Gateway MAN FX510 User Manual

6.83 Mb
Loading...

REFERENCEGUIDE

®

Contents

Chapter 1: About This Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . 1

About this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Accessing the online User Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Gateway contact information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Chapter 2: Checking Out Your Computer . . . . . 5

Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Back . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Chapter 3: Setting Up and Getting Started . . 13

Working safely and comfortably . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Reducing eye strain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Setting up your computer desk and chair . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Sitting at your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Avoiding discomfort and injury from repetitive strain . 16

Preparing power connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Protecting from power source problems . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Checking the voltage selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Connecting to a broadband modem or network . . . . . . . . 17 Connecting a dial-up modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Starting your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Waking up your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Turning off your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Restarting (rebooting) your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Using the keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Premium multimedia keyboard features . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Elite multimedia keyboard features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Using the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Adjusting the volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Configuring the audio jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Installing a printer, scanner, or other device . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Setting up RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 About RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

i

Contents

RAID for performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 RAID for security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 RAID for both: performance and security . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Preparing your computer for RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Configuring RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Adding or replacing a RAID drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Getting help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Chapter 4: Upgrading Your Computer . . . . . . . 39

Preventing static electricity discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Opening the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Removing the side panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Removing the front bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Closing the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Replacing the front bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Replacing the side panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Adding or replacing memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Replacing the system battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Adding or replacing an optical disc drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Adding or replacing an optional diskette drive . . . . . . . . . . 50 Adding or replacing the memory card reader . . . . . . . . . . 52 Adding or replacing a hard drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Replacing the front fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Replacing the rear fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Replacing the power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Replacing the heat sink and processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Replacing the I/O board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Adding or replacing an expansion card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Replacing the system board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Chapter 5: Maintaining Your Computer. . . . . . 73

Setting up a maintenance schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Caring for your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Cleaning your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Cleaning the exterior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Cleaning the keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Cleaning the monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

ii

www.gateway.com

Cleaning the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Cleaning optical discs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Updating Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Using BigFix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Managing hard drive space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Checking hard drive space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Deleting unnecessary files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Checking the hard drive for errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Defragmenting the hard drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Backing up files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Scheduling maintenance tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Moving from your old computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Moving with Windows Easy Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Moving files and settings manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Chapter 6: Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

Safety guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 First steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Add-in cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 CD or DVD drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 DVD drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 File management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Hard drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Memory card reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Modem (cable or DSL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Modem (dial-up) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

iii

Contents

Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Recovering your system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Recovering pre-installed software and drivers . . . . . . 110 Using Microsoft System Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Recovering your system to its factory condition . . . . 119 Recovering your system using the Windows DVD . . . 120 Telephone support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Before calling Gateway Customer Care . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Telephone numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Self-help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Tutoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Chapter 7: Legal Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

iv

CHAPTER1

About This Reference

About this guide

Accessing the online User Guide

Gateway contact information

Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity

For more information

1

CHAPTER 1: About This Reference

About this guide

This guide includes information and maintenance instructions that are specific to your model of Gateway computer. Some illustrations in this guide may look different than your computer because hardware options and port locations may vary. For all other computer information, see your online User Guide.

For more information

For more information about your computer, visit Gateway’s Support page at support.gateway.com or the Web address shown on your computer’s label. The Support page also has links to additional Gateway documentation and detailed specifications.

Accessing the online User

Guide

In addition to this guide, the User Guide has been included on your hard drive. The User Guide is an in-depth, easy-to-read manual that includes information on the following topics:

Help and technical support

Using and customizing Windows and other software

Controlling audio and video settings

Using the Internet

Protecting your files

Playing and recording media

To access the User Guide:

Click (Start), All Programs, then click Gateway Documentation.

2

www.gateway.com

Gateway contact information

The label on the side of your computer case contains information that identifies your computer model and serial number. Gateway Customer Care will need this information if you call for assistance.

Online Support:

Tech Support Phone:

Tech Support Hours:

Microsoft Certificate of

Authenticity

The Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity label found on the back or side of your computer includes the product key code for your operating system. If you ever reinstall Windows from the installation DVD, you will need to enter these numbers to activate Windows.

3

CHAPTER 1: About This Reference

4

CHAPTER2

Checking Out Your

Computer

Front

Back

5

CHAPTER 2: Checking Out Your Computer

Front

DVD/CD drive

USB port (optional)

Important

Your computer hardware options and port locations may vary from this illustration.

DVD/CD drive (optional)

Diskette drive (optional)

Memory card reader (optional)

Power button

Hard drive activity indicator

IEEE 1394 ports (optional)

USB port (optional)

Headphone jack

Microphone jack

6

 

 

 

 

 

www.gateway.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Component

Icon

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

DVD/CD drive

 

 

 

 

Use this drive to listen to audio CDs, install

 

 

 

 

 

games and programs, watch DVDs, and store

 

 

 

 

 

large files onto recordable discs (depending

 

 

 

 

 

on drive type). This drive may be a CD,

 

 

 

 

 

recordable CD, DVD, or recordable DVD drive.

 

 

 

 

 

To identify your drive type and for more

 

 

 

 

 

information about your drive, see your online

 

 

 

 

 

User Guide.

USB port

 

 

 

 

Plug a USB (Universal Serial Bus) device (such

(optional)

 

 

 

 

as a USB printer, scanner, camera, keyboard,

 

 

 

 

 

or mouse) into one of these ports. For more

 

 

 

 

 

information, see “Installing a printer, scanner,

 

 

 

 

 

or other device” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diskette drive

 

 

 

 

Insert a standard 3.5-inch diskette into the

(optional)

 

 

 

 

diskette drive.

Memory card

 

 

 

 

Insert a memory card from a digital camera,

reader (optional)

 

 

 

 

MP3 player, PDA, cellular telephone, or other

 

 

 

 

 

devices into the memory card reader.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power button

 

 

 

 

Press this button to turn the power on or off.

 

 

 

 

 

You can also configure the power button to

 

 

 

 

 

operate in Standby/Resume mode or

 

 

 

 

 

Hibernate mode. The power indicator lights

 

 

 

 

 

when the computer is turned on.

Harddriveactivity

 

 

 

 

Lights when the hard drive is active.

indicator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IEEE 1394 ports

 

 

 

 

Plug IEEE 1394 (also known as Firewire®)

 

 

 

 

(optional)

 

 

 

 

devices (such as a digital camcorder) into

 

 

 

 

 

these 6-pin IEEE 1394 ports. For more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

information, see “Installing a printer, scanner,

 

 

 

 

 

or other device” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USB ports

 

 

 

 

Plug a USB (Universal Serial Bus) device (such

(optional)

 

 

 

 

as a USB printer, scanner, camera, keyboard,

 

 

 

 

 

or mouse) into one of these ports. For more

 

 

 

 

 

information, see “Installing a printer, scanner,

 

 

 

 

 

or other device” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Headphone jack

 

 

 

 

Plug powered, analog front speakers, an

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

external amplifier, or headphones into this

 

 

 

 

 

jack. This jack is color-coded green.

 

 

 

 

 

Microphone jack

 

 

 

 

Plug a microphone into this jack. This jack is

 

 

 

 

 

color-coded red or pink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

CHAPTER 2: Checking Out Your Computer

Back

Important

Your computer’s hardware options and port locations may vary from this illustration.

Power connector Cover release lever

Case cover thumbscrew

Kensington lock slot

Rear speaker jack (optional)

Ethernet (network) jack

IEEE 1394/FireWire™/ i.Link™ port (optional)

Parallel port (optional)

Voltage switch (typical)

Audio in/side speaker jack

Headphone/front speaker jack

Microphone jack

Center/subwoofer jack (optional)

S/PDIF (optical) jack (optional)

USB ports

Digital coaxial audio jack (optional) or video port (optional)

Serial port

PS/2 keyboard port

PS/2 mouse port

DVI monitor port (add-in video card)

Telephone jack (optional)

 

 

 

Modem jack (optional)

 

 

Component

Icon

Description

 

 

 

Power connector

 

Plug the power cord into this connector.

 

 

 

Cover release lever

 

Lift this lever to open the computer cover

 

 

 

Case cover

 

Remove this screw before opening the case.

thumbscrew

 

 

Kensington lock

 

Attach a cable lock to this slot, then attach

slot

 

the cable to a solid object like a desk or table

 

 

to prevent your computer from being stolen.

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

www.gateway.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Component

Icon

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rear speaker jack

 

 

 

 

Plug your rear right and left speakers into

 

 

 

 

(black plug)

 

 

 

 

this jack. For more information, see

 

 

 

 

 

“Configuring the audio jacks” “Configuring

 

 

 

 

 

the audio jacks” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethernet (network)

 

 

 

 

Plug an Ethernet network cable or a device

jack

 

 

 

 

(such as a DSL or cable modem for a

 

 

 

 

 

broadband Internet connection) into this

 

 

 

 

 

jack.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, see “Connecting to a

 

 

 

 

 

broadband modem or network” on page 17.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IEEE 1394 port

 

 

 

 

Plug IEEE 1394 (also known as Firewire®)

 

 

 

 

(optional)

 

 

 

 

devices (such as a digital camcorder) intothis

 

 

 

 

 

6-pin IEEE 1394 port. For more information,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

see “Installing a printer, scanner, or other

 

 

 

 

 

device” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parallel port

 

 

 

 

Plug a parallel device (such as a printer) into

(optional)

 

 

 

 

this port.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Telephone jack

 

 

 

 

Plug the cord from your telephone into this

(optional)

 

 

 

 

jack.

Voltage switch

 

 

 

 

Before turning on your computer, make sure

 

 

 

 

 

that this switch is in the correct position for

 

 

 

 

 

the correct power available. The switch is

 

 

 

 

 

preset at the factory with the correct voltage

 

 

 

 

 

for your area.

 

 

 

 

 

In the United States, the utility power is

 

 

 

 

 

supplied at a nominal 115 volts at 60 Hz. The

 

 

 

 

 

power supply should always be set to this

 

 

 

 

 

when your computer is operating in the

 

 

 

 

 

United States. In other areas of the world,

 

 

 

 

 

such as Europe, the utility power is supplied

 

 

 

 

 

at 230 volts at 50 Hz. If your computer is

 

 

 

 

 

operatingin an environment such as this,the

 

 

 

 

 

voltage switch should be moved to 230. This

 

 

 

 

 

switch may notbe presenton yourcomputer

 

 

 

 

 

if it came with a non-switchable power

 

 

 

 

 

supply.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

CHAPTER 2: Checking Out Your Computer

Component

Icon

Description

 

 

 

 

Audio input (Line

 

 

If the back of your computer has five audio

 

 

in) jack (blue plug)

 

 

jacks, this jack is user configurable for one of

-OR-

 

 

the following:

Side speaker jack

 

 

Stereo in: Plug an external audio input

 

 

 

source (such as a stereo) into this jack so you

 

 

 

can record sound on your computer

 

 

 

(Default).

 

 

 

Stereo out: Plug your side left and right

 

 

 

speakers into this jack.

 

 

 

For more information, see “Configuring the

 

 

 

audio jacks” on page 28.

 

 

 

If the back of your computer has three audio

 

 

 

jacks, this jack is the audio input (line in) jack.

 

 

 

Plug an external audio input source (such as

 

 

 

a stereo) into this jack so you can record

 

 

 

sound on your computer.

Headphone/analo

 

 

If the back of your computer has five audio

g speakers jack

 

 

jacks, this jack is user configurable for one of

(green plug)

 

 

the following:

-OR-

 

 

Headphone: Plug headphones or amplified

Frontspeakersjack

 

 

speakers into this jack (Default).

 

 

 

Stereo out: Plug your front left and right

 

 

 

speakers into this jack.

 

 

 

For more information, see “Configuring the

 

 

 

audio jacks” on page 28.

 

 

 

If the back of your computer has three audio

 

 

 

jacks, this jack is the headphone/analog

 

 

 

speaker (line out) jack. Plug powered

 

 

 

speakers, an external amplifier, or

 

 

 

headphones into this jack.

 

 

 

 

Microphone jack

 

 

Plug a microphone into this jack.

 

 

(pink plug)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Center/subwoofer

 

 

Plugyourcenterspeakerandsubwooferinto

jack

 

 

this jack. For more information, see

(orange

 

 

“Configuring the audio jacks” on page 28.

plug)(optional)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S/PDIF output jack

 

 

Plug an optical cable from an amplifier or

(optional)

 

 

entertainment system into this jack for

 

 

 

digital sound.

USB ports

 

 

Plug USB (Universal Serial Bus) devices (such

 

 

 

as a USB printer, scanner, camera, keyboard,

 

 

 

or mouse) into these ports. For more

 

 

 

information, see “Installing a printer,

 

 

 

scanner, or other device” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

www.gateway.com

 

 

 

 

 

Component

Icon

Description

 

 

 

 

 

Digital coaxial

 

 

 

Plug a single digital coaxial audio connector

audio port (some

 

 

 

intothisjackfordigitalaudio.Providesdigital

models)

 

 

 

audio output from a CD or DVD (optional).

-OR-

 

 

 

 

Video port

 

 

 

Plug a monitor into this port (optional).

Serial port

 

 

 

Plug a serial device into this port. For more

 

 

 

 

information, see “Installing a printer,

 

 

 

 

scanner, or other device” on page 28.

 

 

 

 

 

PS/2 keyboard

 

 

 

Plug a PS/2 keyboard into this port.

 

 

 

port

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS/2 mouse port

 

 

 

Plug a PS/2 mouse into this port.

 

 

 

 

 

DVI monitor port

 

 

 

Plug a digital monitor into this port.

 

 

 

(optional)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modem jack

 

 

 

Plug a modem cable into this jack. For more

(optional)

 

 

 

information, see “Connecting a dial-up

 

 

 

 

modem” on page 18.

 

 

 

 

 

11

CHAPTER 2: Checking Out Your Computer

12

CHAPTER3

Setting Up and Getting

Started

Working safely and comfortably

Preparing power connections

Connecting to a broadband modem or network

Connecting a dial-up modem

Starting your computer

Turning off your computer

Restarting (rebooting) your computer

Using the keyboard

Using the mouse

Adjusting the volume

Configuring the audio jacks

Installing a printer, scanner, or other device

Setting up RAID

13

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Working safely and comfortably

Before using your computer, follow these general guidelines for setting up a safe and comfortable work area and avoiding discomfort and strain:

Keep hands and arms parallel to the floor.

Adjust the screen so it is perpendicular to your line of sight, and the top of the screen is no higher than eye leve.

Place your feet flat on the floor or on a footrest.

Keep ventilation openings clear of obstructions.

Top of screen is not higher than eye level

Screen is perpendicular to your line of sight

Hands and arms are parallel to the floor

Feet are flat on the floor

14

www.gateway.com

Reducing eye strain

Sunlight or bright indoor lighting should not reflect on the monitor screen or shine directly into your eyes.

Position the computer desk and screen so you can avoid glare on your screen and light shining directly into your eyes. Reduce glare by installing shades or curtains on windows, and by installing a glare screen filter.

Use soft, indirect lighting in your work area. Do not use your computer in a dark room.

Set paper holders at the same height and distance as the monitor.

Avoid focusing your eyes on your computer screen for long periods of time. Every 10 or 15 minutes, look around the room, and try to focus on distant objects.

Setting up your computer desk and chair

When you are setting up your computer desk and chair, make sure that the desk isthe appropriate height and the chair helps you maintain good posture.

Select a flat surface for your computer desk.

Adjust the height of the computer desk so your hands and arms are positioned parallel to the floor when you use the keyboard and touchpad. If the desk is not adjustable or is too tall, consider using an adjustable chair to control your arm’s height above the keyboard.

Use an adjustable chair that is comfortable, distributes your weight evenly, and keeps your body relaxed.

Position your chair so the keyboard is at or slightly below the level of your elbow. This position lets your shoulders relax while you type.

Adjust the chair height, adjust the forward tilt of the seat, or use a footrest to distribute your weight evenly on the chair and relieve pressure on the back of your thighs.

Adjust the back of the chair so it supports the lower curve of your spine. You can use a pillow or cushion to provide extra back support.

15

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Sitting at your computer

Avoid bending, arching, or angling your wrists. Make sure that they are in a relaxed position when you type.

Do not slouch forward or lean far back. Sit with your back straight so your knees,hips, and elbowsform right angles when you work.

Take breaks to stand and stretch your legs.

Avoid twisting your torso or neck.

Avoiding discomfort and injury from repetitive strain

Vary your activities to avoid excessive repetition.

Take breaks to change your position, stretch your muscles, and relieve your eyes.

Find ways to break up the work day, and schedule a variety of tasks.

Preparing power connections

Protecting from power source problems

Warning

High voltages can enter your computer through both the power cord and the modem connection. Protect your computer by using a surge protector. If you have a telephone modem, use a surge protector that has a modem jack. If you have a cable modem, use a surge protector that has an antenna/cable TV jack. During an electrical storm, unplug both the surge protector and the modem.

During a power surge, the voltage level of electricity coming into your computer can increase to far above normal levels and cause data lossorsystem damage. Protect yourcomputer and peripheral devices by connecting them to a surge protector, which absorbs voltage surges and prevents them from reaching your computer.

An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) supplies battery power toyourcomputerduring apowerfailure.Althoughyoucannot run your computer for an extended period of time with a UPS, a UPS lets you run your computer long enough to save your work and shut down your computer normally.

16

www.gateway.com

Checking the voltage selection

Caution

If you set the voltage selection switch incorrectly, your system will be damaged. Make sure this switch is set correctly for your location before turning on your computer. In the United States, the utility power is supplied at a nominal 115 volts at 60 Hz. The power supply should always be set to this when your computer is operating in the United States. In other areas of the world, such as Europe, the utility power is supplied at 230 volts at 50 Hz. If your computer is operating in an environment such as this, the voltage switch should be moved to 230.

The power supply, a component built into your computer, provides power to the system board, add-in cards, and peripheral devices. The power supply’s voltage selection for your location istypically set at the factory, but you can change it to match the electrical service available in your usage area (such as while in another country). Use the power selection switch on the back of your computer to set the voltage to 115V or 230V.

To set the voltage selection switch:

1Disconnect your computer’s power cable.

2Use a tool such as an opened paper clip to slide the voltage selection switch to the correct voltage position. The switch is located on the back of your computer, near the power cable connector.

Connecting to a broadband modem or network

Important

Your computer may be equipped with a built-in Ethernet (network) jack. For information about setting up a wired or wireless Ethernet network, see your online User Guide.

You can connect your computer to a cable or DSL modem or to a wired Ethernet network.

To connect to a broadband modem or to an Ethernet network:

1Insert one end of the network cable into the network jack on the back of your computer.

2Insert the other end of the network cable into a cable modem, DSL modem, or network jack.

17

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Connecting a dial-up modem

Warning

To reduce the risk of fire, use only No. 26 AWG or larger telecommunications line cord.

Your computer may have a 56K modem that you can use with a standard telephone line to connect to the internet or fax documents.

To connect the modem:

1Insert one end of the modem cable into the modem jack on the modem at the back of your computer.

2Insert the other end of the modem cable into a telephone wall jack. (The modem will not work with digital or PBX telephone lines.)

3If you want, you can connect a telephone to the PHONE jack on the modem at the back of your computer.

Starting your computer

To start your computer:

1Connect the power, network, mouse, and keyboard cables to your computer according to the setup poster.

2Press the power button on the front of your computer. If your computer does not turn on, check the power cable connections.

Important

Your computer has a built-in, variable-speed fan. In addition, your computer uses a powerful processor which produces heat and has its own cooling fan. Both the system fan and processor fan can run at different speeds at times to ensure correct system cooling. You may notice an increase in the fan noise when the fan is running at high speed and a decrease in the fan noise when it switches to normal speed.

3If you are starting your computer for the first time, to select the language and time zone and to create your first user account, follow the on-screen instructions.

4Attach and turn on any USB or audio peripheral devices, such as printers, scanners, and speakers. If you need to attach a peripheral device to the parallel or serial ports, turn off your computer first. See the documentation that came with each device for its setup instructions.

18

www.gateway.com

5To open your computer’s main menu, click (Start). From that menu, you can run programs and search for files. For more information on using your computer’s menus, see “Using Windows” and “Customizing Windows” in your online User Guide.

Waking up your computer

Tip

For more information about changing the power button mode, see the “Customizing” chapter in your online User Guide.

When you have not used your computer for several minutes, it may enter a power-saving mode called Sleep. While in Sleep mode, the power indicator on the power button flashes.

If your computer is in Sleep mode, move the mouse, press a key on the keyboard, or press the power button to “wake” it up.

Turning off your computer

Warning

When you turn off your computer, certain components in the power supply and system board remain energized. In order to remove all electrical power from your computer, unplug the power cord and modem cable from the wall outlets. We recommend disconnecting the power cord and modem cable when your computer will not be used for long periods.

Important

If for some reason you cannot use the Shut Down option in Windows to turn off your computer, press and hold the power button for about five seconds, then release it.

Putting your computer into Sleep mode is the easiest way to power down your computer. Although it does not turn your computer completely off, it does turn off or slow down most system operations to save power, and saves your desktop layout so the next time you restore power, the programs are laid out just as you left them. Waking your computer from a Sleep state is much fasterthanturning on yourcomputerafter it has been turned completely off.

19

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

To put your computer to sleep:

1Click (Start), then click (power). The computer saves your session and partially shuts down to save power.

2To “wake” your computer, press a key on the keyboard or press the power button.

To turn off your computer:

1Click (Start), click the arrow next to the lock icon, then click Shut Down. The computer turns off.

2To completely disconnect all power (such as for servicing internal components), also disconnect the power cord.

Restarting (rebooting) your computer

If your computer does not respond to keyboard or mouse input, you may need to restart (reboot) your computer.

To restart your computer:

1Click (Start), click the arrow next to the lock icon, then click Restart. Your computer turns off, then turns on again.

20

www.gateway.com

2If your computer does not turn off, press and hold the power button until the computer turns off (about five seconds), then press it again to turn the computer back on.

Using the keyboard

Premium multimedia keyboard features

The keyboard has several different types of keys and buttons. Your keyboard also has status indicators that show which keyboard feature is active.

 

 

 

 

Function keys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indicators

Editing buttons

Internet buttons

Audio playback buttons Navigation keys

 

 

Internet buttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows keys

Application key Directional keys Numeric keypad

 

 

 

Feature

Icon

Description

 

 

 

Editing buttons

 

Press these buttons to copy, cut, and paste.

 

 

 

Function keys

 

Press these keys to start program actions. Each

 

 

program uses different function keys for

 

 

different purposes. See the program

 

 

documentation to find out more about the

 

 

function key actions.

 

 

 

Internet buttons

 

Press these buttons to launch your Internet

 

 

home page, search, or e-mail programs.

Audio playback

 

Press these buttons to play your audio files and

buttons

 

to adjust the volume.

 

 

 

21

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Feature

Icon

Description

 

 

 

 

 

Navigation keys

 

 

 

Press these keys to move the cursor to the

 

 

 

 

beginning of a line, to the end of a line, up the

 

 

 

 

page, down the page, to the beginning of a

 

 

 

 

document, or to the end of a document.

Indicators

 

 

 

Show if your NUM LOCK, CAPS LOCK, or

 

 

 

 

SCROLL LOCK keys are activated. Press the

 

 

 

 

corresponding key to activate the function.

 

 

 

 

 

Windows keys

 

 

 

Press one of these keys to open the Windows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start menu. These keys can also be used in

 

 

 

 

combination with otherkeys to open utilities like

 

 

 

 

F (Find/Search), R (Run), and E (Computer).

 

 

 

 

 

Application key

 

 

 

Press this key toaccess shortcut menus andhelp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

assistants in Windows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directional keys

 

 

 

Press these keys to move the cursor up, down,

 

 

 

 

right, or left.

Numeric keypad

 

 

 

Press these keys to type numbers when the

 

 

 

 

numeric keypad (NUM LOCK) is turned on.

 

 

 

 

 

Elite multimedia keyboard features

The keyboard has several different types of keys and buttons. Your keyboard also has status indicators that show which keyboard feature is active.

Sleep button Function keys

Internet buttons

Audio playback

Indicators

buttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows keys

Application key

Navigation keys Numeric keypad

22

 

 

 

 

www.gateway.com

 

 

 

 

 

Feature

Icon

Description

 

 

 

 

 

Sleep button

 

 

 

Press this button to activate your computer’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleep (power-saving) mode.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Function keys

 

 

 

Press these keys to start program actions.

 

 

 

 

Each program uses different function keys for

 

 

 

 

different purposes. See the program

 

 

 

 

documentation to find out more about the

 

 

 

 

function key actions.

 

 

 

 

 

Application buttons

 

 

 

Press these buttons to launch your Internet

 

 

 

 

home page, search for files, or launch the

 

 

 

 

calculator program.

Audio playback

 

 

 

Press these buttons to play your audio files

buttons

 

 

 

and to adjust the volume.

 

 

 

 

 

Indicators

 

 

 

Show if your NUM LOCK, CAPS LOCK, or

 

 

 

 

SCROLL LOCK keys are activated. Press the

 

 

 

 

corresponding key to activate the function.

Windows keys

 

 

 

Press one of these keys to open the Windows

 

 

 

 

Start menu. These keys can also be used in

 

 

 

 

combination with other keys to open utilities

 

 

 

 

like F (Find/Search), R (Run), and

 

 

 

 

E (Computer).

 

 

 

 

 

Application key

 

 

 

Press this key to access shortcut menus and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

help assistants in Windows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editing buttons

 

 

 

Press these buttons to copy, cut, and paste.

 

 

 

 

 

Navigation keys

 

 

 

Press these keys to move the cursor to the

 

 

 

 

beginning of a line, to the end of a line, up the

 

 

 

 

page, down the page, to the beginning of a

 

 

 

 

document, or to the end of a document. Press

 

 

 

 

the arrow keys to move the cursor.

Numeric keypad

 

 

 

Press these keys to type numbers when the

 

 

 

 

numeric keypad (NUM LOCK) is turned on.

 

 

 

 

 

23

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Using the mouse

Scroll wheel

Right button

Left button

The mouse is a device that controls the pointer movement on the computer display. This illustration shows the standard mouse.

As you move the mouse, the pointer (arrow) on the display moves in the same direction.

You can use the left and right buttons on the mouse to select objects on the display.

24

www.gateway.com

You can use the scroll wheel on the mouse to move through a document. This feature is not available in all programs.

To...

Do this...

 

 

 

 

 

Move the

 

 

 

Move the mouse around. If you

 

 

pointer on the

 

 

 

reach the edge of your mouse

computer

 

 

 

pad and need to move the

display

 

 

 

mouse farther, lift the mouse

 

 

 

 

and place it in the middle of the

 

 

 

 

mouse pad, then continue

 

 

 

 

moving the mouse.

 

 

 

Select an object

 

 

 

Position the pointer over the

onthecomputer

 

 

 

object. Quickly press and

display

 

 

 

release the left mouse button.

 

 

 

 

This is called clicking.

 

 

 

 

 

Start a program

 

 

 

Position the pointer over the

 

 

or open a file or

 

 

 

object. Quickly press and

folder

 

 

 

release the left mouse button

 

 

 

 

twice. This is called

 

 

 

 

double-clicking.

 

 

 

Access a

 

 

 

Position the pointer over the

shortcut menu

 

 

 

object. Quickly press and

or find more

 

 

 

release the right mouse button

information

 

 

 

once. This is called

about an object

 

 

 

right-clicking.

on the display.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Move an object

 

 

 

Position the pointer over the

 

 

 

onthecomputer

 

 

 

object. Press the left mouse

display.

 

 

 

button and hold it down. Move

 

 

 

 

(drag) the object to the

 

 

 

 

appropriate part of the

 

 

 

 

computer display. Release the

 

 

 

 

button to drop the object

 

 

 

 

whereyou wantit.Thisiscalled

 

 

 

 

clicking and dragging.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about how to adjust the double-click speed, pointer speed, right-hand or left-hand configuration, and other mouse settings, see the “Customizing” chapter in your online User Guide. For instructions on how to clean the mouse, see “Cleaning the mouse” on page 77.

25

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Adjusting the volume

You can adjust volume using your speakers’ controls or the Windows volume controls. You can also adjust the volume of specific sound devices in your computer.

To adjust the overall volume using hardware controls:

If you are using external speakers, turn the knob on the front of the speakers.

-OR-

Use the mute and volume control buttons on the keyboard. For more information, see “Using the keyboard” on page 21.

To adjust the volume from Windows:

1Click (Volume) on the taskbar. The volume control slider opens.

2Click and drag the slider up to increase volume and down to decrease volume.

3To mute the volume, click (Mute). To restore volume, click it again.

26

www.gateway.com

4To adjust device volume levels, click Mixer. The Volume Mixer dialog box opens, where you can click and drag sliders for individual devices.

Tip

Adjust the Windows Sounds slider to change system sounds volume independently of general volume (such as the volume used for music and game sounds).

5Click X in the top-right corner of the window to close it.

Help

For more information about adjusting the volume, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type adjusting volume in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

27

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Configuring the audio jacks

If the back of your computer has five audio jacks, they are universal jacks. This means that they can be used for more than one purpose. For example, the blue jack on the computer can be a stereo in jack or a stereo out jack. To use the audio jacks for something other than the default audio device, you need to configure the audio jacks.

To configure the audio jacks:

Shortcut

Start Ö Control Panel Ö Hardware and Sound Ö Advanced

1Connect your audio device(s) to the computer audio jack(s).

2Click (Start), then click Control Panel. The Control Panel window opens.

3Click Hardware and Sound, Sound, the Playback tab, then click Configure.

-OR-

If your computer has the Realtek Sound Effect Manager installed, double-click the Sound Effect Manager icon on the taskbar. The Realtek dialog box opens.

4Follow the on-screen instructions to configure the audio jacks for your speaker setup.

Installing a printer, scanner, or other device

Important

Before you install a printer, scanner, or other peripheral device, see the device documentation and installation instructions.

Your computer has one or more of the following ports: IEEE 1394 (also known as Firewire®), Universal Serial Bus (USB), serial, and parallel. You use these ports to connect peripheral devices such as printers, scanners, and digital cameras to your computer. For more information about port locations, see “Checking Out Your Computer” on page 5.

28

www.gateway.com

IEEE 1394 and USB ports support plug-and-play and hot-swapping, which means that your computer will usually recognize such a device whenever you plug it into the appropriate port. When you use an IEEE 1394 or USB device for the first time, your computer will prompt you to install any software the device needs. After doing this, you can disconnect and reconnect the device at any time.

Help

For more information about installing peripheral devices, click Start, then click Help and Support. Type installing devices in the Search Help box, then press ENTER.

Parallel and serial port devices are not plug-and-play. See the device documentation for detailed information and installation instructions.

Setting up RAID

About RAID

RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive/ Independent Disks) lets your computer use multiple hard drives more efficiently. Your computer supports RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 10.

RAID for performance

RAID 0 lets your computer see multiple hard drives as a single drive. This type of RAID can increase file access speeds, which is important if you work with video editing, sound editing, and high-performance games. RAID 0 is also an affordable way to increase your total file storage capacity.

29

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

How it increases performance

The more drives you have in your RAID 0 array, the faster the potential drive reading performance. All hard drives have limitations on how fast they can read and write files. If half a file is stored on one RAID 0 drive and the other half on another RAID 0 drive, each drive only has to read half of the file. So, the entire file is accessed by the computer up to twice as fast (using a two-drive RAID 0 array). In a three-drive RAID 0 array, if the file is evenly distributed among the drives, each drive must read only a third of the file, and so on. If the entire file happens to be stored on only one of the drives, the file is accessed at the same speed as if it were on a standard hard drive setup. Dividing up files between multiple hard drives like this is called striping.

RAID 0

A

B

C

D

E

F

Howit makes file storage cheaper

Because RAID 0 lets your computer see multiple hard drives as a single drive, you can install several lower capacity (less expensive) drives and have the same single-drive storage simplicity and capacity as a larger, more expensive hard drive.

Drawbacks

Unfortunately, RAID 0 lets multiple drives behave as one in another way. If part of the array fails (such as a hard drive crashing), the entire array fails. Because the drives are treated like a single drive, parts of files (including operating system files) can be spread across several drives, leaving the computer with only file fragments if one drive fails. Regular and frequent backups are critical.

Another drawback is that RAID 0 treats each hard drive as if it has the storage capacity of the smallest drive in the array. So if you have three drives (300 GB, 250 GB, and 200 GB) in a RAID 0 array, your computer only recognizes 600 GB total capacity.

30

www.gateway.com

RAID for security

RAID 1 maintains a complete copy of a file set on each physical hard drive in the array. Maintaining simultaneous, complete copies of files across multiple hard drives is called mirroring. If a drive fails, the mirrored drive takes over and acts as the primary drive.

RAID 1

A

A

B

B

C

C

File reading performance (seek time) is increased using the same methods that RAID 0 uses, although writing speed is the same as if writing to a single hard drive.

Drawback

RAID 1 treatsthe entire array as a single drive with the storage capacity of the smallest physical drive in the array. So if you have two drives (300 GB and 250 GB) in a RAID 1 array, your computer only recognizes a single drive with 250 GB total capacity.

RAID for both: performance and security

RAID 5 uses striping (at the block level) with on-the-fly error correction across all drives. Because of this error correction, small file read/write errors can be quickly and automatically fixed without a significant drop in system performance.

RAID 5 offers good performance and data redundancy. This array preserves your files if a drive fails.

31

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

RAID 5 stripes both data and parity information across multiple drives. Striping across drives improves overall performance, and the parity information provides data protection. Because of the error-correction capabilities, if a drive fails, the data can be quickly and automatically fixed.

RAID 5

A1

A2

AP

B1

BP

B2

CP

C1

C2

RAID 10 (also called RAID 1+0 or RAID 1&0) contains sets of RAID 1 mirrors acting as drives within a RAID 0 striping array. With this setup, the array could survive one drive failure in each mirror array.

 

RAID 0

RAID 1

RAID 1

A

A

B

B

C

C

D

D

E

E

F

F

Drawback

A RAID 5 array is treated as one drive with the capacity of all but one of the drives added together.

RAID 10 treats the entire array as a single drive with the storage capacity of the smallest drive × 2. So if you have four drives (350 GB, 300 GB, 250 GB, and 200 GB) in a RAID 10 array, your computer recognizes a single drive with 400 GB total capacity.

32

www.gateway.com

Preparing your computer for RAID

Setting up RAID on your computer can involve two major steps, depending on how your computer has been configured.

To prepare your computer for RAID:

1Configure the RAID arrays. See the Array Manager User Guide, or “Configuring RAID” on page 33.

2Install the operating system.

Configuring RAID

Enabling RAID

If your computer had RAID enabled at the factory, you do not need to enable it. If you are setting up RAID yourself, and RAID was not enabled at the factory, you must enable it.

To enable RAID on your computer:

1Start (or restart) your computer.

2As soon as your computer turns on and the Gateway logo appears on the screen, press F2. The BIOS Setup utility opens.

3Select the Advanced menu, then select Drive Configuration.

4Change the ATA/IDE Mode to Enhanced.

5Change the SATA mode to RAID.

6Press F10, then type Y to exit BIOS saving changes.

Now that RAID is enabled, you can access the RAID setup.

33

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

Creating a RAID volume

Because RAIDcanbe configuredso manyways,thisprocedure covers only the basics.

To configure RAID:

1Start (or restart) your computer. During startup, the RAID option screen appears. (Number and specifications of your drives may vary from the example.)

2While the RAID option screen is open, press CTRL+i. The Matrix Storage Manager opens.

3Highlight 1. Create RAID Volume, then press ENTER. The Create Volume menu opens.

34

www.gateway.com

4Change the following settings:

Name—Type a volume name (up to 16 characters) or use the default name, then press ENTER.

RAID Level—Press ↑ or ↓ to select the RAID level, then press ENTER.

Select Disks—Press ↑ or ↓ to highlight drives, press the spacebar to select (mark with a green triangle) each drive to use in the array, then press ENTER. You must select a minimum of two drives.

Strip Size—If you have selected RAID 0, RAID 5, or RAID 10, select the strip value for the array, then pressENTER.Defaults:218 KBforRAID 0andRAID 10, 64 KB for RAID 5. We recommend accepting the default strip value.

Capacity—Type the volume capacity, or use the default capacity, then press ENTER. We recommend using the default value (the maximum capacity with the drives you selected).

5Highlight Create Volume, then press ENTER. A warning appears.

6Type Y. The RAID volume is created and the Main menu opens.

7Highlight 4. Exit, then press Enter. You exit the Matrix Storage Manager, and your computer restarts.

Deleting a RAID volume

Deleting a RAID volume deletes all files on that volume, including operating system files.

To delete a RAID volume:

1Start (or restart) your computer. During startup, the RAID option screen appears.

2While the RAID option screen is open, press CTRL+i. The Matrix Storage Manager opens.

Caution

If your computer boots to RAID (to load the operating system), deleting the RAID volume will remove the operating system, and you will not be able to start your computer.

3Highlight 2. Delete RAID Volume,then pressENTER. The Delete Volume menu opens.

35

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

4Press ↑ or ↓ to highlight the RAID volume you want to delete, then press DELETE. A warning message appears.

5Type Y to confirm volume deletion.

Resetting drives to non-RAID status

To troubleshoot or repair incompatible RAID configurations, failed RAID volumes, or failed drives within a RAID volume, you can reset the drives to non-RAID status until the problems can be resolved.

To reset drives to non-RAID status:

1Start (or restart) your computer. During startup, the RAID option screen appears.

2While the RAID option screen is open, press CTRL+i. The Matrix Storage Manager opens.

3Highlight 3. Reset Disks to Non-RAID, then press

ENTER. The Reset RAID Data menu opens.

4Press ↑ or ↓ to highlight drives, press the spacebar to select (mark with a green triangle) each drive you want to reset, then press ENTER. A warning message appears.

5Type Y to confirm the drive reset.

Adding or replacing a RAID drive

Caution

Never remove an active drive from an array until it is placed in a failed state or prepared for removal. For more information, see your RAID controller documentation or the Array Manager User Guide.

If your computer supports hot swapping (adding or replacing a drive without turning off the computer), you can replace a failed RAID drive with a working drive that is the same size or larger than the other array drives. When you add or replace a drive in an array, the array begins rebuilding the drive.

To replace a failed RAID drive:

Insert the new drive in the same drive slot as the failed drive. Your new drive acts as a “hot spare” for the array.

36

www.gateway.com

Getting help

For more information on RAID concepts, configuration, and maintenance, search for RAID FAQ information on the

Gateway Technical Support Web site (www.gateway.com) and the Intel Support & Downloads Web site (support.intel.com).

37

CHAPTER 3: Setting Up and Getting Started

38

CHAPTER4

Upgrading Your Computer

Preventing static electricity discharge

Opening and closing the case

Adding or replacing memory

Replacing the system battery

Adding or replacing an optical disc drive

Adding or replacing an optional diskette drive

Adding or replacing the memory card reader

Adding or replacing a hard drive

Replacing the front fan

Replacing the rear fan

Replacing the power supply

Replacing the heat sink and processor

Replacing the I/O board

Adding or replacing an expansion card

Replacing the system board

39

+ 105 hidden pages