Yale Y80 User Manual

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OPERATION, SERVICE & PARTS MANUAL

SERIESY80

YALE®

Before installing hoist, fill in the information below. Refer to the Hoist and Motor data plates.

Model No. _________________

Serial No. _________________

Purchase Date _____________

Voltage ___________________

Rated Load _______________

WIRE ROPE ELECTRIC HOISTS

INCLUDING

WEIGHT WATCHER OVERLOAD CLUTCH MODELS

RATED LOADS 1/2 THRU 5 TONS

Printed in U.S.A.

May, 2003

Copyright 2003, YaleLift-Tech,division of Columbus McKinnon Corporation

Part No. 117404-10

Page 1

FOREWORD

This manual contains important information to help you install, operate, maintain and service your new YALE electric hoist. We recommend that you study its contents thoroughly before putting the hoist into use. Read ANSI B30.16 safety code for hoists. Then, thru proper installation, application of correct operating procedures and by practicing the recommended maintenance suggestions you can expect maximum lifting service from the hoist.

It will likely be a long time before parts information found in Section IX is needed; therefore, after the hoist is installed and you have completely familiarized yourself with operation and preventive maintenance procedures, we suggest that this book be carefully filed for future reference.

When ordering replacement parts from this book, it will be necessary that you include, with your order, the Hoist Serial Number, Model Number and Catalog Number which is found on the nameplate attached to the hoist electrical cover. For your convenience, a space has been

provided on the front cover of this Manual for entering this information.

We recommend that you fill it out immediately so it is readily at hand when needed.

The contents of this manual are of necessity, general in nature and may cover features not incorporated on your hoist; therefore, the user must exercise care in applying instructions given in this manual. If specific information not in this manual is required, contact the factory at Muskegon, Michigan 49443.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MANUAL IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND YALELIFT-TECHDOES

NOT WARRANT OR OTHERWISE GUARANTEE (IMPLIEDLY OR EXPRESSLY) ANYTHING OTHER THAN THE COMPONENTS THAT YALELIFT-TECHMANUFACTURES AND ASSUMES NO LEGAL

RESPONSIBILITY (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) FOR INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MANUAL.

NOTICE: Information contained in this book is subject to change without notice.

INDEX

SECTION I

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Page

Paragraph

1-1

General .................................................................................................................................................................

3

Paragraph

1-2

Basic Construction ...............................................................................................................................................

3

Paragraph

1-3

Differences Between Models ...............................................................................................................................

3

SECTION II

INSTALLATION

 

Paragraph

2-1

General .................................................................................................................................................................

3

Paragraph

2-2

Suspending Hoist .................................................................................................................................................

3

Paragraph

2-3Connecting Hoist to Electrical Service ................................................................................................................

4

Paragraph

2-4

Pre-OperationChecks ..........................................................................................................................................

4

SECTION III

OPERATION

 

Paragraph

3-1

General .................................................................................................................................................................

6

Paragraph

3-2

Push Button Operation .........................................................................................................................................

6

Paragraph

3-3Overload Clutch Operation (Optional) .................................................................................................................

6

Paragraph

3-4

Operating Precautions ..........................................................................................................................................

6

SECTION IV

LUBRICATION

 

Paragraph

4-1

General .................................................................................................................................................................

7

Paragraph

4-2Change Gear Case Oil .........................................................................................................................................

7

Paragraph

4-3

Lubricate Hoist Cable ...........................................................................................................................................

7

Paragraph

4-4Lubricate Upper Sheave and Lower Block Assembly .........................................................................................

7

Paragraph

4-5Lubricate Limit Stop Lever ....................................................................................................................................

8

Paragraph

4-6

Lubricate Limit Switch ..........................................................................................................................................

8

SECTION V

INSPECTION AND PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

 

Paragraph

5-1

General .................................................................................................................................................................

8

Paragraph

5-2

Inspect Lower Block .............................................................................................................................................

9

Paragraph

5-3Inspect Upper Block and Hoist Suspension ........................................................................................................

9

Paragraph

5-4

Inspect Electrical Controls ....................................................................................................................................

9

Paragraph

5-5

Inspect Motor Brake ...........................................................................................................................................

11

Paragraph

5-6Inspect Mechanical Load Brake, Gearing and Overload Clutch (Optional) .....................................................

11

Paragraph

5-7Inspect Rope Drum and Shaft ............................................................................................................................

13

Paragraph

5-8Rope Inspection, Maintenance and Replacement ............................................................................................

14

Paragraph

5-9

Rope Reeving .....................................................................................................................................................

14

Paragraph

5-10Testing Hoist and Overload Clutch (Optional) ...................................................................................................

17

SECTION Vl

TROUBLE SHOOTING CHART ............................................................................................................................

19-20

SECTION Vll

ADJUSTMENTS

 

Paragraph

7-1

Mechanical Load Brake ......................................................................................................................................

21

Paragraph

7-2

Motor Brake .........................................................................................................................................................

21

Paragraph

7-3Block Operated Limit Switch ..............................................................................................................................

21

Paragraph

7-4

ScrewType Limit Switch ....................................................................................................................................

21

Paragraph

7-5

Overload Clutch Adjustment ..............................................................................................................................

22

SECTION VIII WIRING DIAGRAMS

 

SECTION IX

PARTS LIST

 

Paragraph

9-1

General ...............................................................................................................................................................

22

Paragraph

9-2List of Parts Illustrations .....................................................................................................................................

22

No part of this document may be reproduced in any form, in an electronic retrieval system or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher.

Page 2

SECTION I — GENERAL DESCRIPTION

1-1. GENERAL. YALE electric hoists are precision built wire rope and drum type hoists which are made in five rated load sizes (1/2, 1, 2, 3 and 5 tons) with various lifts, lifting speeds and electrical service. Equipped with an integrally welded mounting lug, they are designed to be rigidly attached to an overhead structure or mounted on YALE rigid mount trolleys for operation on runway beams. On certain models optional base mounting or other supporting methods may be obtained. For full information apply to factory at Muskegon, Michigan 49443.

NOTICE

YALE hoists are available with an optional built-inmechanical overload clutch. Hoists having this device are identified with words WEIGHT WATCHER on the hoist.

The WEIGHT WATCHER overload clutch permits operation of your hoist within its rated load and helps prevent lifting of excessive loads which could cause permanent deformation of a properly maintained hoist or trolley.

1-2. BASIC CONSTRUCTION. All models are of the same basic construction and consist of a rugged welded steel frame which houses a lifting drum and serves as the suspension for carrying the entire hoist load. A mounting lug, for attaching the hoist to a trolley or overhead support, is located on top of the frame. An aluminum alloy gearcase and cover, attached to one end of frame, houses athree-reductiongear train and a mechanical load brake. An electric driving motor with disctype motor brake is located beside the frame, face mounted on the back of the gearcase. Electrical system components, located on the end of the frame (opposite gearcase end) and enclosed by a steel cover, control operation and rotating direction of a driving motor. A hoisting rope and an enclosed lower block assembly are used for lifting loads. An upper limit stop is used to limit travel of the lower block in the raising direction, to protect hoist from damage. A push button control station, for operating the hoist, is suspended from the electrical compartment.

1-3.DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MODELS.The main differences between models are in rope reeving and frame size as described below.

a.Rope Reeving. There are four types of rope reeving used: Two parts of rope single reeved, four parts of rope single reeved, six parts of rope single reeved and two parts of rope double reeved. Single reeved hoists have one end of the rope anchored to the drum, whereas, double reeved hoists have both ends anchored to the drum. On single reeved models, the lower block travels sideways as rope winds on drum, double reeved models offer true vertical lift. For illustrations, refer to Section V, paragraph5-9,“Rope Reeving” instructions.

b.Frame Size. Length of frame furnished is dependent on hoist capacity and lift. Four frame lengths are used; short frame, long frame, first and second extensions. Short frame hoists have a rope drum flange to flange distance of approximately9-3/4",whereas this distance on a long frame hoist is approximately16-3/4".First extension frame hoists have a flange to flange distance of22-15/16"and second extensions have35-3/8".

c.Motor Brake. Hoists are equipped with a disc brake mounted on the motor end bell and operated by a short stroke solenoid.

This brake requires periodic adjustment.

SECTION II — INSTALLATION

2-1. GENERAL. YALE electric hoists are lubricated and tested before being shipped from the factory. To place hoist in service, attach to a suitable suspension (paragraph2-2),connect to electrical service (paragraph2-3)and performpre-operationtests and checks (paragraph2-4).

WARNING

Before attempting installation of hoist or trolley, the main power switch must be locked in the open position (off).

2-2. SUSPENDING HOIST. The hoist may be suspended in a fixed location servicing only the area directly below the hoist (Lug Mounted) or the hoist may be attached to a moveable trolley or trolleys which in turn may be mounted on anl-beamattached to a building or crane, servicing a larger area (Trolley Mounted).

WARNING

DO NOT use small holes for attaching this hoist unless rated load on lower block is 1 (one) ton (2000 Ibs.) or less.

a. Lug Mounted hoists attach to adequate supports welded or bolted to a building or other structure. The supporting structure must have sufficient strength with appropriate safety factor, to support the weight of the hoist and rated load as well as other loads to which the supporting structure may be subjected.

WARNING

Design and installation of hoist support shall be performed only by qualified persons.

Steel angles or plates used to suspend hoist should be spaced as close to the hoist suspension lug as possible. Mounting bolts or threaded studs, attaching hoist to mounting structure, shall have a diameter not less than recommended by manufacturer and material equivalent to ASTM A 325. Make certain that mounting bolts or studs are long enough so that the threads do not engage the mounting support and that mounting bolts or studs are secured with nuts and lockwashers, self-lockingnuts or cross bolting, if unthreaded.

b. Trolley Mounted hoists are attached to moveable trolleys. If the hoist is mounted on an existing trolley, a qualified person shall determine that the trolley and its supporting structure are adequate to support the rated load and weight of the hoist. Hoist/trolley units may be shipped from the factory with trolley packaged separately. If the trolley can be installed directly over the end of the supporting beam, assemble trolley to hoist. Be certain that the spacing between wheel flanges, after assembly, is 1/4" greater than exact width of beam flange. (See Figure2-1below and instruction sheet furnished with trolley.) Using proper equipment, carefully lift trolley and hoist and install on end of beam.

Page 3

For trolleys which are to be mounted along the span of a beam not having open ends, measure exact width of beam flange and assemble trolley to hoist so that spacing between wheel flanges is 1/4" (see Figure 2-1)greater than beam width (3/8" if beam has curves). This is accomplished by rearranging the spacer washers on the bolts connecting trolley side plates to hoist mounting lug. If trolley is shipped separate from hoist, see instruction sheets furnished with trolley for orientation and installation.

When proper spacing has been determined, loosen mounting nuts (item 1, Figure 2-1)to allow trolley wheels to spread far enough to pass over edges of beam flange. (Some installations may require complete removal of one trolley side plate.) Using adequate equipment, carefully lift the hoist and trolley so the wheel treads will rest on the lower beam flange. Replace side plate and washers if removed for installation. Replace suspension stud nuts.

WARNING

Be certain that electrical power supply is off and locked in the open position before attempting any electrical connections to the hoist. This equipment must be effectively grounded according to the National Electric Code, or other applicable codes. If the grounding method used is through the trolley wheels, then each section of track must be grounded by metal-to-metalconnection to the building ground. Certain environments may prevent proper grounding by this means. In this case a separate grounding conductor should be provided.

a. Follow National, State and Local Electrical Codes when providing electrical service to the hoist.

CAUTION

Recheck spacer washers to make certain that the number of washers between the side plate and hoist suspension lug are equal, and also the number on the outside of each side plate are equal. The suspension stud nuts should only be snugged up on the lockwashers until a load has been applied on the hook. A partial load (approx. 25% rated hoist load) placed on the hook will properly seat hoist in the trolley. Tighten suspension stud nuts only after hoist has been properly seated in the trolley.

CAUTION

208/230/460V single speed motors are reconnectable at the motor. See motor nameplate. Transformer may be reconnected for 200/230/460/575V. See transformer. Check with wiring diagram to make certain that motor, transformer and brake leads are properly connected.

b. Make electrical connections using the appropriate wiring diagrams furnished with the hoist. All electrical connections, including connections to collectors or power cord,shall be made only by qualified journeymen electricians.

WARNING

Mounting of the hoist-trolleyunit on the monorail and finalpre-operationinspection shall be performed only by qualified persons properly supervised.

11207A

Figure 2-1.Sectional View of Trolley showing proper wheel and washer spacing.

2-3.CONNECTING HOIST TO ELECTRICAL SERVICE.

Electrical service to the hoist may be power cable or a guarded system having sliding shoe collectors.

WARNING

The green wire provided in the power supply cable (when furnished) is a grounding wire and must be connected to a proper ground.

c. When trolley is shipped separate from hoist, see special instructions furnished with trolley for orientation and installation.

2-4.PRE-OPERATIONCHECKS.

a. Check Oil Level and Grease Fittings. The gearcase has been filled with oil to the proper level and grease points for lower and upper sheaves have been lubricated at the factory. However, this should be checked before operating hoist. Check oil level by removing oil level plug with hoist in a level position. Oil level should be at the bottom edge of the plug hole. If not, add oil as specified in Section IV. Grease fittings in lower and upper sheave pins should show evidence of grease.

CAUTION

Overfilling of the gearcase may result in the excess fluid being expelled through the breather.

Page 4

b. Check Push Button Operation and Phasing.

WARNING

On three phase hoists it is possible to have “Reverse Phasing” causing the lower block to lower when the á button is depressed. When this condition exists, the automatic limit stop switch is inoperative and hoist operation will be dangerous.

To properly check the phase of the hoist, follow the steps below:

(1) With “POWER OFF” operate all the push buttons and determine that they do not bind or stick in any position

When floating rod is raised, stop switch is actuated first and then the reversing switch is actuated (Figure 2-3).Stop switch stops hoist. Reversing switch lowers hook block in case of floating rodover-travel.If limit switch does not function in this manner, refer to trouble shooting chart Section Vl for possible remedy.

WARNING

If any push button binds or sticks in any position — DO NOT TURN POWER ON — determine the cause and correct the malfunction before operating.

(2)Temporarily connect hoist to power source.

(3)Operate á button briefly to determine direction of hook travel.

(4)If hook raises, phase is correct. Turn power off and make temporary connections permanent.

(5)If hook lowers, hoist is “Reverse Phased”. TURN POWER OFF and correct by interchanging any two leads at power source connection. Do not change internal wiring of hoist.

c.Check Limit Switch Operation.

(1)A block operated upper limit stop (Figure 2-2)is furnished as standard equipment. This limit stop is factory set to stop lower block in its high position and guard againstover-traveland possible damage to hoist. (Note mounting position of floating lever for 3 and 5 ton hoists.) No adjustment can be made. Limit switch operation should be tested when hoist is installed. Move hook to a low position by depressing push button markedâ . Now depress button markedá to raise hook. While hook is traveling upward, manually (or with an extension pole) raise limit stop mechanism (Figure2-2).

11403

Figure 2-2.Limit Stop Mechanism

Being Tripped By Lower Block.

Figure 2-3.Electrical Compartment Cover Removed Showing Limit Switch and Reversing Switch Arrangement.

WARNING

Do not attempt to make above test with hook in a high position near hoist.

(2) A screw-typeupper and lower limit switch is provided optionally when both upper and lower limit stops are required (Figure7-2).This switch is adjustable and must be adjusted, at time hoist is installed, to desired high and low limits of lower block travel. Refer to Section Vll.

d.Check Lower Block and Hoisting Cable. Depressâ push button and run lower block to its lowest position.No less than two wraps shall remain on the drum with the loaded hook in its lowest position, unless hoist is equipped with a lower limit switch in which case no less than one and one half wraps shall remain on the drum. Also check to see that lower block and rope does not twist excessively. If it does twist to the extent that two ropes rub against each other, disengage rope from the frame anchor and twist rope four or five turns in a direction opposite to that which the block turns. Reconnect rope to anchor (Figure2-4),holding firmly to eliminate rope twisting back to its original position. Operate hoist up and down a few times. If lower block still rotates, repeat process until twisting is corrected.

e.Lubricate Hoisting Cable. For longer cable life, it is recommended that the cable be lubricated at time of installation by applying a Chain and Cable Fluid as outlined in Section IV, paragraph4-3.

Figure 2-4.Rope End Anchor.

Page 5

SECTION III — OPERATION

3-1. GENERAL. Operation of Series 800 YALE electric hoists is controlled by a convenient pendant push button station. With it, the hoist can be controlled to give fast lifting and lowering; or controlled to lift or lower load in small increments, providing accurate spotting. The push button station has abuilt-ininterlock to prevent depressing opposing buttons simultaneously.

When first using hoist, break-inby operating under lighter loads to full travel before applying maximum load.

3-2.PUSH BUTTON OPERATION.

a.Depress push button marked á to raise load.

b.Depress push button marked â to lower load.

c.Jogging the push button will give “hairline” load movement. The quickness of the depressing motion will determine the amount of movement. Excessive use of this “Jogging”feature will cause premature burning of contact tips and motor overheating.

d.On two-speedhoists, partial depression of button operates the hoist at slow speed; depressing button completely operates the hoist at fast speed.

3-3.OVERLOAD CLUTCH OPERATION (Optional).The overload clutch, when furnished with the hoist, is factory preset and tested so that the hoist will lift its full rated load but will refuse to lift overloads which could cause deformation or weakening of your hoist. If the load to be lifted exceeds the clutch setting, the hoist motor will continue to run when the ábutton is depressed and rotate the load brake gear without lifting the load. Whenever this slipping occurs, immediately release the ápush button to prevent overheating of the clutch friction surfaces and the hoist motor.

NOTICE

Always know load to be lifted. Lift-Techdoes not recommend lifting loads greater than the rated load of your hoist.

3-4.OPERATING PRECAUTIONS.

WARNING

Equipment covered herein is not designed or suitable as a power source for lifting or lowering persons.

Safe operation of an overhead hoist is the operator’s responsibility. Listed below are some basic rules that can make an operator aware of dangerous practices to avoid and precautions to take for his own safety and the safety of others. Observance of these rules in addition to frequent examinations and periodic inspection of the equipment may save injury to personnel and damage to equipment.

a.DO read ANSI B30.16 Safety Standard for Overhead Hoists and the Operation, Service and Parts Manual.

b.DO be familiar with hoist operating controls, procedures and warnings.

c.DO make sure hook travel is in the same direction as shown on controls.

d.DO make sure hoist limit switches function properly.

e.DO maintain firm footing when operating a hoist.

f.DO make sure that load slings or other approved single attachments are properly sized and seated in the hook saddle.

g.DO make sure that the hook latch, is closed and not supporting any part of the load.

h.DO make sure that load is free to move and will clear all obstructions.

i.DO take up slack carefully, check load balance, lift a few inches and check load holding action before continuing.

j.DO avoid swinging of load or load hook.

k.DO make sure that all persons stay clear of the suspended load.

l.DO warn personnel of an approaching load.

m.DO protect wire rope from weld splatter or other damaging contaminants.

n.DO promptly report any malfunction, unusual performance, or damage of the hoist.

o.DO inspect hoist regularly, replace damaged or worn parts, and keep appropriate records of maintenance.

p.DO use the hoist manufacturer’s recommended parts when repairing a hoist.

q.DO use hook latches.

r.DO apply lubricant to wire rope as recommended.

s.DO NOT lift more than rated load.

t.DO NOT use a damaged hoist or a hoist that is not working correctly.

u.DO NOT use the hoist with twisted, kinked, damaged or worn wire rope.

v.DO NOT lift a load unless wire rope is properly seated in its drum groove(s).

w.DO NOT use wire rope as a sling or wrap rope around the load.

x.DO NOT lift a load if any binding prevents equal loading on all supporting ropes.

y.DO NOT apply the load to the tip of the hook.

z.DO NOT operate unless load is centered under hoist.

aa. DO NOT allow your attention to be diverted from operating the hoist.

ab. DO NOT operate the hoist beyond limits of wire rope travel.

ac. DO NOT use limit switches as routine operating stops unless recommended. They are emergency devices only.

ad. DO NOT use hoist to lift, support or transport people.

ae. DO NOT lift loads over people.

af. DO NOT leave a suspended load unattended unless specific precautions have been taken.

ag. DO NOT allow sharp contact between two hoists or between hoist and obstructions.

ah. DO NOT allow the rope or hook to be used as a ground for welding.

ai. DO NOT allow the rope or hook to be touched by a live welding electrode.

aj. DO NOT remove or obscure the warnings on the hoist.

Page 6

ak. DO NOT adjust or repair a hoist unless qualified to perform hoist maintenance.

al. DO NOT attempt to lengthen the wire rope or repair damaged wire rope.

am. DO NOT allow personnel not physically fit or properly qualified to operate hoist.

an. DO NOT operate hoist unless limit switch is operating properly.

ao. DO be sure there is no twist in wire rope.

ap. DO avoid operating hoist when hook is not centered under hoist. Avoid side pulls and swinging of load or load hook when traveling hoist.

WARNING

DO NOT operate hoist with the hoisting rope out of the drum groves. Such operation may result in the rope breaking and dropping the load which can cause damage to equipment and injury to operator and other personnel. Hoist rope will remain in the drum groves during operation under normal operating conditions, however, slack or kinked rope, excessive side pulls, swinging or jerking of load, or similar abuse, may cause the rope to leave the groves.

aq. DO operate hoist within recommended duty cycle and do not “jog’’ unnecessarily.

ar. DO conduct regular visual inspections for signs of damage or wear.

as. DO NOT operate hoist with hooks that have opened up. See Figure 5-1.

at. DO provide supporting structure or anchoring means that has a load rating at least equal to that of the hoist.

au. DO NOT use hoists in locations that will not allow operator movement to be free of the load.

av. DO, when starting to lift or pull, move the load a few inches at which time the hoist should be checked for proper load holding action. The operation shall be continued only after the operator is assured that the hoist is operating properly.

aw. DO NOT leave a loaded hoist unattended at the end of a work shift or for extended periods during the work shift. Where operations are such that this condition cannot be avoided the operator must be assured that the condition does not create a hazard to personnel or property.

ax. DO NOT use the hoist load limiting device to measure the load.

ay. DO NOT operate hoist unless hook moves in the same direction as indicated on the pushbutton. If opposite direction occurs, see pre-operationchecks, Paragraph 2- 4.b.

az. Observe recommended inspection and maintenance procedures.

ba. DO use common sense and best judgement whenever operating a hoist. Observe American National Standard Safety standard, ANSI B30.16, Iatest issue.

SECTION IV — LUBRICATION

4-1. GENERAL. The lubrication ser vices outlined in paragraphs4-2thru4-6should be performed at regular intervals to maintain top hoist performance and ensure long life. Intervals of at least six (6) months, coinciding with spring and fall seasons, are recommended. The reason for this is, on hoists installedout-of-doorsand in unheated areas, a “cold test” lubricant is required in cold (below freezing) climates making seasonal changes necessary.

4-2.CHANGE GEARCASE OIL.(Figure 4-1)

a.Remove oil drain plug from bottom of gearcase and drain out oil. (Two drain plugs, one on front and one on back of gearcase.)

b.Flush out housing using petroleum solvent. Reinstall drain plug.

c.Refill thru oil hole cover to proper level (bottom of oil level plug hole) using 10 pints of Automatic Transmission Fluid, DEXRON III Type, suitable for all temperature ranges.

11413A

Figure 4-1.View Showing Location of

One Oil Drain Plug.

4-3.LUBRICATE HOISTING CABLE.Hoists are shipped from the factory without an exterior coating on hoisting cable. It is recommended, where conditions permit, that the cable be thoroughly coated at installation and kept well lubricated with LUBRIPLATE Chain and Cable Fluid, or equal, suitable for all temperature ranges.

4-4.LUBRICATE UPPER SHEAVE AND LOWER BLOCK ASSEMBLY.

a.All hoists have grease fittings located in ends of sheave pins. Apply (*) NLGI No. 2 grease for operating temperatures from +50°F to +125°F. For colder temperatures, (-20°Fto +50°F) use NLGI No. 1 grease.

b.Apply a few drops of S.A.E. No. 50 oil to hook thrust bearings.

(*) National Lubricating Grease Institute.

4-5.LUBRICATE LIMIT STOP LEVER.

a.Apply a few drops of S.A.E. No. 50 oil to pivot points of limit rod.

b.Apply a few drops of S.A.E. No. 50 oil to shaft bearing at rear of electrical compartment.

Page 7

4-6.LUBRICATE LIMIT SWITCH.Provide a light film of NLGI No. 2 grease on bevel gear of limit switch.

SECTION V

INSPECTION AND PREVENTIVE

MAINTENANCE

5-1. GENERAL. YALE, Series 800, hoists are inspected and tested at the factory. Regular in service inspection and preventive maintenance programs not only help reduce overall maintenance costs but may also prevent serious shutdowns by forewarning of problems that could cause these shutdowns. Regular inspections, periodic minor adjustments, regular cleaning and lubrication and replacement of worn parts can help preserve good performance and operation of your hoist.

Many factors influence the inspection and preventive maintenance program required for your hoist. Frequency and severity of service and material handled, local environmental conditions and various applicable codes are some of the factors that the user must consider to adjust inspection and maintenance program outlined in this section to meet his specific conditions.

The inspection and maintenance services outlined in this section are considered minimum. Recommended in the schedule are minimum inspection and maintenance intervals based on average daily use in a normal environment. Average daily use is based on 1000 operational hours per year maximum and intermittent operation of the hoist eight hours per day, five days per week with a maximum 40% “on” time and the average loading not exceeding 65% of rated load.

Environmental conditions in which the hoist operates are also important considerations for the user when adjusting hoist inspection and maintenance programs to local conditions. Frequency of inspection and maintenance must be increased if hoist is subjected to severe atmospheric environmental conditions, such as corrosive vapors, extreme heat or cold, cement or dust and other airborne contaminants. The user should carefully consider all environmental conditions and adjust frequency and degree of maintenance for his local conditions. Consult Lift-TechField Service Department for advice for unusual environmental conditions.

Various codes also regulate inspection and maintenance programs. Attention must be given to applicable Federal Standards, OSHA regulations, National Standards, state and local codes which may include mandatory rules relating to hoist inspection and maintenance. The user should become familiar with all applicable codes for his area and be guided accordingly.

Listed on the Recommended Inspection and Maintenance Schedule are inspection frequencies and requirements. Perform these inspections regularly as scheduled and additional inspections as may be required for activity, service and environment of your hoist. The hoist operator must be responsible for determining the operating conditions and severity of service.

Inspection Schedule and Maintenance Report Form.

Shown on page 10 of this manual is a recommended Inspection Schedule and Maintenance Report form which lists various components of the hoist. The form also includes trolley components, runway components, and miscellaneous items. This form is suggested as a guide for written inspection

reports. Inspections are recommended each month and should be performed thoroughly enough to inform the hoist user of deficiencies for any item listed. This form does not supersede the Inspection and Maintenance Schedule listed below but may be used to record scheduled inspection and maintenance services required.

The user should revise the inspection interval, add additional units or provide a similar form to suit particular conditions which may exist. However, written, dated and signed inspection reports should be maintained particularly on critical items, such as hoist hooks, hoisting ropes, sheaves, drums and brakes. Periodic review of old inspection reports can point out service life of hoist components, forecasting need for adjustment, repair or replacement of these components.

As a matter of expedience, appointed maintenance personnel inspecting the hoist can also take care of minor adjustments, repairs and cleaning, where required. Note the column on Inspection Schedule and Maintenance Report form headed Corrective Action and Notes. When corrective action is made during inspection, note condition of part or unit as inspected in appropriateCondition column with a check mark (ü). Note “during inspection” corrective action taken and date in space provided. In this manner, items requiring further attention will be checked (ü) without showing corrective action. This will advise the designated person responsible for hoist operation and safety, who reviews the reports, that deficiencies exist. The designated person will check all deficiencies as listed and reexamine or otherwise determine whether they constitute a safety

WARNING

Deficiencies may be hazardous to personnel and equipment. Do not operate a hoist having deficiencies unless a designated qualified person has determined that these deficiencies DO NOT constitute a safety hazard.

Written, dated and signed inspection reports for many items are mandatory under OSHA regulations, and many state safety codes. It is strongly recommended that the Inspection Schedule and Maintenance Report, shown herein, be completed by a qualified person designated with the responsibility for hoist operation and safety or an inspector appointed by this person.

Inspection records can point out the service life of hoist components and help forecast the need for adjustments, repairs and ordering of replacement parts. File and review these reports after each inspection.

WARNING

Do not operate a hoist having unusual vibrations, sounds or other conditions. Danger may be present that the hoist operator cannot see. Determine and correct cause of unusual conditions and make certain the hoist can be operated safely. Be certain to disconnect power to the hoist whenever electrical cover is removed.

Page 8

5-2.INSPECT LOWER BLOCK.

a.Check lubrication of all parts. If the thrust bearing is not equipped with a grease fitting, lubricate with SAE No. 50 oil. Also lubricate the shank of the hook which passes through the lower block body.

b.Check each sheave to ensure rope groove is smooth and free from burrs, or other surface defects.

c.Check each sheave for freedom of rotation; replace bearings if defective.

d.Make certain that dowel pin, holding the hook nut to the hook, is securely in position.

e.If hook is equipped with a safety latch or rotational lock, check to determine that they are in good operating condition.

f.Check throat opening of hook. (Refer to Figure 5-1.)It is recommended that upon receipt of the hoist a measurement be made and recorded of the hook throat opening. OSHA Standards require that the hook be replaced if the throat opening exceeds 15 percent of the original opening, or if the hook is twisted more than 10 degrees from the unbent plane. A gage block, properly identified to the hoist, similar to the one shown in Figure5-1,is suggested to be made for each hook for use in these measurements.

NOTE: Hooks and hook openings shown are based on hooks normally furnished with standard hoists. For dimensions of hooks having a special size, shape or material, consult the Muskegon, Michigan factory. For hooks with certain kinds of safety latches it may be necessary to remove latch to measure hook opening.

g. Hooks showing signs of cracks must be replaced. Hooks should be inspected at least once per year using dye penetrants, magnetic particle or other suitable crack detecting methods.

 

 

 

HOIST

HOOK

CORRECT "L"

 

 

 

 

 

RATED

 

 

 

LOAD

SIZE

DIMENSION

 

 

 

(IN TONS)

(STANDARD)

(NEW HOOK)

 

 

 

1/2

G

1-1/8"

 

 

 

1

G

1-1/8"

 

 

 

2

H

1-1/4"

 

 

 

3

I

1-1/2"

 

11202A

 

5

J

1-3/4"

 

 

Figure 5-1.Proper Hook Opening. (Shown with latch removed for clarity.)

h. Check wear of the hook, especially at the saddle and replace if badly worn.

5-3.INSPECT UPPER BLOCK AND HOIST SUSPENSION.

a.Check upper block sheaves (when hoist is so equipped) for wear, damage and freedom of rotation. If sheaves do not rotate freely, disassemble block and inspect bearings. Replace worn or damaged bearings, washers, pins or sheaves.

b.Make certain that all sheaves, bearings and hanger pins are free of foreign material and properly lubricated. Bearings without grease fittings are lubricated for the life of the bearing and require no further lubrication. After inspection, lubricate all upper block lubrication fittings.

c.Make certain that rope guide pins are not bent, loose or otherwise distorted; guide pins must have close clearance to sheave flange to keep rope in sheave grooves.

d.Check hoist suspension bolts on lug suspended hoists; make certain that bolts are secure, properly tightened and free from damage.

e. Inspect suspension lug at top of hoist frame for damage, cracks, hole elongation or other signs of wear. On all hoists, the suspension lug is integral with hoist frame and the entire frame must be replaced when suspension lug is damaged and requires replacement.

WARNING

Do not operate a hoist having worn or damages suspension bolts.

f. Reinstall all parts following procedure in reverse of disassembly.

5-4.INSPECT ELECTRICAL CONTROLS.Arrangement of electrical control equipment varies with the type of control, physical space and the optional control features ordered with the hoist.

a.Disconnect electrical power to hoist, remove electrical compartment cover (Figure 9-1,Ref. No. 29) and inspect wiring and terminals. Terminals should be securely crimped to wires and electrical insulation should be sound. Terminal screws should be tight.

b.Check condition of contactor assembly, transformer, and limit stop and reverse switches.

Page 9

INSPECTION SCHEDULE AND MAINTENANCE REPORT

HOIST SERIAL NO. (MFGRS) _______________________

CUSTOMER CRANE IDENTITY NO. _______________________

RATED LOAD _________________

LOCATION IN PLANT __________________________________

TYPE ________________________

THIS INSPECTION IS MONTHLY o

ANNUAL o

VOLTAGE _____________________

SEMI-ANNUALo

 

 

INSPECTED BY: ________________

DATE _____________

COMPONENT, UNIT OR PART and location

LOCATION

COMPONENT,

 

 

UNIT OR

 

PART

 

Motor

 

Motor Brake

 

Mechanical Load Brake

 

Overload Clutch

 

Couplings

HOIST

Gears, Shafts & Bearings

Upper Block

 

 

Lower Block

 

Hook & Throat Opening

 

Hoist Rope

 

Rope Drum

 

Guards

CONTROL ORSTATION BUTTONPUSH

Limit Switch

Pushbutton

 

 

Wiring

 

Motor

 

Brake (when so equipped)

 

Couplings

TROLLEY

Gears, Shafts & Bearings

Frame

 

 

Wheels

 

Bumpers

 

Guards

 

Conductors

 

Collectors

RESISTORS

Hoist

Trolley

 

RUNWAYS

Monorail Joints

Monorail

 

 

Main Conductors

 

Main Collectors

 

General Condition

MISC.

Load Attachment Chains

Rope Slings & Connections

 

 

Change Gearcase Lub.

 

Grounding Faults

 

*

 

 

 

CONDITION

 

 

Recom-

 

 

 

 

mended

(Check column best indicating condition when

Inspection

part or unit is inspected. Use note column to

Interval

 

the right if condition is not listed below.)

 

MONTHLY

SEMI-ANNUAL

ANNUAL

GOOD

ADJUSTMENT REQUIRED

REPAIR REQUIRED (Loose Parts or Wires)

REPLACEMENT REQUIRED (Worn or Damaged)

LUBRICATION REQUIRED (Low Oil or Grease, Rust or Corrosion)

CLEANING OR PAINTING REQUIRED

X

CORRECTIVE ACTION

NOTES

(Indicate corrective action taken during inspection and note date. For corrective action to be done after inspection, a designated person must determine that the existing deficiency does not constitute a safety hazard before allowing unit to operate. When corrective action is completed, describe and note date in this column.)

DATE

Record Hook Throat Opening

* See text for DAILY & WEEKLY REQUIREMENTS.

SIGNED & DATED REPORT REQUIRED – OSHA.

 

INSPECTION INTERVAL.

X MAGNETIC PARTICLE OR EQUIVALENT EXAMINATION REQUIRED.

 

Typical Inspection Schedule and Maintenance Report form.

 

 

User must adjust inspection interval and components to suit his individual conditions and usage.

12375B

Page 10

TIME INTERVAL

INSPECTION OR MAINTENANCE

 

 

Daily or start

Check operation of all functional mechanisms including limit switch operation,

of each shift

brakes and control. Check hoist cable for kinks, abrasions, corrosion or broken

(\/isual)

wires or evidence of improper spooling on drum. Inspect hooks, upper and lower

 

blocks, and all load bearing components for damage.

 

 

1 Month

* HOIST CABLE — Inspect and lubricate per paragraph 5-8.

 

 

1 - 3 Months

* ELECTRICAL CONTROLS — Inspect per paragraph 5-4.

Check hoist gearcase oil level — add oil as required per paragraph 4-2.

 

 

 

6 Months

* LOWER BLOCK — Inspect per paragraph 5-2.

UPPER BLOCK — Inspect per paragraph 5-3.

 

 

 

 

Motor brake and actuating mechanisms. Inspect and adjust per paragraph 5-5.

Annually

* Inspect hooks with suitable crack detecting procedures per paragraph 5-2.

 

Drain and refill hoist gearcase per paragraph 4-2.

 

 

 

Inspect electrical controls per paragraph 5-4.Change hoist gearcase oil — Fill

6 Months or

with oil per paragraph 4-2.Lubricate hoist cable per paragraph4-3.Lubricate

500 - 750 hours

* upper and lower hook block per paragraph 4-4.Lubricate limit stop lever per

“on” time

paragraph 4-5.If a screw type limit switch is furnished, add a light film of

 

NLGI No. 2 grease to bevel gear.

 

 

5 Years elapsed

Complete inspection, disassembly, and maintenance required. It is recommended

time or 5000

* that your YALE Repair Station be contacted for this service.

hours “on” time

 

 

 

*Perform services described by paragraph indicated.

Figure 5-2.Inspection and Maintenance Schedule.

5-5.INSPECT MOTOR BRAKE.See Figure 9-4.

 

a. Remove acorn nuts holding brake cover and remove

 

brake cover.

 

b. Remove brake mounting plate screws and lift brake

 

assembly off.

 

c. Check braking surfaces for wear and scoring. Replace

 

badly worn or scored parts.

 

d. Reinstall parts in reverse of disassembly.

11404A

 

e. Adjust brake as explained in Section Vll.

 

 

5-6.INSPECT MECHANICAL LOAD BRAKE, GEARING AND

Figure 5-3.View of Gearcase – Cover Removed.

 

OVERLOAD CLUTCH (Optional).

b. To inspect gearing, pull out intermediate gear and pinion

a. The mechanical load brake and gearing may be inspected

assembly and roller thrust bearings (Figure 5-4),and load

brake assembly (Figure 5-5).Do not remove drum gear unless

and serviced with hoist suspended. To do so, remove lower

visual inspection indicates replacement is necessary.

block and wire rope, drain oil from gearcase, remove 12 hex

 

head bolts and lockwashers holding gearcase cover, and pull

c. Inspect gears and pinions for signs of tooth wear and

cover from gearcase (Figure 5-3).

damage. If replacement of any parts appears necessary,

 

disassemble drum gear, intermediate gear and pinion

 

assembly, and load brake assembly as directed on following

 

page.

Page 11

11421

Figure 5-4.Removing Intermediate Gear and

Pinion Assembly.

11422

Figure 5-5.Removed Load Brake Assembly.

d.To disassemble drum gear, remove external snap ring from splined shaft, using heavy-dutysnap ring pliers, and pull off gear.

e.To disassemble intermediate gear and pinion, press pinion shaft from gear using an arbor press.

f.It is recommended that load brake assembly be returned to an Authorized Repair Station for inspection and repair. If it is necessary that you make your own inspection and repair, instructions below must be followed:

(1)Place load brake assembly, flange up, in a vise equipped with brass or copper jaw plates to protect pinion gear teeth. Remove snap ring from end of load brake shaft (Figure 5-6).

10333

Figure 5-6.Remove Snap Ring From Load Brake Shaft.

(2) Using a puller tool, remove brake flange from shaft. A groove is provided around outer diameter for this purpose. See Figure 5-7.Remove key from shaft and lift off 2 friction discs, and the pawl and ratchet assembly (Figure5-8).

10334

Figure 5-7.View Showing Load Brake

Flange Removed.

(3)Remove load brake gear. If replacement of spring, spring retainer or cam is necessary, press off shaft (Figure 5-9).

(4)The load brake pawl and ratchet is a riveted assembly and is not to be disassembled.

(5)Clean all parts thoroughly and inspect for wear and damage. Replace all parts that are excessively worn or damaged. Hard surface or glazed friction discs should be replaced.

10335A

Figure 5-8.Removing Pawl and Ratchet Assembly

From Load Brake Shaft.

g. Reassemble gearing and load brake parts following reverse procedure of disassembly. In assembling load brake, observe assembly steps (1) through (4) below:

Page 12

(1) Before installing spring in its retainer (Figure 5-9),apply a good grade of ball bearing grease to inside of retainer. Spring must be positioned exactly as illustrated, butted against pin at side of cam.

LOAD BRAKE — OVERLOAD CLUTCH

LOAD BRAKE — STANDARD

Figure 5-9.Load Brake Gear Removed From Load Brake Showing Load Brake Spring.

(2)When installing pawl and ratchet assembly on load brake shaft, be certain that teeth on ratchet face are in the same direction as shown in Figure 5-8.The ratchet assembly should rotate freely when turned counterclockwise and the pawl should engage ratchet teeth when unit is turned clockwise.

(3)When installing brake flange, position it with chamfer facing friction disc (Figure 5-7).

Figure 5-10.Winding Load Brake Gear Using a Strap Wrench to Set Up Load Brake Spring.

(4)The brake spring must be pre-loadedat assembly to a torque of from 10 to 14lb.-ft.This is accomplished using a plumber’s strap wrench to wind (rotate) load brake gear to set up spring (Figure5-10)while pressing brake flange into place using an arbor press. Clamp pinion end of shaft into a portable vise to keep brake from rotating in press. Use brass or copper jaw plates on vise to protect pinion gear teeth. Wind gear counterclockwise (viewing brake from flange end) with strap wrench and press down on flange until snap ring groove in shaft is exposed allowing snap ring to be installed. Use extreme care not to over wind spring as yield will result and final spring torque will be reduced. Do not wind gear beyond point necessary to install snap ring in groove.

h.Install gearing and load brake assembly in gearcase in reverse order of disassembly. Be certain roller thrust bearings are installed at both ends of intermediate gear shaft as shown in Figure 5-4and that thrust washers are properly installed at both ends of load brake shaft as noted below:

(1)A steel thrust washer with 5/8" I.D. must be installed on the brake flange end (end opposite pinion) of load brake as shown in Figure 5-5.

(2)A bronze thrust washer with a lug on one side goes on pinion end of load brake shaft and it must be installed so that its lug engages the special slot located on the spot face surrounding the load brake bearing bore inside gearcase cover. Use heavy grease to hold it in place on cover as cover is installed.

On hoists with 18 or 20 tooth load brake pinion, an 11/ 16" I.D. steel thrust washer is installed between pinion and bronze thrust washer.

j.At completion of reassembly of gearing and load brake in gearcase, refill gearcase to proper level using correct grade of oil, as outlined in Section IV — LUBRICATION.

k.For hoists equipped with an overload clutch (optional) which has been functioning properly, visually inspect clutch adjusting nut and spring washer for signs of damage or looseness. With a small hex allen wrench, make certain two set screws in adjusting nut are tight. DO NOT TURN ADJUSTING NUT OR DISASSEMBLE CLUTCH. If spring washer, adjusting nut or gear is loose or damaged, or the clutch did not function properly before disassembly of hoist for inspection, consult the nearest YALE Authorized Repair Station for repair or adjustment.

5-7.INSPECT ROPE DRUM AND SHAFT.

a.To remove drum, remove wire rope, electrical

compartment cover and electrical panel assembly (Figure 9-1)and gearing and load brake assembly (paragraph5-6).

b. Remove four hex socket head bolts securing gearcase to cover. Three bolts are accessible from inside frame (Figure 2-2,Section II) and the fourth is accessible from electrical end of frame thru special access hole using a socket hex key wrench with an extension (Figure5-11).With bolts removed, pry assembled gearcase and motor from frame. Exercise caution so that gearcase and motor assembly does not fall as it comes free of frame. This disassembly operation is not recommended with hoist suspended. Drum will remain in frame and can be lifted from drum shaft. To remove shaft, remove internal retaining ring from bearing bore in frame.

Page 13

Figure 5-11.Removing Bolt

Securing Gearcase to Frame.

c. Check parts for wear and damage. Replace drum if there are any signs of cracks or other damage.

5-8.ROPE INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT.

WARNING

Wire rope improperly handled or abused can create a SAFETY HAZARD. Read and comply with inspection, maintenance and replacement information given herein.

a. Inspection. Wire rope on your hoist is one of the most important components requiring frequent inspection and maintenance. All wire ropes will eventually deteriorate to a point where they are not safe and will require replacement.

WIRE ROPE SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY INSPECTED AT REGULAR MONTHLY INTERVALS BY AN AUTHORIZED PERSON AND A DETERMINATION MADE WHEN FURTHER USE OF THE ROPE WOULD CONSTITUTE A SAFETY HAZARD. Each inspection should include a written, dated and signed report of rope condition. Reports should be filed and reviewed each month and any rope deterioration carefully noted. Inspections revealing but not limited to the following conditions should cause the inspector to question remaining strength of rope and consider replacement:

(1)Twelve randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or four broken wires in one strand.

(2)Wear of one-thirdof the original diameter of outside individual wires.

(3)Kinking, crushing or bird caging.

(4)Heat damage from any cause.

(5)Reductions from nominal diameter of more than 1/64" for 3/16", 1/4", and 5/16" diameter rope.

(6)Rope corrosion, internal or external.

(7)Effects from improper lubrication.

(8)Rope idle for month or more due to shutdown.

Special attention should be exercised when inspecting rope normally hidden during inspecting procedures.

b. Maintenance. Keep rope well lubricated to help reduce internal friction and prevent corrosion. Lubricant, as described in paragraph4-3,should be applied as a part of the regular maintenance program. Special attention is required to lubricate sections of rope over equalizing sheaves and other hidden areas.

Avoid dragging ropes in dirt or around sharp objects which will scrape, nick, crush or induce sharp bends in the rope.

c. Replacement. When recommended by an authorized inspector, the rope should be replaced. Replacement rope assemblies are shipped from the factory carefully coiled to prevent damage by kinking. Care must be taken to avoid twisting or kinking when uncoiling and handling during reeving.

Before replacing rope, check condition of grooves in sheaves and drums to determine if they are excessively worn.

WARNING

Use only factory approved rope with swagged wire rope sockets.

When first using the hoist after rope replacement, break-inrope by operating under lighter loads to full travel before applying maximum load.

5-9.ROPE REEVING.

a. General. Before unreeling rope from a coil or reel, be sure floor is clean. Dirt picked up by the rope can cause excessive wear and abrasion. Uncoil the rope by rolling the coil or reel along the floor; or, place reel on a stand with a shaft thru the center of reel so rope can be pulled straight out with the reel rotating.

CAUTION

It is imperative that the rope reel or coil rotates as rope unwinds. If coil or reel does not rotate, the wire will be twisted as it is uncoiled and kinking will result. A kinked rope may be damaged and unsafe.

Before removing the old rope, refer to reeving diagrams, (Figures 5-12,5-14,5-15and5-17).Face the rope drum on your hoist from the side which the rope comes off drum. To assist with rereeving your hoist, select the reeving diagram for your hoist. Note the description (such as 2 part double reeved, Figure5-17)and refer to the paragraph below with the same description which describes rereeving procedure.

b.Removing old rope — for all reevings.

(1)Lower the bottom block to a scaffold located 6 to 7 feet below hoist to relieve tension on wire rope. (Bottom block may be lowered to floor if desired; however, to handle less weight and for ease of rereeving adequate scaffold below the hoist is recommended.)

(2)Remove bottom block sheave guard.

(3)Remove key plates from both sides of sheave pin and slide sheave pin from bottom block.

(4)Lift out sheaves from the top of the bottom block and remove wire rope.

Page 14

(5)Remove key plates or snap rings from upper block sheave(s) and slide out upper block sheave pins, releasing upper block sheaves. Remove wire rope from sheaves.

(6)Make certain all personnel are clear of hoist and operate hoist â to completely unwind all wire rope from drum. Stop hoist so drum anchor slot(s) is accessible. Remove live rope and socket(s) from drum.

(7)TURN OFF POWER TO HOIST.

(8)Remove the bolt and lockwasher in the end of the rope anchor fitting. Remove rope from slot in top of anchor.

c.Installing new rope.

WARNING

Winding rope on rope drums with power can be hazardous. Keep hands safe distance from drum, wear gloves and use extreme care when handling rope.

SINGLE REEVED HOISTS

Stretch new cable on floor in one continuous length. Make certain there is no twist in rope.

(1)Place one end of rope in rope drum anchor slot. Be sure end fitting is properly seated.

(2)With all personnel clear of hoist — TURN ON POWER.

(3)Operate hoist á, guiding new rope into drum grooves with gloved hand, until the following lengths remain unwound:

(a)2 part single reeved — about 14'-0".

(b)4 part single reeved — about 28'-0".

(c)6 part single reeved — about 42'-0".

(4)Proceed with reeving as described in appropriate paragraph below and the reeving diagram for your hoist.

DOUBLE REEVED HOISTS

Stretch new cable on floor in one continuous length. Make certain there are no twists in rope.

(1)Pull far end of rope toward end of rope nearest hoist, until both ends are even and a loop is formed. Place fittings on both ends of rope in anchor slots on rope drum. Be sure end fittings are properly seated.

(2)With all personnel clear of hoist — TURN ON POWER.

(3)Operate hoist á guiding rope into grooves at both ends of drum, until the distance from the drum to the loop is

about 28' for 2 part double reeved.

(4)Proceed with reeving as described in appropriate paragraph below and the reeving diagram for your hoist.

d. Reeving — 2 par t single.

See Figure 5-12for diagram.

See Figure 9-11for block parts.

With new rope installed on the drum as described in paragraph 5-9csingle reeved above, proceed with rereeving following steps below:

(1)Pass other end of rope thru bottom opening of hoist, between floating limit rod and motor, and attach rope to cast dead end anchor fitting. A slot is located at top of fitting to accept cable. Reinstall bolt and lockwasher in end of anchor fitting to lock rope compression fitting in place.

(2)Grasp loop, formed after installing end anchor, and place bottom block sheave in loop. Lower sheave into bottom block and insert sheave pin. Replace key plates and bolts holding sheave pin in place.

(3)Replace sheave guard. Make certain rope is not twisted. Should the two parts of rope tend to wind around each other, remove cable from anchor slot and untwist cable. Reattach the cable anchor.

(4)Lubricate cable per paragraph 4-3.

12203A

Figure 5-12.Hoist Reeving — Two Part Single.

e. Reeving — 4 par t single.

See Figure 5-14for diagram.

See Figure 9-13for block parts.

With new rope installed on the drum as described in paragraph 5-9csingle reeved above, proceed with rereeving following steps below:

(1)Grasp the cable near the middle (about 14'-0")of the unwound end and form a loop. Place upper sheave in this loop. Slide upper sheave with cable into sheave pocket.

(2)Insert sheave pin into sheave. Replace key plates and bolts to hold sheave pin in place.

Page 15

Figure 5-13.Upper Sheave Installed.

(Typical 3 and 5 Ton)

(3) Pass free end of rope thru bottom opening of hoist between floating limit rod and motor, and insert rope in anchor fitting at hoist frame. Be certain power is off before attempting to place rope in anchor fitting. With end fitting properly seated in anchor, replace bolt and lockwasher in end of socket. Two loops have now been formed for bottom block sheaves.

12204A

Figure 5-14.Hoist Reeving — Four Part Single.

(4)Place one sheave in each loop. Install one sheave with cable in bottom block, partially insert sheave pin to hold sheave in place. NOTE: Some blocks have spacer washers between sheaves. Be certain that washers are installed between sheaves, when shown on parts illustration. Install second sheave with cable into bottom block. Slide sheave pin through sheave. Replace key plates and bolts securing sheave pin.

(5)Replace sheave guard.

(6)Lubricate cable per paragraph 4-3.f. Reeving — 6 part single.

See Figure 5-15for diagram.

See Figure 9-13for block parts.

With new rope installed on the drum as described in paragraph 5-9csingle reeved above, proceed with rereeving following steps below:

(1)Grasp cable at a point one-third(approx. 14’0") the distance hanging below the rope drum and form a loop. Place one upper sheave in this loop. Slide upper sheave with cable into sheave pocket; partially insert sheave pin to hold sheave in place.

(2)Repeat (1) above and install second upper sheave with rope. Insert sheave pin and install key plates and bolts to secure sheave pin.

12205A

Figure 5-15.Hoist Reeving — Six Part Single.

(3)Pass free end of rope thru bottom opening of hoist between floating limit rod and motor and insert in rope anchor fitting at hoist frame. Be certain power is off before attempting to place rope in anchor fitting. With end fitting properly seated in anchor, replace bolt and lockwasher in end of socket. Three loops have now been formed for bottom block sheaves.

(4)Place sheave in each loop. Install one sheave with cable in bottom block; partially insert sheave pin to hold sheave in place. NOTE: Be certain that washers are installed between sheaves, as shown on parts illustration.

(5)Repeat step 4 for remaining bottom block sheaves. Install sheave pin through sheaves. Replace key plates and bolts securing sheave pin.

(6)Replace sheave guard.

(7)Lubricate cable per paragraph 4-3.g. Reeving — 2 par t double.

See Figure 5-17for diagram.

See Figure 9-12for block parts.

With new rope installed on the drum as described in paragraph 5-9cdouble reeved above, proceed with rereeving following steps below:

(1)Form loops in the two ropes coming from rope drum. Place these loops into bottom block pockets and slide pipe or rod through sheave pin holes. Note position of ropes passing limit stop bar.

(2)Partially insert upper block sheave pin in opening and install one spacer washer. Raise remaining rope up to hoist, form a loop and place upper sheave in this loop.

Page 16

Figure 5-16.Upper Sheave Installed (Typical).

(3) Place sheave with rope into upper sheave pocket and slide pin partially thru sheave. Install remaining washer and push pin thru side plates. Install snap ring on each end of pin to secure pin in place.

12206A

Figure 5-17.Hoist Reeving — Two Part Double.

(4)Insert lower sheave pin into bottom block removing pipe as sheave pin is inserted. Be certain washers are replaced as shown on parts illustration. With sheave pin installed, replace key plates and bolts to secure sheave pin.

(5)Replace sheave guard.

(6)Lubricate rope per paragraph 4-3.h. Checking for and removal of rope twisting.

Although rereeving of hoist may have been done carefully, sometimes after new rope has been installed twisting may occur. With new rope installed, the hoist block should be raised and lowered several times with gradually increasing loads, through full lift. If the block still rotates excessively at no load, the rope may have twists which should be removed.

(1)To remove rope twist in single reeved hoists.

(a)Observe direction block tends to rotate.

(b)Lower the block to a low position and turn off power.

(c)Rotate rope near the anchor end several turns in a direction tending to correct block rotation. This rotates rope end fitting in the anchor.

(d)Turn on power; raise and lower the block several times to feed the correcting twist in the rope through the reeving.

(e)If block still tends to twist, repeat the above procedure until block rotation is corrected.

(2)To remove rope twist in double reeved hoists.

(a)Observe direction block tends to rotate.

(b)Lower the bottom block unspooling rope from rope drum until only one quarter (1/4) turn remains to rope end anchors in drum.

(c)Rotate rope near ends entering drum in a direction tending to correct block rotation. This rotates rope end fittings in the drum.

(d)Turn on power; raise and lower the block several times to feed the correcting twist in the rope through the reeving.

(e)If block still tends to twist, repeat the above procedure until block rotation is corrected.

5-10.TESTING HOIST AND OVERLOAD CLUTCH (Optional).

a.General. Before placing hoist in service or after disassembly and reassembly, hoist should be tested. To test suspend hoist from an overhead supporting member of sufficient strength to support the weight of the hoist and the rated load. Hoists having overload clutches, require an overhead supporting structure capable of supporting with appropriate safety factor, a load equal to 200 percent rated load and the weight of the hoist. Connect hoist to power supply as shown on hoist nameplate and perform the checks listed in b and c below.

b.Check hoist as outlined inPRE-OPERATIONCHECKS, Section II, paragraph2-4.

c.Check hoist with capacity load.

(1)Attach rated load to lower hook.

(2)Depress á push button and raise load. When push button is released, hoist should immediately stop and hold load at that level.

(3)Depress â push button, lower load a short distance and release button. Hoist should stop immediately and hold load at that level.

NOTE: If load drifts downward slowly in step 2 or 3 above, motor brake requires adjustment — see MOTOR BRAKE ADJUSTMENT — Section Vll — paragraph7-2.

d. Overload Clutch. The overload clutch (optional) must

be tested for proper operation before placing hoist in service or after disassembly and reassembly of hoist. For test procedure follow instructions listed below.

Page 17

WARNING

BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO TEST THE OVERLOAD CLUTCH, MAKE CERTAIN THE FOLLOWING PREREQUISITES ARE STRICTLY OBSERVED:

a.An appointed person must determine, before starting, that all structures supporting the hoist are adequately strong to withstand the test load of 200% of the rated load, plus the weight of the hoist, whether hoist is tested in installed position or moved to a designated test facility.

b.Loads used for testing must be accurately known.

c.Test must be made ONLY by a qualified operator, thoroughly familiar with the hoist and the purpose of the test.

d.Adequate and proper rigging must be provided to ensure that test loads are securely attached, properly balanced, and lifted level. Failure to provide adequate support could cause injury to personnel and/or damage to equipment.

(1)Using a known load, equal to the hoist rated load, energize hoist to lift the load. Raise this load just high enough to be certain hoist is lifting the entire load. Clutch should not slip with the rated load. Lower load to rest position. If clutch slips with rated load,adjustment is required. (See paragraph7-5.— “OVERLOAD CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT”.) If hoist will lift rated load, proceed to step (2).

(2)Increase load in steps from rated load, TO A MAXIMUM OF 200% of the rated load, attempting to lift load with each increase in weight. Hoist Overload Clutch should slip and refuse to lift load before 200% of the rated load is reached. Should hoist lift 200% of the rated load —STOP TEST — A CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT IS REQUIRED. (See paragraph7-5— “OVERLOAD CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT”.)

(3)Run hoist with load causing clutch to slip (hoist refusing load) five cycles of approximately 1 second each.

CAUTION

To prevent overheating, release the hoist control button at once when the hoist refuses to lift the load.

(4) Remove weights added in step (2) and return to hoist rated load. Lift rated load one final time. Clutch should not slip.

WARNING

Do not lift more than rated load except for test purposes.

NOTICE

ALWAYS KNOW LOAD TO BE LIFTED, LIFT-TECHDOES NOT RECOMMEND LIFTING LOADS GREATER THAN THE RATED LOAD OF YOUR HOIST.

Page 18

SECTION Vl - TROUBLE SHOOTING

 

Trouble

Probable Cause

 

Remedy

 

6-1.

Hoist Will Not Operate.

a. No power to hoist.

 

a. Check switches, circuit breakers or fuses and

 

 

 

 

 

 

connections in power supply lines. Check power

 

 

 

 

 

 

collectors.

 

 

 

b. Wrong voltage.

 

b. Check voltage required on motor data plate

 

 

 

 

 

 

against power supply.

 

 

 

c. Loose or

broken

wire

c. Shut off power supply, remove electrical cover on

 

 

 

connections

in hoist electrical

hoist and check wiring connections. Also check

 

 

 

system.

 

 

connections in push button station and limit

 

 

 

 

 

 

switches.

 

 

 

d. Contactor

assembly

not

d. See that necessary jumper wires are properly

 

 

 

functioning.

 

 

installed. Verify that the contactor armatures are

 

 

 

 

 

 

free to move. If binding occurs, replace contactor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check for burned out contactor coils.

 

 

 

e. No control voltage.

 

e. Check transformer fuse. If blown, check for

 

 

 

 

 

 

grounding and/or shorts in the push button station.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check the transformer coil for signs of

 

 

 

 

 

 

overheating. Replace transformer if burned out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verify the transformer secondary is the same

 

 

 

 

 

 

voltage as the coils to which it is connected.

 

 

 

f. Motor burned out.

 

f. Replace motor. Check input power supply. Check

 

 

 

 

 

 

hoist motor connections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-2.

Hook Moves in Wrong

a. Reverse phasing on three-

a. Interchange any two power supply line leads.

 

 

Direction.

phase hoists.

 

Refer to Section II, paragraph 2-4b.

 

 

 

b. Hoist wired wrong.

 

b. Check wiring connections with appropriate wiring

 

 

 

 

 

 

diagram.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-3.

Hook Will Raise But

a. Lower electrical circuit open.

a. Check for loose connections. See that necessary

 

Not Lower.

 

 

 

jumper wires are properly installed on contactor.

 

 

 

b. Contactor

assembly

not

b. See that necessary jumper wires are properly

 

 

 

functioning.

 

 

installed. Verify that the contactor armatures are

 

 

 

 

 

 

free to move. If binding occurs, replace contactor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check for burned out contactor coils.

 

 

 

c. Down, push button inoperative. c. Check push button contacts and wires.

 

6-4.Hook Will Lower But

a. Excessive load.

a. Reduce loading to rated load of hoist, as shown

Not Raise.

 

on nameplate.

 

b. Hoist electrical circuit open.

b. Check for loose connections. See that necessary

 

 

jumper wires are properly installed on contactor.

 

 

Check limit switch mounting and connections.

 

c. Contactor assembly not

c. See that necessary jumper wires are properly

 

functioning.

installed. Verify that the contactor armatures are

 

 

free to move. If binding occurs, replace contactor.

 

 

Check for burned out contactor coils.

 

d. Up, push button inoperative.

d. Check push button contacts and wires.

Page 19

SECTION Vl - TROUBLE SHOOTING (Continued)

 

Trouble

Probable Cause

Remedy

6-5.Hoist Will Not Lift Rated

a. Low voltage

a. See that power supply current is same voltage

 

Load.

 

Iisted on motor data plate. Check hoist motor

 

 

 

connections. Check size of power supply lines.

 

 

b. Overload Clutch not properly

b. See Section VII, paragraph 7-5.

 

 

adjusted.

 

 

 

 

 

6-6.

Hoist Motor Overheats.

a. Excessive load.

a. Reduce loading to rated load of hoist, shown on

 

 

 

nameplate.

 

 

b. Excessive duty-cycle.

b. Reduce frequency of lifts or amount of jogging.

 

 

c. Wrong voltage or frequency.

c. Check current rating on motor data plate against

 

 

 

power supply. Check hoist motor connections.

 

 

d. Defective motor or worn bear-

d. Disassemble hoist and inspect for defective, worn

 

 

ings in hoist frame.

or damaged parts.

 

 

e. Overload Clutch slipping without

e. See Section VII, paragraph 7-5.

 

 

lifting load.

 

 

 

 

 

6-7.

Load Drifts Excessively

a. Excessive load.

a. Reduce loading to rated load, as shown on

 

When Hoist Is Stopped.

 

nameplate.

 

 

b. Motor brake not holding.

b. With No Load, check hoist for drift. If drifting is

 

 

 

excessive, inspect motor brake (Section V,

 

 

 

paragraph 5-5)and adjust as outlined in Section

 

 

 

VII, paragraph 7-2.

 

 

c. Load brake not holding.

c. (1) After determining that the motor brake is working

 

 

 

properly, attach rated load to hook and operate

 

 

 

hoist. If the load accelerates during lowering, the

 

 

 

load brake is not functioning properly. See Section

 

 

 

V, paragraph 5-6for replacing worn or damaged

 

 

 

parts.

 

 

 

(2) If load brake checks O.K., magnetic motor brake

 

 

 

needs adjustment (see b. above).

 

 

 

 

6-8.

Hoist Operates

a. Collectors make poor contact.

a. Check collectors for free movement of spring arm,

 

Intermittently

 

weak spring or electrical connections.

 

 

b. Loose connections.

b. Check all wiring for loose connections.

 

 

 

 

Page 20