Gentek 3940202 User Manual

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Appendix C: Filtered Enclosure Specifications

C-2

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Appendix C: Filtered Enclosure Specifications

C-3

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Appendix C: Filtered Enclosure Specifications

C-4

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PPENDIX

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ILTERED

 

 

 

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NCLOSURES

 

 

 

E

 

 

 

 

 

 

Model Size

 

 

 

2'

3'

4'

Sash Height from Work Surface (inches)

9.44

9.44

9.44

Total Open Area with Bypass (sq. ft.)

1.45

2.20

2.95

Exhaust Airflow Volume at 90fpm (CFM)

130

200

265

Alarm Airflow Volume at 60 fpm (CFM)

85

130

175

Initial Mag. Gauge Pressure Reading (inches H2O)

0.20 to .045

0.15 to 0.40

0.10 to 0.35

Number of Laskin Nozzles needed at 10 psig

1

1

1

Exhaust HEPA Filter w/ Gasket Dimensions (inches)

18x18x3.31

30x18x3.31

42x18x3.31

 

*Motor Horsepower (HP)

0.13

0.13

0.30

 

*Capacitor (MFD, Volts)

10MFD, 115V

10MFD, 115V

15MFD, 115V

 

 

 

 

(2) 4MFD, 230V

(2) 4MFD, 230V

4MFD, 230V

 

 

Fluorescent Lights

F15T8-SP35

F17T8

F25T8

*excludes XPert Filtered Balance Station, since it has no integral blower.

To determine the actual face velocity at the sash opening, airflow velocity readings will need to be taken. This should be done across the sash opening of the enclosure in accordance with the Industrial Ventilation Manual. (See Appendix E) The “average face velocity” is achieved by taking readings in two rows across the enclosure with the readings 6" from the ends and evenly spaced every 12"; the first row is 3" down from the upper sash foil and the second row is 3" up from the work surface. A total of four readings will be taken for the 2' enclosure, six readings taken for the 3' enclosure and eight readings taken for the 4' enclosure and then averaged.

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APPENDIXE

REFERENCES ON

VENTILATION,

SAFETY,

OCCUPATIONAL

HAZARDS,

BIOSAFETY AND

DECONTAMINATION

Many excellent reference texts and booklets are currently available. The following is a brief listing:

Laboratory Ventilation Standards

Federal Register 29 CFR Part 1910

Non-mandatoryrecommendations from “Prudent

Practices.”

Fume hoods should have a continuous monitoring device

Face velocities should be between 60-100linear feet per minute (lfpm)

Average 2.5 linear feet of hood space per person

90

Appendix E: References

Occupational Health and Safety U.S. Department of Labor

200 Constitution Avenue N.W. Washington, DC 20210

(202) 523-1452www.osha.gov

Industrial Ventilation-ACGIH

Fume hood face velocities between 60-100lfpm

Maximum of 125 lfpm for radioisotope hoods

Duct velocities of 1000-2000fpm for vapors, gasses and smoke

Stack discharge height 1.3-2.0x building height

Well designed fume hood containment loss, <0.10 ppm

Industrial Ventilation, A Manual of Recommended

Practice.

24th Edition, 2001

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists

1330 Kemper Meadow drive Cincinnati, OH 45240-1634(513)742-2020www.acgih.org

ASHRAE 110-1995Method of Testing Performance of

Fume Hoods

Evaluates fume hood’s containment characteristics

Three part test: Smoke generation, Face velocity profile, Tracer gas release @ 4 liters per minute

Rated As Manufactured (AM), As Installed (AI) and As Used (AU)

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers

1791 Tullie Circle N.E. Atlanta, GA 30329 (404) 636-8400www.ashrae.org

ANSI Z9.5-1993Laboratory Standard

Covers entire laboratory ventilation system.

Vertical stack discharge @ 2000-3000fpm

New and remodeled hoods shall have a monitoring device

Ductless hoods should only be used with non-hazardousmaterials

Fume hood face velocities between 80 – 120 fpm

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Appendix E: References

American Industrial Hygiene Association 2700 Prosperity Avenue, Suite 250 Fairfax, VA 22031

(703) 849-8888www.aiha.org

SEFA 1-2002

Fume hood face velocities based on toxicity levels of chemicals

Class A – 125 to 150 fpm Class B – 80 to100 fpm Class C – 75-to80 fpm

Test method – face velocity profile and smoke generation

Scientific Equipment & Furniture Association 1028 Duchess Drive

McLean, VA 22102 (703) 538-6007www.sefalabs.com

NFPA 45 – 2002 Fire Protection for Laboratories Using

Chemicals

Laboratory hoods should not be relied on for explosion protection

Exhaust air from fume hoods should not be recirculated

Services should be external to the hood

Canopy hoods only for non-hazardousapplications

Materials of construction should have flame spread of 25 or less

80 to 120 fpm to prevent escape

NFPA 30 – 2000 Flammable and Combustible Liquids

Code

Approved cabinets may be metal or wood

Vent location on cabinets are required

Venting of cabinets not a requirement

National Fire Protection Association 1 Batterymarch Park

P.O. Box 9101

Quincy, MA 02269-9101(800)344-3555www.nfpa.org

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Appendix E: References

General References

American Conference of Governmental Industrial

Hygienists. Industrial Ventilation, A Manual of

Recommended Practice, Cincinnati, OH

ASHRAE Standard Committee. ASHRAE Standard Atlanta:

ASHRAE Publications Sales Department, 1995

British Standards Institution, Laboratory Fume Cupboards.

Parts 1, 2 and 3, London: 1990

Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 CFR Part 1910, Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, Final Rule. Vol. 55, No. 21. Washington D.C.:1990

DiBerardinis. L. et al. Guides for Laboratory Design, Health and Safety Considerations. Wiley & Sons, 1987

McDermott, Henry, Handbook of Ventilation for Contaminant Control, 2nd Edition. Butterworth Publishers, 1985.

Miller, Brinton M. et al. Laboratory Safety: Principles and

Practices. American Society for Microbiology, Washington,

D.C.: 1986

NIH Guidelines for the Laboratory Use of Chemical

Carcinogens. NIH Publication No.81-2385.

Rayburn, Stephen R. The Foundation of Laboratory Safety,

A Guide for the Biomedical Laboratory. Springer-Verlag,

New York: 1990

Sax, N. Irving and Lewis, JR., Richard J. Rapid Guide to

Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace. Van Nostrand

Reinhold, 1987.

Schilt, Alfred A. Perchloric Acid and Perchlorates. The G.

Frederick Smith Chemical Company, Columbus, OH: 1979.

Steere, Norman. CRC Handbook of Laboratory Safety, 2nd

Edition. CRC Press, 1971.

Collins, C.H., 1988. Laboratory Acquired Infections,

History, Incidence, Causes and Prevention, 2nd ed.,

Butterworths, London.

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Appendix E: References

Kruse, R.H., WH. Puckett and J. H. Richardson. 1991. Biological Safety Cabinetry, Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 4:207241.

Miller, C.D., D.H.M. Groschel, J. H. Richardson, D. Vesley,

J. R. Songer, R. D. Housewright and W. E. Barkley. 1986.

Laboratory Safety, Principles and Practices, American

Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.D.

National Research Council (U.S.) Committee on Hazardous Biological Substances in the Laboratory. 1989. Biosafety in the Laboratory. Prudent Practices for Handling and Disposal of Infectious Materials. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

Rayburn, S.R. 1990. The Foundations of Laboratory Safety,

Springer-Verlag,New York.

U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare.

Formaldehyde Decontamination of Laminar Flow Biological

Safety Cabinets, National Institutes of Health, Division of

Safety, Bethesda, MD 20892.

U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare.

Effective use of a Laminar Flow Biological Safe Cabinet.

National Audiovisual Center (GSA), Sales Branch, Catalog

No., NAC 005133, Washington, D.C.

U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. 1975.

Selecting a Biological Safety Cabinet. National Audiovisual

Center (GSA), Sales Branch, Catalog No. NAC 000709,

Washington, D.C.

U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. 1999.

Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 4th ed. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Publication No. (CDC) 93-8395. U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

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