Radio Shack PRO-2052 User Manual

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Owner’s Manual

Cat. No. 20-432

PRO-2052

1000-ChannelDual Trunking

TrunkTracker Home Scanner

Please read before using this equipment.

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INTRODUCTION

Your new RadioShack PRO-20521000-ChannelDual Trunking TrunkTracker Home Scanner is one of a new generation of scanners designed to track Motorola Type I, Type II (such as Smartnet and Privacy Plus ), GE/Ericsson EDACS, and hybrid analog trunking systems, which are extensively used in many 800 MHz, 900 MHz and UHF communication systems.

Trunking communications systems let a large group of 2-wayradio users (or even different groups of2-wayradio users) efficiently use a group of frequencies. Instead of selecting a specific frequency for a transmission, the2-wayradio user simply selects a talk group. The trunking system automatically transmits the call on the first available frequency, and also sends a code that uniquely identifies that 2- way radio user’s transmission on a different frequency called a data channel.

Since the trunking system might send individual 2-wayradio user’s calls and response transmissions on different frequencies, it is difficult to listen to trunked communications using a regular scanner. ThePRO-2052monitors the data channel frequency sent with a2-wayradio user’s transmission and instantly switches to an active frequency, so you can hear the call and response for that2-wayradio user and easily “follow” the conversation.

The scanner also lets you scan conventional transmissions, and is preprogrammed with service-searchbanks for convenience. By pressing a single button, you can quickly search those frequencies most commonly used by public service and other agencies without tedious and complicated programming.

This scanner gives you direct access to over 51,000 exciting frequencies, including those used by police and fire departments, ambulance services, and amateur radio services, and you can change your selection at any time.

FEATURES

Your scanner also has these special features:

Flexible Operation — you can track both Motorola and GE/Ericsson trunking systems (used by most trunking communications systems today), letting you hear more calls than many standard trunking scanners.

Frequency Coverage to 1.3 GHz — provides a wide range of frequencies you can listen to.

Twenty Channel-StorageBanks— let you store 50 channels in each bank (1000 total channels), letting you group channels so you can more easily identify calls.

©1999 Tandy Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

RadioShack is a registered trademark used by Tandy Corporation.

HyperSearch and HyperScan are trademarks used by Tandy Corporation.

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NWR-SAME/WeatherAlert— you can set the scanner to sound an alert when it receives NOAA’s Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) coded weather emergency signal, providing more complete information about weather conditions in your immediate area and letting you avoid hearing alerts for geographical areas that do not interest you.

Remote PC Function — lets you control the PRO-2052 from your personal computer.

Five Scan Lists — let you store up to 50 IDs in each tracking bank (up to a total of 1000).

Triple-ConversionCircuitry— virtually eliminates any interference from IF (intermediate frequency) images, so you hear only the selected frequency.

Scan Delay — delays scanning for about 2 seconds before moving to another channel in conventional mode, so you can hear more replies that are made on the same channel. In trunk scanning mode, it delays for about 5 seconds before moving to another ID.

Lock-OutFunction— lets you set your scanner to skip over specified channels or frequencies when scanning or searching, and skip over IDs when tracking trunked systems.

Priority Channels — lets you program one channel in each bank (10 in

all). As the scanner scans a bank, it checks the bank’s priority channel every 2 seconds so you don't miss transmissions on that channel.

Five Service-SearchBanks— let you search preset frequencies in separate public service, police, fire/emergency, aircraft, and weather banks, to make it easy to locate specific types of calls.

HyperSearch and HyperScan — let you set the scanner to search at up to 300 steps per second (in frequency bands with 5 kHz steps) and scan at up to 50 channels per second, to help you quickly find interesting broadcasts. (The normal search speed is 100 steps per second).

Data Signal Skip — lets you set the scanner to skipnon-modulatedor data signals during scanning and searches. This lets the scanner avoidnon-voicesignals, making a scan or search faster.

Manual Access — you can directly access any stored channel by entering that channel’s number.

Liquid-CrystalDisplay— makes it easy to view and change programming information.

Display Backlight — makes the scanner easy to read in low-light situations.

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Supplied Telescoping Antenna — provides good reception of strong local signals.

External Antenna Terminal — lets you connect an external antenna with a BNC connector to the scanner for improved reception of distant/weaker signals.

Memory Backup — keeps the channel frequencies stored in memory in the event AC power goes out.

Key Confirmation Tones — the scanner sounds a tone when you perform an operation correctly, and an error tone if you make an error.

Duplicate Channel Alert — warns you when the frequency you are storing already exists in memory.

Disconnect Tone Detect — the scanner automatically tunes to the trunking data channel when it receives a disconnect transmission. You can turn this feature off to continuously monitor a channel with a weak transmission during disconnected conversations.

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Your PRO-2052scanner can receive these bands:

Frequency

Types of

Range (MHz)

Transmissions

 

 

 

 

29–29.7

10-MeterHam Band

 

 

29.7–50

VHF Lo

 

 

50–54

6-MeterHam Band

 

 

108–136.975

Aircraft

 

 

137–144

Military Land Mobile

 

 

144–148

2-MeterHam Band

 

 

148–174

VHF Hi

 

 

179.75–215.75

VHF TV

 

 

216–225

1-MeterHam Band

 

 

225–400

UHF Aircraft

 

 

400–420

Federal

 

Government

 

 

420–450

70-cmHam Band

 

 

450–470

UHF Standard Band

 

 

470–512

UHF “T” Band

 

 

806–824

Public Service “800”

851–869

except

896–956

Cellular Band

 

 

1240–1300

25-cmHam Band

 

 

Note: See “Specifications” on Page 68 for more information about the scanner’s frequency steps.

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FCC NOTICE

Your scanner might cause radio or TV interference even when it is operating properly. To determine whether your scanner is causing the interference, turn off your scanner. If the interference goes away, your scanner is causing it. Try the following methods to eliminate the interference:

Move your scanner away from the receiver.

Connect your scanner to an outlet that is on a different electrical circuit from the receiver.

Contact your local RadioShack store for help.

Note: Mobile use of this scanner is unlawful or requires a permit in some areas. Check the laws in your area.

SCANNING LEGALLY

Your scanner covers frequencies used by many different groups including police and fire departments, ambulance services, government agencies, private companies, amateur radio services, military operations, pager services, and wireline (telephone and telegraph) service providers. It is legal to listen to almost every transmission your scanner can receive. However, there are some transmissions you should never intentionally listen to. These include:

telephone conversations (cellular, cordless, or other private means of telephone signal transmission)

pager transmissions

any scrambled or encrypted transmissions

According to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), you are subject to fines and possible imprisonment for intentionally listening to, using, or divulging the contents of such a transmission unless you have the consent of a party to the communication (unless such activity is otherwise illegal).

This scanner is designed to prevent reception of illegal transmissions, in compliance with the law which requires that scanners be manufactured in such a way as to not be easily modifiable to pick up those transmissions. Do not open your scanner's case to make any modifications that could allow it to pick up transmissions that it is not legal to listen to. Doing so could subject you to legal penalties.

We encourage responsible, legal scanner use.

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CONTENTS

Preparation ...........................................................................................................

8

Connecting an Antenna ...................................................................................

8

Connecting Power ...........................................................................................

9

Connecting an Extension Speaker ................................................................

10

Connecting an Earphone/Headphones .........................................................

11

Understanding Your Scanner ............................................................................

12

A Look at the Front Panel ..............................................................................

12

A Look at the Display .....................................................................................

14

Understanding Banks ....................................................................................

17

Understanding Trunking .................................................................................

17

Operation ............................................................................................................

18

Turning On the Scanner and Setting Squelch ...............................................

18

Storing Known Frequencies into Channels ....................................................

18

Searching Service Banks ..............................................................................

19

Limit Search ...................................................................................................

20

Scanning the Stored Channels ......................................................................

21

Manually Selecting a Channel .......................................................................

21

Deleting a Frequency from a Channel ...........................................................

21

Priority ...........................................................................................................

21

Special Features ................................................................................................

23

Delay .............................................................................................................

23

Turning Channel-StorageBanks On and Off .................................................

23

Locking Out Channels and Frequencies ........................................................

23

Turning the Key Tone On and Off ...................................................................

24

Changing Search Speeds ..............................................................................

25

Skipping Data Signals ...................................................................................

25

Using NWR-SAMEand Weather Alert ..........................................................

25

Testing Weather Alert Reception ...................................................................

28

 

Trunk Scanning ..................................................................................................

30

 

 

 

 

Types of Trunking Systems ............................................................................

30

 

 

 

Setting the Scanner to the Trunk Scanning Mode .........................................

31

 

 

 

 

Setting Squelch for the Trunk Scanning Mode ...............................................

31

 

 

 

 

Programming Trunked Frequencies ...............................................................

32

 

 

 

 

Scanning a Trunked Bank ..............................................................................

33

 

 

 

 

Monitoring IDs ...............................................................................................

37

 

 

 

Channel Activity Indicators ............................................................................

37

 

 

 

Scan Lists ......................................................................................................

37

 

 

 

Scanning the Scan Lists ................................................................................

39

 

 

 

 

Scanning Type I and Hybrid Trunked Systems ..............................................

40

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PC Remote Function .........................................................................................

46

Connecting the Scanner to a Computer ........................................................

46

Setting the Remote Communication Format .................................................

46

Turning the Remote Function On and Off .....................................................

47

PC to Scanner Commands ...........................................................................

47

PC to Scanner Functions List .......................................................................

48

Scanner to PC Responses ............................................................................

52

Scanner Mode Codes ...................................................................................

53

A General Guide to Scanning ...........................................................................

55

Guide to Frequencies ....................................................................................

55

Guide to the Action Bands ............................................................................

56

Band Allocation .............................................................................................

57

Frequency Conversion ..................................................................................

63

Troubleshooting .................................................................................................

64

Resetting the Scanner ..................................................................................

66

Care and Maintenance ......................................................................................

67

Specifications ....................................................................................................

68

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PREPARATION

This scanner is designed primarily for use in the home as a base station. You can place it on a desk, shelf, or table.

Your scanner’s front feet fold up or down. Adjust them to give you the best view of the display.

Your scanner’s display is protected during shipment by a piece of film. Peel off this film before you use the scanner.

CONNECTING AN

ANTENNA

Connecting the Supplied

Antenna

You must install an antenna before you can operate the scanner.

The supplied telescoping antenna helps your scanner receive strong local signals. To install the antenna, thread it clockwise into the hole on the scanner’s top.

The scanner’s sensitivity depends on the antenna’s length and various environmental conditions. For the best reception of the transmissions you want to hear, adjust the antenna’s length.

Frequency

Antenna Length

 

 

 

 

29–54MHz

Extend fully

 

 

108–400MHz

Collapse one

 

segment

 

 

406–1300MHz

Collapse both

 

segments

 

 

Connecting an Outdoor

Antenna

Instead of the supplied antenna, you can connect an outdoor base-stationor mobile antenna (not supplied) to your scanner using a BNC connector. Your local RadioShack store sells a variety of antennas. Choose the one that best meets your needs.

When deciding on a mobile or basestation antenna and its location, consider these points:

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The antenna should be as high as possible on the vehicle or building.

The antenna and its cable should be as far as possible from sources of electrical noise (appliances, other radios, etc.).

The antenna should be vertical for the best performance.

To connect an optional base-stationor mobile antenna, first remove the supplied antenna from the scanner. Always use50-ohmcoaxial cable, such asRG-58orRG-8,to connect thebase-stationor mobile antenna. For lengths over 50 feet, useRG-8lowloss dielectric coaxial cable. If the antenna cable’s connector does not fit in theANT. jack, you might also need aMotorola-to-BNCantenna plug adapter, such as RadioShack Cat. No. 278117. Your local RadioShack store carries a wide variety of coaxial antenna cable and connectors.

Once you choose an antenna, follow the mounting instructions supplied with the antenna. Then route the antenna’s cable to the scanner and connect the cable to the ANT. jack on the back of the scanner.

Cautions:

Do not run the cable over sharp edges or moving parts that might damage it.

Do not run the cable next to power cables or other antenna cables.

Warning: Use extreme caution when you install or remove an outdoor antenna. If the antenna starts to fall, let it go! It could contact overhead power lines. If the antenna touches a power line, contact with the antenna, mast, cable, or guy wires can cause electrocution and death. Call the power company to remove the antenna. DO NOT attempt to do so yourself.

CONNECTING POWER

Using AC Power

The scanner’s supplied AC adapter lets you power the scanner from a standard AC outlet. To connect power to the scanner, insert the AC adapter’s barrel plug into the DC 12V jack on the back of the scanner, then plug the AC adapter into a standard AC outlet.

A N T

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Cautions:

You must use a Class 2

!power source that sup-

plies 12V DC and delivers at least 500 mA. Its center tip must be set to positive and its plug must fit the scanner's DC 12V jack. The supplied adapter meets these specifications. Using an adapter that does not meet these specifications could damage the scanner or the adapter.

Always connect the AC adapter to the scanner before you connect it to AC power. When you finish, disconnect the adapter from AC power before you disconnect it from the scanner.

Warning: Do not use the AC adapter’s polarized plug with an extension cord receptacle unless the blades can be fully inserted to prevent blade exposure.

Using Your Vehicle’s Battery

Power

If your AC power fails (during an emergency, for example), you can power your scanner from your vehicle’s cigarette lighter socket with an optional DC cigarette lighter power cable, (not supplied).

To connect an optional DC cigarette lighter power cable, insert its barrel plug into the DC 12V jack on the back of the scanner, then plug the power cable into your vehicle’s cigarette lighter socket.

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A N T

D C 1 2 V

Cautions:

You must use a power

!source that supplies 12V DC and delivers at least

500 mA. Its center tip must be set to positive and its plug must fit the scanner's DC 12V jack. The supplied adapter meets these specifications. Using an adapter that does not meet these specifications could damage the scanner or the adapter.

Always connect the adapter to the scanner before you connect it to the power source. When you finish, disconnect the DC adapter from the power source before you disconnect it from the scanner.

Note: If you use a cigarette lighter power cable and your vehicle’s engine is running, you might hear electrical noise from the engine while scanning. This is normal.

CONNECTING AN EXTENSION SPEAKER

In a noisy area, an amplified extension speaker (available at your local RadioShack store) positioned in the right place, might provide more comfortable listening.