Gentek CO1209 User Manual

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550-0498 Pg. C-1

 

 

 

 

 

CO1209 SERIES

 

 

ELECTROCHEMICAL CARBON

 

 

MONOXIDE (CO) ALARM

 

 

 

 

ELECTROCHEMICAL TYPE SINGLE/MULTIPLE STATION

 

CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM, AC POWERED, WITH BATTERY BACK-UP

 

& TANDEM WIRE CONNECTION

 

 

 

Installation Instructions - Owner's/User’s Information Manual -READ CAREFULLY AND SAVE

INTRODUCTION CO1209 SERIES

quiet the alarm horn. If critical levels of CO remain, the alarm will

 

The CO1209 electrochemical carbon monoxide (CO) alarm is for

re-activate and sound.

 

 

use as an evacuation device in all dwelling units. The device has a

NOTICE: MALFUNCTION WARNING This unit performs a self-

solid state piezo signal to warn and alert the occupants to the

diagnostic test. If the alarm malfunctions it should be replaced

presence of carbon monoxide.

immediately. See IF THE CO ALARM IS NOT OPERATING

 

Your CO alarm is designed to detect abnormal amounts of

PROPERLY for more information.

carbon monoxide gas, only. Consequently, it is uncommon for

HOW TO TELL IF THE CO ALARM IS WORKING

household sources of combustion, including properly functioning

household appliances, to produce sufficient levels of CO to cause an

PROPERLY

alarm.

Your device is provided with an alarm horn and flashing red Light

BASIC SAFETY INFORMATION

Emitting Diode (LED) indicator, which flashes every 15-30

 

Dangers, Warnings, Cautions and notices alert you to important

seconds, and a green AC power on LED and red LED for CO.

 

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO MAKE YOUR FAMILYSAFE

 

erating procedures or to potentially hazardous situations. Pay

special attention to these items.

FROM CARBON MONOXIDE (CO)

WARNING!

a. Install CO alarms properly following the instructions in

This CO alarm is listed for use in single-family and multi-family

this manual. Keep your units clean. Test your CO alarm

 

residences, along with hotel, motels and other dwelling units.

weekly and replace when it no longer functions.

This CO alarm will only indicate the presence of increased levels

As with any electronic product, CO alarms have a limited life,

 

of carbon monoxide gas at the sensor. Increased levels of carbon

it is recommended that CO alarms be replaced every five (5)

 

monoxide gas may be present in other areas.

years. CO alarms that don't work cannot protect you.

This CO alarm must receive continuous 120VAC, 60Hz , pure

b. Develop a family escape plan and practice it with your

 

sine wave electrical power. (battery is meant for emergency

entire family, especially small children.

 

back-up only). In order for the emergency battery back-up to work,

Draw and post a floor plan of your home and find ways to

 

a new battery must be properly installed (see BATTERY

exit from each room.

 

INSTALLATIONsection).

Teach children what the CO alarm signal means, and that

NEVER ignore your CO alarm if it sounds. Refer to IF YOUR CO

they must be prepared to leave the residence by themselves

 

ALARM SOUNDS section for more information. Failure to do so

if necessary.

 

can result in serious injury or death.

Decide on a meeting place a safe distance from your house and

Test this device once a week. If the device ever fails to test

make sure that all your children understand that they should go

 

correctly, replace immediately! If the device is not working

and wait for you if there is a CO alarm.

 

properly, it can not alert you to a problem.

Hold CO drills at least every 6 months to make sure that

This product is intended for use in indoor locations of family

everyone, even small children, know what to do to escape

 

dwelling units. It is not designed to measure CO levels in

safely.

 

compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Know where to go to call the fire department from outside your

 

(OSHA) commercial or industrial standards. Individuals with

residence.

 

medical conditions that may make them more sensitive to carbon

WHAT TO DO IF THERE IS A CO EMERGENCY IN

 

monoxide may consider using warning devices which provide

YOUR HOME

 

audible and visual signals for carbon monoxide concentrations

 

under 30 ppm. For additional information on carbon monoxide and

If you have prepared family escape plans and practiced them with

 

your family, you have increased their chances of escaping safely.

 

your medical condition, contact your physician.

 

Review the following rules with your children when you have CO

MODELS

drills so everyone will remember them in a real CO emergency. If

(SEE BACK OF CO ALARM FOR EXACT MODEL)

alarm should sound:

a. Don't panic; stay calm. Your safe escape may depend on thinking

CO1209..........................120VAC, 60Hz

clearly and remembering what you have practiced.

CO1209F........................120VAC,60Hz with Form A/Form C auxilary

b. Open windows or doors. Opening windows or doors can

relay contact

significantly reduce CO levels.

NOTICE: In the event AC Power fails, a 9VDC battery will provide

c. Get out of the house following a planned escape route as quickly

as possible. Do not stop to collect anything or to get dressed.

proper alarm operation for a minimum of 24 hours.

d. Meet at your prearranged meeting place after leaving the house.

HOW THE CO ALARM WORKS

e. Call the Fire Department as soon as possible from outside your

GENERAL INFORMATION

house. Give the address and your name.

NOTICE: CO problems can occur at any time.

f. Never re-enter the building while the device is in alarm.

Contact your local Fire Department for more information on

 

When fully powered, the device samples the air and takes a new

 

making your home safer from CO and about preparing your family's

reading about every 30 seconds. A microchip inside the unit stores

escape plans.

each reading and remembers the levels of CO it has been exposed

 

to over time. The CO alarm will sound when it has been exposed to

NOTE: Current studies have shown CO alarms may

a critical level of CO (measured in parts per million or ppm) within a

not awaken all sleeping individuals, and that it is

specified time (measured in minutes). This CO alarm features a

the responsibility of individuals in the household

permanently installed sensor, an indicator light and an 85dBA,

temporal 4 alarm horn. It also has a reset feature to temporarily

 

that are capable of assisting others to provide assistance to those who may not be awakened by the alarm sound, or to those who may be incapable of safely evacuating the area unassisted.

WHAT THIS CO ALARM CAN DO

This CO alarm is designed to sense carbon monoxide gas entering its sensing element. It does not sense smoke, heat or flames.

When properly located, installed, and maintained, this CO alarm is designed to provide early warning of potential increased levels of carbon monoxide gas at a reasonable cost. This device monitors the air and when it senses CO, activates its built-in alarm horn. It can provide precious time for you and your family to escape from your residence before a CO poisoning occurs. Such an early warning, however, is possible only if the CO alarm is located, installed, and maintained as specified in this User's Manual.

This CO alarm is designed for use within single residential living units only; that is, it should be used inside a single-family home or one apartment of a multi-family building. In a multi-family building, the device may not provide early warning for residents if it is placed outside of the residential units, such as on outside porches, in corridors, lobbies, basements, or in other apartments. In multi-family buildings, each residential unit should have CO alarms to alert the residents of that unit. Devices designed to be interconnected should be interconnected within one family residence only; otherwise, nuisance alarms will occur when a CO alarm in another living unit is tested.

NOTICE: GENERAL LIMITATIONSOF CO ALARMS

This CO alarm is intended for all dwelling units. It is not intended for use in industrial applications where Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements for carbon monoxide detectors must be met.

CO alarms will not work without power. A battery must be connected to the CO alarm to maintain proper device operation if AC power supply is cut off by an electrical fire, an open fuse or

circuit breaker, or for any other reason. In the event of AC power failure, the battery will supply power for a minimum of 24 hours.

CO alarms may not awaken all individuals. If children and others do not readily awaken to the sound of the CO alarm or if there are infants or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the event of an emergency.

CO alarms for solar or wind energy users and battery back-up power systems: AC powered CO alarms should only be operated with true or pure sine wave inverters. Operating this CO alarm with most battery powered UPS (uninterruptible power supply) products or square wave or “quasi sine wave” inverters will damage the alarm. If you are not sure about your inverter or UPS type, please consult with the manufacturer to verify.

This CO alarm will not sense carbon monoxide that does not reach the sensor. This CO alarm will only sense CO at the sensor. CO may be present in other areas. Doors or other obstructions may affect the rate at which CO reaches the alarm. For this reason, if sleeping room doors are usually closed at night, we recommend you install an alarm in each sleeping room and in the hallway of each sleeping area.

CO alarms may not sense CO on another level of the residence. For example, an alarm on the second floor, near the bedrooms may not sense CO in the basement. For complete coverage, it is recommended that an alarm be installed on each level and tandem interconnected.

CO alarms may not be heard. The alarm decibel rating meets or exceeds current UL Standards of 85dBA at 10 feet (3 meters). However if the device is installed outside the sleeping area, it may not awaken a sound sleeper, one who has recently used drugs or has been drinking alcoholic beverages. This is especially true if the door is closed or only partially open. Even persons who are awake may not hear the sounding alarm if the sound is blocked by distance or closed doors. Noise from traffic, stereo, radio, television, air conditioner, or other appliances may also prevent alert persons from hearing the alarm horn. This device is not intended for people who are hearing impaired.

CO alarms are not a substitute for life insurance. Though these CO alarms warn against increasing CO levels, Gentex Corporation does not warrant or imply in any way that they will protect lives from CO poisoning. Homeowners and renters must still insure their lives.

CO alarms have a limited life. Although the CO alarm and all of its components have passed many stringent tests and are designed to be as reliable as possible, any of these parts could fail at any time. Therefore, you must test your CO alarm weekly.

CO alarms are not foolproof. Like all other electrical devices, CO alarms have limitations. They can only detect CO that reaches their sensors. They may not give early warning to rising CO levels if the CO is coming from a remote part of the home, away from the alarm. CO alarms may not alarm when a large influx of CO is introduced into the house. An example of a possible source of a large in-rush of CO is a generator running in an attached, enclosed garage and the door to the connected residence is opened.

NOTICE: The horn in your CO alarm meets or exceeds current audibility requirements of Underwriters Laboratories. However, if the

CO alarm is located outside a bedroom, it may not wake up a sound sleeper, especially if the bedroom door is closed or only partly open. If the CO alarm is located on a different level of the residence than the bedroom, it is even less likely to awaken people sleeping in the bedroom. In such cases, the National Fire Protection Association recommends that the CO alarms be interconnected so that a unit on any level of the residence will sound an alarm loud enough to awaken sleepers in closed bedrooms. This can be done by employing a systematic approach by interconnecting CO alarms together, or by using radio frequency transmitters and receivers.

OWHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

WHAT IS CO? Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless, tasteless gas produced when fossil fuels do not burn completely or are exposed to heat (usually fire). Electrical appliances typically do not produce CO.

These fuels include: wood, coal, charcoal, oil, natural gas, gasoline, kerosene and propane.

Common appliances are often sources of CO. If they are not properly maintained, are improperly ventilated, or malfunction, CO levels can rise quickly. CO is a real danger now that homes are more energy efficient. “Air-tight” homes with added insulation, sealed windows and other weatherproofing can ‘trap’ CO inside.

SYMPTOMS OF CO POISONING: These symptoms are related to CO POISONING and should be discussed with ALL household members.

 

 

EXPOSURE

SYMPTOMS OF CO POISONING

 

 

Mild

Slight headache, nausea, vomiting, fatigue

(flu-like symptoms)

 

 

 

Medium

Throbbing headache, drowsiness, confusion,

rapid heart rate

 

 

 

 

Convulsions, unconsciousness, heart and lung

Extreme

failure. Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO)

 

can cause brain damage and death

 

 

 

 

 

Some individuals are more sensitive to CO than

o

ng people with cardiac, respiratory or other

health problems, infants, young children, pregnant women and

elderly people can be more quickly and severely affected by

CO. People sensitive to CO should consult their doctors for

advice on taking additional precautions.

FINDING THE SOURCE OF CO AFTER AN ALARM

 

 

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, invisible gas, which often

makes it difficult to locate the source of CO after an alarm. A few

factors that can make it difficult to locate sources of CO include:

 

House well ventilated before the investigator arrives.

 

Problem caused by “backdrafting”.

Transient CO problem caused by special circumstances. Because CO may dissipate by the time an investigator arrives, it

may be difficult to locate the source of CO. Gentex Corporation shall not be obligated to pay for any carbon monoxide (CO) investigation or service call.

HOW CAN I PROTECT MY FAMILY?

A CO alarm is an excellent way of protection. It monitors the air and sounds a loud alarm before carbon monoxide (CO) levels become threatening for average, healthy adults.

NOTICE: A CO alarm is not a substitute for proper maintenance of home appliances.

550-0498

Pg. C-2

To help prevent CO problems and reduce the risk of CO poisoning:Clean chimneys and flues yearly. Keep them free of debris,

leaves, and nests for proper air flow. Also, have a professional check for rust and corrosion, cracks or separations. These conditions can prevent proper air movement and cause backdrafting. Never cap or cover a chimney in any way that would block air flow.

Test and maintain all fuel-burning equipment annually. Many local gas or oil companies and HVAC companies offer appliance inspections for a nominal fee.

Make regular visual inspections of all fuel-burning appliances.

Check appliances for excessive rust and scaling. Also check the flame on the burner and pilot lights. The flame should be blue. A yellow flame means fuel is not being burned completely and CO may be present. Keep the blower door on the furnace closed. Use vents or fans when they are available on all fuel-burning appliances. Make sure appliances are vented to the outside. Do not grill or barbecue indoors, in garages or on screen porches.

Check for exhaust backflow from CO sources. Check the draft hood on an operating furnace for a backdraft. Look for cracks on furnace heat exchangers.

Check the house or garage on the other side of shared wall.

Keep windows and doors open slightly. If you suspect that CO is escaping into your home, open a window or door. Opening windows or doors can significantly reduce CO levels.

POTENTIAL SOURCES OF CO IN RESIDENTIAL DWELLINGS

Fuel-burning appliances like: portable heater, gas or wood burning fireplace, gas kitchen range or cooktop, gas clothes dryer, portable generators.

Damaged or insufficient venting: corroded or disconnected water heater vent pipe, leaking chimney pipe or flue, or cracked heat exchanger, blocked or clogged chimney opening.

Improper use of appliance/device: operating a barbecue grill, portable generator or vehicle in an enclosed area (like a garage or screened porch), or even your home.

Figure 1

Figure 1: POTENTIAL SOURCES OF CO IN HOME. Transient CO Problems: transient or on-again-off-again CO problems can be caused by outdoor conditions and other special circumstances.

The following conditions can result in transient CO situations:

1) Excessive spillage or reverse venting of fuel appliances caused by outdoor conditions such as:

Wind direction and/or velocity, including high, gusty winds. Heavy air in vent pipes (cold/humid air with extended periods between cycles).

Negative pressure differential resulting from the use of exhaust fans.

Several appliances running at the same time competing for limited fresh air.

Vent pipe connections vibrating loose from clothes dryers, furnaces or water heaters.

Obstructions in or unconventional vent pipe designs which can amplify the above situations.

2) Extended operation of unvented fuel burning devices (range, oven, fireplace)

3) Temperature inversions, which can trap exhaust close to the ground.

4) Car idling in an open or closed garage or near a home.

5) Portable generator used in an open or closed garage or near a home.

These conditions can come and go, they are also hard to recreate during a CO investigation.

PLACEMENT OF CO ALARMS

THIS EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE INSTALLED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION'S STANDARD 720 (National Fire Protection Association, Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269).

For your information, the National Fire Protection Association's Standard 720, reads as follows:

NFPA 720, 2009 Edition, Chapter 9, Section 9.4.1.1 Where required by applicable laws, codes or standards for a specific type of occupancy, approved single and multiple-station CO alarms shall be installed as follows:

1) Outside of each separate dwelling unit sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.

2) On every occupiable level of a dwelling unit, including basements, excluding attics and crawl spaces.

3) Other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards.

The installation of additional CO alarms should result in a higher degree of protection. Adding alarms to rooms that are normally closed off from the required alarms increases the escape time because the CO levels do not need to build to the higher level necessary to force CO out of the closed room to the required alarms. As a consequence, it is recommended that the householder consider the installation of additional CO protection devices. However, it should be understood that NFPA 720 does not require additional CO alarms over and above those called for in Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5 where required CO alarms are shown.

Figure 2

Figure 2: A CO ALARM MUST BE LOCATED ON EVERY LEVEL OF DWELLING UNIT, INCLUDING BASEMENT AND OUTSIDE SLEEPING AREAS.

Where to Locate the Required CO Alarms. The major threat from CO in a dwelling unit occurs at night when everyone is asleep. Persons in sleeping areas can be threatened by CO levels in the remainder of the unit; therefore, CO alarms are best located between the bedroom areas and the rest of the unit as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3

Figure 3: A CO ALARM MUST BE LOCATED BETWEEN THE SLEEPING AREA AND THE REST OF THE DWELLING UNIT.

In dwelling units with more than one bedroom area or with bedrooms on more than one floor, more than one CO alarm is required, as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4

Figure 4: IN DWELLING UNITS WITH MORE THAN ONE SLEEPING AREA, A CO ALARM MUST BE PROVIDED TO PROTECT EACH SLEEPING AREA.

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