Files for LOGIC PRO 8
Size:
1.22 Mb
Download

Logic Pro 8

Control Surfaces

Support

Apple Inc.

© 2007 Apple Inc. All rights reserved.

Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Apple. Your rights to the software are governed by the accompanying software licence agreement.

The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K)for commercial purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple Inc. is not responsible for printing or clerical errors.

Note: Because Apple frequently releases new versions and updates to its system software, applications, and Internet sites, images shown in this book may be slightly different from what you see on your screen.

Apple Inc.

1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, CA 95014-2084408-996-1010www.apple.com

Apple, FireWire, iPod, Logic, Mac, Macintosh, and Mac OS are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

GarageBand is a trademark of Apple Inc.

Intel, Intel Core, and Xeon are trademarks of Intel Corp. in the U.S. and other countries.

Other company and product names mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective companies. Mention of third-partyproducts is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products.

3 Contents

Preface

7

Introduction

 

7

What Are Control Surfaces?

 

8

Using Control Surfaces With Logic Pro

 

9

Control Surfaces Supported by Logic Pro

 

12

Control Surface Plug-ins

 

12

About Software and Firmware

 

13

About This Guide

Chapter 1

15

Basic Control Surface Setup

 

15

Getting Started

 

16

Connecting Control Surfaces

 

18

Adding Control Surfaces to Logic Pro

 

19

Creating Control Surface Groups

 

22

Configuring Your Control Surface Setup

 

29

Setting Control Surface Preferences

 

32

Modal Dialog Display

 

33

Usage Tips

Chapter 2

35

Customizing Controller Assignments

 

35

Assigning Controllers to Logic Pro Parameters

 

36

Working in Easy View

 

38

Working in Expert View

 

55

Assigning Buttons to Key Commands

 

56

Controller Assignments Storage

Chapter 3

57

Mackie Control

 

57

Setting Up Your Mackie Control

 

57

Using the Mackie Control With Logic Pro

 

58

Display Zone

 

61

Channel Strip Controls

 

64

Master Fader

 

64

Assignment Zone

 

79

Fader Bank Zone

 

81

Function Key Zone

3

 

82

Global View Zone

 

83

Modifier Buttons

 

83

Automation Buttons

 

85

Utilities Buttons

 

86

Transport Zone

 

93

Cursor Key Zone

 

94

Jog/Scrub Wheel Zone

 

95

Programmable User Modes

 

95

Connecting Foot Switches

 

96

Assignment Overview

Chapter 4

107

M-Audio iControl

 

107

Setting Up Your iControl

 

107

Editing Plug-in Parameters

 

108

Assignment Buttons

 

110

Arrow Up and Arrow Down Buttons

 

110

Channel Strip Controls

 

112

Mixer View and Channel View

 

112

The Jog Wheel

 

112

Transport Controls

 

113

Master Fader

 

114

Assignment Overview

Chapter 5

117

EuCon Support of Euphonix MC and System 5-MC

 

117

Setting Up Your MC or System 5-MC

 

118

Setting Up Soft Key Assignments

 

119

Main-Tracks Touchscreen

 

119

Main-Layouts

 

120

Faders

 

120

Choosing Automation Modes

 

121

Using Knobsets

 

126

Monitors and Control Room

 

126

Clear Keys

 

127

Track Control Bar

 

127

System 5-MC Specific Features

Chapter 6

129

CM Labs Motormix

 

129

Setting Up Your CM Labs Motormix

 

129

Assignment Overview

Chapter 7

137

Frontier Design TranzPort

 

137

Setting Up Your Frontier Design TranzPort

 

137

LCD

 

138

Assignment Overview

4

Contents

 

 

Chapter 8

141

JLCooper CS-32 MiniDesk

 

141

Setting Up Your JL Cooper CS-32 MiniDesk

 

142

Assignment Overview

Chapter 9

147

JLCooper FaderMaster 4/100

 

147

What You Will Need

 

147

Setting Up Your JLCooper FaderMaster 4/100

 

148

Assignment Overview

Chapter 10

149

Korg microKONTROL and KONTROL49

 

149

Setting Up Your Korg microKONTROL and KONTROL49

 

150

Assignment Overview

Chapter 11

155

Mackie Baby HUI

 

155

Setting Up Your Mackie Baby HUI

 

156

Assignment Overview

Chapter 12

159

Mackie C4

 

159

Setting Up Your Mackie C4

 

159

V-Pots, V-Selects

 

166

Buttons at Bottom

 

169

Marker Overlay

 

169

Track Overlay

 

170

Channel Strip Overlay

 

170

Function Overlay

Chapter 13

173

Mackie HUI

 

173

Setting Up Your Mackie HUI

 

174

Assignment Overview

Chapter 14

183

Radikal Technologies SAC-2K

 

183

Setting Up Your Radikal Technologies SAC-2K

 

184

Assignment Overview

 

188

Troubleshooting

Chapter 15

189

Roland SI-24

 

189

Setting Up Your Roland SI-24

 

190

Assignment Overview

Chapter 16

195

Tascam FW-1884

 

195

Introduction

 

195

Setting Up Your Tascam FW-1884

 

196

Assignment Overview

Contents

5

 

 

Chapter 17

203

Tascam US-2400

 

203

Setting Up Your Tascam US-2400

 

204

Assignment Overview

Chapter 18

211

Tascam US-428 and US-224

 

211

Setting Up Your Tascam US-428 and US-224

 

211

Assignment Overview

Chapter 19

215

Yamaha 01V96

 

215

Setting Up Your Yamaha 01V96

 

216

Assignment Overview

 

218

SELECTED CHANNEL Section

 

219

Data Entry Section

 

219

Channel Strips

 

219

Stereo Channel Strip Section

 

219

User Defined Keys Section

Chapter 20

223

Yamaha 02R96

 

223

Setting Up Your Yamaha 02R96

 

224

Assignment Overview

Chapter 21

229

Yamaha DM1000

 

229

Setting Up Your Yamaha DM1000

 

230

Assignment Overview

Chapter 22

237

Yamaha DM2000

 

237

Setting Up Your Yamaha DM2000

 

238

Assignment Overview

6

Contents

 

 

Introduction

Preface

You can use hardware control surfaces to control and automate transport, mixing, recording, and other tasks in Logic Pro.

All of the Logic Pro functions which correspond to mixer controls, such as setting volume level and pan position, can be performed onscreen—usingyour mouse and computer keyboard. This is not an optimal method for precise real time control. You can expand your creative experience, and achieve greater flexibility and precision, by connecting a hardware control surface to your computer, and using it with Logic Pro.

When you move a fader on the control surface, the corresponding fader in Logic Pro moves with it. Similarly, when you adjust a control onscreen, the corresponding control on the control surface moves to the same position. You can adjust EQ or other parameters by turning the rotary knobs on the control surface, and have the corresponding parameters update instantly in Logic Pro.

What Are Control Surfaces?

Control surfaces are hardware devices that feature a variety of controls, which can include faders, rotary knobs, switches, and displays. These controls can be mapped to functions in Logic Pro, allowing you to change parameters—suchas volume orpanning—withmore precision than by using your mouse and computer keyboard. You can also control multiple parameters at the same time.

Control surfaces also typically provide buttons that allow you to select parameters for editing, or to select particular tracks/channel or banks (of channels). Many also offer a jog wheel, which allows you to move the playhead precisely, Transport buttons, such as Play, Rewind, and so on, and other controls. When you use a supported control surface with Logic Pro, some controls are pre-mappedto common functions. You can mapnon-assignedcontrols to other Logic Pro commands and functions (see“Assigning Controllers to Logic Pro Parameters” on page 35).

7

Some simple control surfaces only provide (non-motorized)faders and knobs. More sophisticated units include motorized faders, rotary encoders, LED rings, and programmable displays. The additional feedback these control surfaces provide make them easier touse—withouthaving to refer to your computer screen to know what mode the device is in, or what current parameter values are.

Using Control Surfaces With Logic Pro

To use a control surface with Logic Pro, you connect the control surface to your computer (via MIDI, USB, a Network port, or FireWire). You then add it to Logic Pro (this is automatic for many supported devices), map the controls you want to use to

Logic Pro commands (again, much of this is done for you, if using a supported device), then use the control surface as you play and record.

Recorded control surface automation appears in (the Arrange, when enabled, and in the Piano Roll Editor). For detailed information about connecting and adding control surfaces, see Chapter 1,“Basic Control Surface Setup,” on page 15. Please read this chapter before moving to the chapters for your particular control surfaces.

The following outlines some of the things you can accomplish when using control surfaces with Logic Pro:

ÂControl transport functions, including setting locators, and activating Cycle or Punch Recording modes.

ÂAdjust instrument, aux, master, and audio channel volume and pan levels.

ÂSelect, and control, all effect and instrument parameters.

ÂSelect, solo, mute, and record-enabletracks/channels.

ÂSet and adjust send parameters.

ÂRemotely switch between screensets.

ÂScrub MIDI and audio (in the Arrange window).

ÂZoom in on individual tracks, or the window with key focus.

ÂCreate, delete, and move the playhead between markers.

Control surfaces allow you to create a dynamic live performance using a control surface along with a laptop, a music keyboard, and audio and MIDI interfaces. Some devices incorporate a music keyboard, audio and MIDI interfaces, and a control surface into a single integrated unit.

The track automation facilities of Logic Pro can be active even when the application is not in record mode, allowing you to capture your live real time changes for later playback. This ensures that you’ll never again lose that “once-in-a-lifetime”performance—onstage or in the studio.

8

Preface Introduction

 

 

Logic Pro directly supports a variety of control surfaces, as mentioned, but also allows you to remap existing assignments for supported control surfaces, or to program new assignments for unsupported control surfaces. This allows you to extend the use of faders, knobs, and switches—eitherdirectly, or through the use of modifier commands.

You can use any combination of control surfaces with Logic Pro. You will get the most out of them when used in a control surface group. A detailed overview of group, installation, and other control surface setup parameters is found in “Creating Control Surface Groups” on page 19.

The best way to learn about using control surfaces is to adopt a hands-onapproach— moving faders, turning knobs, and using the other controls on your device as you read through the manual. This will help you to get a feel for how your control surface works, and how the various parts of the control surface interact with Logic Pro.

Control Surfaces Supported by Logic Pro

Following is an alphabetical listing of control surfaces directly supported by Logic Pro. The list contains cross references to the relevant device-specificsections.

Note: It is possible that your device may be directly supported in Logic Pro via one or more downloadable support files. This is often, a driver orplug-in(see “Control Surface Plug-ins on page 12), supplied by the manufacturer. Please check the documentation/ discs that came with the device, and the manufacturer’s website. Follow any written instructions supplied with the files, if available.

Supported Devices

Manufacturer

Notes

01V96

Yamaha

The Yamaha 01V96 emulates two HUI units, using

 

 

two virtual MIDI in and out connections over its

 

 

USB cable.

 

 

See “Yamaha 01V96” on page 215.

 

 

 

01X

Yamaha

The Yamaha 01X emulates a Mackie Control. It

 

 

does not feature all controls available to the

 

 

Mackie units, however. Please refer to the 01X

 

 

documentation for details.

 

 

Logic Pro recognizes the 01X as an 01X, and

 

 

displays a custom icon, but communication is as

 

 

with a Mackie Control unit.

 

 

See “Mackie Control” on page 57.

 

 

 

02R96

Yamaha

The Yamaha 02R96 emulates three HUI units,

 

 

using three virtual MIDI in and out connections

 

 

over its USB cable.

 

 

See “Yamaha 02R96” on page 223.

 

 

 

Baby HUI

Mackie

The Baby HUI is a stripped-downversion of the

 

 

HUI. See “Mackie Baby HUI” on page 155.

 

 

 

Preface Introduction

9

 

 

Supported Devices

Manufacturer

Notes

C4

Mackie

The Mackie C4 is directly supported.

 

 

See “Mackie C4” on page 159.

 

 

 

CM408T (System 5 MC)

Euphonix

See “EuCon Support of Euphonix MC and System

 

 

5-MC on page 117.

 

 

 

CS-32MiniDesk

JLCooper

See “JLCooper CS-32 MiniDesk” on page 141.

 

 

 

DM1000

Yamaha

The Yamaha DM1000 emulates two HUI units,

 

 

using two virtual MIDI in and out connections

 

 

over its USB cable.

 

 

See “Yamaha DM1000” on page 229.

 

 

 

DM2000

Yamaha

The Yamaha DM2000 emulates three HUI units,

 

 

using three virtual MIDI in and out connections

 

 

over its USB cable.

 

 

See “Yamaha DM2000” on page 237.

 

 

 

FaderMaster 4/100

JLCooper

See “JLCooper FaderMaster 4/100” on page 147.

 

 

 

FE-8

Tascam

Extension unit for FW-1884.See“Tascam FW-

 

 

1884” on page 195.

 

 

 

FW-1082

Tascam

A stripped-downversion of theFW-1884.

 

 

See “Tascam FW-1884 on page 195.

 

 

 

FW-1884

Tascam

See “Tascam FW-1884 on page 195.

 

 

 

HUI

Mackie

Important: HUI support has been tested with the

 

 

original Mackie HUI. There are a number of

 

 

control surfaces—notmentionedhere—which

 

 

can emulate the HUI. Not all devices capable of

 

 

HUI emulation have been tested. These are not

 

 

supported by Apple, nor are they guaranteed to

 

 

work with Logic Pro in HUI emulation mode.

 

 

See “Mackie HUI” on page 173.

 

 

 

iControl

M-Audio

See M-Audio iControl” on page 107.

 

 

 

KONTROL49

Korg

A larger version of the microKONTROL. See “Korg

 

 

microKONTROL and KONTROL49” on page 149.

 

 

 

Logic Control XT

Mackie/Emagic

This is the extension unit for the Logic Control. It

 

 

only offers the channel strip section, making it

 

 

less useful without a Logic (or Mackie) Control.

 

 

See “Mackie Control” on page 57.

 

 

Also see the Appendix for more details.

 

 

 

Logic/Mackie Control

Mackie/Emagic

See “Mackie Control” on page 57.

 

 

Also see the Appendix for more details.

 

 

 

10

Preface Introduction