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Catalyst 2960-XSwitch Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2)EX

First Published: July 10, 2013

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Text Part Number: OL-29034-01

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© 2013 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

P r e f a c e

C H A P T E R 1

C H A P T E R 2

C O N T E N T S

Preface ix

Document Conventions ix

Related Documentation xi

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request xi

Using the Command-Line Interface 1

Information About Using the Command-Line Interface 1

Command Modes 1

Using the Help System 3

Understanding Abbreviated Commands 4

No and default Forms of Commands 4

CLI Error Messages 4

Configuration Logging 5

How to Use the CLI to Configure Features 5

Configuring the Command History 5

Changing the Command History Buffer Size 6

Recalling Commands 6

Disabling the Command History Feature 7

Enabling and Disabling Editing Features 7

Editing Commands through Keystrokes 8

Editing Command Lines That Wrap 9

Searching and Filtering Output of show and more Commands 10

Accessing the CLI through a Console Connection or through Telnet 11

Configuring Interface Characteristics 13

Finding Feature Information 13

Information About Configuring Interface Characteristics 13

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Contents

Interface Types 13

Port-Based VLANs 14

Switch Ports 14

Access Ports 14

Trunk Ports 15

Switch Virtual Interfaces 15

SVI Autostate Exclude 16

EtherChannel Port Groups 16

Power over Ethernet Ports 16

Using the Switch USB Ports 17

USB Mini-Type B Console Port 17

Console Port Change Logs 17

USB Type A Ports 18

Interface Connections 18

Interface Configuration Mode 19

Default Ethernet Interface Configuration 20

Interface Speed and Duplex Mode 21

Speed and Duplex Configuration Guidelines 21

IEEE 802.3x Flow Control 22

How to Configure Interface Characteristics 23

Configuring Interfaces Procedure 23

Adding a Description for an Interface 24

Configuring a Range of Interfaces 25

Configuring and Using Interface Range Macros 26

Configuring Ethernet Interfaces 27

Setting the Interface Speed and Duplex Parameters 27

Configuring IEEE 802.3x Flow Control 29

Configuring SVI Autostate Exclude 30

Shutting Down and Restarting the Interface 31

Configuring the Console Media Type 32

Configuring the USB Inactivity Timeout 33

Monitoring Interface Characteristics 34

Monitoring Interface Status 34

Clearing and Resetting Interfaces and Counters 35

Configuration Examples for Interface Characteristics 36

 

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C H A P T E R 3

C H A P T E R 4

C H A P T E R 5

Adding a Description to an Interface: Example 36

Identifying Interfaces on a Stack-Capable Switch: Examples 36

Configuring a Range of Interfaces: Examples 36

Configuring and Using Interface Range Macros: Examples 37

Setting Interface Speed and Duplex Mode: Example 37

Configuring the Console Media Type: Example 37

Configuring the USB Inactivity Timeout: Example 38

Additional References for the Interface Characteristics Feature 38

Feature History and Information for Configuring Interface Characteristics 39

Configuring Auto-MDIX 41

Prerequisites for Auto-MDIX 41

Restrictions for Auto-MDIX 41

Information about Configuring Auto-MDIX 42

Auto-MDIX on an Interface 42

How to Configure Auto-MDIX 42

Configuring Auto-MDIX on an Interface 42

Monitoring Auto-MDIX 43

Example for Configuring Auto-MDIX 44

Configuring Ethernet Management Port 45

Finding Feature Information 45

Prerequisites for Ethernet Management Ports 45

Information about the Ethernet Management Port 45

Ethernet Management Port Direct Connection to a Switch 46

Ethernet Management Port Connection to Stack Switches using a Hub 46

Supported Features on the Ethernet Management Port 46

How to Configure the Ethernet Management Port 47

Disabling and Enabling the Ethernet Management Port 47

Additional References 48

Configuring LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service 51

Finding Feature Information 51

LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service Overview 51

LLDP 51

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C H A P T E R 6

C H A P T E R 7

LLDP Supported TLVs 52

LLDP and Cisco Switch Stacks 52

LLDP and Cisco Medianet 52

LLDP-MED 52

LLDP-MED Supported TLVs 53

Wired Location Service 54

Default LLDP Configuration 55

Configuration Guidelines 55

How to Configure LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service 56

Enabling LLDP 56

Configuring LLDP Characteristics 57

Configuring LLDP-MED TLVs 59

Configuring Network-Policy TLV 61

Configuring Location TLV and Wired Location Service 63

Enabling Wired Location Service on the Switch 66

Configuration Examples for LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service 67

Configuring Network-Policy TLV: Examples 67

Monitoring and Maintaining LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service 68

Additional References for LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service 69

Configuring System MTU 71

Finding Feature Information 71

Information about the MTU 71

System MTU Guidelines 71

How to Configure MTU Sizes 72

Configuring the System MTU 72

Configuration Examples for System MTU 73

Additional References for System MTU 74

Configuring PoE 75

Finding Feature Information 75

Restrictions for PoE 75

Information about PoE 76

Power over Ethernet Ports 76

Supported Protocols and Standards 76

 

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Contents

Powered-Device Detection and Initial Power Allocation 77

Power Management Modes 78

Power Monitoring and Power Policing 79

Maximum Power Allocation (Cutoff Power) on a PoE Port 80

Power Consumption Values 80

How to Configure PoE 81

Configuring a Power Management Mode on a PoE Port 81

Budgeting Power for Devices Connected to a PoE Port 82

Budgeting Power to All PoE ports 83

Budgeting Power to a Specific PoE Port 84

Configuring Power Policing 85

Monitoring Power Status 88

Configuration Examples for Configuring PoE 88

Budgeting Power: Example 88

C H A P T E R 8

Configuring EEE 89

Finding Feature Information 89

Information About EEE 89

EEE Overview 89

Default EEE Configuration 90

Restrictions for EEE 90

How to Configure EEE 90

Enabling or Disabling EEE 90

Monitoring EEE 91

Configuration Examples for Configuring EEE 92

Additional References 92

Feature History and Information for Configuring EEE 93

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Contents

 

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Preface

This preface contains the following topics:

Document Conventions, page ix

Related Documentation, page xi

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request, page xi

Document Conventions

This document uses the following conventions:

Convention

Description

^ or Ctrl

Both the ^ symbol and Ctrl represent the Control (Ctrl) key on a keyboard.

 

For example, the key combination ^D orCtrl-D means that you hold

 

down the Control key while you press the D key. (Keys are indicated in

 

capital letters but are not case sensitive.)

bold font

Commands and keywords and user-enteredtext appear inbold font.

Italic font

Document titles, new or emphasized terms, and arguments for which you

 

supply values are in italic font.

Courier font

Terminal sessions and information the system displays appear in courier

 

font.

Bold Courier font

Bold Courier font indicates text that the user must enter.

[x]

Elements in square brackets are optional.

...

An ellipsis (three consecutive nonbolded periods without spaces) after

 

a syntax element indicates that the element can be repeated.

|

A vertical line, called a pipe, indicates a choice within a set of keywords

 

or arguments.

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Preface

Document Conventions

Convention

Description

[x | y]

Optional alternative keywords are grouped in brackets and separated by

 

vertical bars.

{x | y}

Required alternative keywords are grouped in braces and separated by

 

vertical bars.

[x {y | z}]

Nested set of square brackets or braces indicate optional or required

 

choices within optional or required elements. Braces and a vertical bar

 

within square brackets indicate a required choice within an optional

 

element.

string

A nonquoted set of characters. Do not use quotation marks around the

 

string or the string will include the quotation marks.

< >

Nonprinting characters such as passwords are in angle brackets.

[ ]

Default responses to system prompts are in square brackets.

!, #

An exclamation point (!) or a pound sign (#) at the beginning of a line

 

of code indicates a comment line.

Reader Alert Conventions

This document uses the following conventions for reader alerts:

Note Meansreader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the manual.

Tip Means the following information will help you solve a problem.

Caution Meansreader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment damage or loss of data.

Timesaver Meansthe described action saves time. You can save time by performing the action described in the paragraph.

Warning Meansreader be warned. In this situation, you might perform an action that could result in bodily injury.

 

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Related Documentation

Related Documentation

Note Before installing or upgrading the switch, refer to the release notes.

Catalyst 2960-X Switch, located at http://www.cisco.com/go/cat2960x_docs.

Cisco SFP and SFP+ modules documentation, including compatibility matrixes, located at: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/modules/ps5455/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html

Subscribe to the What's New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.

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Preface

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

 

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C H A P T E R 1

Using the Command-LineInterface

This chapter contains the following topics:

Information About Using the Command-LineInterface, page 1

How to Use the CLI to Configure Features, page 5

Information About Using the Command-LineInterface

This section describes the Cisco IOS command-lineinterface (CLI) and how to use it to configure your switch.

Command Modes

The Cisco IOS user interface is divided into many different modes. The commands available to you depend on which mode you are currently in. Enter a question mark (?) at the system prompt to obtain a list of commands available for each command mode.

You can start a CLI session through a console connection, through Telnet, a SSH, or by using the browser.

When you start a session, you begin in user mode, often called user EXEC mode. Only a limited subset of the commands are available in user EXEC mode. For example, most of the user EXEC commands are one-timecommands, such asshow commands, which show the current configuration status, andclear commands, which clear counters or interfaces. The user EXEC commands are not saved when the switch reboots.

To have access to all commands, you must enter privileged EXEC mode. Normally, you must enter a password to enter privileged EXEC mode. From this mode, you can enter any privileged EXEC command or enter global configuration mode.

Using the configuration modes (global, interface, and line), you can make changes to the running configuration. If you save the configuration, these commands are stored and used when the switch reboots. To access the various configuration modes, you must start at global configuration mode. From global configuration mode, you can enter interface configuration mode and line configuration mode.

This table describes the main command modes, how to access each one, the prompt you see in that mode, and how to exit the mode.

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Using the Command-LineInterface

Command Modes

Table 1: Command Mode Summary

 

 

 

Mode

Access Method

Prompt

Exit Method

About This Mode

User EXEC

Begin a session

Switch>

Enter logout or

Use this mode to

 

using Telnet, SSH,

quit.

Change

 

or console.

 

 

 

 

 

terminal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

settings.

 

 

 

 

Perform basic

 

 

 

 

tests.

 

 

 

 

Display

 

 

 

 

system

 

 

 

 

information.

Privileged EXEC

While in user EXEC

Switch#

Enter disable to

Use this mode to

 

mode, enter the

exit.

verify commands

 

enable command.

 

 

that you have

 

 

 

 

entered. Use a

 

 

 

 

password to protect

 

 

 

 

access to this mode.

Global

While in privileged

Switch(config)#

To exit to privileged

Use this mode to

configuration

EXEC mode, enter

EXEC mode, enter

configure

 

the configure

 

exit orend, or press

parameters that

 

command.

 

Ctrl-Z.

apply to the entire

 

 

 

 

switch.

VLAN

While in global

To exit to global

configuration

configuration mode,

Switch(config-vlan)#configuration mode,

 

enter the vlan

enter the exit

 

vlan-idcommand.

command.

 

 

To return to

 

 

privileged EXEC

 

 

mode, press Ctrl-Z

 

 

or enter end.

Use this mode to configure VLAN parameters. When VTP mode is transparent, you can create extended-rangeVLANs(VLANIDs greater than 1005) and save configurations in the switch startup configuration file.

Interface

While in global

To exit to global

configuration

configuration mode,

Switch(config-if)#configuration mode,

 

enter the interface

enter exit.

 

command (with a

To return to

 

specific interface).

 

privileged EXEC

 

 

 

 

mode, press Ctrl-Z

 

 

or enter end.

Use this mode to configure parameters for the Ethernet ports.

 

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Using the Help System

Mode

Access Method

Prompt

Exit Method

About This Mode

Line configuration While in global

To exit to global

configuration mode,

Switch(config-line)#configuration mode,

specify a line with

enter exit.

the line vtyor line

To return to

console command.

privileged EXEC

 

 

mode, press Ctrl-Z

 

or enter end.

Use this mode to configure parameters for the terminal line.

Using the Help System

You can enter a question mark (?) at the system prompt to display a list of commands available for each command mode. You can also obtain a list of associated keywords and arguments for any command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.help

2.abbreviated-command-entry?

3.abbreviated-command-entry<Tab>

4.?

5.command ?

6.command keyword ?

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

help

Obtains a brief description of the help system in any

 

 

command mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# help

 

Step 2

abbreviated-command-entry?

Obtains a list of commands that begin with a particular

 

 

character string.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# di?

 

 

dir disable disconnect

 

Step 3

abbreviated-command-entry<Tab>

Completes a partial command name.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# sh conf<tab>

 

 

Switch# show configuration

 

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Understanding Abbreviated Commands

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 4

?

Lists all commands available for a particular command

 

 

mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch> ?

 

Step 5

command ?

Lists the associated keywords for a command.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch> show ?

 

Step 6

command keyword ?

Lists the associated arguments for a keyword.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# cdp holdtime ?

 

 

<10-255>Length of time (in sec) that receiver

 

 

must keep this packet

 

Understanding Abbreviated Commands

You need to enter only enough characters for the switch to recognize the command as unique.

This example shows how to enter the show configuration privileged EXEC command in an abbreviated form:

Switch# show conf

No and default Forms of Commands

Almost every configuration command also has a no form. In general, use theno form to disable a feature or function or reverse the action of a command. For example, theno shutdown interface configuration command reverses the shutdown of an interface. Use the command without the keywordno to reenable a disabled feature or to enable a feature that is disabled by default.

Configuration commands can also have a default form. Thedefault form of a command returns the command setting to its default. Most commands are disabled by default, so thedefault form is the same as theno form. However, some commands are enabled by default and have variables set to certain default values. In these cases, thedefault command enables the command and sets variables to their default values.

CLI Error Messages

This table lists some error messages that you might encounter while using the CLI to configure your switch.

 

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Configuration Logging

Table 2: Common CLI Error Messages

Error Message

% Ambiguous command: "show con"

% Incomplete command.

% Invalid input detected at ^marker.

Meaning

How to Get Help

You did not enter enough characters for your switch to recognize the command.

You did not enter all the keywords or values required by this command.

You entered the command incorrectly. The caret (^) marks the point of the error.

Reenter the command followed by a question mark (?) with a space between the command and the question mark.

The possible keywords that you can enter with the command appear.

Reenter the command followed by a question mark (?) with a space between the command and the question mark.

The possible keywords that you can enter with the command appear.

Enter a question mark (?) to display all the commands that are available in this command mode.

The possible keywords that you can enter with the command appear.

Configuration Logging

You can log and view changes to the switch configuration. You can use the Configuration Change Logging and Notification feature to track changes on a per-sessionandper-userbasis. The logger tracks each configuration command that is applied, the user who entered the command, the time that the command was entered, and the parser return code for the command. This feature includes a mechanism for asynchronous notification to registered applications whenever the configuration changes. You can choose to have the notifications sent to the syslog.

Note Only CLI or HTTP changes are logged.

How to Use the CLI to Configure Features

Configuring the Command History

The software provides a history or record of commands that you have entered. The command history feature is particularly useful for recalling long or complex commands or entries, including access lists. You can customize this feature to suit your needs.

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Configuring the Command History

Changing the Command History Buffer Size

By default, the switch records ten command lines in its history buffer. You can alter this number for a current terminal session or for all sessions on a particular line. This procedure is optional.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. terminal history[sizenumber-of-lines]

DETAILED STEPS

Command or Action

Step 1 terminal history[sizenumber-of-lines]

Example:

Switch# terminal history size 200

Purpose

Changes the number of command lines that the switch records during the current terminal session in the privileged EXEC mode. You can configure the size from 0 through 256.

Recalling Commands

To recall commands from the history buffer, perform one of the actions listed in this table. These actions are optional.

Note The arrow keys function only onANSI-compatibleterminals such as VT100s.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.Ctrl-Por use the up arrowkey

2.Ctrl-Nor use the down arrowkey

3.show history

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

Ctrl-Por use the up arrowkey

Recalls commands in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent command.

 

 

Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.

Step 2

Ctrl-Nor use the down arrowkey

Returns to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands

 

 

with Ctrl-P or the up arrow key. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively

 

 

more recent commands.

 

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Enabling and Disabling Editing Features

 

Command or Action

Step 3

show history

 

Example:

Purpose

Lists the last several commands that you just entered in privileged EXEC mode. The number of commands that appear is controlled by the setting of the terminal history global configuration command and thehistory line configuration

Switch# show history

command.

Disabling the Command History Feature

The command history feature is automatically enabled. You can disable it for the current terminal session or for the command line. This procedure is optional.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. terminal no history

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

terminal no history

Disables the feature during the current terminal session in the

 

 

privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# terminal no history

 

Enabling and Disabling Editing Features

Although enhanced editing mode is automatically enabled, you can disable it, and reenable it.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.terminal editing

2.terminal no editing

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

terminal editing

Reenables the enhanced editing mode for the current terminal

 

 

session in the privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# terminal editing

 

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Enabling and Disabling Editing Features

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 2

terminal no editing

Disables the enhanced editing mode for the current terminal session

 

 

in the privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# terminal no editing

 

Editing Commands through Keystrokes

The keystrokes help you to edit the command lines. These keystrokes are optional.

Note The arrow keys function only onANSI-compatibleterminals such as VT100s.

Table 3: Editing Commands

 

Editing Commands

Description

Ctrl-Bor use the left arrowkey

Moves the cursor back one character.

Ctrl-For use the right arrowkey

Moves the cursor forward one character.

Ctrl-A

Moves the cursor to the beginning of the command

 

line.

Ctrl-E

Moves the cursor to the end of the command line.

Esc B

Moves the cursor back one word.

Esc F

Moves the cursor forward one word.

Ctrl-T

Transposes the character to the left of the cursor with

 

the character located at the cursor.

Delete or Backspacekey

Erases the character to the left of the cursor.

Ctrl-D

Deletes the character at the cursor.

Ctrl-K

Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of

 

the command line.

Ctrl-Uor Ctrl-X

Deletes all characters from the cursor to the beginning

 

of the command line.

Ctrl-W

Deletes the word to the left of the cursor.

 

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Enabling and Disabling Editing Features

Esc D

Deletes from the cursor to the end of the word.

Esc C

Capitalizes at the cursor.

Esc L

Changes the word at the cursor to lowercase.

Esc U

Capitalizes letters from the cursor to the end of the

 

word.

 

Ctrl-Vor Esc Q

Designates a particular keystroke as an executable

 

command, perhaps as a shortcut.

Return key

Scrolls down a line or screen on displays that are

 

longer than the terminal screen can display.

 

Note

The More prompt is used for any output that

 

 

has more lines than can be displayed on the

 

 

terminal screen, including show command

 

 

output. You can use the Return andSpace

 

 

bar keystrokes whenever you see the More

 

 

prompt.

Space bar

Scrolls down one screen.

Ctrl-Lor Ctrl-R

Redisplays the current command line if the switch

 

suddenly sends a message to your screen.

Editing Command Lines That Wrap

You can use a wraparound feature for commands that extend beyond a single line on the screen. When the cursor reaches the right margin, the command line shifts ten spaces to the left. You cannot see the first ten characters of the line, but you can scroll back and check the syntax at the beginning of the command. The keystroke actions are optional.

To scroll back to the beginning of the command entry, press Ctrl-B or the left arrow key repeatedly. You can also pressCtrl-A to immediately move to the beginning of the line.

Note The arrow keys function only onANSI-compatibleterminals such as VT100s.

The following example shows how to wrap a command line that extend beyond a single line on the screen.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.access-list

2.Ctrl-A

3.Return key

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Searching and Filtering Output of show and more Commands

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

access-list

Displays the global configuration command entry that extends beyond

 

 

one line.

Example:

Switch(config)# access-list101 permit tcp

10.15.22.25 255.255.255.0 10.15.22.35

Switch(config)# $ 101 permit tcp

10.15.22.25 255.255.255.0 10.15.22.35 255.25

Switch(config)# $t tcp 10.15.22.25

255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.255.255.0 eq

Switch(config)# $15.22.25 255.255.255.0

10.15.22.35 255.255.255.0 eq 45

When the cursor first reaches the end of the line, the line is shifted ten spaces to the left and redisplayed. The dollar sign ($) shows that the line has been scrolled to the left. Each time the cursor reaches the end of the line, the line is again shifted ten spaces to the left.

Step 2

Ctrl-A

Example:

Switch(config)# access-list101 permit tcp

10.15.22.25 255.255.255.0 10.15.2$

Checks the complete syntax.

The dollar sign ($) appears at the end of the line to show that the line has been scrolled to the right.

Step 3

Return key

Execute the commands.

The software assumes that you have a terminal screen that is 80 columns wide. If you have a different width, use the terminal width privileged EXEC command to set the width of your terminal.

Use line wrapping with the command history feature to recall and modify previous complex command entries.

Searching and Filtering Output of show and more Commands

You can search and filter the output for show andmore commands. This is useful when you need to sort through large amounts of output or if you want to exclude output that you do not need to see. Using these commands is optional.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. {show| more} command | {begin| include| exclude} regular-expression

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

{show| more} command | {begin| include| exclude}

Searches and filters the output.

 

regular-expression

 

 

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Accessing the CLI through a Console Connection or through Telnet

Command or Action

Example:

Switch# show interfaces | include protocol

Vlan1 is up, line protocol is up Vlan10 is up, line protocol is down

GigabitEthernet1/0/1 is up, line protocol is down GigabitEthernet1/0/2 is up, line protocol is up

Purpose

Expressions are case sensitive. For example, if you enter | exclude output, the lines that containoutput are not displayed, but the lines that containoutput appear.

Accessing the CLI through a Console Connection or through Telnet

Before you can access the CLI, you must connect a terminal or a PC to the switch console or connect a PC to the Ethernet management port and then power on the switch, as described in the hardware installation guide that shipped with your switch.

If your switch is already configured, you can access the CLI through a local console connection or through a remote Telnet session, but your switch must first be configured for this type of access.

You can use one of these methods to establish a connection with the switch:

Connect the switch console port to a management station or dial-upmodem, or connect the Ethernet management port to a PC. For information about connecting to the console or Ethernet management port, see the switch hardware installation guide.

Use any Telnet TCP/IP or encrypted Secure Shell (SSH) package from a remote management station. The switch must have network connectivity with the Telnet or SSH client, and the switch must have an enable secret password configured.

The switch supports up to 16 simultaneous Telnet sessions. Changes made by one Telnet user are reflected in all other Telnet sessions.

The switch supports up to five simultaneous secure SSH sessions.

After you connect through the console port, through the Ethernet management port, through a Telnet session or through an SSH session, the user EXEC prompt appears on the management station.

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Using the Command-LineInterface

Accessing the CLI through a Console Connection or through Telnet

 

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C H A P T E R 2

Configuring Interface Characteristics

This module contains the following topics:

Finding Feature Information, page 13

Information About Configuring Interface Characteristics, page 13

How to Configure Interface Characteristics, page 23

Monitoring Interface Characteristics, page 34

Configuration Examples for Interface Characteristics, page 36

Additional References for the Interface Characteristics Feature, page 38

Feature History and Information for Configuring Interface Characteristics, page 39

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About Configuring Interface Characteristics

Interface Types

This section describes the different types of interfaces supported by the switch. The rest of the chapter describes configuration procedures for physical interface characteristics.

Note The stack ports on the rear of thestacking-capableswitches are not Ethernet ports and cannot be configured.

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Interface Types

Port-BasedVLANs

A VLAN is a switched network that is logically segmented by function, team, or application, without regard to the physical location of the users. Packets received on a port are forwarded only to ports that belong to the same VLAN as the receiving port. Network devices in different VLANs cannot communicate with one another without a Layer 3 device to route traffic between the VLANs.

VLAN partitions provide hard firewalls for traffic in the VLAN, and each VLAN has its own MAC address table. A VLAN comes into existence when a local port is configured to be associated with the VLAN, when the VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) learns of its existence from a neighbor on a trunk, or when a user creates a VLAN. VLANs can be formed with ports across the stack.

To configure VLANs, use the vlan vlan-id global configuration command to enter VLAN configuration mode. The VLAN configurations fornormal-rangeVLANs (VLAN IDs 1 to 1005) are saved in the VLAN database. If VTP is version 1 or 2, to configureextended-rangeVLANs (VLAN IDs 1006 to 4094), you must first set VTP mode to transparent.Extended-rangeVLANs created in transparent mode are not added to the VLAN database but are saved in the switch running configuration. With VTP version 3, you can createextended-rangeVLANs in client or server mode. These VLANs are saved in the VLAN database.

In a switch stack, the VLAN database is downloaded to all switches in a stack, and all switches in the stack build the same VLAN database. The running configuration and the saved configuration are the same for all switches in a stack.

Add ports to a VLAN by using the switchport interface configuration commands:

Identify the interface.

For a trunk port, set trunk characteristics, and, if desired, define the VLANs to which it can belong.

For an access port, set and define the VLAN to which it belongs.

Switch Ports

Switch ports are Layer 2-onlyinterfaces associated with a physical port. Switch ports belong to one or more VLANs. A switch port can be an access port or a trunk port. You can configure a port as an access port or trunk port or let the Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) operate on aper-portbasis to set the switchport mode by negotiating with the port on the other end of the link. Switch ports are used for managing the physical interface and associated Layer 2 protocols and do not handle routing or bridging.

Configure switch ports by using the switchport interface configuration commands.

Access Ports

An access port belongs to and carries the traffic of only one VLAN (unless it is configured as a voice VLAN port). Traffic is received and sent in native formats with no VLAN tagging. Traffic arriving on an access port is assumed to belong to the VLAN assigned to the port. If an access port receives a tagged packet (Inter-SwitchLink [ISL] or IEEE 802.1Q tagged), the packet is dropped, and the source address is not learned.

Two types of access ports are supported:

Static access ports are manually assigned to a VLAN (or through a RADIUS server for use with IEEE 802.1x.

VLAN membership of dynamic access ports is learned through incoming packets. By default, a dynamic access port is not a member of any VLAN, and forwarding to and from the port is enabled only when

 

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Interface Types

the VLAN membership of the port is discovered. Dynamic access ports on the switch are assigned to a VLAN by a VLAN Membership Policy Server (VMPS). The VMPS can be a Catalyst 6500 series switch; the switch cannot be a VMPS server.

You can also configure an access port with an attached Cisco IP Phone to use one VLAN for voice traffic and another VLAN for data traffic from a device attached to the phone.

Trunk Ports

A trunk port carries the traffic of multiple VLANs and by default is a member of all VLANs in the VLAN database.

The switch supports only IEEE 802.1Q trunk ports. An IEEE 802.1Q trunk port supports simultaneous tagged and untagged traffic. An IEEE 802.1Q trunk port is assigned a default port VLAN ID (PVID), and all untagged traffic travels on the port default PVID. All untagged traffic and tagged traffic with a NULL VLAN ID are assumed to belong to the port default PVID. A packet with a VLAN ID equal to the outgoing port default PVID is sent untagged. All other traffic is sent with a VLAN tag.

Although by default, a trunk port is a member of every VLAN known to the VTP, you can limit VLAN membership by configuring an allowed list of VLANs for each trunk port. The list of allowed VLANs does not affect any other port but the associated trunk port. By default, all possible VLANs (VLAN ID 1 to 4094) are in the allowed list. A trunk port can become a member of a VLAN only if VTP knows of the VLAN and if the VLAN is in the enabled state. If VTP learns of a new, enabled VLAN and the VLAN is in the allowed list for a trunk port, the trunk port automatically becomes a member of that VLAN and traffic is forwarded to and from the trunk port for that VLAN. If VTP learns of a new, enabled VLAN that is not in the allowed list for a trunk port, the port does not become a member of the VLAN, and no traffic for the VLAN is forwarded to or from the port.

Switch Virtual Interfaces

A switch virtual interface (SVI) represents a VLAN of switch ports as one interface to the routing or bridging function in the system. You can associate only one SVI with a VLAN. You configure an SVI for a VLAN only to route between VLANs or to provide IP host connectivity to the switch. By default, an SVI is created for the default VLAN (VLAN 1) to permit remote switch administration. Additional SVIs must be explicitly configured.

Note You cannot delete interface VLAN 1.

SVIs provide IP host connectivity only to the system.

Although the switch stack or switch supports a total of 1005 VLANs and SVIs, the interrelationship between the number of SVIs and routed ports and the number of other features being configured might impact CPU performance because of hardware limitations.

SVIs are created the first time that you enter the vlan interface configuration command for a VLAN interface. The VLAN corresponds to the VLAN tag associated with data frames on an ISL or IEEE 802.1Q encapsulated trunk or the VLAN ID configured for an access port. Configure a VLAN interface for each VLAN for which you want to route traffic, and assign it an IP address.

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Interface Types

Note When you create an SVI, it does not become active until it is associated with a physical port.

SVI Autostate Exclude

The line state of an SVI with multiple ports on a VLAN is in the up state when it meets these conditions:

The VLAN exists and is active in the VLAN database on the switch

The VLAN interface exists and is not administratively down.

At least one Layer 2 (access or trunk) port exists, has a link in the up state on this VLAN, and is in thespanning-treeforwarding state on the VLAN.

Note The protocol link state for VLAN interfaces come up when the first switchport belonging to the corresponding VLAN link comes up and is in STP forwarding state.

The default action, when a VLAN has multiple ports, is that the SVI goes down when all ports in the VLAN go down. You can use the SVI autostate exclude feature to configure a port so that it is not included in the SVI line-stateup-or-downcalculation. For example, if the only active port on the VLAN is a monitoring port, you might configure autostate exclude on that port so that the VLAN goes down when all other ports go down. When enabled on a port,autostate exclude applies to all VLANs that are enabled on that port.

The VLAN interface is brought up when one Layer 2 port in the VLAN has had time to converge (transition from STP listening-learningstate to forwarding state). This prevents features such as routing protocols from using the VLAN interface as if it were fully operational and minimizes other problems, such as routing black holes.

EtherChannel Port Groups

EtherChannel port groups treat multiple switch ports as one switch port. These port groups act as a single logical port for high-bandwidthconnections between switches or between switches and servers. An EtherChannel balances the traffic load across the links in the channel. If a link within the EtherChannel fails, traffic previously carried over the failed link changes to the remaining links. You can group multiple trunk ports into one logical trunk port or multiple access ports into one logical access port. Most protocols operate over either single ports or aggregated switch ports and do not recognize the physical ports within the port group. Exceptions are the DTP, the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP), and the Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP), which operate only on physical ports.

When you configure an EtherChannel, you create a port-channellogical interface and assign an interface to the EtherChannel. For Layer 2 interfaces, use thechannel-group interface configuration command to dynamically create theport-channellogical interface. This command binds the physical and logical ports together.

Power over Ethernet Ports

A PoE-capableswitch port automatically supplies power to one of these connected devices if the switch senses that there is no power on the circuit:

 

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Using the Switch USB Ports

a Cisco pre-standardpowered device (such as a Cisco IP Phone or a Cisco Aironet Access Point)

an IEEE 802.3af-compliantpowered device

an IEEE 802.3at-compliantpowered device

A powered device can receive redundant power when it is connected to a PoE switch port and to an AC power source. The device does not receive redundant power when it is only connected to the PoE port.

After the switch detects a powered device, the switch determines the device power requirements and then grants or denies power to the device. The switch can also sense the real-timepower consumption of the device by monitoring and policing the power usage.

Using the Switch USB Ports

The switch has three USB ports on the front panel a USBmini-TypeB console port and two USB Type A ports.

USB Mini-TypeB Console Port

The switch has the following console ports available on its front panel:

USB mini-TypeB console connection

RJ-45console port

Console output appears on devices connected to both ports, but console input is active on only one port at a time. By default, the USB connector takes precedence over the RJ-45connector.

Note Windows PCs require a driver for the USB port. See the hardware installation guide for driver installation instructions.

Use the supplied USB Type A-to-USBmini-TypeB cable to connect a PC or other device to the switch. The connected device must include a terminal emulation application. When the switch detects a valid USB connection to apowered-ondevice that supports host functionality (such as a PC), input from theRJ-45console is immediately disabled, and input from the USB console is enabled. Removing the USB connection immediately reenables input from theRJ-45console connection. An LED on the switch shows which console connection is in use.

Console Port Change Logs

At software startup, a log shows whether the USB or the RJ-45console is active. Each switch in a stack issues this log. Every switch always first displays theRJ-45media type.

In the sample output, switch 1 has a connected USB console cable. Because the bootloader did not change to the USB console, the first log from switch 1 shows the RJ-45console. A short time later, the console changes and the USB console log appears. Switch 2 and switch 3 have connectedRJ-45console cables.

switch-stack-1

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Interface Connections

*Mar 1 00:01:00.171: %USB_CONSOLE-6-MEDIA_RJ45:Consolemedia-typeis RJ45. *Mar 1 00:01:00.431:%USB_CONSOLE-6-MEDIA_USB:Consolemedia-typeis USB.

switch-stack-2

*Mar 1 00:01:09.835: %USB_CONSOLE-6-MEDIA_RJ45:Consolemedia-typeis RJ45.

switch-stack-3

*Mar 1 00:01:10.523: %USB_CONSOLE-6-MEDIA_RJ45:Consolemedia-typeis RJ45.

When the USB cable is removed or the PC de-activatesthe USB connection, the hardware automatically changes to theRJ-45console interface:

switch-stack-1

Mar 1 00:20:48.635: %USB_CONSOLE-6-MEDIA_RJ45:Consolemedia-typeis RJ45.

You can configure the console type to always be RJ-45,and you can configure an inactivity timeout for the USB connector.

USB Type A Ports

The USB Type A ports provide access to external USB flash devices, also known as thumb drives or USB keys. The switch supports Cisco 64 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB and 1 GB flash drives. You can use standard Cisco IOS commandline interface (CLI) commands to read, write, erase, and copy to or from the flash device. You can also configure the switch to boot from the USB flash drive.

For information about configuring the switch to boot from a USB flash drive, refer to the Catalyst 2960-X Switch System Management Configuration Guide.

For information about reading, writing, erasing, and copying files to or from the flash device, refer to the

Catalyst 2960-XSwitch Managing Cisco IOS Image Files Configuration Guide.

Interface Connections

Devices within a single VLAN can communicate directly through any switch. Ports in different VLANs cannot exchange data without going through a routing device.

 

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Interface Configuration Mode

In the following configuration example, when Host A in VLAN 20 sends data to Host B in VLAN 30, the data must go from Host A to the switch, to the router, back to the switch, and then to Host B.

Figure 1: Connecting VLANs with the Switch

With a standard Layer 2 switch, ports in different VLANs have to exchange information through a router.

Interface Configuration Mode

The switch supports these interface types:

Physical portsswitchports and routed ports

VLANsswitchvirtual interfaces

Port channelsEtherChannelinterfaces

You can also configure a range of interfaces.

To configure a physical interface (port), specify the interface type, stack member number, module number, and switch port number, and enter interface configuration mode.

TypeGigabitEthernet (gigabitethernet or gi) for 10/100/1000 Mb/s Ethernet ports, or smallform-factorpluggable (SFP) module Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (gigabitethernet or gi).

Stack member numberThenumber that identifies the switch within the stack. The range is 1 to 8 for a stack of Catalyst2960-Xswitches, and 1 to 4 for a mixed stack of Catalyst2960-Xand Catalyst2960-Sswitches. The switch number is assigned the first time the switch initializes. The default switch number, before it is integrated into a switch stack, is 1. When a switch has been assigned a stack member number, it keeps that number until another is assigned to it.

You can use the switch port LEDs in Stack mode to identify the stack member number of a switch.

Module numberThemodule or slot number on the switch (always 0).

Port numberTheinterface number on the switch. The 10/100/1000 port numbers always begin at 1, starting with the far left port when facing the front of the switch, for example, gigabitethernet1/0/1 or

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Default Ethernet Interface Configuration

gigabitethernet1/0/8. For a switch with 10/100/1000 ports and SFP module ports, SFP module ports are numbered consecutively following the 10/100/1000 ports.

You can identify physical interfaces by physically checking the interface location on the switch. You can also use the show privileged EXEC commands to display information about a specific interface or all the interfaces on the switch. The remainder of this chapter primarily provides physical interface configuration procedures.

These are examples of how to identify interfaces on a stacking-capableswitch:

To configure 10/100/1000 port 4 on a standalone switch, enter this command:

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/4

To configure 10/100/1000 port 4 on stack member 3, enter this command:

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet3/0/4

Default Ethernet Interface Configuration

This table shows the Ethernet interface default configuration, including some features that apply only to Layer 2 interfaces.

Table 4: Default Layer 2 Ethernet Interface Configuration

Feature

Operating mode

Allowed VLAN range

Default VLAN (for access ports)

Native VLAN (for IEEE 802.1Q trunks)

802.1p priority-taggedtraffic

VLAN trunking

Port enable state

Port description

Speed

Duplex mode

Flow control

Default Setting

Layer 2 or switching mode (switchport command).

VLANs 14094.

VLAN 1.

VLAN 1.

Drop all packets tagged with VLAN 0.

Switchport mode dynamic auto (supports DTP).

All ports are enabled.

None defined.

Autonegotiate. (Not supported on the 10-Gigabitinterfaces.)

Autonegotiate. (Not supported on the 10-Gigabitinterfaces.)

Flow control is set to receive: off. It is always off for sent packets.

 

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Interface Speed and Duplex Mode

Feature

EtherChannel (PAgP)

Port blocking (unknown multicast and unknown unicast traffic)

Broadcast, multicast, and unicast storm control

Protected port

Port security

Port Fast

Auto-MDIX

Power over Ethernet (PoE)

Keepalive messages

Default Setting

Disabled on all Ethernet ports.

Disabled (not blocked).

Disabled.

Disabled.

Disabled.

Disabled.

Enabled.

Note The switch might not support apre-standardpowereddevicesuchas Cisco IP phones and access points that do not fully support IEEE802.3afifthat powered device is connected to the switch through a crossover cable. This is regardless of whetherauto-MIDXis enabled on the switch port.

Enabled (auto).

Disabled on SFP module ports; enabled on all other ports.

Interface Speed and Duplex Mode

Ethernet interfaces on the switch operate at 10, 100, or 1000 Mb/s and in either fullor half-duplexmode. Infull-duplexmode, two stations can send and receive traffic at the same time. Normally,10-Mb/sports operate inhalf-duplexmode, which means that stations can either receive or send traffic.

Switch models include Gigabit Ethernet (10/100/1000-Mb/s)ports and smallform-factorpluggable (SFP) module slots supporting SFP modules.

Speed and Duplex Configuration Guidelines

When configuring an interface speed and duplex mode, note these guidelines:

Gigabit Ethernet (10/100/1000-Mb/s)ports support all speed options and all duplex options (auto, half, and full). However, Gigabit Ethernet ports operating at 1000 Mb/s do not supporthalf-duplexmode.

For SFP module ports, the speed and duplex CLI options change depending on the SFP module type:

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IEEE 802.3x Flow Control

The1000BASE-x (where-x is-BX,-CWDM,-LX,-SX,and-ZX)SFP module ports support thenonegotiate keyword in thespeed interface configuration command. Duplex options are not supported.

The1000BASE-TSFP module ports support the same speed and duplex options as the10/100/1000-Mb/sports.

For information about which SFP modules are supported on your switch, see the product release notes.

If both ends of the line support autonegotiation, we highly recommend the default setting of auto negotiation.

If one interface supports autonegotiation and the other end does not, configure duplex and speed on both interfaces; do not use the auto setting on the supported side.

When STP is enabled and a port is reconfigured, the switch can take up to 30 seconds to check for loops. The port LED is amber while STP reconfigures.

Caution Changing the interface speed and duplex mode configuration might shut down andre-enablethe interface during the reconfiguration.

IEEE 802.3x Flow Control

Flow control enables connected Ethernet ports to control traffic rates during congestion by allowing congested nodes to pause link operation at the other end. If one port experiences congestion and cannot receive any more traffic, it notifies the other port by sending a pause frame to stop sending until the condition clears. Upon receipt of a pause frame, the sending device stops sending any data packets, which prevents any loss of data packets during the congestion period.

Note The switch ports can receive, but not send, pause frames.

You use the flowcontrol interface configuration command to set the interfaces ability toreceive pause frames toon,off, ordesired. The default state isoff.

When set to desired, an interface can operate with an attached device that is required to sendflow-controlpackets or with an attached device that is not required to but can sendflow-controlpackets.

These rules apply to flow control settings on the device:

receive on (ordesired): The port cannot send pause frames but can operate with an attached device that is required to or can send pause frames; the port can receive pause frames.

receive off: Flow control does not operate in either direction. In case of congestion, no indication is given to the link partner, and no pause frames are sent or received by either device.

Note For details on the command settings and the resulting flow control resolution on local and remote ports, see theflowcontrol interface configuration command in the command reference for this release.

 

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How to Configure Interface Characteristics

How to Configure Interface Characteristics

Configuring Interfaces Procedure

These general instructions apply to all interface configuration processes.

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

 

Step 1

Enter the configure terminal command at the privileged EXEC

 

 

 

prompt:

 

 

 

Example:

 

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

 

 

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with

 

 

 

CNTL/Z.

 

 

 

Switch(config)#

 

 

Step 2

Enter the interface global configuration command. Identify the

Note

You do not need to add a space between the

 

interface type, the switch number (only on stacking-capable

 

interface type and the interface number. For

 

switches), and the number of the connector. In this example,

 

example, in the preceding line, you can specify

 

Gigabit Ethernet port 1 on switch 1 is selected:

 

either gigabitethernet 1/0/1,

 

 

 

gigabitethernet1/0/1, gi 1/0/1, or gi1/0/1.

 

Example:

 

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

 

 

 

Switch(config-if)#

 

 

Step 3 Follow eachinterface command with the interface configuration commands that the interface requires. The commands that you enter define the protocols and applications that will run on the interface. The commands are collected and applied to the interface when you enter another interface command or enterend to return to privileged EXEC mode.

You can also configure a range of interfaces by using the interface range orinterface range macro global configuration commands. Interfaces configured in a range must be the same type and must be configured with the same feature options.

Step 4 After you configure an interface, verify its status by using theshow privileged EXEC commands.

Example:

Enter the show interfaces privileged EXEC command to see a list of all interfaces on or configured for the switch. A report is provided for each interface that the device supports or for the specified interface.

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Adding a Description for an Interface

Adding a Description for an Interface

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.description string

4.end

5.show interfaces interface-id description

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies the interface for which you are adding a

 

 

description, and enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/2

 

Step 3

description string

Adds a description (up to 240 characters) for an

 

 

interface.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)# description Connects to

 

 

Marketing

 

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)#end

 

Step 5

show interfaces interface-id description

Verifies your entry.

 

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Configuring a Range of Interfaces

Configuring a Range of Interfaces

To configure multiple interfaces with the same configuration parameters, use the interface range global configuration command. When you enter theinterface-rangeconfiguration mode, all command parameters that you enter are attributed to all interfaces within that range until you exit this mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface range {port-range | macromacro_name}

3.end

4.show interfaces [interface-id]

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2 interface range{port-range | macromacro_name}

Example:

Switch(config)# interface range macro

Step 3

end

Specifies the range of interfaces (VLANs or physical ports) to be configured, and enter interface-rangeconfiguration mode.

You can use the interface range command to configure up to five port ranges or a previously defined macro.

The macro variable is explained in theConfiguring and Using Interface Range Macros, on page 26.

In a comma-separatedport-range,you must enter the interface type for each entry and enter spaces before and after the comma.

In a hyphen-separatedport-range,you do not need tore-enterthe interface type, but you must enter a space before the hyphen.

Note Use the normal configuration commands to apply the configuration parameters to all interfaces in the range. Each command is executed as it is entered.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config)# end

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Configuring and Using Interface Range Macros

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 4

show interfaces [interface-id]

Verifies the configuration of the interfaces in the range.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# show interfaces

 

Configuring and Using Interface Range Macros

You can create an interface range macro to automatically select a range of interfaces for configuration. Before you can use the macro keyword in theinterface range macro global configuration command string, you must use thedefine interface-range global configuration command to define the macro.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.define interface-range macro_nameinterface-range

3.interface range macro macro_name

4.end

5.show running-config| include define

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

define interface-rangemacro_name

 

interface-range

Example:

Switch(config)# defineinterface-rangeenet_list gigabitethernet1/0/1 - 2

Defines the interface-rangemacro, and save it in NVRAM.

The macro_name is a32-charactermaximum character string.

A macro can contain up to five comma-separatedinterface ranges.

Each interface-range must consist of the same port type.

Note Before you can use themacro keyword in theinterface range macro global configuration command string, you must usethedefineinterface-range globalconfigurationcommand to define the macro.

 

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Configuring Ethernet Interfaces

 

Command or Action

Step 3

interface range macro macro_name

Example:

Switch(config)# interface range macro enet_list

Step 4

end

Example:

Switch(config)# end

Purpose

Selects the interface range to be configured using the values saved in the interface-rangemacro calledmacro_name.

You can now use the normal configuration commands to apply the configuration to all interfaces in the defined macro.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 5

show running-config| include define

Shows the defined interface range macro configuration.

Example:

Switch# showrunning-config| include define

Configuring Ethernet Interfaces

Setting the Interface Speed and Duplex Parameters

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.speed {10| 100| 1000| auto[10| 100| 1000] | nonegotiate}

4.duplex {auto| full| half}

5.end

6.show interfaces interface-id

7.copy running-configstartup-config

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Configuring Interface Characteristics

Configuring Ethernet Interfaces

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

 

Switch# configure terminal

Step 2

interface interface-id

 

Example:

 

Switch(config)# interface

 

gigabitethernet1/0/3

Step 3

speed {10| 100| 1000| auto[10| 100|

 

1000] | nonegotiate}

 

Example:

 

Switch(config-if)#speed 10

Step 4

duplex {auto| full| half}

Example:

Switch(config-if)#duplex half

Step 5

end

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Purpose

Enters global configuration mode.

Specifies the physical interface to be configured, and enter interface configuration mode.

This command is not available on a 10-GigabitEthernet interface.

Enter the appropriate speed parameter for the interface:

Enter 10,100, or1000 to set a specific speed for the interface. The1000 keyword is available only for 10/100/1000 Mb/s ports.

Enter auto to enable the interface to autonegotiate speed with the connected device. If you use the10,100, or the1000 keywords with theauto keyword, the port autonegotiates only at the specified speeds.

The nonegotiate keyword is available only for SFP module ports. SFP module ports operate only at 1000 Mb/s but can be configured to not negotiate if connected to a device that does not support autonegotiation.

This command is not available on a 10-GigabitEthernet interface.

Enter the duplex parameter for the interface.

Enable half-duplexmode (for interfaces operating only at 10 or 100 Mb/s). You cannot configurehalf-duplexmode for interfaces operating at 1000 Mb/s.

You can configure the duplex setting when the speed is set to auto.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 6

show interfaces interface-id

Displays the interface speed and duplex mode configuration.

Example:

Switch# show interfaces

 

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Configuring IEEE 802.3x Flow Control

 

Command or Action

Purpose

 

gigabitethernet1/0/3

 

Step 7

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# copyrunning-config

 

 

startup-config

 

Configuring IEEE 802.3x Flow Control

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.flowcontrol {receive} {on| off| desired}

4.end

5.show interfaces interface-id

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies the physical interface to be configured, and

 

 

enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

 

Step 3

flowcontrol {receive} {on| off| desired}

Configures the flow control mode for the port.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)# flowcontrol receive on

 

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Configuring Interface Characteristics

Configuring SVI Autostate Exclude

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Step 5

show interfaces interface-id

Verifies the interface flow control settings.

Example:

Switch# show interfaces gigabitethernet1/0/1

Configuring SVI Autostate Exclude

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.switchport autostate exclude

4.end

5.show running config interface interface-id

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies a Layer 2 interface (physical port or port channel),

 

 

and enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/2

 

 

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Shutting Down and Restarting the Interface

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 3

switchport autostate exclude

Excludes the access or trunk port when defining the status

 

 

of an SVI line state (up or down)

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)# switchport autostate

 

 

exclude

 

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Step 5

show running config interface interface-id

(Optional) Shows the running configuration.

Verifies the configuration.

Shutting Down and Restarting the Interface

Shutting down an interface disables all functions on the specified interface and marks the interface as unavailable on all monitoring command displays. This information is communicated to other network servers through all dynamic routing protocols. The interface is not mentioned in any routing updates.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface {vlanvlan-id} | {gigabitethernetinterface-id} | {port-channelport-channel-number}

3.shutdown

4.no shutdown

5.end

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface {vlanvlan-id} | {gigabitethernetinterface-id} |

Selects the interface to be configured.

 

{port-channel port-channel-number}

 

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Configuring the Console Media Type

Command or Action

Purpose

Example:

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/2

Step 3

shutdown

Shuts down an interface.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#shutdown

Step 4

no shutdown

Restarts an interface.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 5

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Configuring the Console Media Type

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to set the console media type to RJ-45.If you configure the console asRJ-45,USB console operation is disabled, and input comes only through theRJ-45connector.

This configuration applies to all switches in a stack.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.line console 0

3.media-typerj45

4.end

 

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Configuring the USB Inactivity Timeout

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters the global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

line console 0

Configures the console and enters line configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# line console 0

 

Step 3

media-typerj45

Configures the console media type to be only RJ-45port. If

 

 

you do not enter this command and both types are connected,

 

Example:

the USB port is used by default.

 

Switch(config-line)#media-type rj45

 

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# end

 

Configuring the USB Inactivity Timeout

The configurable inactivity timeout reactivates the RJ-45console port if the USB console port is activated but no input activity occurs on it for a specified time period. When the USB console port is deactivated due to a timeout, you can restore its operation by disconnecting and reconnecting the USB cable.

Note The configured inactivity timeout applies to all switches in a stack. However, a timeout on one switch does not cause a timeout on other switches in the stack.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure an inactivity timeout.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.line console 0

3.usb-inactivity-timeouttimeout-minutes

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Monitoring Interface Characteristics

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters the global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

line console 0

Configures the console and enters line configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# line console 0

 

Step 3

usb-inactivity-timeouttimeout-minutes

Specify an inactivity timeout for the console port. The range

 

 

is 1 to 240 minutes. The default is to have no timeout

 

Example:

configured.

 

Switch(config-line)# usb-inactivity-timeout30

 

Monitoring Interface Characteristics

Monitoring Interface Status

Commands entered at the privileged EXEC prompt display information about the interface, including the versions of the software and the hardware, the configuration, and statistics about the interfaces.

This table lists some of the available interface monitoring commands.

Table 5: Show Commands for Interfaces

 

Command

Purpose

show interfaces [interface-id]

Displays the status and configuration of all interfaces

 

or a specific interface.

show interfaces interface-id status[err-disabled]

Displays interface status or a list of interfaces in the

 

error-disabledstate.

show interfaces [interface-id] switchport

Displays administrative and operational status of

 

switching (nonrouting) ports. You can use this

 

command to find out if a port is in routing or in

 

switching mode.

 

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Clearing and Resetting Interfaces and Counters

Command

Purpose

show interfaces [interface-id] description

Displays the description configured on an interface

 

or all interfaces and the interface status.

show ip interface [interface-id]

Displays the usability status of all interfaces

 

configured for IP routing or the specified interface.

show interface [interface-id] stats

Displays the input and output packets by the switching

 

path for the interface.

show interfaces interface-id

(Optional) Displays speed and duplex on the interface.

show interfaces transceiver dom-supported-list

(Optional) Displays Digital Optical Monitoring

 

(DOM) status on the connect SFP modules.

show interfaces transceiver properties

(Optional) Displays temperature, voltage, or amount

 

of current on the interface.

show interfaces [interface-id] [{transceiver

Displays physical and operational status about an SFP

properties | detail}] module number]

module.

show running-configinterface[interface-id]

Displays the running configuration in RAM for the

 

interface.

show version

Displays the hardware configuration, software

 

version, the names and sources of configuration files,

 

and the boot images.

show controllers ethernet-controllerinterface-id

Displays the operational state of the auto-MDIX

phy

feature on the interface.

Clearing and Resetting Interfaces and Counters

Table 6: Clear Commands for Interfaces

 

Command

Purpose

clear counters [interface-id]

Clears interface counters.

clear interface interface-id

Resets the hardware logic on an interface.

clear line [number | console 0| vtynumber]

Resets the hardware logic on an asynchronous serial

 

line.

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Configuration Examples for Interface Characteristics

Note Theclear counters privileged EXEC command does not clear counters retrieved by using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), but only those seen with theshow interface privileged EXEC command.

Configuration Examples for Interface Characteristics

Adding a Description to an Interface: Example

Switch# configure terminal

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTRL/Z.

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/2

Switch(config-if)# description Connects to Marketing

Switch(config-if)#end

Switch# show interfaces gigabitethernet1/0/2 description

Interface

Status

Protocol

Description

Gi1/0/2

admin down

down

Connects to Marketing

Identifying Interfaces on a Stack-CapableSwitch: Examples

To configure 10/100/1000 port 4 on a standalone switch, enter this command:

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/4

Configuring a Range of Interfaces: Examples

This example shows how to use the interface range global configuration command to set the speed to 100 Mb/s on ports 1 to 4 on switch 1:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface range gigabitethernet1/0/1 - 4

Switch(config-if-range)#speed 100

This example shows how to use a comma to add different interface type strings to the range to enable Gigabit Ethernet ports 1 to 3 and 10-GigabitEthernet ports 1 and 2 to receiveflow-controlpause frames:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface range gigabitethernet1/0/1 - 3 , tengigabitethernet1/0/1 - 2

Switch(config-if-range)#flowcontrol receive on

If you enter multiple configuration commands while you are in interface-rangemode, each command is executed as it is entered. The commands are not batched and executed after you exitinterface-rangemode. If you exitinterface-rangeconfiguration mode while the commands are being executed, some commands might not be executed on all interfaces in the range. Wait until the command prompt reappears before exitinginterface-rangeconfiguration mode.

 

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Configuring and Using Interface Range Macros: Examples

Configuring and Using Interface Range Macros: Examples

This example shows how to define an interface-rangenamedenet_list to include ports 1 and 2 on switch 1 and to verify the macro configuration:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# defineinterface-rangeenet_list gigabitethernet1/0/1 - 2

Switch(config)# end

Switch# showrunning-config| include define

define interface-rangeenet_list GigabitEthernet1/0/1 - 2

This example shows how to create a multiple-interfacemacro namedmacro1:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# defineinterface-rangemacro1 gigabitethernet1/0/1 - 2, gigabitethernet1/0/5

- 7, tengigabitethernet1/0/1 -2

Switch(config)# end

This example shows how to enter interface-rangeconfiguration mode for theinterface-rangemacroenet_list:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface range macro enet_list

Switch(config-if-range)#

This example shows how to delete the interface-rangemacroenet_list and to verify that it was deleted.

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# no defineinterface-rangeenet_list

Switch(config)# end

Switch# show run | include define

Switch#

Setting Interface Speed and Duplex Mode: Example

This example shows how to set the interface speed to 100 Mb/s and the duplex mode to half on a 10/100/1000 Mb/s port:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/3

Switch(config-if)#speed 10

Switch(config-if)#duplex half

This example shows how to set the interface speed to 100 Mb/s on a 10/100/1000 Mb/s port:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/2

Switch(config-if)#speed 100

Configuring the Console Media Type: Example

This example disables the USB console media type and enables the RJ-45console media type.

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# line console 0

Switch(config-line)#media-type rj45

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Configuring the USB Inactivity Timeout: Example

This configuration terminates any active USB console media type in the stack. A log shows that this termination has occurred. This example shows that the console on switch 1 reverted to RJ-45.

*Mar 1 00:25:36.860: %USB_CONSOLE-6-CONFIG_DISABLE:Consolemedia-typeUSB disabled by system configuration,media-typereverted to RJ45.

At this point no switches in the stack allow a USB console to have input. A log entry shows when a console cable is attached. If a USB console cable is connected to switch 2, it is prevented from providing input.

*Mar 1 00:34:27.498: %USB_CONSOLE-6-CONFIG_DISALLOW:Consolemedia-typeUSB is disallowed by system configuration,media-typeremains RJ45.(switch-stk-2)

This example reverses the previous configuration and immediately activates any USB console that is connected.

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# line console 0

Switch(config-line)#no media-type rj45

Configuring the USB Inactivity Timeout: Example

This example configures the inactivity timeout to 30 minutes:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# line console 0

Switch(config-line)# usb-inactivity-timeout30

To disable the configuration, use these commands:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# line console 0

Switch(config-line)# nousb-inactivity-timeout

If there is no (input) activity on a USB console port for the configured number of minutes, the inactivity timeout setting applies to the RJ-45port, and a log shows this occurrence:

*Mar 1 00:47:25.625: %USB_CONSOLE-6-INACTIVITY_DISABLE:Consolemedia-typeUSB disabled due to inactivity,media-typereverted to RJ45.

At this point, the only way to reactivate the USB console port is to disconnect and reconnect the cable. When the USB cable on the switch has been disconnected and reconnected, a log similar to this appears:

*Mar 1 00:48:28.640: %USB_CONSOLE-6-MEDIA_USB:Consolemedia-typeis USB.

Additional References for the Interface Characteristics Feature

Standards and RFCs

 

Standard/RFC

Title

None

--

 

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Feature History and Information for Configuring Interface Characteristics

MIBs

 

MIB

MIBs Link

All supported MIBs for this release.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

 

Description

Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online

http://www.cisco.com/support

resources, including documentation and tools for

 

troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with

 

Cisco products and technologies.

 

To receive security and technical information about

 

your products, you can subscribe to various services,

 

such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field

 

Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter,

 

and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

 

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website

 

requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

 

Feature History and Information for Configuring Interface Characteristics

Release

Modification

Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2)EX

This feature was introduced.

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Feature History and Information for Configuring Interface Characteristics

 

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C H A P T E R 3

Configuring Auto-MDIX

This module contains the following sections:

Prerequisites for Auto-MDIX, page 41

Restrictions for Auto-MDIX, page 41

Information about Configuring Auto-MDIX, page 42

How to Configure Auto-MDIX, page 42

Monitoring Auto-MDIX, page 43

Example for Configuring Auto-MDIX, page 44

Prerequisites for Auto-MDIX

Automatic medium-dependentinterface crossover(auto-MDIX)is enabled by default. When you enableauto-MDIX,you must also set the interface speed and duplex toauto so that the feature operates correctly.

Auto-MDIXis supported on all10/100/1000-Mb/sand on10/100/1000BASE-TXsmallform-factorpluggable(SFP)-moduleinterfaces. It is not supported on1000BASE-SXor-LXSFP module interfaces.

Restrictions for Auto-MDIX

The switch might not support a pre-standardpowereddevicesuchas Cisco IP phones and access points that do not fully support IEEE802.3afifthat powered device is connected to the switch through a crossover cable. This is regardless of whetherauto-MIDXis enabled on the switch port.

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Configuring Auto-MDIX

Information about Configuring Auto-MDIX

Information about Configuring Auto-MDIX

Auto-MDIXon an Interface

When automatic medium-dependentinterface crossover(auto-MDIX)is enabled on an interface, the interface automatically detects the required cable connection type (straight through or crossover) and configures the connection appropriately. When connecting switches without theauto-MDIXfeature, you must usestraight-throughcables to connect to devices such as servers, workstations, or routers and crossover cables to connect to other switches or repeaters. Withauto-MDIXenabled, you can use either type of cable to connect to other devices, and the interface automatically corrects for any incorrect cabling. For more information about cabling requirements, see the hardware installation guide.

This table shows the link states that result from auto-MDIXsettings and correct and incorrect cabling.

Table 7: Link Conditions and Auto-MDIXSettings

 

 

Local Side Auto-MDIX

Remote Side Auto-MDIX

With Correct Cabling

With Incorrect Cabling

On

On

Link up

Link up

On

Off

Link up

Link up

Off

On

Link up

Link up

Off

Off

Link up

Link down

How to Configure Auto-MDIX

Configuring Auto-MDIXon an Interface

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.speed auto

4.duplex auto

5.mdix auto

6.end

 

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Monitoring Auto-MDIX

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies the physical interface to be configured, and enter

 

 

interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

 

Step 3

speed auto

Configures the interface to autonegotiate speed with the

 

 

connected device.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)#speed auto

 

Step 4

duplex auto

Configures the interface to autonegotiate duplex mode

 

 

with the connected device.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)#duplex auto

 

Step 5

mdix auto

Enables auto-MDIXon the interface.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)#mdix auto

 

Step 6

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)#end

 

Monitoring Auto-MDIX

Command

Purpose

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Configuring Auto-MDIX

Example for Configuring Auto-MDIX

show controllers ethernet-controllerinterface-id

Verifies the operational state of the auto-MDIX

phy

feature on the interface.

Example for Configuring Auto-MDIX

This example shows how to enable auto-MDIXon a port:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

Switch(config-if)#speed auto

Switch(config-if)#duplex auto

Switch(config-if)#mdix auto

Switch(config-if)#end

 

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C H A P T E R 4

Configuring Ethernet Management Port

This module contains the following sections:

Finding Feature Information, page 45

Prerequisites for Ethernet Management Ports, page 45

Information about the Ethernet Management Port, page 45

How to Configure the Ethernet Management Port, page 47

Additional References, page 48

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for Ethernet Management Ports

When connecting a PC to the Ethernet management port, you must first assign an IP address.

Information about the Ethernet Management Port

The Ethernet management port, also referred to as the Fa0 orfastethernet0 port, is a Layer 3 host port to which you can connect a PC. You can use the Ethernet management port instead of the switch console port for network management. When managing a switch stack, connect the PC to the Ethernet management port on a stack member.

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Configuring Ethernet Management Port

Ethernet Management Port Direct Connection to a Switch

Ethernet Management Port Direct Connection to a Switch

This figure displays how to connect the Ethernet management port to the PC for a switch or a standalone switch.

Figure 2: Connecting a Switch to a PC

Ethernet Management Port Connection to Stack Switches using a Hub

In a stack with only stack switches, all the Ethernet management ports on the stack members are connected to a hub to which the PC is connected. The active link is from the Ethernet management port on the stack masterthrough the hub, to the PC. If the active switch fails and a new active switch is elected, the active link is now from the Ethernet management port on the new active switch to the PC.

This figure displays how a PC uses a hub to connect to a switch stack.

Figure 3: Connecting a Switch Stack to a PC

Supported Features on the Ethernet Management Port

The Ethernet management port supports these features:

Express Setup (only in switch stacks)

Network Assistant

Telnet with passwords

 

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How to Configure the Ethernet Management Port

TFTP

Secure Shell (SSH)

DHCP-basedautoconfiguration

SMNP (only the ENTITY-MIBand theIF-MIB)

IP ping

Interface features

Speed10Mb/s, 100 Mb/s, and autonegotiation

DuplexmodeFull,half, and autonegotiation

Loopback detection

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP)

DHCP relay agent

IPv4 and IPv6 access control lists (ACLs)

Caution Before enabling a feature on the Ethernet management port, make sure that the feature is supported. If you try to configure an unsupported feature on the Ethernet Management port, the feature might not work properly, and the switch might fail.

How to Configure the Ethernet Management Port

Disabling and Enabling the Ethernet Management Port

To disable or enable the Ethernet management port in the CLI, follow this procedure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface fastethernet0

3.shutdown

4.no shutdown

5.exit

6.show interfaces fastethernet0

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Additional References

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface fastethernet0

Specifies the Ethernet management port in the CLI.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface fastethernet0

 

Step 3

shutdown

 

Example:

 

Switch(config-if)#shutdown

Step 4

no shutdown

 

Example:

 

Switch(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 5

exit

 

Example:

 

Switch(config-if)#exit

Step 6

show interfaces fastethernet0

 

Example:

 

Switch# show interfaces fastethernet0

Disables the Ethernet management port.

Enables the Ethernet management port.

Exits interface configuration mode.

Displays the link status.

To find out the link status to the PC, you can monitor the LED for the Ethernet management port. The LED is green (on) when the link is active, and the LED is off when the link is down. The LED is amber when there is a POST failure.

What to Do Next

Proceed to manage or configure your switch using the Ethernet management port. Refer to the Catalyst 2960-X Switch Network Management Configuration Guide.

Additional References

Related Documents

 

Related Topic

Document Title

Bootloader configuration

Catalyst 2960-XSwitch System Management

 

Configuration Guide

 

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Additional References

Related Topic

Bootloader commands

MIBs

MIB

All supported MIBs for this release.

Document Title

Catalyst 2960-XSwitch System Management

Configuration Guide

MIBs Link

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

 

Description

Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online

http://www.cisco.com/support

resources, including documentation and tools for

 

troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with

 

Cisco products and technologies.

 

To receive security and technical information about

 

your products, you can subscribe to various services,

 

such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field

 

Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter,

 

and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

 

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website

 

requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

 

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Configuring LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired

Location Service

This module contains the following sections:

Finding Feature Information, page 51

LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service Overview, page 51

How to Configure LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service, page 56

Configuration Examples for LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service, page 67

Monitoring and Maintaining LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service, page 68

Additional References for LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service, page 69

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service Overview

LLDP

The Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) is a device discovery protocol that runs over Layer 2 (the data link layer) on all Cisco-manufactureddevices (routers, bridges, access servers, and switches). CDP allows network management applications to automatically discover and learn about other Cisco devices connected to the network.

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LLDP-MED

To support non-Ciscodevices and to allow for interoperability between other devices, the switch supports the IEEE 802.1AB Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP). LLDP is a neighbor discovery protocol that is used for network devices to advertise information about themselves to other devices on the network. This protocol runs over thedata-linklayer, which allows two systems running different network layer protocols to learn about each other.

LLDP Supported TLVs

LLDP supports a set of attributes that it uses to discover neighbor devices. These attributes contain type, length, and value descriptions and are referred to as TLVs. LLDP supported devices can use TLVs to receive and send information to their neighbors. This protocol can advertise details such as configuration information, device capabilities, and device identity.

The switch supports these basic management TLVs. These are mandatory LLDP TLVs.

Port description TLV

System name TLV

System description TLV

System capabilities TLV

Management address TLV

These organizationally specific LLDP TLVs are also advertised to support LLDP-MED.

Port VLAN ID TLV (IEEE 802.1 organizationally specific TLVs)

MAC/PHY configuration/status TLV (IEEE 802.3 organizationally specific TLVs)

LLDP and Cisco Switch Stacks

A switch stack appears as a single switch in the network. Therefore, LLDP discovers the switch stack, not the individual stack members.

LLDP and Cisco Medianet

When you configure LLDP or CDP location information on a per-portbasis, remote devices can send Cisco Medianet location information to the switch. For information, go tohttp://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/ netmgmt/configuration/guide/nm_cdp_discover.html.

LLDP-MED

LLDP for Media Endpoint Devices (LLDP-MED)is an extension to LLDP that operates between endpoint devices such as IP phones and network devices such as switches. It specifically provides support for voice over IP (VoIP) applications and provides additional TLVs for capabilities discovery, network policy, Power over Ethernet, inventory management and location information. By default, allLLDP-MEDTLVs are enabled.

 

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LLDP-MED

LLDP-MEDSupported TLVs

LLDP-MEDsupports these TLVs:

LLDP-MEDcapabilities TLV

Allows LLDP-MEDendpoints to determine the capabilities that the connected device supports and has enabled.

Network policy TLV

Allows both network connectivity devices and endpoints to advertise VLAN configurations and associated Layer 2 and Layer 3 attributes for the specific application on that port. For example, the switch can notify a phone of the VLAN number that it should use. The phone can connect to any switch, obtain its VLAN number, and then start communicating with the call control.

By defining a network-policyprofile TLV, you can create a profile for voice andvoice-signalingby specifying the values for VLAN, class of service (CoS), differentiated services code point (DSCP), and tagging mode. These profile attributes are then maintained centrally on the switch and propagated to the phone.

Power management TLV

Enables advanced power management between LLDP-MEDendpoint and network connectivity devices. Allows switches and phones to convey power information, such as how the device is powered, power priority, and how much power the device needs.

LLDP-MEDalso supports an extended power TLV to advertisefine-grainedpower requirements,end-pointpower priority, andend-pointand networkconnectivity-devicepower status. LLDP is enabled and power is applied to a port, the power TLV determines the actual power requirement of the endpoint device so that the system power budget can be adjusted accordingly. The switch processes the requests and either grants or denies power based on the current power budget. If the request is granted, the switch updates the power budget. If the request is denied, the switch turns off power to the port, generates a syslog message, and updates the power budget. IfLLDP-MEDis disabled or if the endpoint does not support theLLDP-MEDpower TLV, the initial allocation value is used throughout the duration of the connection.

You can change power settings by entering the power inline {auto [max max-wattage]|never |static [max max-wattage]}interface configuration command. By default the PoE interface is inauto mode; If no value is specified, the maximum is allowed (30 W).

Inventory management TLV

Allows an endpoint to send detailed inventory information about itself to the switch, including information hardware revision, firmware version, software version, serial number, manufacturer name, model name, and asset ID TLV.

Location TLV

Provides location information from the switch to the endpoint device. The location TLV can send this information:

Civic location information

Provides the civic address information and postal information. Examples of civic location information are street address, road name, and postal community name information.

ELIN location information

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Wired Location Service

Provides the location information of a caller. The location is determined by the Emergency location identifier number (ELIN), which is a phone number that routes an emergency call to the local public safety answering point (PSAP) and which the PSAP can use to call back the emergency caller.

Geographic location information

Provides the geographical details of a switch location such as latitude, longitude, and altitude of a switch.

custom location

Provides customized name and value of a switch location.

Wired Location Service

The switch uses the location service feature to send location and attachment tracking information for its connected devices to a Cisco Mobility Services Engine (MSE). The tracked device can be a wireless endpoint, a wired endpoint, or a wired switch or controller. The switch notifies the MSE of device link up and link down events through the Network Mobility Services Protocol (NMSP) location and attachment notifications.

The MSE starts the NMSP connection to the switch, which opens a server port. When the MSE connects to the switch there are a set of message exchanges to establish version compatibility and service exchange information followed by location information synchronization. After connection, the switch periodically sends location and attachment notifications to the MSE. Any link up or link down events detected during an interval are aggregated and sent at the end of the interval.

When the switch determines the presence or absence of a device on a link-uporlink-downevent, it obtains theclient-specificinformation such as the MAC address, IP address, and username. If the client isLLDP-MED-orCDP-capable,the switch obtains the serial number and UDI through theLLDP-MEDlocation TLV or CDP.

Depending on the device capabilities, the switch obtains this client information at link up:

Slot and port specified in port connection

MAC address specified in the client MAC address

IP address specified in port connection

802.1X username if applicable

Device category is specified as a wired station

State is specified as new

Serial number, UDI

Model number

Time in seconds since the switch detected the association

Depending on the device capabilities, the switch obtains this client information at link down:

Slot and port that was disconnected

MAC address

 

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Default LLDP Configuration

IP address

802.1X username if applicable

Device category is specified as a wired station

State is specified as delete

Serial number, UDI

Time in seconds since the switch detected the disassociation

When the switch shuts down, it sends an attachment notification with the state delete and the IP address before closing the NMSP connection to the MSE. The MSE interprets this notification as disassociation for all the wired clients associated with the switch.

If you change a location address on the switch, the switch sends an NMSP location notification message that identifies the affected ports and the changed address information.

Default LLDP Configuration

Table 8: Default LLDP Configuration

Feature

LLDP global state

LLDP holdtime (before discarding)

LLDP timer (packet update frequency)

LLDP reinitialization delay

LLDP tlv-select

LLDP interface state

LLDP receive

LLDP transmit

LLDP med-tlv-select

Default Setting

Disabled

120 seconds

30 seconds

2 seconds

Disabled to send and receive all TLVs

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled to send all LLDP-MEDTLVs. When LLDP is globally enabled,LLDP-MED-TLVis also enabled.

Configuration Guidelines

If the interface is configured as a tunnel port, LLDP is automatically disabled.

If you first configure a network-policyprofile on an interface, you cannot apply theswitchport voice vlan command on the interface. If theswitchport voice vlan vlan-id is already configured on an interface,

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How to Configure LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

you can apply a network-policyprofile on the interface. This way the interface has the voice orvoice-signalingVLANnetwork-policyprofile applied on the interface.

You cannot configure static secure MAC addresses on an interface that has a network-policyprofile.

You cannot configure a network-policyprofile on aprivate-VLANport.

For wired location to function, you must first enter the ip device tracking global configuration command.

How to Configure LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

Enabling LLDP

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable LLDP:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.lldp run

3.interface interface-id

4.lldp transmit

5.lldp receive

6.end

7.show lldp

8.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

lldp run

Enables LLDP globally on the switch.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config)# lldp run

 

Step 3

interface interface-id

Specifies the interface on which you are enabling

 

 

LLDP, and enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config)# interface

 

 

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Configuring LLDP Characteristics

 

Command or Action

Purpose

 

gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 4

lldp transmit

Enables the interface to send LLDP packets.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#lldp transmit

Step 5

lldp receive

Enables the interface to receive LLDP packets.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#lldp receive

Step 6

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Step 7

show lldp

Verifies the configuration.

Example:

Switch# show lldp

Step 8

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

Example:

Switch# copyrunning-configstartup-config

Configuring LLDP Characteristics

You can configure the frequency of LLDP updates, the amount of time to hold the information before discarding it, and the initialization delay time. You can also select the LLDP and LLDP-MEDTLVs to send and receive.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure the LLDP characteristics.

Note Steps 2 through 5 are optional and can be performed in any order.

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Configuring LLDP Characteristics

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.lldp holdtime seconds

3.lldp reinit delay

4.lldp timer rate

5.lldp tlv-select

6.interface interface-id

7.lldp med-tlv-select

8.end

9.show lldp

10.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Step 1

configure terminal

Example:

Switch# configure terminal

Step 2

lldp holdtime seconds

Example:

Switch(config)# lldp holdtime 120

Step 3

lldp reinit delay

Example:

Switch(config)# lldp reinit 2

Step 4

lldp timer rate

Example:

Switch(config)# lldp timer 30

Step 5

lldp tlv-select

Example:

Switch(config)# tlv-select

Purpose

Enters global configuration mode.

(Optional) Specifies the amount of time a receiving device should hold the information from your device before discarding it.

The range is 0 to 65535 seconds; the default is 120 seconds.

(Optional) Specifies the delay time in seconds for LLDP to initialize on an interface.

The range is 2 to 5 seconds; the default is 2 seconds.

(Optional) Sets the sending frequency of LLDP updates in seconds.

The range is 5 to 65534 seconds; the default is 30 seconds.

(Optional) Specifies the LLDP TLVs to send or receive.

 

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Configuring LLDP-MEDTLVs

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 6

interface interface-id

Specifies the interface on which you are enabling LLDP, and

 

 

enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config)# interface

 

 

gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 7

lldp med-tlv-select

(Optional) Specifies the LLDP-MEDTLVs to send or receive.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config-if)#lldp

 

 

med-tlv-selectinventory management

 

Step 8

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config-if)#end

 

Step 9

show lldp

Verifies the configuration.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# show lldp

 

Step 10

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# copyrunning-config

 

 

startup-config

 

Configuring LLDP-MEDTLVs

By default, the switch only sends LLDP packets until it receives LLDP-MEDpackets from the end device. It then sends LLDP packets with MED TLVs, as well. When theLLDP-MEDentry has been aged out, it again only sends LLDP packets.

By using the lldp interface configuration command, you can configure the interface not to send the TLVs listed in the following table.

Table 9: LLDP-MEDTLVs

 

LLDP-MEDTLV

Description

inventory-management

LLDP-MEDinventory management TLV

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Configuring LLDP-MEDTLVs

LLDP-MEDTLV

Description

location

LLDP-MEDlocation TLV

network-policy

LLDP-MEDnetwork policy TLV

power-management

LLDP-MEDpower management TLV

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable a TLV on an interface:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.lldp med-tlv-select

4.end

5.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Example:

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet2/0/1

Specifies the interface on which you are configuring an LLDP-MEDTLV, and enter interface configuration mode.

Step 3

lldp med-tlv-select

Specifies the TLV to enable.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#lldp med-tlv-select inventory management

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

 

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Configuring Network-PolicyTLV

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 5

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# copyrunning-config

 

 

startup-config

 

Configuring Network-PolicyTLV

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to create a network-policyprofile, configure the policy attributes, and apply it to an interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.network-policyprofileprofile number

3.{voice| voice-signaling} vlan[vlan-id {coscvalue | dscpdvalue}] | [[dot1p{coscvalue | dscpdvalue}] | none| untagged]

4.exit

5.interface interface-id

6.network-policyprofile number

7.lldp med-tlv-selectnetwork-policy

8.end

9.show network-policyprofile

10.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

network-policyprofileprofile number

Specifies the network-policyprofile number, and enternetwork-policy

 

 

configuration mode. The range is 1 to 4294967295.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# network-policyprofile

 

 

1

 

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Command or Action

Step 3

{voice| voice-signaling} vlan[vlan-id {cos

 

cvalue | dscp dvalue}] | [[dot1p {cos cvalue|

 

dscp dvalue}] | none| untagged]

 

Example:

 

Switch(config-network-policy)#voice vlan

 

100 cos 4

Step 4

exit

Example:

Switch(config)# exit

Purpose

Configures the policy attributes:

voiceSpecifiesthe voice application type.

voice-signalingSpecifiesthevoice-signalingapplication type.

vlanSpecifiesthe native VLAN for voice traffic.

vlan-id(Optional)Specifies the VLAN for voice traffic. The range is 1 to 4094.

cos cvalue(Optional)Specifies the Layer 2 priority class of service (CoS) for the configured VLAN. The range is 0 to 7; the default is 5.

dscp dvalue(Optional)Specifies the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value for the configured VLAN. The range is 0 to 63; the default is 46.

dot1p(Optional)Configures the telephone to use IEEE 802.1p priority tagging and use VLAN 0 (the native VLAN).

none(Optional)Do not instruct the IP telephone about the voice VLAN. The telephone uses the configuration from the telephone key pad.

untagged(Optional)Configures the telephone to send untagged voice traffic. This is the default for the telephone.

untagged(Optional)Configures the telephone to send untagged voice traffic. This is the default for the telephone.

Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 5

interface interface-id

Specifies the interface on which you are configuring a network-policy

 

 

profile, and enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config)# interface

 

 

gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 6

network-policyprofile number

Specifies the network-policyprofile number.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-if)#network-policy 1

 

 

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Configuring Location TLV and Wired Location Service

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 7

lldp med-tlv-selectnetwork-policy

Specifies the network-policyTLV.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#lldp med-tlv-select network-policy

Step 8

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config)# end

Step 9

show network-policyprofile

Verifies the configuration.

Example:

Switch# shownetwork-policyprofile

Step 10

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

Example:

Switch# copyrunning-configstartup-config

Configuring Location TLV and Wired Location Service

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure location information for an endpoint and to apply it to an interface.

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Configuring Location TLV and Wired Location Service

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.location {admin-tagstring | civic-locationidentifier{id | host} | elin-locationstring identifierid | custom-locationidentifier{id | host} | geo-locationidentifier{id | host}}

3.exit

4.interface interface-id

5.location {additional-location-informationword | civic-location-id{id | host} | elin-location-idid | custom-location-id{id | host} | geo-location-id{id | host} }

6.end

7.Use one of the following:

show location admin-tagstring

show location civic-locationidentifierid

show location elin-locationidentifierid

8.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2 location{admin-tagstring | civic-locationidentifier{id | host} | elin-locationstring identifierid | custom-locationidentifier{id | host} | geo-locationidentifier{id | host}}

Example:

Switch(config)# location civic-location identifier 1

Switch(config-civic)#number 3550

Switch(config-civic)# primary-road-name"Cisco

Way"

Switch(config-civic)#city "San Jose" Switch(config-civic)#state CA Switch(config-civic)#building 19 Switch(config-civic)#room C6 Switch(config-civic)#county "Santa Clara" Switch(config-civic)#country US

Specifies the location information for an endpoint.

admin-tagSpecifiesan administrative tag or site information.

civic-locationSpecifiescivic location information.

elin-locationSpecifiesemergency location information (ELIN).

custom-locationSpecifiescustom location information.

geo-locationSpecifiesgeo-spatiallocation information.

identifier idSpecifiesthe ID for the civic, ELIN, custom, or geo location.

hostSpecifiesthe host civic, custom, or geo location.

stringSpecifiesthe site or location information in alphanumeric format.

 

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Command or Action

Purpose

Step 3

exit

Returns to global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config-civic)#exit

 

Step 4

interface interface-id

Specifies the interface on which you are configuring the location

 

 

information, and enter interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch (config)# interface gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 5 location{additional-location-informationword | civic-location-id{id | host} | elin-location-idid | custom-location-id{id | host} | geo-location-id{id | host} }

Example:

Switch(config-if)# locationelin-location-id1

Enters location information for an interface:

additional-location-informationSpecifies additional information for a location or place.

civic-location-idSpecifiesglobal civic location information for an interface.

elin-location-idSpecifiesemergency location information for an interface.

custom-location-idSpecifiescustom location information for an interface.

geo-location-idSpecifiesgeo-spatiallocation information for an interface.

hostSpecifiesthe host location identifier.

wordSpecifiesa word or phrase with additional location information.

idSpecifiesthe ID for the civic, ELIN, custom, or geo location. The ID range is 1 to 4095.

Step 6

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Step 7

Use one of the following:

Verifies the configuration.

show location admin-tagstring

show location civic-locationidentifierid

show location elin-locationidentifierid

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Command or Action

Purpose

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# show locationadmin-tag

 

 

or

 

 

Switch# show locationcivic-location

 

 

identifier

 

 

or

 

 

Switch# show locationelin-location

 

 

identifier

 

Step 8

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

Example:

Switch# copyrunning-configstartup-config

Enabling Wired Location Service on the Switch

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable wired location service on the switch.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.nmsp enable

3.nmsp notification interval {attachment| location} interval-seconds

4.end

5.show network-policyprofile

6.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

 

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Command or Action

Purpose

Step 2

nmsp enable

Enables the NMSP features on the switch.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# nmsp enable

 

Step 3

nmsp notification interval {attachment| location}

 

interval-seconds

Example:

Switch(config)# nmsp notification interval location 10

Step 4

end

Specifies the NMSP notification interval.

attachmentSpecifiesthe attachment notification interval.

locationSpecifiesthe location notification interval.

interval-secondsDurationin seconds before the switch sends the MSE the location or attachment updates. The range is 1 to 30; the default is 30.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config)# end

Step 5

show network-policyprofile

Verifies the configuration.

Example:

Switch# shownetwork-policyprofile

Step 6

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

Example:

Switch# copyrunning-configstartup-config

Configuration Examples for LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

Configuring Network-PolicyTLV: Examples

This example shows how to configure VLAN 100 for voice application with CoS and to enable the network-policyprofile andnetwork-policyTLV on an interface:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# network-policy 1

Switch(config-network-policy)#voice vlan 100 cos 4

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Monitoring and Maintaining LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

Switch(config-network-policy)#exit

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

Switch(config-if)# network-policyprofile 1

Switch(config-if)# lldpmed-tlv-selectnetwork-policy

This example shows how to configure the voice application type for the native VLAN with priority tagging:

Switchconfig-network-policy)#voice vlan dot1p cos 4

Switchconfig-network-policy)#voice vlan dot1p dscp 34

Monitoring and Maintaining LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired

Location Service

Commands for monitoring and maintaining LLDP, LLDP-MED,and wired location service.

Command

Description

clear lldp counters

Resets the traffic counters to zero.

clear lldp table

Deletes the LLDP neighbor information table.

clear nmsp statistics

Clears the NMSP statistic counters.

show lldp

Displays global information, such as frequency of

 

transmissions, the holdtime for packets being sent,

 

and the delay time before LLDP initializes on an

 

interface.

show lldp entry entry-name

Displays information about a specific neighbor.

 

You can enter an asterisk (*) to display all neighbors,

 

or you can enter the neighbor name.

show lldp interface [interface-id]

Displays information about interfaces with LLDP

 

enabled.

 

You can limit the display to a specific interface.

show lldp neighbors [interface-id] [detail]

Displays information about neighbors, including

 

device type, interface type and number, holdtime

 

settings, capabilities, and port ID.

 

You can limit the display to neighbors of a specific

 

interface or expand the display for more detailed

 

information.

show lldp traffic

Displays LLDP counters, including the number of

 

packets sent and received, number of packets

 

discarded, and number of unrecognized TLVs.

show location admin-tagstring

Displays the location information for the specified

 

administrative tag or site.

 

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Additional References for LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

Command

Description

show location civic-locationidentifierid

Displays the location information for a specific global

 

civic location.

show location elin-locationidentifierid

Displays the location information for an emergency

 

location

show network-policyprofile

Displays the configured network-policyprofiles.

show nmsp

Displays the NMSP information

Additional References for LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

MIBs

 

MIB

MIBs Link

All supported MIBs for this release.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

 

Description

Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online

http://www.cisco.com/support

resources, including documentation and tools for

 

troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with

 

Cisco products and technologies.

 

To receive security and technical information about

 

your products, you can subscribe to various services,

 

such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field

 

Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter,

 

and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

 

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website

 

requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

 

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Additional References for LLDP, LLDP-MED,and Wired Location Service

 

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Configuring System MTU

This module contains the following sections:

Finding Feature Information, page 71

Information about the MTU, page 71

How to Configure MTU Sizes, page 72

Configuration Examples for System MTU, page 73

Additional References for System MTU, page 74

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information about the MTU

The default maximum transmission unit (MTU) size for frames received and transmitted on all interfaces is 1500 bytes. You can increase the MTU size for all interfaces operating at 10 or 100 Mb/s by using the system mtu global configuration command. You can increase the MTU size to support jumbo frames on all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces by using thesystem mtu jumbo global configuration command.

System MTU Guidelines

When configuring the system MTU values, follow these guidelines:

The default maximum transmission unit (MTU) size for frames received and transmitted on all interfaces is 1500 bytes. You can increase the MTU size for all interfaces operating at 10 or 100 Mb/s by using

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How to Configure MTU Sizes

the system mtu global configuration command. You can increase the MTU size to support jumbo frames on all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces by using thesystem mtu jumbo global configuration command.

Gigabit Ethernet ports are not affected by the system mtu command; 10/100 ports are not affected by thesystem mtu jumbo command. If you do not configure thesystem mtu jumbo command, the setting of thesystem mtu command applies to all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.

Frames sizes that can be received by the switch CPU are limited to 1998 bytes, no matter what value was entered with the system mtu or system mtu jumbo commands. Although frames that are forwarded are typically not received by the CPU, in some cases, packets are sent to the CPU, such as traffic sent to control traffic, SNMP, or Telnet.

Note If Layer 2 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are configured to accept frames greater than the 10/100 interfaces, jumbo frames received on a Layer 2 Gigabit Ethernet interface and sent on a Layer 2 10/100 interface are dropped.

How to Configure MTU Sizes

Configuring the System MTU

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the MTU size for all 10/100 or Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.system mtu bytes

3.system mtu jumbo bytes

4.end

5.copy running-configstartup-config

6.reload

7.show system mtu

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

 

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Configuration Examples for System MTU

 

Command or Action

Step 2

system mtu bytes

Example:

Switch(config)# system mtu 2500

Step 3

system mtu jumbo bytes

Example:

Switch(config)# system mtu jumbo 7500

Step 4

end

Example:

Switch(config)# end

Purpose

(Optional) Change the MTU size for all interfaces on the switch stack that are operating at 10 or 100 Mb/s.

The range is 1500 to 1998 bytes; the default is 1500 bytes.

(Optional) Changes the MTU size for all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the switch or the switch stack.

The range is 1500 to 9198 bytes; the default is 1500 bytes.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 5

copy running-configstartup-config

Saves your entries in the configuration file.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# copyrunning-configstartup-config

 

Step 6

reload

Reloads the operating system.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# reload

 

Step 7

show system mtu

Verifies your settings.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# show system mtu

 

Configuration Examples for System MTU

This example shows how to set the maximum packet size for a Gigabit Ethernet port to 7500 bytes:

Switch(config)# system mtu jumbo 7500

Switch(config)# exit

Switch# reload

If you enter a value that is outside the allowed range for the specific type of interface, the value is not accepted. This example shows the response when you try to set Gigabit Ethernet interfaces to an out-of-rangenumber:

Switch(config)# system mtu jumbo 25000

^

% Invalid input detected at '^' marker.

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Additional References for System MTU

Additional References for System MTU

MIBs

 

MIB

MIBs Link

All supported MIBs for this release.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

 

Description

Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online

http://www.cisco.com/support

resources, including documentation and tools for

 

troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with

 

Cisco products and technologies.

 

To receive security and technical information about

 

your products, you can subscribe to various services,

 

such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field

 

Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter,

 

and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

 

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website

 

requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

 

 

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Configuring PoE

This module contains the following sections:

Finding Feature Information, page 75

Restrictions for PoE, page 75

Information about PoE, page 76

How to Configure PoE, page 81

Monitoring Power Status, page 88

Configuration Examples for Configuring PoE, page 88

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Restrictions for PoE

Note This feature is supported only on the LAN Base image.

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Information about PoE

Information about PoE

Power over Ethernet Ports

A PoE-capableswitch port automatically supplies power to one of these connected devices if the switch senses that there is no power on the circuit:

a Cisco pre-standardpowered device (such as a Cisco IP Phone or a Cisco Aironet Access Point)

an IEEE 802.3af-compliantpowered device

an IEEE 802.3at-compliantpowered device

A powered device can receive redundant power when it is connected to a PoE switch port and to an AC power source. The device does not receive redundant power when it is only connected to the PoE port.

After the switch detects a powered device, the switch determines the device power requirements and then grants or denies power to the device. The switch can also sense the real-timepower consumption of the device by monitoring and policing the power usage.

Supported Protocols and Standards

The switch uses these protocols and standards to support PoE:

CDP with power consumptionThepowered device notifies the switch of the amount of power it is consuming. The switch does not reply to thepower-consumptionmessages. The switch can only supply power to or remove power from the PoE port.

Cisco intelligent power managementThepowered device and the switch negotiate throughpower-negotiationCDP messages for anagreed-uponpower-consumptionlevel. The negotiation allows ahigh-powerCisco powered device, which consumes more than 7 W, to operate at its highest power mode. The powered device first boots up inlow-powermode, consumes less than 7 W, and negotiates to obtain enough power to operate inhigh-powermode. The device changes tohigh-powermode only when it receives confirmation from the switch.

High-powerdevices can operate inlow-powermode on switches that do not supportpower-negotiationCDP.

Cisco intelligent power management is backward-compatiblewith CDP with power consumption; the switch responds according to the CDP message that it receives. CDP is not supported onthird-partypowered devices; therefore, the switch uses the IEEE classification to determine the power usage of the device.

IEEE 802.3afThemajor features of this standard arepowered-devicediscovery, power administration, disconnect detection, and optionalpowered-devicepower classification. For more information, see the standard.

IEEE 802.3atThePoE+ standard increases the maximum power that can be drawn by a powered device from 15.4 W per port to 30 W per port.

 

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Powered-DeviceDetection and Initial Power Allocation

The switch detects a Cisco pre-standardor anIEEE-compliantpowered device when thePoE-capableport is in theno-shutdownstate, PoE is enabled (the default), and the connected device is not being powered by an AC adaptor.

After device detection, the switch determines the device power requirements based on its type:

A Cisco prestandard powered device does not provide its power requirement when the switch detects it, so a switch that does not support PoE+ allocates 15.4 W as the initial allocation for power budgeting; a PoE+ switch allocates 30 W (PoE+).

The initial power allocation is the maximum amount of power that a powered device requires. The switch initially allocates this amount of power when it detects and powers the powered device. As the switch receives CDP messages from the powered device and as the powered device negotiates power levels with the switch through CDP power-negotiationmessages, the initial power allocation might be adjusted.

The switch classifies the detected IEEE device within a power consumption class. Based on the available power in the power budget, the switch determines if a port can be powered. Table 10: IEEE Power Classifications, on page 77 lists these levels.

Table 10: IEEE Power Classifications

 

Class

Maximum Power Level Required from the Switch

0 (class status unknown)

15.4 W

1

4 W

2

7 W

3

15.4 W

4

30 W PoE+ devices only

The switch monitors and tracks requests for power and grants power only when it is available. The switch tracks its power budget (the amount of power available on the switch for PoE). The switch performs power-accountingcalculations when a port is granted or denied power to keep the power budget up to date.

After power is applied to the port, the switch uses CDP to determine the CDP-specific power consumption requirement of the connected Cisco powered devices, which is the amount of power to allocate based on the CDP messages. The switch adjusts the power budget accordingly. This does not apply tothird-partyPoE devices. The switch processes a request and either grants or denies power. If the request is granted, the switch updates the power budget. If the request is denied, the switch ensures that power to the port is turned off, generates a syslog message, and updates the LEDs. Powered devices can also negotiate with the switch for more power.

With PoE+, powered devices use IEEE 802.3at and LLDP power with media dependent interface (MDI) type, length, and value descriptions (TLVs), Power-via-MDATLVs, for negotiating power up to 30 W. Ciscopre-standarddevices and Cisco IEEE powered devices can use CDP or the IEEE 802.3atpower-via-MDIpower negotiation mechanism to request power levels up to 30 W.

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Note The initial allocation for Class 0, Class 3, and Class 4 powered devices is 15.4 W. When a device starts up and uses CDP or LLDP to send a request for more than 15.4 W, it can be allocated up to the maximum of 30 W.

Note TheCDP-specificpower consumption requirement is referred to as theactual power consumption requirement in the software configuration guides and command references.

If the switch detects a fault caused by an undervoltage, overvoltage, overtemperature, oscillator-fault,orshort-circuitcondition, it turns off power to the port, generates a syslog message, and updates the power budget and LEDs.

The PoE feature operates the same whether or not the switch is a stack member. The power budget is per-switchand independent of any other switch in the stack. Election of a new active switch does not affect PoE operation. The active switch keeps track of the PoE status for all switches and ports in the stack and includes the status in output displays.

The stacking-capableswitch also supports StackPower, which allows the power supplies to share the load across multiple systems in a stack when you connect the switches with power stack cables. You can manage the power supplies of up to four stack members as a one large power supply.

Power Management Modes

The switch supports these PoE modes:

autoTheswitch automatically detects if the connected device requires power. If the switch discovers a powered device connected to the port and if the switch has enough power, it grants power, updates the power budget, turns on power to the port on afirst-come,first-servedbasis, and updates the LEDs. For LED information, see the hardware installation guide.

If the switch has enough power for all the powered devices, they all come up. If enough power is available for all powered devices connected to the switch, power is turned on to all devices. If there is not enough available PoE, or if a device is disconnected and reconnected while other devices are waiting for power, it cannot be determined which devices are granted or are denied power.

If granting power would exceed the system power budget, the switch denies power, ensures that power to the port is turned off, generates a syslog message, and updates the LEDs. After power has been denied, the switch periodically rechecks the power budget and continues to attempt to grant the request for power.

If a device being powered by the switch is then connected to wall power, the switch might continue to power the device. The switch might continue to report that it is still powering the device whether the device is being powered by the switch or receiving power from an AC power source.

If a powered device is removed, the switch automatically detects the disconnect and removes power from the port. You can connect a nonpowered device without damaging it.

You can specify the maximum wattage that is allowed on the port. If the IEEE class maximum wattage of the powered device is greater than the configured maximum value, the switch does not provide power to the port. If the switch powers a powered device, but the powered device later requests through CDP messages more than the configured maximum value, the switch removes power to the port. The power that was allocated to the powered device is reclaimed into the global power budget. If you do not specify

 

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a wattage, the switch delivers the maximum value. Use the auto setting on any PoE port. The auto mode is the default setting.

staticTheswitchpre-allocatespower to the port (even when no powered device is connected) and guarantees that power will be available for the port. The switch allocates the port configured maximum wattage, and the amount is never adjusted through the IEEE class or by CDP messages from the powered device. Because power ispre-allocated,any powered device that uses less than or equal to the maximum wattage is guaranteed to be powered when it is connected to the static port. The port no longer participates in thefirst-come,first-servedmodel.

However, if the powered-deviceIEEE class is greater than the maximum wattage, the switch does not supply power to it. If the switch learns through CDP messages that the powered device needs more than the maximum wattage, the switch shuts down the powered device.

If you do not specify a wattage, the switch pre-allocatesthe maximum value. The switch powers the port only if it discovers a powered device. Use thestatic setting on ahigh-priorityinterface.

neverTheswitch disablespowered-devicedetection and never powers the PoE port even if an unpowered device is connected. Use this mode only when you want to make sure that power is never applied to aPoE-capableport, making the port adata-onlyport.

Power Monitoring and Power Policing

When policing of the real-timepower consumption is enabled, the switch takes action when a powered device consumes more power than the maximum amount allocated, also referred to as thecutoff-power value.

When PoE is enabled, the switch senses the real-timepower consumption of the powered device. The switch monitors thereal-timepower consumption of the connected powered device; this is calledpower monitoring orpower sensing. The switch also polices the power usage with thepower policing feature.

Power monitoring is backward-compatiblewith Cisco intelligent power management andCDP-basedpower consumption. It works with these features to ensure that the PoE port can supply power to the powered device.

The switch senses the real-timepower consumption of the connected device as follows:

1 The switch monitors thereal-timepower consumption on individual ports.

2The switch records the power consumption, including peak power usage. The switch reports the information through the CISCO-POWER-ETHERNET-EXT-MIB.

3If power policing is enabled, the switch polices power usage by comparing the real-timepower consumption to the maximum power allocated to the device. The maximum power consumption is also referred to as thecutoff power on a PoE port.

If the device uses more than the maximum power allocation on the port, the switch can either turn off power to the port, or the switch can generate a syslog message and update the LEDs (the port LED is now blinking amber) while still providing power to the device based on the switch configuration. By default, power-usagepolicing is disabled on all PoE ports.

If error recovery from the PoE error-disabledstate is enabled, the switch automatically takes the PoE port out of theerror-disabledstate after the specified amount of time.

If error recovery is disabled, you can manually re-enablethe PoE port by using theshutdown andno shutdown interface configuration commands.

4If policing is disabled, no action occurs when the powered device consumes more than the maximum power allocation on the PoE port, which could adversely affect the switch.

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Maximum Power Allocation (Cutoff Power) on a PoE Port

When power policing is enabled, the switch determines one of the these values as the cutoff power on the PoE port in this order:

1Manually when you set the user-definedpower level that the switch budgets for the port by using thepower inline consumption default wattage global or interface configuration command

2Manually when you set the user-definedpower level that limits the power allowed on the port by using thepower inline auto max max-wattage or thepower inline static max max-wattage interface configuration command

3Automatically when the switch sets the power usage of the device by using CDP power negotiation or by the IEEE classification and LLDP power negotiation.

Use the first or second method in the previous list to manually configure the cutoff-powervalue by entering thepower inline consumption default wattage or thepower inline [auto |static max]max-wattage command.

If you do not manually configure the cutoff-powervalue, the switch automatically determines it by using CDP power negotiation or the device IEEE classification and LLDP power negotiation. If CDP or LLDP are not enabled, the default value of 30 W is applied. However without CDP or LLDP, the switch does not allow devices to consume more than 15.4 W of power because values from 15400 to 30000 mW are only allocated based on CDP or LLDP requests. If a powered device consumes more than 15.4 W without CDP or LLDP negotiation, the device might be in violation of the maximum current (Imax) limitation and might experience anIcut fault for drawing more current than the maximum. The port remains in the fault state for a time before attempting to power on again. If the port continuously draws more than 15.4 W, the cycle repeats.

Note When a powered device connected to a PoE+ port restarts and sends a CDP or LLDP packet with a power TLV, the switch locks to thepower-negotiationprotocol of that first packet and does not respond to power requests from the other protocol. For example, if the switch is locked to CDP, it does not provide power to devices that send LLDP requests. If CDP is disabled after the switch has locked on it, the switch does not respond to LLDP power requests and can no longer power on any accessories. In this case, you should restart the powered device.

Power Consumption Values

You can configure the initial power allocation and the maximum power allocation on a port. However, these values are only the configured values that determine when the switch should turn on or turn off power on the PoE port. The maximum power allocation is not the same as the actual power consumption of the powered device. The actual cutoff power value that the switch uses for power policing is not equal to the configured power value.

When power policing is enabled, the switch polices the power usage at the switch port, which is greater than the power consumption of the device. When you are manually set the maximum power allocation, you must consider the power loss over the cable from the switch port to the powered device. The cutoff power is the sum of the rated power consumption of the powered device and theworst-casepower loss over the cable.

The actual amount of power consumed by a powered device on a PoE port is the cutoff-powervalue plus a calibration factor of 500 mW (0.5 W). The actual cutoff value is approximate and varies from the configured value by a percentage of the configured value. For example, if the configured cutoff power is 12 W, the actualcutoff-valueis 11.4 W, which is 0.05% less than the configured value.

 

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We recommend that you enable power policing when PoE is enabled on your switch. For example, if policing is disabled and you set the cutoff-powervalue by using thepower inline auto max 6300 interface configuration command, the configured maximum power allocation on the PoE port is 6.3 W (6300 mW). The switch provides power to the connected devices on the port if the device needs up to 6.3 W. If theCDP-powernegotiated value or the IEEE classification value exceeds the configured cutoff value, the switch does not provide power to the connected device. After the switch turns on power on the PoE port, the switch does not police thereal-timepower consumption of the device, and the device can consume more power than the maximum allocated amount, which could adversely affect the switch and the devices connected to the other PoE ports.

Because the switch supports internal power supplies and the Cisco Redundant Power System 2300 (also referred to as the RPS 2300), the total amount of power available for the powered devices varies depending on the power supply configuration.

If a power supply is removed and replaced by a new power supply with less power and the switch does not have enough power for the powered devices, the switch denies power to the PoE ports in auto mode in descending order of the port numbers. If the switch still does not have enough power, the switch then denies power to the PoE ports in static mode in descending order of the port numbers.

If the new power supply supports more power than the previous one and the switch now has more power available, the switch grants power to the PoE ports in static mode in ascending order of the port numbers. If it still has power available, the switch then grants power to the PoE ports in auto mode in ascending order of the port numbers.

How to Configure PoE

Configuring a Power Management Mode on a PoE Port

For most situations, the default configuration (auto mode) works well, providing plug-and-playoperation. No further configuration is required. However, perform this task to configure a PoE port for a higher priority, to make it data only, or to specify a maximum wattage to disallowhigh-powerpowered devices on a port.

When you make PoE configuration changes, the port being configured drops power. Depending on the new configuration, the state of the other PoE ports, and the state of the power budget, the port might not be powered up again. For example, port 1 is in the auto and on state, and you configure it for static mode. The switch removes power from port 1, detects the powered device, and repowers the port. If port 1 is in the auto and on state and you configure it with a maximum wattage of 10 W, the switch removes power from the port and then redetects the powered device. The switch repowers the port only if the powered device is a class 1, class 2, or a Cisco-onlypowered device.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.power inline {auto[maxmax-wattage] | never| static[maxmax-wattage]}

4.end

5.show power inline [interface-id| module switch-number]

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Budgeting Power for Devices Connected to a PoE Port

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies the physical port to be configured, and enters interface configuration

 

 

mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface

 

 

gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 3

power inline {auto[maxmax-wattage] |

Configures the PoE mode on the port. The keywords have these meanings:

never | static[maxmax-wattage]}

Example:

Switch(config-if)#power inline auto

autoEnablespowered-devicedetection. If enough power is available, automatically allocates power to the PoE port after device detection. This is the default setting.

never Disablesdevice detection, and disable power to the port.

Note If a port has a Cisco powered device connected to it, do not use thepower inline never command to configure the port. A falselink-upcan occur, placing the port into theerror-disabledstate.

staticEnablespowered-devicedetection.Pre-allocate(reserve) power for a port before the switch discovers the powered device. The switch reserves power for this port even when no device is connected and guarantees that power will be provided upon device detection.

The switch allocates power to a port configured in static mode before it allocates power to a port configured in auto mode.

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Step 5 show power inlineswitch-number]

Example:

[interface-id |module Displays PoE status for a switch or a switch stack, for the specified interface, or for a specified stack member.

The module switch-number keywords are supported only onstacking-capableswitches.

Switch# show power inline

Budgeting Power for Devices Connected to a PoE Port

When Cisco powered devices are connected to PoE ports, the switch uses Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) to determine the CDP-specific power consumption of the devices, and the switch adjusts the power budget accordingly. This does not apply to IEEEthird-partypowered devices. For these devices, when the switch

 

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Budgeting Power for Devices Connected to a PoE Port

grants a power request, the switch adjusts the power budget according to the powered-deviceIEEE classification. If the powered device is a class 0 (class status unknown) or a class 3, the switch budgets 15,400 mW for the device, regardless of theCDP-specificamount of power needed. If the powered device reports a higher class than itsCDP-specificconsumption or does not support power classification (defaults to class 0), the switch can power fewer devices because it uses the IEEE class information to track the global power budget.

By using the power inline consumption wattage interface configuration command or thepower inline consumption default wattage global configuration command, you can override the default power requirement specified by the IEEE classification. The difference between what is mandated by the IEEE classification and what is actually needed by the device is reclaimed into the global power budget for use by additional devices. You can then extend the switch power budget and use it more effectively.

Caution You should carefully plan your switch power budget, enable the power monitoring feature, and make certain not to oversubscribe the power supply.

Note When you manually configure the power budget, you must also consider the power loss over the cable between the switch and the powered device.

Budgeting Power to All PoE ports

Perform this task to configure the amount of power budgeted to a powered device connected to each PoE port on a switch:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.no cdp run

3.power inline consumption default wattage

4.end

5.show power inline consumption default

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

no cdp run

(Optional) Disables CDP.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# no cdp run

 

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Command or Action

Step 3

power inline consumption default wattage

Example:

Switch(config)# power inline consumption default 5000

Purpose

Configures the power consumption of powered devices connected to each the PoE port on the switch.

The range for each device is 4000 to 30000 mW (PoE+). The default is 30000 mW.

Note When you use this command, we recommend you also enable power policing.

Step 4

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# end

 

Step 5

show power inline consumption default

Displays the power consumption status.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# show power inline consumption default

 

Budgeting Power to a Specific PoE Port

Perform this task to configure the amount of power budgeted to a powered device connected to a specific PoE port:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.no cdp run

3.interface interface-id

4.power inline consumption wattage

5.end

6.show power inline consumption

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

 

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Command or Action

Purpose

Step 2

no cdp run

(Optional) Disables CDP.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# no cdp run

 

Step 3

interface interface-id

Specifies the physical port to be configured, and enter

 

 

interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 4

power inline consumption wattage

Example:

Switch(config-if)# power inline consumption

5000

Step 5

end

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Configures the power consumption of a powered device connected to a PoE port on the switch.

The range for each device is 4000 to 30000 mW (PoE+). The default is 30000 mW.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 6

show power inline consumption

Displays the power consumption data.

Example:

Switch# show power inline consumption

Configuring Power Policing

By default, the switch monitors the real-timepower consumption of connected powered devices. You can configure the switch to police the power usage. By default, policing is disabled.

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Configuring Power Policing

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.power inline police [action{log| errdisable}]

4.exit

5.Use one of the following:

errdisable detect cause inline-power

errdisable recovery cause inline-power

errdisable recovery interval interval

6.exit

7.Use one of the following:

show power inline police

show errdisable recovery

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies the physical port to be configured, and enter interface

 

 

configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface

 

 

gigabitethernet2/0/1

 

Step 3 power inline police[action{log| errdisable}]

Example:

Switch(config-if)#power inline police

If the real-timepower consumption exceeds the maximum power allocation on the port, configures the switch to take one of these actions:

power inline policeShutsdown the PoE port, turns off power to it, and puts it in theerror-disabledstate.

Note You can enable error detection for the PoEerror-disabledcause by using theerrdisable detect cause inline-power global configuration command. You can also enable the timer to recover from the PoEerror-disabledstate by using theerrdisable recovery cause inline-power interval interval global configuration command.

power inline police action errdisableTurns off power to the port if the real-time power consumption exceeds the maximum power allocation on the port.

 

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Command or Action

Purpose

power inline police actionlogGenerates a syslog message while still providing power to the port.

If you do not enter the action log keywords, the default action shuts down the port and puts the port in theerror-disabledstate.

Step 4

exit

Returns to global configuration mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#exit

Step 5 Use one of the following:

errdisable detect cause inline-power

errdisable recovery cause inline-power

errdisable recovery interval interval

Example:

Switch(config)# errdisable detect causeinline-power

Switch(config)# errdisable recovery causeinline-power

Switch(config)# errdisable recovery interval 100

(Optional) Enables error recovery from the PoE error-disabledstate, and configures the PoE recover mechanism variables.

By default, the recovery interval is 300 seconds.

For interval interval, specifies the time in seconds to recover from theerror-disabledstate. The range is 30 to 86400.

Step 6

exit

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# exit

 

Step 7

Use one of the following:

Displays the power monitoring status, and verify the error recovery

 

show power inline police

settings.

 

 

 

show errdisable recovery

 

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# show power inline police

 

 

Switch# show errdisable recovery

 

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Monitoring Power Status

Monitoring Power Status

Table 11: Show Commands for Interfaces

 

Command

Purpose

show env power switch [switch-number]

(Optional) Displays the status of the internal power

 

supplies for each switch in the stack or for the

 

specified switch. The range is 1 to 9, depending on

 

the switch member numbers in the stack.

 

These keywords are available only on

 

stacking-capableswitches.

show power inline [interface-id | module

Displays PoE status for a switch or switch stack, for

switch-number]

an interface, or for a specific switch in the stack.

show power inline consumption

Displays the power consumption data.

show power inline police

Displays the power policing data.

Configuration Examples for Configuring PoE

Budgeting Power: Example

When you enter one of the following commands,

[no] power inline consumption defaultwattage global configuration command

[no] power inline consumptionwattage interface configuration command

this caution message appears:

%CAUTION: Interface Gi1/0/1: Misconfiguring the 'power inline consumption/allocation' command may cause damage to the

switch and void your warranty. Take precaution not to oversubscribe the power supply. It is recommended to enable power

policing if the switch supports it. Refer to documentation.

 

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Configuring EEE

This module contains the following sections:

Finding Feature Information, page 89

Information About EEE, page 89

Restrictions for EEE, page 90

How to Configure EEE, page 90

Monitoring EEE, page 91

Configuration Examples for Configuring EEE, page 92

Additional References, page 92

Feature History and Information for Configuring EEE, page 93

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About EEE

EEE Overview

Energy Efficient Ethernet (EEE) is an IEEE 802.3az standard that is designed to reduce power consumption in Ethernet networks during idle periods.

EEE can be enabled on devices that support low power idle (LPI) mode. Such devices can save power by entering LPI mode during periods of low utilization. In LPI mode, systems on both ends of the link can save

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Default EEE Configuration

power by shutting down certain services. EEE provides the protocol needed to transition into and out of LPI mode in a way that is transparent to upper layer protocols and applications.

Default EEE Configuration

EEE is disabled by default.

Restrictions for EEE

EEEhas the following restrictions:

Changing the EEE configuration resets the interface because the device has to restart Layer 1 autonegotiation.

You might want to enable the Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) for devices that require longer wakeup times before they are able to accept data on their receive paths. Doing so enables the device to negotiate for extended system wakeup times from the transmitting link partner.

How to Configure EEE

You can enable or disable EEE on an interface that is connected to an EEE-capablelink partner.

Enabling or Disabling EEE

SUMMARY STEPS

1.configure terminal

2.interface interface-id

3.power efficient-ethernetauto

4.no power efficient-ethernetauto

5.end

6.copy running-configstartup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch# configure terminal

 

 

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Command or Action

Purpose

Step 2

interface interface-id

Specifies the interface to be configured, and enter

 

 

interface configuration mode.

 

Example:

 

 

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

 

Step 3

power efficient-ethernetauto

Example:

Switch(config-if)# powerefficient-ethernetauto

Enables EEE on the specified interface. When EEE is enabled, the device advertises and autonegotiates EEE to its link partner.

Step 4

no power efficient-ethernetauto

Disables EEE on the specified interface.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#no power efficient-ethernet auto

Step 5

end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Example:

Switch(config-if)#end

Step 6

copy running-configstartup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

Example:

Switch# copyrunning-configstartup-config

Monitoring EEE

Table 12: Commands for Displaying EEE Settings

Command

Purpose

show eee capabilities interface interface-id Displays EEE capabilities for the specified interface.

show eee status interface interface-id

Displays EEE status information for the specified interface.

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Configuration Examples for Configuring EEE

Configuration Examples for Configuring EEE

This example shows how to enable EEE for an interface:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

Switch(config-if)# powerefficient-ethernetauto

This example shows how to disable EEE for an interface:

Switch# configure terminal

Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1

Switch(config-if)# no powerefficient-ethernetauto

Additional References

MIBs

 

MIB

MIBs Link

All supported MIBs for this release.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

 

Description

Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online

http://www.cisco.com/support

resources, including documentation and tools for

 

troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with

 

Cisco products and technologies.

 

To receive security and technical information about

 

your products, you can subscribe to various services,

 

such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field

 

Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter,

 

and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

 

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website

 

requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

 

 

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Feature History and Information for Configuring EEE

Feature History and Information for Configuring EEE

Release

Modification

Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2)EX

This feature was introduced.

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Feature History and Information for Configuring EEE

 

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I N D E X

A

active link 45 and routing45

and routing protocols 45 auto mode78 auto-MDIX42

configuring 42 described42

auto-MDIX,configuring42

B

Budgeting Power 88

Example command 88

C

CDP 51, 76

defined with LLDP 51

power negotiation extensions 76

CDP with power consumption, described 76 CDP with power negotiation, described76 Cisco intelligent power management76 civic location53

Configuration Examples for Configuring PoE command 88 configuring42

custom location 54

E

ELIN location 53 enhanced PoE76, 84

Ethernet management port 45, 46 active link45

and routing 45

and routing protocols 45 default setting45 described45

for network management 45 supported features46 unsupported features46

Ethernet management port configuration 47 Ethernet management port, internal45, 46

and routing 45

and routing protocols 45 unsupported features46

Example for Configuring Auto-MDIXcommand44 Examples for Configuring the System MTU command73

F

Fa0 port 45

See Ethernet management port 45 fastethernet0 port45

See Ethernet management port 45 for network management45

D

G

geo location 54

 

default configuration 55

 

LLDP 55

 

default setting 45

H

described 42, 45

 

devices supported 16, 76

high-powerdevices operating inlow-powermode76

 

hub 46

 

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Index

I

IEEE power classification levels 77 interface88

interfaces 42

auto-MDIX,configuring42 inventory management TLV53

L

LLDP 51, 55, 56, 57

transmission timer and holdtime, setting 57 configuring55

default configuration 55 enabling56

overview 51

switch stack considerations 51 LLDP-MED 52, 59

configuring 59 TLVs59 overview52

supported TLVs 52 location TLV53

M

MAC/PHY configuration status TLV 51 management address TLV51 monitoring79

monitoring power 85 MTU71

system 71

PoE (continued)

policing power consumption 85 policing power usage79 power management modes78

power negotiation extensions to CDP 76 powered-devicedetection and initial power allocation77 standards supported76

static mode 78

supported watts per port 16, 76 policing power consumption85 policing power usage79

port description TLV 51 port VLAN ID TLV51

power management modes 78 power management TLV53 power negotiation extensions76

power negotiation extensions to CDP 76 powered-devicedetection and initial power allocation77

S

See Ethernet management port 45 standards supported76

static mode 78 statistics88

interface 88 supported features46

supported watts per port 16, 76 system71

system capabilities TLV 51 system description TLV51 system name TLV51

N

network policy TLV 53

P

PoE 16, 76, 77, 78, 79, 85 auto mode 78

CDP with power consumption, described 76 CDP with power negotiation, described76 Cisco intelligent power management76 devices supported16, 76

high-powerdevices operating inlow-powermode76 IEEE power classification levels77

monitoring 79 monitoring power85

T

TLVs 51

defined 51

U

unsupported features 46

W

wired location service 53, 54, 63 configuring63

location TLV 53 understanding54

 

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