strength of the tape. Do not store important data on a tape that was used outside the specified ranges. For reliable archiving, transfer the data to a new tape.

Status Lights

The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive has two green status lights and one amber status light. The on and off combinations of the status lights indicate the conditions of the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive.

Each of the International Organization for Standards (ISO) symbols located above a status light indicates a specific condition of the tape drive as follows:

1

3

24

5

6

 

1Tape Drive Door

2Status lights

3Ready (green)

4Tape Motion (green)

5Disturbance (amber)

6Unload/Reset button

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 33

Status Light States

The following tables explain the meaning of the green and amber status lights.

Status

 

Ready (green)

 

Tape Motion (green)

Disturbance (amber)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off

 

No cartridge installed or

 

No cartridge or no activity

No error condition

 

 

error condition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steady

 

Cartridge installed or

 

 

 

Cleaning required or worn

 

 

loading/unloading

 

 

 

media

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flashing

 

Power-on self-test in

 

Cartridge activity

 

Error condition

 

 

progress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status Lights on the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status

 

 

Ready (green)

Tape Motion

Disturbance

 

 

 

 

 

 

(green)

 

(amber)

 

 

 

 

 

 

LED test

 

 

On 2 seconds at

On 2 seconds at

On 2 seconds at

 

 

 

 

power on

power on

 

power on

 

 

 

 

 

 

The power-on self-test (POST) is running or the

 

Flashing

Off

 

Off

diagnostic cartridge is running.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the following has occurred:

 

Off

Off

 

Off/On

v The power is off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

v The POST has completed successfully, but no tape

 

 

 

 

 

 

cartridge has been loaded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(See note 2 below.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A tape cartridge has been inserted and the 12/24GB

 

On

Off

 

Off/On

4mm Tape Drive is ready to receive commands from the

 

 

 

 

 

 

system. (See note 2 below.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tape is in motion and the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive

 

On

Flashing

 

Off/On

is running a device operation or cleaning. (See note 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

below.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive has detected an internal

 

Off

Off

 

Flashing

error that requires corrective action such as tape

 

 

 

 

 

 

cartridge failure, high humidity. (See note 1 below.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tape path requires cleaning, or a poor quality tape

 

Off or On

Off or Flashing

On

cartridge is being used. See ªCleaning the Tape Path on

 

 

 

 

 

 

the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Driveº on page 37.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.If a fault or an error condition occurs, press the unload button for approximately 15 seconds to reset the drive. If the disturbance light still flashes after the reset, contact your service representative for assistance.

2.If the disturbance light is on, cleaning is required. See ªCleaning the Tape Path on the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Driveº on page 37.

34 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Loading the 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridge

Before you load the tape cartridge, make sure the power is on and the write-protect tab on the tape cartridge is properly set. Refer to ªSetting the Write-Protect Tab on 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridgesº on page 32. The tape drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it for reading and writing.

To load the 12/24 GB 4 mm tape cartridge, do the following:

1.Grasp the edges of the 12/24 GB 4 mm tape cartridge with the write-protect tab towards you and the window side of the cartridge facing up.

2.Slide the tape cartridge into the opening on the front of the 12/24 GB 4 mm tape drive until the loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive and the drive door closes. The ready status light (green) goes on if the load operation was successful.

Window Side of

 

4 mm Tape Cartridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tape Cartridge

 

 

Write-Protect Tab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready Status

Unload Button

Light (Green)

 

The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive is ready for data operations when the tape cartridge is inserted. After the cartridge is inserted into the tape drive, the tape takes about 15 seconds to load.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 35

Unloading the 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Cartridge

Before performing the unload operation, make sure the power to the system unit is on.

To unload and eject the tape cartridge, press the unload button. The 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive rewinds the tape and then ejects the tape cartridge from the tape drive.

After you press the unload button, the following occurs:

1.The Ready status light turns off.

2.The Tape Motion status light flashes during the unload operation.

3.The Tape Motion status light turns off when the cartridge is ejected from the tape drive.

Write-Protect Tab

4 mm Tape Cartridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready Status

Ready-Write Status

 

 

Unload Button

Light (Green)

 

 

 

 

Light (Green)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The time required for a tape to rewind and unload is between 10 seconds and 1.5 minutes, depending on the position of the tape when the unload button is pushed.

If a fault or an error condition occurs and you cannot eject the tape, press the unload button for approximately 15 seconds to reset the drive.

If the tape cartridge cannot unload and has to be removed manually from the drive, contact your service representative.

36 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Cleaning the Tape Path on the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive

The 12/24 GB 4 mm tape path should be cleaned either approximately every 30 hours of tape motion or once a month, whichever occurs first. The 12/24 GB 4 mm tape drive monitors the recording quality of the tape cartridge and indicates that the tape path requires cleaning when the disturbance status light (amber) is on.

More frequent cleaning may be required if the drive is operated in a dusty environment or in humid conditions. If the dust is allowed to accumulate, the drive has to perform more reads and writes. This can cause data loss, and can be prevented by regularly scheduled cleaning of the drive. The amber Disturbance status light also comes on automatically after 30 hours of tape motion without cleaning.

If you attempt to use a 12/24 GB 4 mm cleaning cartridge beyond 20 cleanings, the tape drive automatically detects an error and ejects the cleaning cartridge with the disturbance status light (amber) remaining on.

Before you load the cleaning cartridge, make sure the power to the system unit is on.

To load the 12/24 GB 4 mm cleaning cartridge, do the following:

1.Grasp the edges of the 12/24 GB 4 mm cleaning cartridge with the window side of the cartridge facing up.

2.Slide the cleaning cartridge into the opening on the front of the 12/24 GB 4 mm tape drive until the loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive.

Window Side of

 

Cleaning Cartridge

4 mm Cleaning Cartridge

 

Unload Button

Disturbance Status

Light (Amber)

After the 12/24 GB 4 mm cleaning cartridge has been fully inserted into the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive, the following cleaning operations are performed automatically:

1.The cleaning tape is loaded into the tape path. The cleaning cycle lasts approximately 30 seconds.

2.The tape is unloaded and the cleaning cartridge is ejected from the tape drive when the cleaning operation is complete.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 37

3.A successful cleaning operation is indicated when the disturbance status light (amber) goes off (if it was activated before the cleaning operation).

Obtaining Additional Tape Cartridges

The following table lists the tape cartridges that you can order for the 12/24GB 4mm Tape Drive. Contact your customer service representative or the place of purchase to obtain the recommended tape cartridges.

Tape Cartridges for the 12/24 GB 4 mm Tape Drive

Part Number

Type of Cartridge

Length

 

 

 

59H3465

12/24 GB 4 mm Data Cartridge

160 m (525 ft)

 

 

 

59H3466

12/24 GB 4 mm Test Cartridge

11.5 m (37.7 ft)

 

 

 

59H3090

12/24 GB 4 mm Cleaning Cartridge

N/A

 

 

 

Using the Service Processor and Service Director Features

The Service Processor and Service Director features protect users against unnecessary system downtime by keeping support personnel (both internal and external) aware of any unexpected changes in the system environment. In combination, the two features provide a flexible solution to automated system maintenance.

Service Processor

The Service Processor runs on its own power boundary and continually monitors hardware attributes, the AIX Operating System, and the environmental conditions within the system. Any system failure which prevents the system from coming back to an operational state (a fully functional AIX Operating System) is reported by the Service Processor. The Service Processor is controlled by firmware and does not require the AIX Operating System to be operational to perform its tasks. If any system failures are detected, the Service Processor has the ability to take predetermined corrective actions. The methods of corrective actions are:

vSurveillance

vCall Home

vAIX Operating System Monitoring

Surveillance is a function in which the Service Processor monitors the system through heartbeat communication with the system firmware. The heartbeat is a periodic signal that the firmware can monitor. During system startup, the firmware surveillance monitor is automatically enabled to check for heartbeats from the firmware. If a heartbeat is not detected within a default period, the Service Processor cycles the system power and attempts to restart until the system either restarts successfully, or a predetermined retry threshold is reached. In the event the Service Processor is unsuccessful in bringing the system online (or in the event that the user asked to be alerted to any Service Processor assisted restarts), the system can call home to report the error.

38 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

The Call Home function can be initialized to call either a service center telephone number, a customer administration center, or a digital pager telephone number. The Service Processor can be configured to stop at the first successful call to any of the numbers listed, or can be configured to call every number provided. If connected to the service center, the Service Processor transmits the relevant system information (the system's serial number and model type) and Service Request Number (SRN). If connected to a digital pager service, the Service Processor inputs a Customer Voice Telephone Number defined by the customer. An established sequence of digits or the telephone number to a phone near the failed system could be used to signal a system administrator to a potential system failure.

During normal operations, the Service Processor can also be configured to monitor the AIX Operating System. If AIX does not respond to the Service Processor heartbeat, the Service Processor assumes the Operating System is hung. The Service Processor can automatically initiate a restart and, if enabled, initiate the call home function to alert the appropriate parties to the system hang. Enabling Operating System Surveillance also affords AIX the means to detect any Service Processor failures and report those failures to the Service Director application.

Unlike the Service Director, the Service Processor cannot be configured in a client/server environment where one system can be used to manage all dial-out functionally for a set of systems.

Prior to installing the Service Processor feature, ensure that you have the latest levels of Service Processor microcode and system firmware. You also need a properly configured modem. For more information on configuring a modem, see ªModem Configuration Menuº on page 54.

Service Director

The Service Director is a software extension to the AIX Operating System that monitors the system while the AIX Operating System is running. The Service Director monitors and analyzes all recoverable system failures, and, if needed, can automatically place a service call to a service center (without user intervention).

The service center receives the machine type/serial number, host name, SRN, and a problem description. The service center analyzes the problem report and, if warranted, dispatches a service person to the customer site. The service center also determines if any hardware components need to be ordered prior to the service person's arrival.

The Service Director code also gives the user the option to establish a single system as the problem reporting server. A single system, accessible over the user network, can be used as the central server for all the other systems on the Local Area Network (LAN) who are running the Service Director application. If the Service Director application on a remote client decides a service request needs to be placed, the client forwards the information to the Service Director server who dials the service center telephone number from its locally attached modem. In this scenario, the user only needs to maintain a single analog line for providing call-out capabilities for a large set of servers.

Chapter 2. Using the 44P Series Model 170 39

When used in a Scalable Parallel (SP) environment, a client/server type implementation is configured. The Service Director client code runs on each of the Scalable Parallel (SP) nodes. The server component runs on the Control Workstation. In the event of any system failures, the relevant information is transmitted to the Control Workstation through the integrated Ethernet. Once alerted to the system failure, the Control Workstation initiates actions to prepare and send the service request.

A modem is required for enabling automated problem reporting to the service center. Configuration files for several types of modems are included as part of the Service Director package. Refer to ªModem Configuration Menuº on page 54 for more information on configuring your modem.

40 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor

The service processor menus enable you to configure service processor options and to enable and disable functions.

service processor menus are available using an ASCII terminal when the server is turned off and the service processor is operating with standby power. service processor menus are also available when server power is on and the service processor has detected a server problem (such as loss of surveillance).

During the first power-up (that is, the power cord is plugged into the outlet), service processor menus are not available for 45 seconds while the service processor is running self-tests and initializing the server. If the server powers down, service processor menus become available after 15 seconds.

For a summary of the service processor functions and the methods for invoking them, see the table below.

Service Processor Functions

Service

Service

SMS (ASCII or

 

Processor

Processor

graphics

 

Menus (ASCII

Service Aids

terminals)

 

terminals)

(ASCII or

 

 

 

graphics

 

 

 

terminals)

 

 

 

 

 

View System Environmental Conditions

Y3

 

 

Read System POST Errors

Y3

 

 

Read Service Processor Error Logs

Y3

 

 

View Progress Indicators from last Boot

Y3

 

 

Power-on System

Y3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power-off System

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read NVRAM

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reset Service Processor

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setup Reboot/Restart Policy

Y2

 

 

Start Talk Mode

Y2

 

 

Enable/Disable Console Mirroring

Y2

Y1

 

 

 

 

 

Select Modem Line Speed

Y2

Y1

 

 

 

 

 

Enable/Disable Modem

Y2

Y1

 

Setup Modem Configuration

Y2

Y1

 

Setup Ring Indicate Power-On

Y2

Y1

 

Setup Dial-out Phone Numbers

Y2

Y1

 

Setup Surveillance

Y2

Y1

 

Update Service Processor Flash EPROM

Y2

Y1

Y2

Change General-Access Password

Y2

 

Y2

 

 

 

 

41

Service Processor Functions

Service

Service

SMS (ASCII or

 

Processor

Processor

graphics

 

Menus (ASCII

Service Aids

terminals)

 

terminals)

(ASCII or

 

 

 

graphics

 

 

 

terminals)

 

 

 

 

 

Change Privileged Access Password

Y2

 

Y2

Select Language

Y2

 

Y2

 

 

 

 

Enable/Disable Unattended Start Mode

Y2

 

Y2

 

 

 

 

1 Operating system root password 2 Privileged-access password 3 General-Access password

Service Processor Menus

The service processor menus are divided into two groups:

vGeneral user menus - the user must know the general-access password.

vPrivileged user menus - the user must know the privileged-access password.

The following section describes these two groups of menus, how to access them, and the functions associated with each option.

When the server is powered down, the service processor menus can be accessed locally or remotely.

Service Processor Menu Inactivity

To prevent loss of control in unstable power environments, the service processor leaves the menu mode after five minutes of inactivity. Return to the menus by pressing any key on the terminal, local or remote.

Accessing Service Processor Menus Locally

Service Processor menus can be accessed locally by connecting an ASCII terminal to either serial port. Because the presence of the ASCII terminal cannot be confirmed by the service processor, you must press a key on the ASCII terminal to confirm its presence. The service processor then prompts you for a password (if set), and when verified, displays the service processor menus.

Accessing Service Processor Menus Remotely

Service Processor menus can be accessed remotely by connecting a modem to serial port 1 or serial port 2, as follows:

1.Turn off the server, unplug the power cord, and press the Power button to drain capacitance while power is disconnected.

2.Connect the modem to the appropriate serial port and turn on the modem.

3.Plug in the server.

Note:

42 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

If your modem has not been configured, go to ªCall-In/Call-Out Setup Menuº on page 54 with a terminal or terminal emulator, call the server's modem.

The service processor prompts you for a password (if set), and when verified, displays the service processor menus.

General User Menu

The menu options presented to the general user are a subset of the options available to the privileged user. The user must know the General-Access password, if set, to access these menus.

GENERAL USER MENU

1.Power-On System

2.Read VPD Image from Last System Boot

3.Read Progress Indicators from Last System Boot

4.Read Service Processor Error Logs

5.Read System POST Errors

6.View System Environmental Conditions

99. Exit from Menus

1>

Note: The service processor prompt reads either 1> or 2> to indicate which serial port on the system unit is being used to communicate with the service processor.

vPower-On System

Allows the user to power-on the system.

vRead VPD Image from last System Boot

Displays manufacturer vial product data, such as serial numbers, part numbers, and so on, that were stored from the system boot prior to the one in progress now.

vRead Progress Indicators from Last System Boot

Displays the boot progress indicators (checkpoints), up to a maximum of 100, from the system boot prior to the one in progress. This historical information can be useful to help diagnose system faults.

The progress indicators are displayed in two sections. Above the dashed line are the progress indicators (latest) from the boot that produced the current sessions. Below the dashed line are progress indicators (oldest) from the boot preceding the one that produced the current sessions.

The progress indicator codes are listed from top (latest) to bottom (oldest). The dashed line represents the point where the latest boot started.

If the <-- arrow occurs, use the posted code.

vRead Service Processor Error Logs

Displays the service processor error logs.

The time stamp in this error log is Coordinated Universal Time (CUT), also known as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). AIX error logs have additional information available and are able to time stamp the errors with local time. See page 68 for an example of the error log.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 43

vRead System POST Errors

Select this item to review the results of the POST (Power-On Self-Test). Your server may be able to start in the presence of POST errors if there are sufficient working system resources. If POST errors occur during startup, this error log, when used with the diagnostics, helps to isolate faults. See page ªSystem POST Errorsº on page 69 for an example of the POST error screen.

vView System Environmental Conditions

With this menu option, the service processor reads all environmental sensors and reports the results to the user. This option can be useful when surveillance fails, because it allows the user to determine the environmental conditions that may be related to the failure. See page 50 for an example of the System Environmental Conditions screen.

Privileged User Menus

The following menus are available to privileged users only. The user must know the privileged access password, if set, to access these menus.

Main Menu

At the top of the Main Menu is a listing containing:

vYour Service Processor's current firmware version

vThe firmware copyright notice

vThe System Name given to your server during setup (optional)

You need the firmware version for reference when you either update or repair the functions of your service processor.

The System Name, an optional field, is the name that your server reports in problem messages. This name helps your support team (for example, your system administrator, network administrator, or service representative) to more quickly identify the location, configuration, and history of your server. The System Name is set from the Main Menu using option 6.

Note: The information under the Service Processor Firmware heading in the following Main Menu illustration is example information only.

44 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Service Processor Firmware

Firmware Level: sh991029

Copyright 1997, IBM Corporation

SYSTEM NAME

MAIN MENU

1.Service Processor Setup Menu

2.System Power Control Menu

3.System Information Menu

4.Language Selection Menu

5.Call-In/Call-Out Setup Menu

6.Set System Name

99. Exit from Menus

1>

Service Processor Setup Menu

The Service Processor Setup menu shown below is accessed from the Main Menu:

SERVICE PROCESSOR SETUP MENU

1.Change Privileged Access Password

2.Change General-Access Password

3.Enable/Disable Console Mirroring: Currently Disabled

4.Start Talk Mode

5.OS Surveillance Setup Menu

6.Reset Service Processor

7.Reprogram Service Processor Flash EPROM

8.Serial Port Snoop Setup Menu

98.Return to Previous Menu

99.Exit from Menus

1>

Note: Unless otherwise stated in the menu responses, setings become effective when a menu is exited using option 98 or 99.

Passwords

Passwords can be any combination of up to eight alphanumeric characters. You can enter longer passwords, but the entries are truncated to include only the first eight characters. Passwords can be set from the service processor menu or from the System Management Services menus.

For security purposes, the service processor counts the number of attempts to enter correct passwords. The results of not recognizing a correct password within this error threshold are different, depending on whether the attempts are being made locally (at the server) or remotely (through a modem). The error threshold is three attempts.

If the error threshold is reached by someone entering passwords at the server, the service processor exits the menus. This action is taken based on the assumption that

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 45

the server is in an adequately secure location with only authorized users having access. Such users must still successfully enter a login password to access AIX.

If the error threshold is reached by someone entering passwords remotely, the service processor disconnects the modem to prevent potential security attacks on the server by unauthorized remote users.

The following table illustrates what you can access with the Privileged Access Password and the General-Access Password.

Privileged Access Password

General Access Password

Resulting Menu

 

 

 

None

None

MAIN MENU displays

 

 

 

None

Set

MAIN MENU displays

 

 

 

Set

None

Users with password, see the

 

 

MAIN MENU displays Other

 

 

users, the GENERAL USER

 

 

MENU displays

 

 

 

Set

Set

Users see menus associated

 

 

with the entered password

 

 

 

vChange Privileged Access Password

Set or change the privileged access password. It provides the user with the capability to access all service processor functions. This password is usually used by the system administrator or root user.

vChange General-Access Password

Set or change the general-access password. It provides limited access to service processor menus and is usually available to all users who are allowed to power on the server.

vEnable/Disable Console Mirroring

When Console Mirroring is enabled, the service processor sends information to both serial ports. This capability, which can be enabled by local or remote users, provides local users with the capability to monitor remote sessions. Console mirroring can be enabled for the current session only. For more information, see ªConsole Mirroringº on page 67.

vStart Talk Mode

In a console-mirroring session, it is useful for those who are monitoring the session to be able to communicate with each other. Selecting this menu item activates the keyboards and displays for such communications while console mirroring is established. This is a full duplex link, so message interference is possible. Alternating messages between users works best.

vOS Surveillance Setup Menu

This menu can be used to set up operating system (OS) surveillance.

46 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

OS Surveillance Setup Menu

1.Surveillance: Currently Enabled

2.Surveillance Time Interval: Currently 5 or Not Applicable

3.Surveillance Delay:

Currently 10 or Not Applicable

98.Return to Previous Menu v Surveillance

Can be set to Enabled or Disabled.

vSurveillance Time Interval

Can be set to any number from 1 to 255 minutes.

vSurveillance Delay

Can be set to any number from 0 to 255 minutes.

Surveillance time interval and surveillance delay can only be changed after surveillance is enabled.

Refer to ªService Processor System Monitoring - Surveillanceº on page 65 for more information about surveillance.

vReset Service Processor

Allows the user to reinitialize the service processor.

vReprogram Service Processor Flash EPROM

This is an automatic process.

Serial Port Snoop Setup Menu

This menu can be used to setup Serial Port Snooping, in which the user can configure serial port 1 as a ²catch-all² reset device.:

From the main Service Processor menu, select option 1, Service Processor setup, then select option 8 (Serial Port Snoop Setup Menu).

SERIAL PORT SNOOP SETUP MENU

1.System reset string: Currently Unassigned

2.Snoop Serial Port: Currently Unassigned

98. Return to Previous Menu

1>

Use the system reset string option to enter the system reset string, which resets the machine when it is detected on the main console on Serial Port 1.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 47

Use the Snoop Serial Port option to select the Serial Port to Snoop.

Note: Only Serial Port 1 is supported.

After Serial Port Snooping is correctly configured, at any point after the system unit is booted to AIX, whenever the reset string is typed on the main console, the system unit uses the Service Processor reboot policy to restart. This action causes an EPOW (Early Power Off Warning) to be logged, and also an AIX dump to be created if the machine is at an AIX prompt, with AIX in such a state that it can respond. If AIX cannot respond, the EPOW record is created, rather than the AIX dump.

Pressing Enter after the reset string is not required, so make sure that the string is not common or trivial. A mixed-case string is recommended.

System Power Control Menu

The menu is used to set power control options.

SYSTEM POWER CONTROL MENU

1.Enable/Disable Unattended Start Mode: Currently Disabled

2.Ring Indicate Power-On Menu

3.Reboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu

4.Power-On System

5.Power-Off System

6.Enable/Disable Fast System Boot: Currently Disabled

7.Boot Mode Menu

98.Return to Previous Menu

99.Exit from Menus

1>

Enable/Disable Unattended Start Mode

Use this option to instruct the service processor to immediately power-on the server after a power failure, bypassing power-on password verification. Unattended Start Mode can also be set using SMS menus. Unattended Start Mode can be used on servers that require automatic power-on after a power failure.

48 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

BOOT MODE MENU

1.Boot to SMS Menu: Currently Disabled

2.Service Mode Boot from Saved List: Currently Disabled

3.Service Mode Boot from Default List: Currently Disabled

4.Boot to Open Firmware Prompt: Currently Disabled

98. Return to Previous Menu

1>

Boot Mode Menu

Allows users to configure the system to automatically start a specific function on the next system start. This configuration applies to the next boot only and is reset to the default state of being disabled following a successful boot attempt.

vEnabling the Boot to SMS Menu option

Causes the system to automatically enter the System Management Services menu during the boot process. Enabling this option is equivalent to pressing 1 on the attached ASCII terminal (or F1 on a graphics terminal) while the system initialization indicators display on screen.

vEnabling the Service Mode Boot from Saved list option

Causes the system to automatically enter the Stand-alone diagnostics (see ªStandalone Diagnostic Operationº on page 112 for more on Stand-alone diagnostics). Enabling this option is equivalent to pressing 5 on the attached ASCII terminal (or F5 on a graphics terminal) while the system initialization indicators display on screen.

vEnabling the Service Mode Boot from Default List option

Causes the system to automatically enter the Online Diagnostics in Service Mode (see ªOnline Diagnostics Modesº on page 109 for more Online Diagnostics). Enabling this option is equivalent to pressing '6' on the attached ASCII terminal (or F6 on a graphics terminal while the system initialization indicators display on screen.

vEnabling the Boot to Open Firmware Prompt option

Causes the system to automatically enter Open Firmware prompt (also called the OK prompt). Enabling this option is equivalent to pressing 8 on the attached ASCII terminal (or F8 on a graphics terminal) while the system initialization indicators display on screen (see page 149 for more information about Open Firmware prompt).

If more than one option is enabled, the system recognizes only the option corresponding to the smallest menu number. For example, If options 4 and 2 were enabled, the system recognizes only Option 2: Service Mode Boot from Saved List. After a boot attempt, all enabled options are disabled. In effect, the system throws away any menu options that are enabled after the option with the highest priority (the option with the smallest menu number) is executed.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 49

The user can also override the choices in the Boot Mode Menu while the system initialization indicators display on the screen. For example, if the user had enabled the system to enter the SMS menus (option 1) but pressed the 8 key while the system initialization indicators displayed on the screen, the system would enter the Open Firmware prompt and disregards the settings in the Boot Mode Menu.

After the logo displays, the initialization icons display across the bottom of the screen.

vRing Indicate Power-On Menu

Ring Indicate Power-On is an alternate method of dialing in, without establishing a service processor session. If the system is powered off and Ring Indicate Power-On is enabled, the server is powered on at the predetermined number of rings, If the server is already on, no action is taken. In either case, the telephone call is not answered. The caller receives no feedback that the server is powered on. The Ring Indicate Power-On Menu and defaults are shown below:

Ring Indicate Power-On Menu

1.Ring indicate power-on: Currently Disabled

2.Number of rings: Currently 6

98. Return to Previous Menu

The number of rings can be set to any number greater than zero.

vReboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu, see ªReboot/Restart Policy Setup Menuº on page 59.

vPower-On System

Allows immediate power-on of the system. For other power-on methods, see ªSystem Power-On Methodsº on page 61.

vPower-Off System

Allows the user to power-off the server following a surveillance failure.

System Information Menu

This menu provides access to system configuration information, error logs, system resources, and processor configuration.

50 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

SYSTEM INFORMATION MENU

1.Read Progress Indicators from Last System Boot

2.Read Service Processor Error Logs

3.Read System POST Errors

4.Read NVRAM

5.Read Service Processor Configuration

6.View System Environmental Conditions

7.Processor configuration/deconfiguration Menu

10.Enable/Disable CPU Guard Menu Currently Enable

11.Enable/Disable MEM Guard Currently Enable

98.Return to Previous Menu

99.Exit from Menus

1>

vRead Progress Indicators from Last System Boot

Displays the boot progress indicators (checkpoints), up to a maximum of 100, from the system boot prior to the one in progress. This historical information can help to diagnose system faults.

The progress indicators are displayed in two sections. Above the dashed line are the progress indicators (latest) from the boot that produced the current sessions. Below the dashed line are progress indicators (oldest) from the boot preceding the one that produced the current sessions.

The progress indicator codes are listed from top (latest) to bottom (oldest). The dashed line represents the point where the latest boot started.

vRead Service Processor Error Logs

Displays error conditions detected by the service processor.

The time stamp in this error log is Coordinated Universal Time (CUT), also known as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). AIX error logs have additional information available and are able to time stamp the errors with the local time. See page 68 for an example of the error log.

vRead System POST Errors

Select this option to review the results of the POST (Power-On Self-Test). Your system unit may be able to start in the presence of POST errors if there is sufficient working system resources. If POST errors occur during start up, this error log, when used with the diagnostics, helps to isolate faults. See page ªSystem POST Errorsº on page 69 for an example of the POST error screen.

vRead NVRAM

Displays nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) contents.

vRead Service Processor Configuration

Displays current service processor configuration.

vView System Environmental Conditions

The service processor reads all environmental sensors and reports the results to the user. Use this option when surveillance fails, because it allows the user to determine the environmental conditions that may be related to the failure.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 51

The following is an example of the System Environmental Conditions screen:

System Environmental Conditions (System Power is currently off.)

Fan 0: A stopped fan detected Fan 1: A stopped fan detected Fan 2: A stopped fan detected Fan 3: A stopped fan detected

MEM Temperature is operating within normal tolerances I/O Temperature is operating within normal tolerances CPU Temperature is operating within normal tolerances 5.0 Volts: A low 5.0 Voltage reading detected

3.3 Volts: A low 3.3 Voltage reading detected

5.0 Standby Volts: is operating within normal tolerance

+12.0 Volts: A low +12.0 voltage reading detected -12.0 Volts: A high -12.0 voltage reading detected

(Press Return to Continue)

vProcessor Configuration/Deconfiguration Menu

Use this option to view and modify processor configuration.

The following is an example of the Processor Configuration/Deconfiguration Menu:

Processor Configuration/Deconfiguration Menu

Processor number

0.Configured by system (0x0)

1.Configured by system (0x0)

2.Configured by system (0x0)

3.Configured by system (0x0)

98.Return to Previous Menu

To change the configuration, select the processor number 1>

The user can manually configure or deconfigure any processor, regardless of failure status, through this Service Processor menu. The configuration process takes place during the system power-up. Therefore, the configuration displayed in STANDBY mode reflects the configuration during the last boot.

To view the current configuration, access the Service Processor menu after the system starts. When the user selects a processor, its state toggles between configured and deconfigured. Processors that are not present are not listed. A processor can be in any of the following four states:

±Configured by system: The processor is present, and has not exceeded the number of failure threshold. It is configured by the system and is available.

±Deconfigured by system: The processor is present, but has exceeded the number of failure threshold. It is deconfigured by the system and is currently unavailable.

±Manually configured: The processor is present and available. It is configured by the user through the service processor menus.

±Manually deconfigured: The processor is present, but unavailable. It has been deconfigured by the user through the service processor menus.

52 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

v The following is an example of the Memory Configuration/Deconfiguration Menu:

Memory Configuration/Deconfiguration Menu

DIMMs on memory card number 0:

DIMMs on memory card number 1: 1. Configured by system (0x0)

98. Return to Previous Menu

Enter card number _and_ DIMM number separated by a space 1>

The user can manually configure or deconfigure any memory DIMM,(Dual Inline Memory Module) regardless of failure status, through this Service Processor menu. The configuration process takes place during the system power-up. Therefore, the configuration displayed in STANDBY mode reflects the configuration during the last boot.

To view the current configuration, access the Service Processor menu after the system starts. When the user selects a memory DIMM, its state will toggle between configured and deconfigured. Memory DIMMs that are not present are not listed. A memory DIMM can be in any of the following four states:

±Configured by system: The memory DIMM is present, and has not exceeded the number of failure threshold. It is configured by the system and is available.

±Deconfigured by system: The memory DIMM is present, but has exceeded the number of failure threshold. It is deconfigured by the system and is currently unavailable.

±Manually configured: The memory DIMM is present and available. It is configured by the user through the service processor menus.

±Manually deconfigured: The memory DIMM is present, but unavailable. It has been deconfigured by the user through the service processor menus.

Language Selection Menu

The service processor menus and messages are available in different languages. This menu allows selecting languages into which service processor and system firmware menus and messages are displayed.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 53

LANGUAGE SELECTION MENU

1.English

2.France

3.Deutsch

4.Italian

5.Espanol

6.Svenska

98.Return to Previous Menu

99.Exit from Menus

1>

Note: Your ASCII terminal must support the ISO-8859 character set to correctly display languages other than English.

Call-In/Call-Out Setup Menu

This menu is used to configure a modem for the service processor to use to support the system.

CALL-IN/CALL-OUT SETUP MENU

1.Modem Configuration Menu

2.Serial Port Selection Menu

3.Serial Port Speed Setup Menu

4.Telephone Number Setup Menu

5.Call-Out Policy Setup Menu

6.Customer Account Setup Menu

7.Call-Out Test

8.Ring Indicate Power-On Menu

98.Return to Previous Menu

99.Exit from Menus

1>

vModem Configuration Menu, see ªModem Configuration Menuº.

vSerial Port Selection Menu, see ªSerial Port Selection Menuº on page 55.

vSerial Port Speed Setup Menu, see ªSerial Port Selection Menuº on page 55.

vTelephone Number Setup Menu, see ªTelephone Number Setup Menuº on page 56.

vCall-Out Policy Setup Menu, see ªCall-Out Policy Setup Menuº on page 57.

vCustomer Account Setup Menu, see ªCustomer Account Setup Menuº on page 58.

vCall-out Test, see ªCall-Out Policy Setup Menuº on page 57.

vRing Indicate Power-On Menu, see 50.

Modem Configuration Menu

Two entries at the top of the Modem Configuration Menu display the status of the current selections. Selections are made in the two sections labeled Modem Ports and Modem Configuration File Name. Select the serial port that you want to activate and then select the modem configuration file for the modem on the port. To set up both serial ports with modems, make your selections one port at a time.

54 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

For information on choosing a modem configuration file, see ªSample Modem Configuration Filesº on page 171 and ªTransfer of a Modem Sessionº on page 175.

Modem Configuration Menu

Port 1 Modem Configuration File Name:

Port 2 Modem Configuration File Name:

To make changes, First select the port and then the configuration file name

Modem Ports:

1.Serial port 1

2.Serial port 2

Modem Configuration File Name:

3.none

4.modem_f_sp

5.modem_f0_sp

6.modem_f1_sp

7.modem_z_sp

8.modem_z0_sp

9.modem_m0_sp

10.modem_m1_sp

30. Save configuration to NVRAM and Configure modem

98. Return to Previous Menu

Serial Port Selection Menu

This menu allows you to enable and/or disable the call-in functions of each serial port in any combination.

Serial Port Selection Menu

1.Serial Port 1 Call-Out: Currently Disabled

2.Serial Port 2 Call-Out: Currently Disabled

3.Serial Port 1 Call-In: Currently Disabled

4.Serial Port 2 Call-In: Currently Disabled

98. Return to Previous Menu

Serial Port Speed Setup Menu

This menu allows you to set Serial port speed to enhance terminal performance or to accommodate modem capabilities.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 55

Serial Port Speed Setup Menu

1.Serial port 1 speed: Currently 9600

2.Serial port 2 speed: Currently 9600

98. Return to Previous Menu

A speed of 9600 baud or higher is recommended. Valid serial port speeds are shown below:

50

600

4800

75

1200

7200

110

2000

9600

134

2400

19200

150

2400

57600

300

3600

115200

Telephone Number Setup Menu

Use the menu to set or change the telephone numbers for reporting a system failure.

Telephone Number Setup Menu

1.Service Center Telephone Number: Currently Unassigned

2.Customer Administration Center Telephone Number: Currently Unassigned

3.Digital Pager Telephone Number:

Currently Unassigned

4.Customer Voice Telephone Number: Currently Unassigned

5.Customer System Telephone Number: Currently Unassigned

98. Return to Previous Menu

1>

vService Center Telephone Number is the number of the service center computer. The service center usually includes a computer that takes calls from servers with call-out capability. This computer is referred to as the catcher. The catcher expects messages in a specific format to which the service processor conforms. Contact your service provider for the correct service center telephone number to enter here. For

more information about the format and catcher computers, refer to the README file in the AIX /usr/samples/syscatch directory.

vCustomer Administration Center Telephone Number is the number of the System Administration Center computer (catcher) that receives problem calls from servers. Contact your system administrator for the correct telephone number to enter here.

56 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

vDigital Pager Telephone Number is the number for a pager carried by someone who responds to problem calls from your server. Contact your administration center representative for the correct telephone number to enter here. For test purposes, use a test number, which you can change later.

Note: Some modems, such as IBM 7857-017, are not designed for the paging function. Although they can be used for paging, they return an error message when they do not get the expected response from another modem. Therefore, even though the paging was successful, the error message causes the service processor to retry, continuing to place pager calls for the number of retries specified in the Call-Out policy Setup Menu. These retries result in redundant pages.

For digital pagers that require a personal identification number (PIN) for access, include the PIN in this field as shown in the following example:

18001234567,,,,87654

The commas create pauses for the voice response system, and the 87654 represents the PIN. The length of these pauses is set in modem register S8. The default is usually 1 or 2 seconds each.

vCustomer Voice Telephone Number is the telephone number of a phone near the server or answered by someone responsible for the server. This is the telephone number left on the pager for callback. For test purposes, use a test number, which you can change later.

vCustomer System Telephone Number is the telephone number to which your server's modem is connected. The service or administration center representatives need this number to make direct contact with your server for problem investigation. This is also referred to as the call-in phone number.

Call-Out Policy Setup Menu

This menu allows you to set call-out policy.

Call-Out Policy Setup Menu

1.Call-Out policy (First/All): Currently First

2.Remote timeout, (in seconds): Currently 120

3.Remote latency, (in seconds): Currently 2

4.Number of retries:

Currently 2

98. Return to Previous Menu

1>

vCall-Out Test

The Call-Out Test verifies if the Call-Out function is working properly. Before the Test, call-out must be enabled and the system configured properly for call-out.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 57

During the setup, the user should have entered the phone numbers for the Digital Pager and Customer Voice for test purposes. These numbers are used to determine whether call-out is working during the Call-Out Test.

The Call-Out Test should cause the user's phone to ring. If the test is successful, call-out is working properly. The user should now change the test Digital pager and Customers Voice number to the correct numbers.

Call-Out policy can be set to first or all. If call-out policy is set to first, the service processor stops at the first successful call out to one of the following numbers in the order listed:

1.Service Center

2.Customer Administration Center

3.Pager

If call-out policy is set to all, the service processor attempts a call out to the following numbers in the order listed:

1.Service Center

2.Customer Administration Center

3.Pager

v Remote timeout and Remote latency are functions of your service provider's catcher computer. Either use the defaults or contact your service provider for arecommended settings.

vNumber of retries is the number of times you want the server to retry calls that resulted in busy signals or in other error messages.

Customer Account Setup Menu

This menu allows users to enter information that is specific to their account.

Customer Account Setup Menu

1.Customer account number: Currently Unassigned

2.Customer RETAIN login userid: Currently Unassigned

3.Customer RETAIN login password: Currently Unassigned

98. Return to Previous Menu

1>

vCustomer account number is assigned by your service provider for record-keeping and billing. If you have an account number, enter it. Otherwise, leave this field blank.

vCustomer RETAIN login userid and Customer RETAIN login password apply to a service function to which your service provider may or may not have access. Leave these fields blank if your service provider does not use RETAIN.

58 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Reboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu

Reboot describes bringing the system hardware back up from scratch, for example, from a system reset or power-on. The boot process ends when control passes to the operating system process.

Restart describes activating the operating system after the system hardware reinitialized. Restart must follow a successful reboot.

Reboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu

1.Number of reboot attempts: Currently 3

2.Use OS-Defined restart policy? Currently Yes

3.Enable supplemental restart policy? Currently No

4.Call-Out before restart:

Currently Disabled

98. Return to Previous Menu

1>

vNumber of reboot attempts If the server fails to successfully complete the boot process, it attempts to reboot the number of times specified. Entry values equal to or greater than 0 are valid. Only successive failed reboot attempts count, not reboots that occur after a restart attempt. At restart, the counter is set to 0.

vUse OS-Defined restart policy lets the service processor react or not react the same as the operating system to major system faults, by reading the setting of the operating system parameter Automatically Restart/Reboot After a System Crash. This parameter may or may not be defined, depending on the operating system or its version and level. If the operating system automatic restart setting is defined, then it can be set to respond to a major fault by restarting or by not restarting. See your operating system documentation for details on setting up operating system automatic restarts. The default value is Yes.

vEnable supplemental restart policy - The default setting is No. If set to Yes, the service processor restarts the system when the system loses control as detected by the service processor surveillance, and either:

vThe Use OS-Defined restart policy is set to No. OR

vThe Use OS-Defined restart policy is set to Yes, and the operating system has NO automatic restart policy.

Refer to ªService Processor Reboot/Restart Recoveryº on page 63.

vCall-Out before restart If a restart is necessary due to a system fault, you can enable the service processor to call out and report the event. This option can be valuable if the number of these events becomes excessive, signalling a bigger problem.

The following table describes the relationship among the operating system and service processor restart controls:

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 59

OS Automatic

Service processor to

Service Processor

System response

reboot/restart after

use OS-Defined

Enable supplemental

 

crash setting

restart policy?

restart policy?

 

None

No

No1

 

None

No

Yes

Restarts

None

Yes1

No1

 

None

Yes1

Yes

Restarts

False2

No

No1

 

False2

No

Yes

Restarts

False2

Yes1

No1

 

False2

Yes1

Yes

 

True

No

No1

 

True

No

Yes

Restarts

True

Yes1

No1

Restarts

True

Yes1

Yes

Restarts

 

 

 

 

1Service Processor default

2AIX default

Service Processor Functions

This section provides detailed information about the service processor functions.

The 44P Series Model 170 supports the functions listed in the following table:

Built-in Functions

Initialization and Test

Service Processor

 

 

Basic Instructions Test (BIST)

 

 

 

 

 

JTAG System Chip Initialization

 

 

 

 

Error Data Collection

BIST/POST errors and status

 

 

 

 

 

Checkstop FIR data logout

 

 

 

 

 

Machine check logout

 

 

 

 

Configuration

CPU Complex validation

 

 

 

 

 

VPD Collection

 

 

 

 

System Management

Reset and Reboot on System

 

 

Firmware fail

 

 

 

 

 

Reboot on system failure

 

 

 

60 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Local User Function

User Interface

Local async console

 

 

 

 

 

Text based menus with NLS

 

 

 

 

 

Operator Panel messages

 

 

 

 

Power and Miscellaneous

Power On/Off

 

 

 

 

 

Configurable Reboot Policy

 

 

 

 

Status and Data Access

VPD

 

 

 

 

 

Error data (Service Processor)

 

 

 

 

 

Error data (system)

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental data

 

 

 

 

Service Processor Setup Utilities

Passwords

 

 

 

 

 

Phone numbers

 

 

 

 

 

Language (NLS) selection

 

 

 

 

 

Call In/Call Out enable/disable

 

 

 

 

 

Flash (Gold/Recovery block) Update

 

 

 

 

 

Flash (Composite block) Update

 

 

 

 

 

System Name

 

 

 

 

 

Modem Configuration

 

 

 

Remote User Functions

Call Out (Call Home) Reporting

Boot failure

 

 

 

 

 

OS Termination

 

 

 

 

 

Surveillance failure

 

 

 

 

 

Critical EPOW reporting

 

 

 

 

 

Checkstop

 

 

 

 

 

Machine check

 

 

 

 

Identify system by name

Call In

 

 

 

 

 

Power-on via ring-indicate

 

 

 

 

 

Password/security check

 

 

 

 

 

Console mirroring/Quick disconnect

 

 

 

System Power-On Methods

This section discusses the following system power-on methods:

vPower-on Switch

vRemote Power-on via Ring-Indicate Signal

The server automatically powers on when it detects a ²ring indicate² signal from a modem attached to one of the integrated serial ports.

A remote user can call the server to activate ring detection by the modem. Listen for a few more rings than the threshold number for starting the system and then hang up. The default threshold is one ring.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 61

Wait 5 minutes for the server to initialize and then call again using an ASCII terminal. The server responds by requesting a password, if set, or presenting the service processor menus. The remote user now has control of the server.

Note: For security, if the system is powered on by the remote power-on via ring indicate signal and the service processor detects an operator panel battery failure, the service processor causes the system to power off. See ªService Processor Call-In Securityº for more information.

vUnattended start mode - refer to Enable/Disable Unattended Start Mode on page 48.

The Service Processor can be enabled to recover from the loss of ac power (see Enable/Disable Unattended Power-On Mode in the SYSTEM POWER CONTROL MENU). When ac power is restored, the system returns to the then current power state at the time ac loss occurred. For example, if the system was powered-on when ac loss occurred, it reboots/restarts when power is restored. If the system was powered-off when ac loss occurred, it remains off when power is restored.

vTimed power-on - refer to the shutdown -t command on servers using AIX.

Working in conjunction with AIX, the Service Processor in your server can operate a timer, much like the wake-up timer on your clock radio. You can set the timer so that your server powers on at a certain time after shutting down. The timer is battery operated, so power interruptions occurring while the server is off do not affect its accuracy. Refer to the AIX shutdown -t command for details on setting the timer.

Note: If an ac power loss is in progress when the Timed Power-On attempt occurs, the server is not able to power on when ac power is restored.

vFollow-up to a Failed Boot Attempt

The service processor initiates a power-on sequence if a failed boot attempt is detected (due to a hardware or software failure).

vFast/Slow Boot (IPL) Capabilities

Using the operator-panel functions, you can select the IPL type, mode, and speed of your boot capabilities. For more information, refer to operator panel functions 01 and 02.

Attention: Selecting fast IPL results in several diagnostic tests being skipped.

Service Processor Call-In Security

If the service processor detects bad battery-powered storage (indicating that the battery in the operator panel has failed or is disconnected), it maintains server security by disabling the call-in capability to both serial ports.

When call-in is disabled, the system can still be powered on by using the ring-indicator signal, but the service processor then causes the system to power down, preventing access to any system facilities or to AIX.

After battery power is restored, the password(s) must be reset and the call-in function(s) enabled. Both of these operations can be performed from Service Processor menus. See ªSerial Port Selection Menuº on page 55.

62 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Service Processor Reboot/Restart Recovery

Reboot describes bringing the system hardware back up; for example, from a system reset or power-on. The boot process ends when control passes to the operating system process.

Restart describes activating the operating system after the system hardware is reinitialized. Restart must follow a successful reboot.

Boot (IPL) Speed

When the server enters reboot recovery, slow IPL is automatically started, which gives the POST an opportunity to locate and report any problems that may otherwise be untested.

Failure During Boot Process

During the boot process, either initially after system power-on or upon reboot after a system failure, the Service Processor monitors the boot progress. If progress stops, the Service Processor can reinitiate the boot process (reboot) if enabled to do so. The Service Processor can re-attempt this process according to the number of retries selected in the Reboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu.

Failure During Normal System Operation

When the boot process completes and control transfers to the operating system (OS), the service processor can monitor operating system activity (see the Set Surveillance Parameters option in the SERVICE PROCESSOR SETUP MENU). If OS activity stops due to a hardware-or software-induced failure, the service processor can initiate a reboot/restart process based on the settings in the Service Processor Reboot/Restart Policy Setup Menu and the OS automatic restart settings (see the operating system documentation).

If you are using the AIX operating system, the menu item under SMIT for setting the restart policy is Automatically Reboot After Crash (True/False). The default is False. When the setting is True, and if the service processor parameter ²Use OS-Defined Restart Policy² is Yes (the default), Service Processor takes over for AIX to reboot/restart after a hardware or surveillance failure.

Service Processor Reboot/Restart Policy Controls

The operating system's automatic restart policy (see operating system documentation) indicates the operating system response to a system crash. The service processor can be instructed to refer to that policy by the Use OS-Defined Restart Policy setup menu.

Processor Boot-Time Deconfiguration (CPU Repeat-Gard)

Processor boot time deconfiguration allows for the removal of processors from the system configuration at boot time. The objective is to minimize system failure or data integrity exposure due to a faulty processor.

This function uses processor hardware Built-In Self-Test (BIST) and firmware Power-On Self-Test (POST) to discover and isolate processor hardware failures during boot time.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 63

It also uses the hardware error detection logic in the processor to capture run-time recoverable and irrecoverable error indications. The firmware uses the error signatures in the hardware to analyze and isolate the error to a specific processor.

The processors that are deconfigured remain off-line for subsequent reboots until the faulty processor hardware is replaced.

This function allows usersto manually deconfigure or re-enable a previously deconfigured processor through the Service Processor menu. The user can also enable or disable this function through the Service Processor.

Processor Run-Time Deconfiguration (CPU-Gard)

Processor run-time deconfiguration allows for the dynamic removal of CPUs from the system configuration. The objective is to minimize system failures or data integrity exposures due to a faulty processor. The processor to be removed is the one that has experienced repeated run-time recoverable internal errors (over a predefined threshold).

The function uses the hardware error detection logic in the processor to capture run-time recoverable error indications. The firmware uses the error signatures in the hardware to analyze and isolate the error to a specific CPU. The firmware also maintains error-threshold information.

When an internal recoverable error for a processor reaches a predefined threshold, the firmware notifies the AIX operating system. The AIX operating system migrates all software processes and interrupts to another processor and puts the faulty processor in stop state.

CPUs that are deconfigured at run time remain off-line for subsequent reboots through the CPU Boot Time Deconfiguration function, until the faulty CPU hardware is replaced. The user can also enable or disable this function via the AIX system management function.

Memory Boot-Time Deconfiguration (Memory Repeat-Gard)

Memory boot time deconfiguration allows for the removal of a memory segment or DIMM from the system configuration at boot time. The objective is to minimize system failures or data integrity exposure due to faulty memory hardware. The hardware resource(s) to be removed are the ones that experienced the following failures:

vA boot-time test failure.

vRun-time recoverable errors over threshold prior to the current boot phase.

vRun-time irrecoverable errors prior to the current boot phase.

This function uses firmware Power-On Self-Test (POST) to discover and isolate memory hardware failures during boot time. It also uses the hardware error detection logic in the memory controller to capture run-time recoverable and irrecoverable error indications.

The firmware uses the error signatures in the hardware to analyze and isolate the error to the specific memory segment or DIMM.

64 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

The memory segment or DIMM that is deconfigured remains off-line for subsequent reboots until the faulty memory hardware is replaced.

The function allows users to manually deconfigure or re-enable a previously deconfigured memory segment/DIMM through the Service Processor menu. The user can also enable or disable this function through the Service Processor menu.

Service Processor System Monitoring - Surveillance

Surveillance is a function in which the service processor monitors the system, and the system monitors the service processor. This monitoring is accomplished by periodic samplings called heartbeats

Surveillance is available during two phases:

vSystem firmware bring-up (automatic)

vOperating system run time (optional)

System Firmware Surveillance

System firmware surveillance provides the service processor with a means to detect boot failures while the system firmware is running.

System firmware surveillance is automatically enabled during system power-on. It cannot be disabled by the user.

If the service processor detects no heartbeats during system boot (for 7 minutes), it cycles the system power to attempt a reboot. The maximum number of retries is set from the service processor menus. If the fail condition repeats, the service processor leaves the machine powered on, logs an error, and displays menus to the user. If Call-out is enabled, the service processor calls to report the failure and displays the operating-system surveillance failure code on the operator panel.

Operating System Surveillance

The operating system surveillance provides the service processor with a means to detect hang conditions, as well as hardware or software failures, while the operating system is running. It also provides the operating system with a means to detect service processor failure caused by the lack of a return heartbeat.

Operating system surveillance is enabled by default, allowing the user to run operating systems that do not support this service processor option.

You can also use Service Processor Menus and Service Processor Service Aid to enable or disable operating system surveillance.

For operating system surveillance to work correctly, you must set the following parameters:

vSurveillance enable/disable

vSurveillance interval

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 65

This is the maximum time (in minutes) the service processor should wait for a heartbeat from the operating system before timeout.

vSurveillance delay

This is the length of time (in minutes) for the service processor to wait from when the operating system is started to when the first heartbeat is expected.

Surveillance takes effect immediately after the parameters are set from the service processor menus.

If operating system surveillance is enabled (and system firmware has passed control to the operating system), and the service processor does not detect any heartbeats from the operating system, the service processor assumes the system is hung. The machine is left powered on and the service processor enters standby phase, displaying the operating system surveillance failure code on the operator panel. If Call-out is enabled, the service processor calls to report the failure.

Call Out

The service processor can call out when it detects one of the following conditions:

vSystem firmware surveillance failure

vOperating system surveillance failure (if supported by the operating system)

vCritical environmental failures

vRestarts

To enable the call-out feature, do the following:

1.Have a modem connected to serial port 1 or 2

2.Set up the following using the service processor Menus or Diagnostic Service Aids: v Enable call out for the serial port where the modem is connected.

vSet up serial port line speed.

vEnter the modem configuration filename.

vSet up site-specific parameters (such as phone numbers for call out and call out policy).

vTo call out before restart, set Call-Out before restart to ENABLED from the Reboot/Restart Policy Setup menu.

Note: Some modems, such as IBM 7857-017, are not designed for the paging function. Although they can be used for paging, they return an error message when they do not get the expected response from another modem. Therefore, even though the paging was successful, the error message causes the service processor to retry, continuing to place pager calls for the number of retries specified in the Call-Out policy Setup Menu. These retries result in redundant pages.

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Console Mirroring

Console mirroring allows a user on a local ASCII terminal to monitor the service processor activities of a remote user. Console mirroring ends when the service processor releases control of the serial ports to the system firmware.

Using this option the user can set the modem connection, remote sessions, and console mirroring.

vservice processor

vModem connected to one serial port and enabled for incoming calls

vLocal ASCII terminal connected to the other serial port. This local terminal can be connected directly to your server or connected through another modem.

Remote console mirroring can be invoked in three ways:

1.Remote session first, then local session added

2.Remote session already in progress.

3.Remote user uses the service processor menus to enable console mirroring, allowing both consoles to be active.

Local console mirroring can be invoked in three ways:

1.Local session first, then remote session added

2.Local session is already in progress.

3.The service processor receives a call from the remote user.

4.The local user selects the option to enable console mirroring. The service processor immediately begins mirroring service processor menus.

Note: To disconnect quickly, press Ctrl+D on either console, and both sessions will exit the service processor menus.

Service Processor Firmware Updates

Attention: Only the service processor firmware can be updated from the service processor menus; the system firmware cannot be updated from the service processor menus. A service processor firmware update always requires a companion system firmware update which must be applied first. For this reason, updating only the service processor firmware using the service processor menus is not recommended. Go to the RS/6000 support web site at http://www.rs6000.ibm.com/support/micro to download the latest firmware levels and update instructions.

The service processor firmware update image must be written onto a DOSformatted diskette. The update image can be obtained from the RS/6000 support web site: http://www.rs6000.ibm.com/support/micro.

After the update diskette has been made, from the service processor main menu, select ²Service Processor Setup². Then select ²Reprogram Service Processor Flash EPROM².

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 67

The program requests the update diskette(s) as they are needed. The service processor will automatically reboot after the firmware update is complete.

Service Processor Error Log

The service processor error logs contain error conditions detected by the service processor.

Error Log

19991118165344 1. 4B276851 CPU BIST fail detected FRUs to replace: P1-C1

Press "C" to clear error log, any other key to continue. >

The time stamp in this error log is Coordinated Universal Time (CUT), also known as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). AIX error logs have more information available and are able to time stamp with local time.

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System POST Errors

If POST (Power-On Self-Test) errors occur during startup, this error log helps isolate faults when used with the diagnostics.

 

 

 

 

 

Read System POST Errors

Version :

0

 

 

 

 

 

Severity : 0

 

 

 

 

 

Disposition : 0

 

 

 

 

 

Initiator : 0

 

 

 

 

 

Event being reported : 0

 

 

 

Extended Error Log Data:

 

 

 

0xC2

0x00

0x84

0x09

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x20

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x72

0x74

0x63

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x28

0x03

0x00

0x05

0x00

0x01

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x00

0x49

0x42

0x4D

0x00

0x55

0x30

0x2E

0x31

0x2D

0x50

0x31

0x2D 0x58

0x31

0x00

 

(Press Return to Continue)

Service Processor Operational Phases

This section provides a high-level flow of the phases of the service processor.

SP Power Applied

Pre-Standby Phase

 

 

 

Standby Phase

SP Menus Available

Bring-Up Phase

SMS Menus Available

Runtime Phase

AIX Login Prompt Available

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Standby Phase

This phase is entered when the server is connected to a power source. The server may or may not be fully powered on. This phase is exited when the Power-On Self-Tests (POST) and configuration tasks are completed.

The Pre-Standby phase components are:

vService Processor Initialization - Performs any necessary hardware and software initializations.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 69

vService Processor POST - Conducts Power-On Self-Tests on its various work and code areas.

vService Processor Unattended Start Mode Checks - To assist fault recovery. If unattended start mode is set, the service processor automatically reboots the server. The service processor does not wait for user input or power-on command, but moves through the phase and into the Bring-up Phase. Access SMS menus or &sp menus to reset the unattended start mode.

Standby Phase

The standby phase can be reached in either of two ways:

vWith the server off and power connected (the normal path), recognized by OK in the LCD display. OR

vWith the server on after an operating system fault, recognized by STBY or an 8-digit code in the LCD display.

In the Standby phase, the service processor takes care of some automatic duties and is available for menu operation. The service processor remains in the standby phase until a power-on request is detected.

The Standby phase components are as follows:

vModem Configuration

The service processor configures the modem (if installed) so that incoming calls can be received or outgoing calls can be placed.

vDial In

Monitor incoming phone line to answer calls, prompt for a password, verify the password, and remotely display the standby menu. The remote session can be mirrored on the local ASCII console if the server is so equipped and the user enables this function.

vMenus

The service processor menus are password-protected. Before you can access them, you need either the General User (General Access Password or GAP) or Privileged User (Privileged Access Password or PAP).

Bring-Up Phase

This phase is entered upon power-on, and exited upon loading of the operating system.

The Bring-Up phase components are:

vRetry Request Check

The service processor checks to see if the previous boot attempt failed. If two consecutive failures are detected, the service processor displays an error code and places an outgoing call to notify an external party if the user has enabled this option.

vDial Out

The service processor can dial a preprogrammed telephone number in the event of an IPL failure. The service processor issues an error report with the last reported IPL status indicated and any other available error information.

70 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

vUpdate Operator Panel

The service processor displays Operator Panel data on the ASCII terminal if a remote connection is active.

vEnvironmental Monitoring

The Service Processor provides expanded error recording and reporting.

vSystem Firmware Surveillance (Heartbeat Monitoring)

The service processor monitors and times the interval between system firmware heartbeats.

vResponding to System Processor Commands

The service processor responds to any command issued by the system processor.

Run-time Phase

This phase includes the tasks that the service processor performs during steady-state execution of the operating system.

vEnvironmental Monitoring

The Service Processor monitors voltages, temperatures, and fan speeds (on some servers).

vResponding to System Processor Commands

The service processor responds to any command issued by the system processor.

vRun-Time Surveillance (Heartbeat Monitoring)

If the device driver is installed and surveillance enabled, the service processor monitors the system heartbeat. If the heartbeat times out, the service processor places an outgoing call. This is different from the Bring-up Phase scenario where two reboot attempts are made before placing an outgoing call.

Service Processor Procedures in Service Mode

When the system is in service mode, the following service processor parameters are suspended:

vUnattended Start Mode

vReboot/Restart Policy

vCall-Out

vSurveillance

When service mode is exited, the service processor parameters revert to the customer settings.

Chapter 3. Using the Service Processor 71

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Chapter 4. System Management Services

Use the System Management Services menus to view information about your computer and to perform such tasks as setting passwords and changing device configurations.

If you have chosen a graphical display as your system console, you can use the graphical System Management Services described below. If you are using an ASCII display as your system console, see ªText-Based System Management Servicesº on page 94.

Graphical System Management Services

To start the Graphical System Management Services, turn on or restart the computer.

The firmware version installed in your system unit is displayed at the bottom right corner of the initial logo screen. Note the version number; processor upgrades may require a specified version of firmware to be installed in your system unit. (Update System Firmware is an option under the Utilities menu in the System Management Services.)

After the logo is displayed, initialization icons display across the bottom of the screen.

To enter the Graphical System Management Services, you must press the F1 key after the keyboard icon displays during startup and before the tone.

If you have pressed the F1 key, the System Management Services menu displays after the initialization and power-on self-test (POST) are complete.

Note: If you have installed a privileged-access password, you are prompted for this password before you gain access to the System Management Services menu.

After the System Management Services starts, the following screen displays.

73

System Management Services

Config

Multiboot

Utilities

Exit

You can also press F8 here to enter the open firmware OK> prompt.

The System Management Services screen contains the following choices.

Config: Enables you to view your system setup. Go to ªConfigº on page 75.

Multiboot: Enables you to set and view the default operating system, modify the boot sequence, access the Open Firmware command prompt, and work with other options. Go to ªMultibootº on page 76.

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Utilities: Enables you to set and remove passwords, enable the unattended start mode, set and view the addresses of your system's SCSI controllers, select the active console, view or clear the firmware error log, and update your system unit's firmware program. Go to ªUtilitiesº on page 79.

Exit: Returns you to the previous screen.

To select an icon, move the cursor with the arrow keys to choose which icon is highlighted, then press the Enter key. You can also select an icon by clicking on it with your left mouse button. To leave the current screen, either press the Esc key or select the Exit icon.

Config

By selecting this icon, you can view information about the setup of your system unit. A list similar to the following displays when you select the Config icon.

Chapter 4. System Management Services 75

Device Name

PowerPC, POWER3 375 MHz L2-Cache, 4096K

PowerPC, POWER3 375 MHz L2-Cache, 4096K

Memory

Memory Card slot 1, Module Slot =1 size=128MB Memory Card slot 1, Module Slot =2 size=128MB

Service Processor Tablet Port

LPT addr=378

Com

addr=3F8

Com addr=2F8

Audio Keyboard Mouse Diskette

addr=3F0

Integrated Ethenet addr=9999FF111R

SCSI controller id= 7

If more than one screen of information is available, a blue arrow displays in the top right corner of the screen. Use the Page Up and Page Down keys to scroll through the pages.

Multiboot

The options available from this screen allow you to view and set various options regarding the operating system and boot devices.

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OK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Select

Software

Install

Boot

OK prompt

Software

Default

From

Device

 

 

 

Multiboot Startup

EXIT

The following describes the choices available on this screen.

Select Software: This option, if supported by the operating system, allows you to choose which operating system to use. Choosing an operating system causes the system to start. This option is supported by AIX. However, not all operating systems support this option.

If you receive an informational message saying that no operating system is installed, then the system information in nonvolatile storage may have been lost. This situation can occur if the battery has been removed. To correct this situation, refer to the bootlist reference in your AIX operating system documentation.

Software Default: This option, if supported by the operating system, enables you to select a default operating system for your system unit.

Chapter 4. System Management Services 77

OK

Install From: Enables you to select a media drive from which to install an operating system. Selection of a device is done using the spacebar.

Boot Sequence: Enables you to view and change the custom boot list (the sequence in which devices are searched for operating system code). You may choose from 1 to 5 devices for the custom boot list.

The default boot sequence is:

1.Primary diskette drive

2.CD-ROM drive

3.Tape drive

4.Hard disk drive

5.Network device

To change the custom boot list, enter a new order in the New column, then click on the Save icon. The list of boot devices is updated to reflect the new order.

Attention: To change the custom boot list back to the default values, click on Default. If you change your startup sequence, you must be extremely careful when performing write operations (for example, copying, saving, or formatting). You can accidentally overwrite data or programs if you select the wrong drive.

OK Prompt: Enables you to go directly to the Open Firmware command prompt. The Open Firmware command prompt is used for debugging and device driver development. For more information about the operation of the Open Firmware command prompt, refer to IEEE Standard 1275.

Note: This is for debugging and device development only. Do not envoke this feature if you are not familiar with Open Firmware. To exit from the command prompt, restart your system.

Multiboot Startup: Clicking on this button toggles whether the Multiboot menu displays automatically at startup.

78 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Utilities

Selecting this icon enables you to perform various tasks and view additional information about your system unit.

Password

Spin Delay

ErrorLog

RIPL

SCSI id

Update

Select

 

 

 

 

 

 

Console

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit

The following describes the choices available on this screen.

Password: Enables you to set password protection for turning on the system unit and for using system administration tools. Go to ªPasswordº on page 80.

Spin Delay: Enables you to change the spin-up delay for SCSI hard disk drives attached to your system. Go to ªSpin Delayº on page 85.

Chapter 4. System Management Services 79

Error Log: Enables you to view and clear the firmware error log information for your system unit. Go to ªErrorLogº on page 85.

RIPL (Remote Initial Program Load): Enables you to select a remote system from which to load programs through a network adapter when your system unit is first turned on. This option also allows you to configure network adapters that are required for RIPL. Go to ªRIPLº on page 86.

SCSI ID: Allows you to view and change the addresses (IDs) of the SCSI controllers attached to your system unit. Go to ªSCSI IDº on page 91.

Firmware Update: Allows you to update the system firmware program. Go to ªFirmware Updateº on page 92.

Select Console:Allows the user to select which console the user would like to use to display the SMS Menus. This selection is only for the SMS Menus and doesnot affect the display used by the AIX operating system.

Follow the instructions that display on the screen, select the console from the screen. Press F1 the system will

start the boot to AIX. Go to ªSelect Consoleº on page 104.

Password

80 44P Series Model 170 User's Guide

Select this icon to perform password-related tasks.

Power-On Access

Set

Remove

Remote <Off>

Privileged Access

Set

Remove

Exit

Power-On Password

Setting a Power-On Access password helps protect information stored in your system unit. If a Power-On Access password is set for your system unit, the Power-On Access status icon is shown in the locked position. If a Power-On Access password is not set, then the Power-On Access status icon is shown in the unlocked position (as shown in the screen above).

When you select the Set icon, a screen with eight empty boxes displays. Type your password in these boxes. You can use any combination of up to eight characters (A±Z, a±z, and 0±9) for your password. As you type a character, a key displays in the box.

Chapter 4. System Management Services 81

Enter Password

Press Enter when you are finished; you must type the password again for verification.

Verify Password

If the two password entries do not match, an error icon displays with a message:

Password was attempted to be set and an error code Power-On Access: 20E00000 displays.

Note: If you forget the Power-On Access password, you can erase the password by shutting down the system unit and removing the battery for at least 30 seconds.

A password becomes effective only after the system is turned off and back on again.

Remote Mode: The remote mode, when enabled, allows the system to start from the defined boot device. This mode is ideal for network servers and other system units that operate unattended. When the remote mode is set, the icon label changes to Remote <On>.

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