Radio Shack MTX-103 User Manual

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19-1004.fmPage 1 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

Cat. No. 19-1004

OWNER’S MANUAL

Please read before using this equipment.

MTX-103

VHF Marine Transceiver

19-1004.fmPage 2 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

FEATURES

Your Radio Shack MTX-103VHF Marine Transceiver lets you transmit and receive on all United States and international channels in the VHF marine band, as assigned by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). It also provides tenreceive-onlychannels for weather information.

Your transceiver has the following features:

USA/International Channel Switch

— lets you quickly switch from the USA channel mode to the International channel mode.

Emergency Channel 16 Switch — lets you immediately switch to Channel 16, the universal marine emergency channel.

Weather Channel Switch — lets you select from 10 weather channels.

PLL (Phase-LockedLoop)-Con-trolled Circuitry— provides accurate and stable channel selection.

Adjustable Squelch — helps eliminate noise between transmissions.

High/Low Power Button — lets you save power by selecting a suitable transmitting power for long or short distances.

Battery Low Indicator — shows the battery pack’s condition.

Transmit and Receive Indicators — light when you transmit or receive.

Removable, Rechargeable Battery Pack — lets you use one battery pack while you charge another (additional packs available).

Supplied Battery Charger — conveniently recharges your transceiver’s battery pack.

Speaker and Microphone Jacks — let you use an earphone or external speaker or microphone to help ensure understandable communication in noisy areas.

For your records, we recommend you record your transceiver’s serial number in the space provided. The serial number is on the back of the transceiver.

Serial Number __________________

©1995 Tandy Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Radio Shack is a registered trademark used by Tandy Corporation.

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CAUTION

!

 

 

 

RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK.

 

DO NOT OPEN.

 

 

 

 

CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE COVER OR BACK. NOUSER-SERVICE-ABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.

Warning: To prevent fire or shock hazard, do not expose this product to rain or moisture.

This symbol is intended to alert you to the presence of uninsulated dangerous voltage within the product’s enclosure that might be of sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock. Do not open the product’s case.

This symbol is intended to inform

!you that important operating and maintenance instructions are in-

cluded in the literature accompanying this product.

FCC LICENSE

REQUIRED

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requires you to have a license before you operate this transceiver. You must complete and submit FCC Form 506 — a copy of Form 506 is enclosed. Furthermore, you are required to understand Part 80 of FCC Rules and Regulations.

The Marine Radiotelephone Service is under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Any adjustments or alterations which would alter the performance of the transceiver’s original FCC type acceptance or would change the frequency determining method are strictly prohibited.

Replacement or substitution of crystals, transistors, ICs, regulator diodes or any other part of a unique nature, with parts other than those recommended by Radio Shack, may cause violation of the technical regulation of the FCC Rules or violation of type acceptance requirements of the rules.

Before operating the radiotelephone, you must obtain your license. It is illegal to transmit without the appropriate license which can be obtained by submitting a completed FCC Form 506 (included) to the FCC. Furthermore, you are required to understand Part 80 of the FCC Rules and Regulations prior to the operation of your radiotelephone. It is the user’s responsibility to see that this unit is operating at all times in accordance with theFCC Rules and Regulations.

FCC Form 506-A,Temporary Operating Authority, Ship Radio Station, is also included with your transceiver. Complete and post this temporary permit in accordance with the instructions.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Preparation ...........................................................................................................

5

Charging the Battery Pack ...............................................................................

5

Connecting the Antenna ..................................................................................

6

Using an Earphone ..........................................................................................

7

Using an External Speaker/Microphone ..........................................................

7

Using the Wrist Strap .......................................................................................

7

Using the Belt Clip ...........................................................................................

7

Operation ..............................................................................................................

8

Receiving .........................................................................................................

8

Transmitting ...................................................................................................

10

Calling Another Boat ...............................................................................

10

Making a Ship-to-ShoreCall ...................................................................

11

Making an Emergency Call .....................................................................

12

Channel Assignments .......................................................................................

13

Installed Channels and Frequencies .............................................................

14

USA VHF Marine Channels ....................................................................

14

International VHF Marine Channels ........................................................

15

Comprehensive VHF FM Marine Radiotelephone Channels ..................

16

Care and Maintenance .......................................................................................

18

If You Have Problems ....................................................................................

19

FCC Notice .....................................................................................................

19

Specifications .....................................................................................................

20

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PREPARATION

CHARGING THE

BATTERY PACK

The MTX-103operates on abuilt-inrechargeable battery pack (supplied). You must charge the battery pack with the supplied battery charger before you use it the first time and when BAT lights steadily.

You can charge the battery pack while it is detached from or while it is attached to the transceiver.

To attach the battery pack, slide it onto the transceiver until the latch clicks.

To remove the battery pack, push the battery pack latch in the direction of the arrow, then slide the battery pack off the transceiver.

Follow these steps to charge the battery pack.

Caution: Do not use the transceiver while the charger is connected.

1.If the battery pack is attached to the transceiver, make sure VOLUME is turned fully counterclockwise so the transceiver is off.

2.Pull out the CHG PWR jack plug on the bottom of the battery pack. Plug the charger’s barrel plug into theCHG PWR jack, then connect the charger to a standard AC outlet.

Note: Charging time is 14 to 16 hours.

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Cautions:

To prevent permanent battery power loss, never charge the batteries in an area where the temperature is above about 80°F. The charger does not operate at all at temperatures below 32°F or above 113°F.

Never use any other charger to recharge the transceiver’s battery pack. This could permanently damage your transceiver or the battery pack.

Important: This transceiver uses a rechargeablenickel-cadmiumbattery pack. At the end of the battery pack’s useful life, it must be recycled or disposed of properly. Contact your local, county, or state hazardous waste management authorities for information on recycling or disposal programs in your area. Some options that might be available are municipalcurb-sidecollection,drop-offboxes at retailers, recycling collection centers, and mailback programs.

CONNECTING THE

ANTENNA

Caution: To prevent damage to your transceiver, you must connect an antenna before you operate it.

6

1.Position the BNC antenna connector over the antenna jack on the top of the transceiver.

2.Place the slots in the antenna’s connector over the tabs on the antenna jack, squeeze the base of the antenna, and push down and turn the antenna’s base clockwise until it locks into place.

Instead of the supplied antenna, you can connect an optional antenna. The BNC antenna jack on your transceiver makes it easy to connect a variety of antennas, such as an external mobile antenna or an outdoor base antenna, available at your local Radio Shack store.

Caution: Never connect an antenna that is not specifically tuned for the transceiver’s frequency range(156.025–162.275MHz).

Warning: Use extreme caution when installing or removing a base station antenna. If it starts to fall, let it go! It could contact overhead power lines. If the antenna touches the power line, contact with the antenna, mast, cable, or guy wires can cause electrocution and death! Call the power company to remove the antenna. Do not attempt to do so yourself.

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USING AN EARPHONE

To listen privately or to hear better in a noisy area, remove the plug from the SPK jack on the right of the transceiver and plug a monaural earphone (such as Cat. No.33-175)into the jack. This automatically disconnects the internal speaker.

USING AN EXTERNAL SPEAKER/MICROPHONE

An external speaker/microphone (such as Cat. No. 19-310)can make it easier to use the transceiver when you clip it to your belt. Remove the plugs from theMIC andSPK jacks. Then plug the speaker/microphone’s connector into the jacks. This automatically disconnects the internal speaker.

USING THE WRIST

STRAP

Clip the supplied wrist strap to the wrist strap tab, as shown. Then simply slip the strap over your hand.

USING THE BELT CLIP

You can use the supplied belt clip to make the transceiver easier to use when you are on the go. Use the two supplied screws to attach the belt clip to the transceiver. Slide the belt clip over your belt or waistband.

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OPERATION

RECEIVING

1.Turn SQUELCH fully counterclockwise.

2.Turn on the radio by turning VOLUME clockwise. AdjustVOLUME to the desired listening level.

3.Adjust SQUELCH to eliminate background noise between transmissions. Wait until there is no signal on the channel, then slowly turnSQUELCH clockwise until the background noise stops.

4.Raise the protective cover.

5.Use the channel thumbwheels to select the desired channel. The left wheel selects the first digit of the channel number; the right wheel selects the second digit.

6.Set 1W/5W to select the desired output power.

Use 1W for normal communication.

Use 5W for emergency or long distance communication.

Note: In a marina or harbor, try to establish communications using the1-wattsetting before switching to the5-wattsetting.

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7.The USA/INT’L switch must be set toUSA if you are in United States waters. If you are outside the USA, set the switch toINT’L. Although the channel numbers are the same, the frequencies are different for USA and international channels. See “Channel Assignments.”

8.Set the NORM/CH16/WX switch for the desired channel.

Use NORM to go to the channel selected by the channel thumbwheels.

Use CH16 to quickly select Channel 16 in an emergency, regardless of the channel thumbwheel setting.

Use WX to monitor the available24-hourweather channels. Select the desired channel

using the channel thumbwheels. See “Channel Assignments” for the receive-onlyweather channels.

9.To turn off the radio, turn VOLUME counterclockwise until it clicks.

Note: To get the best communication range:

Orient the antenna vertically.

Move the transceiver away from shielding caused by nearby structures.

Raise the transceiver as high as possible above the surrounding terrain.

Try an external antenna.

Cautions:

Receiving excessively strong signals might damage the transceiver. Do not use the transceiver close to a base station antenna or within 20 inches of another unit.

Transmission without an antenna connected might cause damage to the transmitter.

If the MTX-103is accidentally subjected to water spray, immediately wipe it with a soft cloth. If the unit is contaminated with salt water, wipe it with a soft cloth moistened with fresh water. Then dry the radio.

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TRANSMITTING

When making a call using a marine transceiver, you must follow these calling procedures.

Channel 16 is the universal calling and safety channel. Leave the radio set to Channel 16, unless a call is in progress on a different channel.

Listen to Channel 16 for at least 2 minutes before making a call on it (to be sure the channel is not already in use).

Press the push-to-talkbutton to talk; the TX indicator should light. Release it to listen; the RX indicator should light when a transmission is received.

When you are ready for the other party to talk, end your sentence by saying “over.”

When you are ready to end communication, say “(Your call sign or name of your boat), out.”

When in a marina or harbor, try first to make calls using the 1W (1- watt) power setting. If you do not receive a response, switch to the5W (5-watt)setting.

If you do not receive a response to a call after 30 seconds, wait at least 2 minutes before trying again. If you receive no response after the second try, wait at least 15 minutes before trying again.

10

After making contact on Channel 16, switch to a different channel to continue the call — Channel 16 must be left open for other calls. See “Channel Assignments.”

Calling Another Boat

1.Turn on the radio, and select Channel 16.

2.Hold the transceiver about 3 inches from your mouth, and press the push-to-talkbutton.

3.Say “(Name of boat you are calling), this is (your call sign or name of your boat).”

4.Release the push-to-talkbutton and listen for a response.

5.After establishing communication, switch to a ship-to-shipchannel. See “Channel Assignments.”

6.When the call is complete, say “(Your call sign or name of your boat), out.”

7.Switch back to Channel 16.

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Making an Emergency Call

Emergency calls are made on Channel 16 because it is monitored by marine radio owners. In many areas, the Coast Guard monitors Channel 16 24hours a day.

There are three levels of emergency calls:

The Mayday distress signal is for the most severe situations and is used when there is grave and imminent danger to people and/or a vessel. Mayday has priority over all other calls.

The Pan-Pan urgency signal is the second level of emergency and is used when people or vessels are in jeopardy.

The Security safety signal is the third level of emergency and is used for messages about the safety of navigation or important weather warnings.

Follow these steps to make a distress call.

1.Turn on the radio, and select Channel 16.

2.Set the output power to 5W (5 watts).

3.Hold the transceiver about 3 inches from your mouth, and press the push-to-talkbutton.

4.Say, “Mayday-Mayday-Mayday!This is (your call sign and name of your boat), (your call sign and name of your boat), (your call sign and name of your boat), Mayday (name of your boat).

5.Then give the following information:

Your location, including any navigational aids or landmarks

The nature of your emergency

The number of people on the boat and the condition of any injured

The estimated seaworthiness of your boat

A brief description of your boat length, type, color, and so forth

6.To end the message, say “I will be listening on Channel 16. This is

(your call sign or name of your boat). Over.”

7.Release the push-to-talkbutton and listen.

8.Someone should answer. If not, repeat the call beginning with Step 3.

Use this same basic procedure for transmitting urgent and safety signals, substituting Pan-Pan andSecurity in place ofMayday, and providing appropriate information.

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CHANNEL ASSIGNMENTS

Each of the 78 two-waycommunication channels and 18receive-onlychannels is reserved for a specific type of transmission. Misuse of a channel is a violation of FCC regulations.

You can listen to any channel. But, with the Ship Radio Station License that you receive by filling out FCC Form 506, you can only transmit on Channel 16 and channels marked in the list that follows as “Non-Commercial”or “Public Correspondence (Public Corresp).”

Also, be sure to observe the ship-to-ship andship-to-shoreassignments of the channels.

The USA and international marine channels share the same channel numbers. They do not, however, always use the same frequencies. Also, many of the international channels use different frequencies for transmitting and receiving on a particular channel. Be sure that you set the USA/INT’L switch to the appropriate position.

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IINSTALLED CHANNELS AND FREQUENCIES

USA VHF Marine Channels

Channel

Frequency (MHz)

 

 

 

TX

RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

01

156.050

156.050

02

160.700

03

160.750

04

160.800

05

156.250

156.250

06

156.300

156.300

07

156.350

156.350

08

156.400

156.400

09

156.450

156.450

10

156.500

156.500

11

156.550

156.550

12

156.600

156.600

13

156.650

156.650

14

156.700

156.700

15

156.750

16

156.800

156.800

17

156.850

156.850

18

156.900

158.900

19

156.950

156.950

20

157.000

161.600

21

157.050

157.050

22

157.100

157.100

23

157.150

157.150

24

157.200

161.800

25

157.250

161.850

26

157.300

161.900

27

157.350

161.950

28

157.400

162.000

60

160.625

61

160.675

62

160.725

63

156.175

156.175

64

160.825

65

156.275

156.275

66

156.325

156.325

67

156.375

156.375

 

 

 

Channel

Frequency (MHz)

 

 

 

TX

RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

68

156.425

156.425

69

156.475

156.475

70

156.525

156.525

71

156.575

156.575

72

156.625

156.625

73

156.675

156.675

74

156.725

156.725

77

156.875

156.875

78

156.925

156.925

79

156.975

156.975

80

157.025

157.025‘

81

157.075

157.075

82

157.125

157.125

83

157.175

157.175

84

157.225

161.825

85

156.275

161.875

86

157.325

161.925

87

157.375

161.975

88

157.425

157.425

 

 

 

13

19-1004.fmPage 14 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

International VHF Marine Channels

Channel

Frequency (MHz)

 

 

 

TX

RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

01

156.050

156.650

02

156.100

160.700

03

156.150

160.750

04

156.200

160.800

05

156.250

160.850

06

156.300

156.300

07

156.350

160.950

08

156.400

156.400

09

156.450

156.450

10

156.500

156.500

11

156.550

156.550

12

156.600

156.600

15

156.750

156.750

16

156.800

156.800

17

156.850

156.850

18

156.900

161.500

19

156.950

161.550

20

157.000

161.600

21

157.050

161.650

22

157.100

157.100

23

157.150

157.150

24

157.200

161.800

25

157.250

161.850

26

157.300

161.900

27

157.250

161.850

26

157.300

161.900

27

157.350

161.950

28

157.400

162.000

60

156.025

160.625

61

156.015

160.675

62

156.125

160.725

63

156.175

160.775

64

156.225

160.825

65

156.275

160.875

66

156.325

160.925

67

156.375

156.375

 

 

 

Channel

Frequency (MHz)

 

 

 

TX

RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

68

156.425

156.425

69

156.475

156.475

70

156.525

156.525

71

156.575

156.575

72

156.625

156.625

73

156.675

156.675

74

156.725

156.725

77

156.875

156.875

78

156.925

161.525

79

156.975

161.575

80

157.025

161.625‘

81

157.075

161.675

82

157.125

161.725

83

157.175

161.775

84

157.225

161.825

85

156.275

161.875

86

157.325

161.925

87

157.375

161.975

88

157.425

152.025

90

157.850

157.850

91

161.425

161.425

95

158.250

158.250

96

158.450

158.450

97

158.550

158.550

 

 

 

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19-1004.fmPage 15 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

Comprehensive VHF FM Marine Radiotelephone Channels

Operating

Frequency (MHz)

 

 

 

Channel

 

 

Type Traffic

Ship/Ship

Ship/Shore

Designations

Ship TX

Coast RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

156.050

160.650

International Only

Yes

2

157.100

160.700

International Only

Yes

3

157.150

161.750

International Only

Yes

4

156.200

160.800

International Only

Yes

5

156.250

160.850

International Only

Yes

6

156.300

Safety

Yes

No

7

156.350

160.950

International Only

Yes

7A

156.350

156.350

Commercial

Yes

Yes

8

156.400

Commercial

Yes

No

9

156.450

156.450

Commercial

Yes

Yes

9

156.450

156.450

Non-Commercial

Yes

Yes

10

156.500

156.500

Commercial

Yes

Yes

11

156.550

156.550

Commercial

Yes

Yes

12

156.600

156.600

Port Ops, USCG

Yes

Yes

13

156.650

156.650

Locks, Canals,Pilots

Yes

Yes

14

156.700

156.700

Port Ops, USCG

Yes

No

15

156.750

156.750

Environmental

RX Only

RX Only

16

156.800

156.800

Distress Calling

Yes

Distress

17

156.850

156.850

State Control

No

Yes

18

156.900

161.500

International Only

Yes

Yes

18A

156.900

156.900

Commercial

Yes

Yes

19

156.950

161.550

International Only

Yes

Yes

19A

156.950

156.950

Commercial

Yes

Yes

20

157.000

161.600

Port Ops

No

Yes

21

157.050

161.650

International Only

Yes

21CG

157.050

157.050

USCG Restricted

Yes

Yes

22

157.100

161.700

International Only

Yes

22CG

157.100

157.100

USCG Restricted

Yes

Yes

23

157.150

161.750

International Only

Yes

23CG

157.150

157.150

USCG Restricted

Yes

Yes

24

157.200

161.800

Public Corresp

No

Yes

25

157.250

161.850

Public Corresp

No

Yes

26

157.300

161.900

Public Corresp

No

Yes

27

157.350

161.950

Public Corresp

No

Yes

28

157.400

162.000

Public Corresp

No

Yes

WE1

162.550

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE3

162.475

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE5

161.650

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE7

162.425

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE9

162.500

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

19-1004.fmPage 16 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

Operating

Frequency (MHz)

 

 

 

Channel

 

 

Type Traffic

Ship/Ship

Ship/Shore

Designations

Ship TX

Coast RX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60

156.025

160.625

International Only

RX Only

RX Only

61

156.075

160.675

International Only

RX Only

RX Only

62

156.125

160.725

International Only

RX Only

RX Only

63

156.175

160.775

International Only

RX Only

RX Only

64

156.225

160.825

International Only

RX Only

RX Only

65

156.275

160.875

International Only

Yes

Yes

65A

156.275

156.275

Port Ops

Yes

No

66

156.325

160.925

International Only

Yes

Yes

66A

156.325

156.325

Port Ops

Yes

Yes

67

156.375

Commercial

Yes

Yes

68

156.425

156.425

Non-Commercial

Yes

Yes

69

156.475

156.475

Non-Commercial

Yes

Yes

70

156.525

Non-Commercial

Yes

No

71

156.575

156.575

Non-Commercial

Yes

Yes

72

156.625

Non-Commercial

Yes

No

73

156.675

156.675

Port Ops

Yes

Yes

74

156.725

156.725

Port Ops

Yes

Yes

77

155.875

Commercial

Yes

No

78

156.925

161.525

International Only

Yes

Yes

78A

156.925

156.925

Non Commercial

No

Yes

79

156.975

161.575

International Only

Yes

Yes

79A

156.975

156.975

Commercial

Yes

Yes

80

157.025

161.625

International Only

Yes

Yes

80A

157.025

157.025

Commercial

Yes

Yes

81

157.075

161.675

International Only

Yes

82

157.125

161.725

International Only

Yes

83CG

157.175

157.175

USCG Auxiliary Only

Yes

Yes

84

157.225

161.825

Public Corresp

No

Yes

85

157.275

161.875

Public Corresp

No

Yes

86

157.325

161.325

Public Corresp

No

Yes

87

157.375

161.975

Public Corresp

No

Yes

88

157.425

162.025

International Only

Yes

Yes

88A

151.425

Commercial

Yes

No

WE2

162.400

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE4

162.275

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE6

161.775

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE8

162.450

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

WE10

162.525

Weather

RX Only

RX Only

 

 

 

 

 

 

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19-1004.fmPage 17 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

CARE AND MAINTENANCE

Your Radio Shack MTX-103VHF Marine Transceiver is an example of superior design and craftsmanship. The following suggestions will help you care for the transceiver so you can enjoy it for years.

Keep the transceiver dry. If it gets wet, wipe it dry immediately. Liquids might contain minerals that can corrode the electronic circuits.

Handle the transceiver gently and carefully. Dropping it can damage circuit boards and cases and can cause the transceiver to work improperly.

Use and store the transceiver only in normal temperature environments. Temperature extremes can shorten the life of electronic devices, damage batteries, and distort or melt plastic parts.

Keep the transceiver away from dust and dirt, which can cause premature wear of parts.

Wipe the transceiver with a damp cloth occasionally to keep it looking new. Do not use harsh chemicals, cleaning solvents, or strong detergents to clean the transceiver.

Modifying or tampering with the transceiver’s internal components can cause a malfunction and might invalidate your transceiver’s warranty. If your transceiver is not performing as it should, take it to your local Radio Shack store for assistance.

17

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IF YOU HAVE

PROBLEMS

If your transceiver does not operate properly, check the following items first. If you still have a problem, bring the transceiver to your local Radio Shack store for assistance.

Important: Repair and/or adjustment of this transceiver must be performed by a technician with an FCC generalclass commercial license.

Check the battery pack condition.

If you are using an external antenna, check the antenna cable and its connection at both ends.

Check the connections of an external microphone or external speaker.

Check the settings of the VOLUME control,SQUELCH control,1W/5W switch,NORM/CH16/WX switch, and the frequency channel thumbwheels.

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FCC NOTICE

This device complies with Part 15 of FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:

1.This device may not cause harmful interference.

2.This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

Your transceiver might cause TV or radio interference, even when it is operating properly. To determine whether your transceiver is causing the interference, turn off your transceiver. If the interference goes away, your transceiver is causing the interference. Try to eliminate the interference by:

Moving your transceiver away from the receiver

Contacting your local Radio Shack store for help

If you cannot eliminate the interference, the FCC requires that you stop using your transceiver.

19-1004.fmPage 19 Tuesday, August 3, 1999 9:11 AM

SPECIFICATIONS

GENERAL

 

 

Channels ....................................

All USA and International Channels Included, Plus

 

Ten Weather Channels and CH90, 91, 95, 96, 97

 

 

for International Usage

Frequency Method ........................................................................

 

Phase Lock Loop

ETR Synthesizer Antenna Impedance ..........................................................

50 ohm

Power Input ..............................................................................................

 

12 Volt DC

Frequency Range .................................................................

 

156.025–162.275MHz

Operating Temperature ............................................

 

–4°Fto 122°F(–20°Cto 50°C)

Dimensions (HWD) ...............................................................

 

17/8 ¥ 25/8 ¥ 71/4 Inches

 

 

(47 ¥ 66 ¥ 184 mm)

Weight ........................................................................................

 

1 lb. 3 oz. (1.09 kg)

TRANSMITTER

 

 

Power Output .........................................................

 

1 or 5 Watts (Switch Selectable)

Modulation ...........................................................................................................

 

FM

Hum and Noise Attenuation ............................................................................

 

40 dB

Audio Distortion............................

10% Maximum at 1 kHz with ±3.0 kHz Deviation

Spurious Suppression .....................................................................................

 

60 dB

RECEIVER

 

 

Sensitivity ..........................................................................................

 

2 mV for 12 dB

SINAD .............................................................................................

 

0.3 mV for 20 dB

Quieting Squelch Sensitivity .........................

Threshold 0.15 mV Maximum for 6 dB

SINAD Receiver Attack Time .....................................................

 

60 mSec Maximum

Adjacent CH Rejection....................................................................................

 

65 dB

Audio Power Output ................................................................

 

300 mW at 10% THD

Spurious Response Attenuation .....................................................................

 

60 dB

Hum and Noise Attenuation ............................................................................

 

50 dB

Squelched Modulation Acceptance Bandwidth ..........................

±7.5 KHz Minimum

Specifications are typical; individual units might vary. Specifications are subject to change and improvement without notice.

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NOTES

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