Cisco Systems 12816 User Manual

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General Information

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Document Information

Document Title:

Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Installation and Configuration Guide

Part Number:

OL-11495-01

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Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and

Cisco 12816 Router Installation and

Configuration Guide

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THE SPECIFICATIONS AND INFORMATION REGARDING THE PRODUCTS IN THIS MANUAL ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL STATEMENTS, INFORMATION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS IN THIS MANUAL ARE BELIEVED TO BE ACCURATE BUT ARE PRESENTED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. USERS MUST TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR APPLICATION OF ANY PRODUCTS.

THE SOFTWARE LICENSE AND LIMITED WARRANTY FOR THE ACCOMPANYING PRODUCT ARE SET FORTH IN THE INFORMATION PACKET THAT SHIPPED WITH THE PRODUCT AND ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY THIS REFERENCE. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO LOCATE THE SOFTWARE LICENSE OR LIMITED WARRANTY, CONTACT YOUR CISCO REPRESENTATIVE FOR A COPY.

The following information is for FCC compliance of Class A devices: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequencyenergy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be required to correct the interference at their own expense.

The following information is for FCC compliance of Class B devices: The equipment described in this manual generates and may radiate radio-frequencyenergy. If it is not installed in accordance with Cisco’s installation instructions, it may cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in part 15 of the FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation.

Modifying the equipment without Cisco’s written authorization may result in the equipment no longer complying with FCC requirements for Class A or Class B digital devices. In that event, your right to use the equipment may be limited by FCC regulations, and you may be required to correct any interference to radio or television communications at your own expense.

Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco Systems, Inc. could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product.

You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:

Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.

Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.

Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.

Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)

The Cisco implementation of TCP header compression is an adaptation of a program developed by the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) as part of UCB’s public domain version of the UNIX operating system. All rights reserved. Copyright © 1981, Regents of the University of California.

NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER WARRANTY HEREIN, ALL DOCUMENT FILES AND SOFTWARE OF THESE SUPPLIERS ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” WITH ALL FAULTS. CISCO AND THE ABOVE-NAMEDSUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT OR ARISING FROM A COURSE OF DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE.

IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS MANUAL, EVEN IF CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

CCSP, CCVP, the Cisco Square Bridge logo, Follow Me Browsing, and StackWise are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Changing the Way We Work, Live, Play, and Learn, and iQuick Study are service marks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; and Access Registrar, Aironet, BPX, Catalyst, CCDA, CCDP, CCIE, CCIP, CCNA, CCNP, Cisco, the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert logo, Cisco IOS, Cisco Press, Cisco Systems, Cisco Systems Capital, the Cisco Systems logo, Cisco Unity, Enterprise/Solver, EtherChannel, EtherFast, EtherSwitch, Fast Step, FormShare, GigaDrive, GigaStack, HomeLink, Internet Quotient, IOS, IP/TV, iQ Expertise, the iQ logo, iQ Net Readiness Scorecard, LightStream, Linksys, MeetingPlace, MGX, the Networkers logo, Networking Academy, Network Registrar, Packet, PIX,Post-Routing,Pre-Routing,ProConnect, RateMUX, ScriptShare, SlideCast, SMARTnet, The Fastest Way to Increase Your Internet Quotient, and TransPath are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and certain other countries.

All other trademarks mentioned in this document or Website are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (0601R)

Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Installation and Configuration Guide

Copyright © 2000–2006Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

About This Guide

Audience

The Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Installation and Configuration Guideis written for hardware installers and system administrators of Cisco routers.

This publication assumes that the user has a substantial background in installing and configuring router and switch-basedhardware. The reader should also be familiar with electronic circuitry and wiring practices, and have experience as an electronic or electromechanical technician.

Purpose

This installation and configuration guide contains procedures for installing the router hardware, creating a basic startup configuration file, and powering on the router for the first time.

 

 

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Document Organization

Document Organization

This installation and configuration guide is organized into the following chapters and appendixes:

Chapter 1, “Product Overview,”provides an introduction to the major components of the Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 series routers.

Chapter 2, “Preparing for Installation,” describes safety considerations, required tools and equipment, an overview of the installation, and procedures to perform before the installation.

Chapter 3, “Installing the Router,” provides instructions for installing the hardware and connecting external network interface cables.

Chapter 4, “System Startup and Basic Configuration,” provides simple procedures for completing a basic system configuration, and for checking and saving the configuration to system memory.

Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting the Installation,” provides guidelines for troubleshooting the router hardware installation.

Chapter 6, “Router Field Diagnostics,” describes how to load and run router field diagnostics.

Chapter 7, “Maintaining the Router,”provides removal and replacement procedures for primary router components or field-replaceable units (FRUs).

Appendix A, “Technical Specifications,” provides a summary of physical, electrical, and environmental specifications for the router.

Appendix B, “Site Log,”provides a sample site log that can be used to record actions relevant to the operation and maintenance of the router.

Index

 

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About This Guide

Document Conventions

Document Conventions

This publication uses the following conventions:

Ctrl represents the key labeledControl. For example, the key combinationCtrl-Z means hold down theControl key while you press thez key.

Command descriptions use these conventions:

Examples that contain system prompts denote interactive sessions, indicating the commands that you should enter at the prompt. The system prompt indicates the current level of the EXEC command interpreter.

For example, the prompt router> indicates that you should be at theuser level, and the promptrouter# indicates that you should be at theprivileged level. Access to the privileged level usually requires a password. Refer to the related software configuration and reference documentation for additional information.

Commands and keywords are in bold font.

Arguments for which you supply values are in italic font.

Elements in square brackets ([ ]) are optional.

Alternative but required keywords are grouped in braces ({ }) and separated by vertical bars (|).

Examples use these conventions:

Terminal sessions and sample console screen displays are in screen font.

Information you enter is in bold font.

Nonprinting characters, such as passwords, are in angle brackets (< >).

Default responses to system prompts are in square brackets ([ ]).

Exclamation points (!) at the beginning of a line indicate a comment line.

Caution Meansreader be careful. You are capable of doing something that might result in equipment damage or loss of data.

Note Meansreader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to materials not contained in this manual.

 

 

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Timesaver Meansthe described action saves time. You can save time by performing the action described in the paragraph.

Warning This warning symbol meansdanger. You are in a situation that could cause bodily injury. Before you work on any equipment, be aware of the hazards involved with electrical circuitry and be familiar with standard practices for preventing accidents. To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to theRegulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available on Cisco.com. Cisco also provides several ways to obtain technical assistance and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

You can access the Cisco website at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

You can access international Cisco websites at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

 

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Obtaining Documentation

Product Documentation DVD

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in the Product Documentation DVD package, which may have shipped with your product. The Product Documentation DVD is updated regularly and may be more current than printed documentation.

The Product Documentation DVD is a comprehensive library of technical product documentation on portable media. The DVD enables you to access multiple versions of hardware and software installation, configuration, and command guides for Cisco products and to view technical documentation in HTML. With the DVD, you have access to the same documentation that is found on the Cisco website without being connected to the Internet. Certain products also have .pdf versions of the documentation available.

The Product Documentation DVD is available as a single unit or as a subscription. Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order a Product Documentation DVD (product number DOC-DOCDVD=)from the Ordering tool or Cisco Marketplace.

Cisco Ordering tool:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/

Cisco Marketplace:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Ordering Documentation

Beginning June 30, 2005, registered Cisco.com users may order Cisco documentation at the Product Documentation Store in the Cisco Marketplace at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Cisco will continue to support documentation orders using the Ordering tool:

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order documentation from the Ordering tool:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/

 

 

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Documentation Feedback

Instructions for ordering documentation using the Ordering tool are at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 1 800553-NETS(6387).

Documentation Feedback

You can rate and provide feedback about Cisco technical documents by completing the online feedback form that appears with the technical documents on Cisco.com.

You can send comments about Cisco documentation to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit comments by using the response card (if present) behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems

Attn: Customer Document Ordering

170 West Tasman Drive

San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Cisco Product Security Overview

Cisco provides a free online Security Vulnerability Policy portal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.ht ml

From this site, you can perform these tasks:

Report security vulnerabilities in Cisco products.

Obtain assistance with security incidents that involve Cisco products.

Register to receive security information from Cisco.

 

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Cisco Product Security Overview

A current list of security advisories and notices for Cisco products is available at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/psirt

If you prefer to see advisories and notices as they are updated in real time, you can access a Product Security Incident Response Team Really Simple Syndication (PSIRT RSS) feed from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_psirt_rss_feed.html

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

Cisco is committed to delivering secure products. We test our products internally before we release them, and we strive to correct all vulnerabilities quickly. If you think that you might have identified a vulnerability in a Cisco product, contact PSIRT:

Emergencies — security-alert@cisco.com

An emergency is either a condition in which a system is under active attack or a condition for which a severe and urgent security vulnerability should be reported. All other conditions are considered nonemergencies.

Nonemergencies — psirt@cisco.com

In an emergency, you can also reach PSIRT by telephone:

1 877 228-7302

1 408 525-6532

Tip We encourage you to use Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) or a compatible product to encrypt any sensitive information that you send to Cisco. PSIRT can work from encrypted information that is compatible with PGP versions 2.x through 8.x.

Never use a revoked or an expired encryption key. The correct public key to use in your correspondence with PSIRT is the one linked in the Contact Summary section of the Security Vulnerability Policy page at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.ht ml

 

 

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Obtaining Technical Assistance

The link on this page has the current PGP key ID in use.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Technical Support provides 24-hour-a-dayaward-winningtechnical assistance. The Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website on Cisco.com features extensive online support resources. In addition, if you have a valid Cisco service contract, Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineers provide telephone support. If you do not have a valid Cisco service contract, contact your reseller.

Cisco Technical Support & Documentation Website

The Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Access to all tools on the Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do

Note Use the Cisco Product Identification (CPI) tool to locate your product serial number before submitting a web or phone request for service. You can access the CPI tool from the Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website by clicking theTools & Resources link under Documentation & Tools. ChooseCisco Product Identification Tool from the Alphabetical Indexdrop-downlist, or click theCisco Product Identification Tool link under Alerts & RMAs. The CPI tool offers three search options: by product ID or model name; by tree view; or for certain products, by copying and pastingshow command output. Search results show an illustration of your product with the serial number label location highlighted. Locate the serial number label on your product and record the information before placing a service call.

 

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Obtaining Technical Assistance

Submitting a Service Request

Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3 and S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool provides recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your service request is assigned to a Cisco engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest

For S1 or S2 service requests or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone. (S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.) Cisco engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific:+61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)

EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55

USA: 1 800 553-2447

For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts

Definitions of Service Request Severity

To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity definitions.

Severity 1 (S1)—Yournetwork is “down,” or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Severity 2 (S2)—Operationof an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commitfull-timeresources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

 

 

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Severity 3 (S3)—Operationalperformance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Severity 4 (S4)—Yourequire information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, documentation, and logo merchandise. Visit Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco Systems technical user magazine for maximizing Internet and networking investments. Each quarter, Packet delivers coverage of the latest industry trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions, as well as network deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, certification and training information, and links to scores ofin-depthonline resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/packet

iQ Magazine is the quarterly publication from Cisco Systems designed to help growing companies learn how they can use technology to increase revenue, streamline their business, and expand services. The publication identifies the challenges facing these companies and the technologies to help

 

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Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

solve them, using real-worldcase studies and business strategies to help readers make sound technology investment decisions. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine

or view the digital edition at this URL:

http://ciscoiq.texterity.com/ciscoiq/sample/

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/ipj

Networking products offered by Cisco Systems, as well as customer support services, can be obtained at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/index.html

Networking Professionals Connection is an interactive website for networking professionals to share questions, suggestions, and information about networking products and technologies with Cisco experts and other networking professionals. Join a discussion at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/discuss/networking

World-classnetworking training is available from Cisco. You can view current offerings at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html

 

 

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C O N T E N T S

 

 

About This Guide xiii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audience

xiii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purpose

xiii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Document Organization

xiv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Document Conventions

xv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obtaining Documentation

xvi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cisco.com xvi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product Documentation DVD

 

xvii

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordering Documentation xvii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Documentation Feedback

xviii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cisco Product Security Overview

xviii

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

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Obtaining Technical Assistance

xx

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cisco Technical Support & Documentation Website xx

 

 

Submitting a Service Request

xxi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definitions of Service Request Severity

xxi

 

 

 

 

 

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

xxii

 

Product Overview 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C H A P T E R 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical and Functional Description of Router

1-2

 

 

 

 

 

AC and DC Power Subsystems

1-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard AC Power Shelf

1-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Optional AC Power Shelf

1-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Contents

 

 

AC Power Supplies

1-10

 

 

 

 

 

DC Power Shelf 1-12

 

 

 

 

 

DC Power Supplies

1-15

 

 

 

 

 

Chassis Card Cages 1-17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upper Card Cage

1-17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lower Card Cage

1-18

 

 

 

 

 

 

Switch Fabric Card Cage

1-18

 

 

 

 

 

Switch Fabric Overview 1-19

 

 

 

 

 

 

Switch Fabric Card Functionality 1-19

 

 

 

 

 

Clock Scheduler Cards 1-20

 

 

 

 

 

Switch Fabric Cards

1-20

 

 

 

 

 

Alarm Card, Line Card, and Rout Processor Overview 1-21

 

 

Alarm Cards

1-21

 

 

 

 

 

 

Line Cards

1-23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Route Processor Selection 1-24

 

 

 

 

 

Gigabit Route Processor Overview 1-24

 

 

 

 

 

GRP PCMCIA Card Slots and Status LEDs

1-25

 

 

 

GRP Reset Switch 1-27

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Auxiliary and Console Ports 1-28

 

 

 

 

GRP Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

1-28

 

 

 

 

GRP Alphanumeric Message Displays 1-30

 

 

GRP Memory Components 1-31

 

 

 

 

 

GRP DRAM

1-33

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP SRAM

1-33

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP NVRAM

1-33

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Flash Memory

1-34

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Route Processor Overview

1-34

 

 

 

 

PRP PCMCIA Card Slots and Status LEDs

1-35

 

 

 

PRP Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

1-35

 

 

 

 

PRP Auxiliary and Console Ports 1-36

 

 

 

 

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PRP Reset Switch

1-37

 

 

PRP Alphanumeric Message Displays

1-38

 

PRP Memory Components

1-39

 

 

PRP SDRAM

1-41

 

 

 

 

PRP SRAM

1-41

 

 

 

 

PRP NVRAM

1-42

 

 

 

 

PRP Flash Memory

1-42

 

 

Upper and Lower Cable Management Brackets 1-43

 

Blower Module 1-44

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing for Installation 2-1

 

 

 

C H A P T E R 2

 

 

 

 

Safety Guidelines 2-2

 

 

 

 

Safety with Equipment

2-2

 

 

Safety with Electricity

2-3

 

 

 

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

2-4

 

Lifting Guidelines 2-6

 

 

 

 

Compliance and Safety Information 2-6

 

 

Laser Safety 2-7

 

 

 

 

 

Site Requirement Guidelines 2-7

 

 

Rack-Mounting Guidelines

2-7

 

 

Enclosed Rack 2-8

 

 

 

 

Open Rack 2-8

 

 

 

 

Telco Rack

2-9

 

 

 

 

Site Layout and Equipment Dimensions

2-11

 

Air Flow Guidelines 2-15

 

 

 

Temperature and Humidity Guidelines 2-17

 

 

Power Connection Guidelines 2-17

 

 

AC-Powered Routers

2-18

 

 

DC-Powered Routers

2-19

 

 

NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines

2-22

 

 

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Site Wiring Guidelines 2-24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Port Connection Guidelines

2-25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

2-26

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

2-27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Console Port Signals

2-28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP Ethernet Port Connections

2-29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP RJ-45 Ethernet Connections

2-31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP MII Ethernet Connections

2-33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRP Port Connection Guidelines

2-36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines 2-36

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

2-38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRP Console Port Signals

2-39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRP Ethernet Connections

2-40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRP RJ-45 Ethernet Connections

2-42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alarm Card Connection Guidelines

2-45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Router 3-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C H A P T E R 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Installation Considerations and Requirements

 

3-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Required Tools and Equipment

3-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unpacking and Positioning the Router

3-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Removing the Front Covers from Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

3-4

 

 

 

 

 

Removing the Front Cover from Cisco 12016 Enhanced Series Routers

3-6

 

 

 

 

 

Rack-Mounting the Router Chassis

3-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verifying Rack Dimensions

3-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing Center-Mount Brackets—Optional

3-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Chassis Rack-Mounting Platform

3-13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unpack and Position the Router

3-15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Chassis into the Rack

3-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

3-21

 

 

 

 

 

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Connecting to the Front Grounding Receptacle

3-22

Connecting to the Top Rear Receptacle 3-24

 

Attaching the Vertical Cable-Management Trough

3-25

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables 3-27

Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

3-31

 

Connecting to the GRP Console Port

3-32

 

Connecting to the GRP Auxiliary Port

3-33

 

Connecting to the GRP Ethernet Port

3-33

 

RJ-45 Connection 3-35

 

 

MII Connection 3-35

 

 

Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

3-36

 

Connecting to the PRP Console Port

3-37

 

Connecting to the PRP Auxiliary Port

3-38

 

Connecting to the PRP Ethernet Ports

3-38

 

 

 

Connecting an Alarm Card Cable 3-40

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf 3-41

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting Power to the AC-Input Power Shelf

3-41

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting Power to the DC-Input Power Shelf

3-42

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

3-47

 

 

 

Installing the Front Cover of Cisco 12010 Enhanced Series Routers

3-49

 

System Startup and Basic Configuration 4-1

 

 

 

 

C H A P T E R 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources of Cisco IOS Software

4-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preconfiguration Requirements

4-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boot Process Overview 4-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Powering On the Router and Observing the Boot Process 4-4

 

 

 

 

 

Manually Booting the System

4-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

Locating a Valid Cisco IOS Software Image 4-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Booting from the Cisco IOS Software Image

4-12

 

 

 

 

 

Configuring the Router

4-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cisco IOS User Interface 4-15

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cisco IOS User Interface Command Modes 4-15

 

 

 

 

 

User EXEC Mode 4-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Privileged EXEC Mode 4-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Global Configuration Mode 4-17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Setup for Configuration Changes 4-18

 

 

 

 

 

 

Configuring Global Parameters Using the Setup Facility

4-22

 

 

 

Configuring Network Interfaces 4-24

 

 

 

 

 

 

Checking the Software Version Number and Installed Interfaces 4-26

 

 

Using Global Configuration Mode 4-27

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verifying Running Configuration File Settings

4-28

 

 

 

 

 

Saving the Running Configuration Settings to NVRAM

4-29

 

 

 

 

Viewing the Running Configuration Settings

4-30

 

 

 

 

 

Configuring the Software Configuration Register

4-31

 

 

 

 

 

Setting Software Configuration Settings 4-33

 

 

 

 

 

Changing Software Configuration Register Settings 4-35

 

 

 

 

Low-Order Bits in the Software Configuration Register

4-37

 

 

 

 

High-Order Bits in the Software Configuration Register

4-39

 

 

 

 

Recovering a Lost Password 4-41

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using RP Flash Memory Cards 4-44

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing and Removing a Flash Memory Card 4-44

 

 

 

 

 

Formatting a New Flash Memory Card 4-47

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specifying a Cisco IOS Software Image to Boot the System

4-48

 

 

 

Flash Memory Commands 4-49

 

 

 

 

 

 

pwd Command 4-49

 

 

 

 

 

 

cd Command

4-49

 

 

 

 

 

 

dir Command

4-50

 

 

 

 

 

 

delete Command 4-50

 

 

 

 

 

 

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squeeze Command 4-51

 

 

Booting from Flash Memory 4-52

 

 

Copying Image Files to or From Flash Memory

4-52

 

Copying a Cisco IOS Software Image into a Flash Memory Card 4-54

 

Copying Cisco IOS Software Images Between Flash Memory Cards 4-56

 

Copying System Configuration Files Between RP Memory and a Flash

 

Memory Card 4-57

 

 

Booting a New Cisco IOS Software Image from a Flash Memory

 

Card 4-62

 

 

Recovering from Locked Blocks in Flash Memory Cards 4-62

 

Post-Installation Procedures 4-63

 

 

Troubleshooting the Installation 5-1

 

C H A P T E R 5

 

 

Troubleshooting Overview 5-2

 

 

Troubleshooting Using a Subsystem Approach

5-2

 

Normal Router Startup Sequence 5-3

 

 

Identifying Startup Issues 5-4

 

 

Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem 5-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the AC-Input Power Subsystem

5-6

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the DC-Input Power Subsystem

5-10

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Power Subsystem Troubleshooting Information

5-14

 

Troubleshooting the Power Distribution System

5-15

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the Processor Subsystem 5-17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the RP 5-18

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting Using the RP Alphanumeric Display

5-19

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting Line Cards 5-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting Using the Line Card Alphanumeric Display

5-22

 

Troubleshooting Using the Alarm Cards 5-27

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monitoring Critical, Major, and Minor Alarm Status

5-28

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the Switch Fabric 5-29

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Analyzing the Data

5-30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

crc16 Output

5-30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Parity and Request Errors

5-33

 

 

 

 

 

Properly Seating Switch Fabric Cards

 

5-35

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the Cooling Subsystem

5-36

 

 

 

 

 

Blower Module Operation

5-38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power Supply Operation

5-38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overtemperature Conditions

5-39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isolating Cooling Subsystem Problems

5-39

 

 

 

 

Router Field Diagnostics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C H A P T E R

6

 

6-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnostics Overview

6-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Downloading the Diagnostic Image

6-3

 

 

 

 

 

Field-Programmable Gate Array Overview

 

6-3

 

 

 

 

 

Upgrading an FPGA Image on a Line Card 6-5

 

 

 

 

Using the diag Command

6-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic Commands for Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816

 

 

 

 

RouterLine Cards

6-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic Commands for Cisco 12000 Series Rout Processors 6-9

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic Commands for Cisco 12000 Series Switch Fabric Cards and Clock

 

 

 

 

Scheduler Cards 6-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic Command Reference Table

6-9

 

 

 

 

 

diag Command Output Examples

6-13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Testing Without the verbose Option

6-13

 

 

 

 

 

Testing Using the verbose Option

6-14

 

 

 

 

 

Displaying Previous Test Results

6-16

 

 

 

 

 

Maintaining the Router

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C H A P T E R

7

 

7-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prerequisites and Preparation

7-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Powering Off the Router

7-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Removing and Installing the Front Covers and Bezel Extenders on Original Cisco 12000 Series Routers 7-3

Removing the Front Covers 7-3

Installing the Front Covers 7-4

Attaching Bezel Extenders to the Front Cover 7-6

Removing and Replacing the Air Filter Door Front Cover 7-9

Removing and Installing Front Doors on Cisco 12016 Enhanced Series

Routers 7-13

Cleaning or Replacing the Chassis Air Filter 7-17

Cleaning or Replacing the Chassis Air Filter on Cisco 12016 Original Series

Routers 7-18

Cleaning or Replacing the Chassis Air Filter on Cisco 12016 Enhanced Series

Routers 7-22

 

Removing and Replacing Blower Modules 7-24

 

 

 

 

Upper and Lower Blower Module Orientation 7-25

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the Blower Installation 7-28

 

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing AC and DC Power Subsystem Components

7-29

 

Installation Guidelines 7-29

 

 

 

 

 

Power Supply and Power Shelf Compatibility 7-30

 

 

 

Installing Upgrade Kits 7-32

 

 

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing an AC Power Supply 7-33

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the AC Power Supply Installation

7-42

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing the Standard AC-Input Power Shelf 7-44

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing the Optional 2-Level AC-Input Power Shelf

7-51

 

Troubleshooting the AC Power Shelf Installation

7-57

 

 

 

Upgrading the AC-Input Power Shelf

7-59

 

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing a DC PEM

7-60

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the DC PEM Installation 7-66

 

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing the DC-Input Power Shelf 7-68

 

 

 

Troubleshooting the DC Power Shelf Installation

7-77

 

 

 

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Removing and Replacing Cards from the Chassis

7-79

Removing and Replacing RP and Line Cards from the Upper and Lower Card

Cages 7-79

 

 

Removing and Replacing an Alarm Card 7-81

 

Removing and Replacing Switch Fabric Cards

7-84

Upgrading the Switch Fabric

7-86

 

Upgrade Requirements

7-86

 

Upgrade Procedures 7-87

 

 

 

Removing and Installing a Chassis

7-88

 

 

 

 

Preparing the Replacement Chassis

7-90

 

 

 

Preparing the Installed Chassis for Removal

7-90

 

 

Removing and Installing System Components

7-91

 

 

Removing the Chassis from the Equipment Rack 7-92

 

 

Installing the Replacement Chassis

7-97

 

 

 

Removing and Replacing a Power Bus Board Fuse

7-97

 

 

Technical Specifications A-1

 

 

 

A P P E N D I X

A

 

 

 

 

 

Router Specifications A-1

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance and Safety Information

A-5

 

 

 

 

Site Log B-1

 

 

 

A P P E N D I X

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I N D E X

 

 

 

 

 

 

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C H A P T E R 1

Product Overview

This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 series routers. It contains physical descriptions of the router hardware and major components, as well as functional descriptions of the hardware-relatedfeatures.

Introduction

The routers described in this guide are part of the Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 series routers and include:

The original Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 series routers.

The newer Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 enhanced series routers. The enhanced series of routers use higher capacity power supplies, more powerful blower modules, and have newly designed front doors.

The capacity of the router switch fabric differentiates each model:

Cisco 12016 Router—2.5-Gbpsswitch fabric

Cisco 12416 Route—10-Gbpsswitch fabric

Cisco 12816 Router—40-Gbpsswitch fabric

Other than their various capacities, these routers are nearly identical. Differences between each router are described where necessary, and unless otherwise noted, the information in this publication applies to all routers.

 

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

Physical and Functional Description of Router

The Cisco 12000 series router chassis is a sheet-metalenclosure that houses router components. The major components consist of three power supplies, upper and lower line card cages, a switch fabric card cage, and upper and lower blower modules. Power is distributed to these components over the chassis backplane.

All router models contain the following major components (Figure 1-1):

Power shelf and power supplies—ThreeAC or DC power entry modules (PEMs) provide power to the router. See the“AC and DC Power Subsystems” section on page 1-4 for additional information.

Upper blower module—Suppliescooling air to the upper half of the router so it does not overheat. See the“Blower Module” section on page 1-44 for additional information.

Upper and lower cable management brackets—Usedto neatly route line card cables. See the“Upper and Lower Cable Management Brackets” section on page 1-43 for additional information.

Upper Line card and Route Processor card cage—Has8user-configurableslots that support a combination of line cards, a route processor (RP), and an alarm card. See the“Alarm Card, Line Card, and Rout Processor Overview” section on page 1-21 for additional information.

Switch fabric card cage—Locatedbehind the air filter door, this card cage contains 5 slots for the switch fabric card set. The switch fabric card set is made up of 3 switch fabric cards (SFCs) and 2 clock scheduler cards (CSCs). See the“Switch Fabric Overview” section on page 1-19 for additional information.

Lower Line card and Route Processor card cage—Has8user-configurableslots that support a combination of line cards, a redundant route processor (RP), and an alarm card. See the“Alarm Card, Line Card, and Rout Processor Overview” section on page 1-21 for additional information.

Lower blower module—Suppliescooling air to the lower half of the router so it does not overheat. See the“Blower Module” section on page 1-44 for additional information.

Chassis backplane (not shown)—Distributespower to card cages and to the blower modules.

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

Figure 1-1Cisco 12016 Series RouterComponents—FrontView

Power shelf and power supplies

Upper blower module

Upper cable

 

 

 

management

 

 

 

bracket

0

0

 

 

1

1

 

RP

2

2

 

3

3

AUX

 

4

4

 

 

5

5

 

 

 

 

CON

 

 

 

SOLE

 

 

6

 

Alarm card

 

7

 

 

9

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

10

 

Upper card cage

 

11

 

 

 

FAST

 

/ /

/ /

ETERNET

Air filter door

Switch fabric card cage

(behind filter door)

Alarm card

Lower card cage

Lower cable management bracket

LESO ONC

AUX

ETERNET

/ /

/ /

FAST

 

 

 

11

 

 

10

 

 

9

 

 

8

 

 

7

 

 

6

 

 

5

5

 

4

4

 

3

3

 

2

2

 

1

1

 

0

0

Lower blower module

26194

 

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

AC and DC Power Subsystems

A router ships with either an AC or DC powered system. Source power connects to the power shelf at the back of the chassis which route power to the power supplies, also referred to as power entry modules (PEMs).

Standard AC Power Shelf

The standard AC-inputpower subsystem consists of asingle-levelAC-inputpower shelf that house three (2000 W original series or 2400 W enhanced series) AC power supplies which supply full redundant power to the router.Figure 1-2 shows the standard power shelf housing original series 2000 W power supplies.

The power supplies participate in an N+1 redundant current-sharingscheme that is divided among all three power supplies. If one power supply fails, the system can continue to operate temporarily, (depending on your system configuration) with the remaining two power supplies. Failed power supplies should be replaced as soon as possible to ensure full redundancy.

Caution To ensure that the chassis configuration complies with the required power budgets, use theon-linepower calculator. Failure to properly verify the configuration may result in an unpredictable state if one of the power units fails. Contact your local sales representative for assistance.

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

Figure 1-2StandardAC-InputPower Subsystem—2000W

26198

Caution A router equipped with the standard AC power subsystem must be operated with three power supplies installed in the power shelf at all times for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).

 

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

AC power to the router is provided through power cords connected from AC power outlets to connectors on back of the power shelf as shown in Figure 1-3.

Figure 1-3Standard Power ShelfAC-InputConnections

Power cord retention clip

26199

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

Optional AC Power Shelf

The power subsystem consists of a double-levelAC-inputpower shelf with bays for 4AC-inputpower supplies.Figure 1-4 shows the optional power shelf housing original series 2000 W power supplies. It attaches to the top of the router chassis and is secured to the chassis the same way as the standardAC-inputpower shelf.

Note A router equipped with the optionalAC-inputpower subsystem stands 77.5 inches (196.85 cm) tall and does not fit in a standard7-foot(2.1 m) rack.

The 4 power supplies in the optional power shelf participate in an N+2 redundant current-sharingscheme in which current sharing is divided among all 4 power supplies. Up to two power supplies can fail and the system can continue to operate temporarily, (depending on your system configuration) using the remaining two power supplies. Failed supplies should be replaced as soon as possible to ensure full redundancy.

Caution To ensure that the chassis configuration complies with the required power budgets, use theon-linepower calculator. Failure to properly verify the configuration may result in an unpredictable state if one of the power units fails. Contact your local sales representative for assistance.

 

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

Figure 1-4OptionalAC-InputPowerSubsystem—2000W

Caution A router equipped with the optional AC power subsystem must be operated with 4 power supplies installed in the power shelf at all times for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).

 

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Chapter 1 Product Overview

Physical and Functional Description of Router

AC power to the router is provided through power cords connected from AC power outlets to the connectors on the back of the power shelf as shown in Figure 1-5.

Figure 1-5Optional Power ShelfAC-InputConnections

Power cords

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Chapter 1 Product Overview

Physical and Functional Description of Router

AC Power Supplies

Each AC PEM converts 200 to 240 VAC into -48VDC, which is distributed through the chassis backplane to all cards, RPs, and the blower modules.

Figure 1-6 identifies the components of a 2000 W AC power supply.

Figure 1-62000 W AC Power Supply Components

Handle

PWR OK

FAULT

TEMP

I LIM

PWR OK

FAULT

TEMP

I LIM

Ejector lever

26200

 

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Figure 1-7 identifies the components of a 2500 W AC power supply.

Figure 1-72500 W AC Power Supply Components

1

2

Pwr Ok

Fault Temp

OC

Pwr Ok

Fault Temp

OC

1

Ejector handle

2

Captive screw

 

 

 

 

The status LEDs on an AC PEM provide information about the current operational status of the power supply:

PWR OK (green)—Indicatesthat the power supply module is operating normally.

FAULT (yellow)—Indicatesthat a fault is detected within the PEM.

TEMP (yellow)—Indicatesthe PEM is in an overtemperature condition and shutdown has occurred.

 

 

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Physical and Functional Description of Router

ILMI (yellow)—Indicatesthe PEM is operating in acurrent-limitingcondition.

For additional information about troubleshooting AC PEMs, see the “Troubleshooting the AC-Input Power Subsystem” section on page 5-6.

DC Power Shelf

A DC-inputpower subsystem consists of aDC-inputpower shelf that houses 4 (2000 W or 2400 W) DC PEMs that provide full redundant power to the router.Figure 1-8 shows aDC-inputpower shelf housing original series 2000 W power supplies.

The Cisco 12416 and 12816 DC powered systems (part numbers GSR16/320-DCandGSR16/320-DC)are equipped with 4 PEMs. The chassis is electrically divided between the PEMS. These sections are referred to as power zones and are labeled accordingly:

Two PEMs power the upper card cage (Zone 1)

Two PEMs power the lower card cage (Zone 2)

Each zone provides power to one blower, one alarm card, line cards and route processor cards.

Zone 2 also supplies power to all switch fabric cards. The result is that there is less power available for line cards in Zone 2, limiting the number of high-poweredline cards that can be configured in the lower cage.

Caution To ensure that the chassis configuration complies with the required power budgets, contact your sales representative to provide you with the required power calculator. Failure to properly verify the configuration may result in an unpredictable state if one of the power units fails.

Contact your local sales representative for assistance.

In the DC-inputpower configuration:

Modules A1 and B1 provide redundant power for system load zone 1 (the upper blower module and the upper card cage).

Modules A2 and B2 provide redundant power for system load zone 2 (the switch fabric card cage, the lower card cage, and the lower blower module).

 

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Figure 1-8DC-InputPowerShelf—2000Watts

PWR OK

 

 

PWR OK

FAULT

PWR OK

PWR OK

 

FAULT

TEMP

FAULT

FAULT

 

TEMP

 

TEMP

 

TEMP

26201

Caution A router configured for source DC operation must be operated with 4DC-inputPEMs installed at all times for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).

Note DC PEMs support online insertion and removal (OIR) which means that you can remove and replace one PEM in each load zone (A1 or B1; A2 or B2) while the system remains powered on.

DC power to the router is provided from cables from a DC power source that are connected to threaded terminal studs on the back of the DC-inputpower shelf as shown inFigure 1-9.

 

 

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Figure 1-9DC-InputPower Shelf Connections

B1

A1A1+ A2A2+

B2+ B2B1+ B1-

Ground

27964

Cover with slotted screw hole; fastens to standoff in middle of cable connection area

 

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DC Power Supplies

Each DC PEM operates from a nominal source DC voltage of –48to–60VDC and requires a dedicated 60 amp service.

Figure 1-10 identifies the components of a 2000 W DC power supply.

Figure 1-102000 W DC Power Supply Components

LEDs

Handle

PWR OK

FAULT

TEMP

PWR OK

FAULT

TEMP

Circuit breaker

 

Captive screw

 

 

 

 

Ejector lever

26203

 

 

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Figure 1-11 identifies the components of a 2400 W DC power supply.

Figure 1-112400 W DC Power Supply Components

2

1

3

PWR OK

FAULT

TEMP

OC

4

PWR OK FAULT

TEMP

OC

129494

1

Handle

3

Ejector lever

 

 

 

 

2

Fan

4

Power switch

 

 

 

 

The status LEDs on a DC PEM provide information about the current operational status of the power supply:

PWR OK (green)—Indicatesthat the power supply module is operating normally.

FAULT (yellow)—Indicatesthat a fault is detected within the PEM.

TEMP (yellow)—Indicatesthe PEM is in an overtemperature condition and shutdown has occurred.

 

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Chassis Card Cages

For additional information about troubleshooting DC PEMs, see the “Troubleshooting the DC-Input Power Subsystem” section on page 5-10.

Chassis Card Cages

There are three integral card cages in the chassis: the upper card cage, the lower card cage, and the switch fabric card cage (see Figure 1-1).

Upper Card Cage

The upper card cage has eight user-configurableslots that support a combination of line cards, an alarm card, and an RP.

Alarm—Thefarleft slot is a dedicated slot for an alarm card.

Slots 0 through 6—Canbe populated with any line cards supported by the router.

Slot 7—Thefarright slot is reserved for the RP.

 

 

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Chassis Card Cages

Lower Card Cage

The lower card cage also has eight user-configurableslots that support additional line cards, an alarm card, and an optional, redundant RP.

Note The lower card cage is an inverted, orhead-down, copy of the upper card cage, which means that cards are installed in an inverted orhead-downorientation. The orientation of the slots is opposite that of the upper card cage.

Slot 8—Thefarleft slot is reserved for an optional redundant RP.

Note This slot may be used for a line card if you are not using an redundant RP.

Slots 9 through 15—Canbe populated with any line cards supported by the router.

Alarm—Thefarright slot is a dedicated slot for an alarm card.

Switch Fabric Card Cage

The router ships from the factory with 2 CSCs and 3 SFCs installed in five of the eight slots in the switch fabric card cage.

The 2 CSCs are installed in slot 0 (CSC0) or slot 1 (CSC1)

The 3 SFCs are installed in slot 2 (SFC0), slot 3 (SFC1), and slot 4 (SFC2).

Three non-workingslots with no backplane connectors. Thesenon-workingslots are not labeled, but there is a blank filler panel installed in the far left slot to help maintain proper air flow through the chassis.

Caution Do not remove the blank filler panel unless instructed to do so by a Cisco support representative.

 

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Switch Fabric Overview

Switch Fabric Overview

The switch fabric provides synchronized gigabit-speedconnections between line cards and the RP. The switch fabric card cage is located behind the air filter door and consists of 2 clock and scheduler cards (CSCs) and 3 switch fabric cards (SFCs). One CSC and the 3 SFCs are the active switch fabric; the second CSC provides redundancy for the other 4 cards.

Note 10-Gbpsand40-Gbpsswitch fabrics do not operate in1/4-bandwidthmode as they did in some earlier models of the Cisco 12000 series routers. You must have at least one CSC and three SFCs for the system to function. You can add an additional CSC for redundancy.

The combination of CSCs and SFCs make up the 2.5-Gbps,10-Gbps,or40-Gbpsper-slotswitch fabric. Routers are identified by the switch fabrics they use:

Cisco 12010: 2.5-Gbpsswitch fabric

Cisco 12410: 10-Gbpsswitch fabric

Cisco 12810: 40-Gbpsswitch fabric

Each SFC or CSC provides a 2.5-Gbps,10-Gbps,or40-Gbpsfull-duplexconnection to each line card in the system. For example, in a Cisco 12416 router with 16 line cards, each with 2 x 10 Gbps capacity (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 16x 20 Gbps = 320 Gbps.

Note The Cisco 12000 series router supports online insertion and removal (OIR), allowing you to remove and replace a card while the router remains powered on.

Switch Fabric Card Functionality

The core of the router is a crossbar switch fabric that provides synchronized connections between the line cards and the RP. The switch fabric consists of 2 clock scheduler cards (CSCs) and 3 switch fabric cards (SFCs) installed in the switch fabric card cage. One CSC and the three SFCs are the active switch fabric; the second CSC provides redundancy for the other 4 cards.

 

 

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Switch Fabric Overview

The router also ships with a blank switch fabric card installed in the far left (non-working)slot of the switch fabric card cage. The blank filler panel balances the air flow through the switch fabric card cage which helps maintain proper air flow through the chassis.

Caution Do not remove the blank filler panel unless instructed to do so by a Cisco support representative.

Clock Scheduler Cards

Clock scheduler cards provide the following functionality:

Scheduler—Handlesall scheduling requests from the line cards for access to the switch fabric.

System clock—Suppliesthe synchronizing signal to all SFCs, line cards, and the RP. The system clock synchronizes data transfers between line cards or between line cards and the RP through the switch fabric.

Switch fabric—Carriesthe user traffic between line cards or between the RP and a line card. The switch fabric on the CSC is identical to the switch fabric on the SFC.

The second CSC provides redundancy for the data path, scheduler, and reference clock. Traffic between the line cards and the switch fabric is monitored constantly. If the system detects a loss of synchronization (LOS), it automatically activates the data paths on the redundant CSC so data flows across the redundant paths. The switch to the redundant CSC occurs within The switch to the redundant CSC occurs within sub-seconds(the actual switch time depends on your configuration and its scale).

Switch Fabric Cards

The switch fabric cards augment the traffic capacity of the router. SFCs contain switch fabric circuitry that can only carry user traffic between line cards or between the RP and the line cards. SFCs receive all scheduling information and the system clock signal from the CSCs.

 

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Alarm Card, Line Card, and Rout Processor Overview

Alarm Card, Line Card, and Rout Processor Overview

This section provides general information about alarm cards, line cards and types of route processors installed in the router.

Note The Cisco 12000 series router supports online insertion and removal (OIR), allowing you to remove and replace a card while the router remains powered on.

Alarm Cards

The router is equipped with 2 alarm cards:

One alarm card occupies the dedicated far left slot of the upper card cage.

The other alarm card occupies the dedicated far right slot of the lower card cage.

The alarm card slots differ from the rest of the card cage slots in that it is labeled as an “alarm” card slot, is physically narrower than the other slots, and has a different backplane connector.

 

 

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Some of the functions that the alarm cards provide are:

Supplies +5 VDC to the MBus modules on router components (see AC and DC Power Subsystems, page 1-4).

Displays alarm severity levels (critical, major, and minor) detected by the system through the MBus.

Provides connections for an external alarm system.

Displays the status of the alarm cards, clock scheduler cards, and switch fabric cards.

The following components and LEDs are on the front panel of the alarm card (Figure 1-12):

Critical, Major, and Minor LEDs that identify system level alarm conditions.

A switch to shut off an audio alarm.

Cable connection for an external alarm (labeled Alarm)

Alarm card LEDs:

ENABLED (green)—Thealarm card is operational and functioning properly.

FAIL (yellow)—Thealarm card in that slot is faulty.

A pair of status LEDs that correspond to each of the 5 card slots in the switch fabric card cage (2 CSCs and 3 SFCs):

ENABLED (green)

On—Thecard installed in that slot is operational and functioning properly.

Off—Eitherthe slot is empty or the card installed in that slot is faulty.

FAIL (yellow)—Thecard in that slot is faulty.

 

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Figure 1-12Alarm Card Components and LEDs

 

Critical, major, and

 

 

Handle

minor alarm LEDs

 

Pin 1

 

CRITICAL

ACO/LT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAJORMINOR

 

ALARM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pin 25

 

 

Audio alarm

 

 

CRITICAL

cutoff switch

 

 

MAJORMINOR

 

 

 

 

FAIL

 

 

CSC

 

SFC

 

FAIL

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

0

1

0

1

2

 

 

 

CSC

 

SFC

26867

FAIL

FAIL

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

ENABLED

0

1

0

1

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALARM

Clock and scheduler card and switch fabric card LEDs

Line Cards

Up to 15 Cisco 12000 series line cards can be installed in the routers upper and lower card cages to support a variety of physical network media. Ports and connectors on the line card front panels provide interfaces for external connections. Line cards communicate with the RP and exchange packet data with each other through the switch fabric cards.

Caution Any unoccupied card slot in the upper and lower card cages must have a blank filler panel installed to meet electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements and to ensure proper air flow through the chassis. Also, if the front panel of a line card does not completely fill the card slot opening, a narrow card filler panel must be installed to meet the EMC requirements.

A cable management bracket on the front panel of each line card helps to organize the interface cables connected to that line card.

 

 

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Route Processor Selection

Two types of RPs are available: a Gigabit Route Processor (GRP) or a Performance Route Processor (PRP). The GRP is the route processor that shipped with earlier Cisco 12000 series routers; the PRP is the route processor shipping with all current Cisco 12000 series routers. You cannot mix GRPs with PRPs. If you install a redundant RP, it must be the same type as the primary RP.

Note This publication uses the term route processor (RP) to indicate either a Gigabit Route Processor (GRP) or a Performance Route Processor (PRP) unless otherwise specified.

Each system includes at least one RP that performs a variety of functions including the following:

Downloads the Cisco IOS software to all installed line cards at power-on.

Processes the network routing protocols and distributes updates to Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) tables on the line cards.

Communicates with the line cards, either through the switch fabric or the maintenance bus (MBus):

The switch fabric connection is the main data path for distributing routing tables, as well as packets passed between the RP and the line cards.

The MBus connection allows the RP to download a system bootstrap image, collect or load diagnostic information, and perform general, internal system maintenance operations.

Gigabit Route Processor Overview

The GRP uses an IDT R5000 Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) CPU that runs at an external bus clock speed of 100 MHz and has an internal clock speed of 200 MHz.

Figure 1-13 identifies the connectors and LEDs on the GRP front panel.

 

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Figure 1-13Gigabit Route Processor Front Panel

EJECT

-1

RESET

 

 

COLL RX

-45

SLOT

 

 

RJ

 

-0

 

 

 

 

 

SLOT

AUX

CONSOLE

 

 

 

 

 

LINK

TX

MII

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

 

 

5

GIGABIT ROUTE PROCESSOR

6

7

129306

 

1

PCMCIA flash card slots, eject buttons, and

5

RJ-45Ethernet port and data status LEDs

 

slot LEDs

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Reset button

6

MII Ethernet connection

 

 

 

 

3

Auxiliary serial port

7

Alphanumeric message displays

 

 

 

 

4

Console serial port

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRP PCMCIA Card Slots and Status LEDs

Two PCMCIA card slots (slot 0 and slot 1) provide the GRP with additional flash memory capacity or other input/output (I/O) device capability.

Caution The GRP only supports +5.2 VDC Type I and Type II devices. It does not support +3.3 VDC PCMCIA devices.

Status LEDs (Slot-0/Slot-1)indicate when the flash memory card or I/O device in that slot is accessed. Each slot has an eject button to remove the card from the slot (Figure 1-14).

 

 

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Figure 1-14Slot ActivityLEDs—FrontPanel

EJECT

SLOTSLOT

-

-

0

1

AUX RESET

129254

 

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GRP Reset Switch

Access to the (soft) reset switch is through a small opening in the GRP front panel. To press the switch, insert a paper clip or similar small pointed object into the opening (see Figure 1-13 on page 1-25).

Caution The reset switch isnot a mechanism for resetting the GRP and reloading the Cisco IOS image. It is intended for software development use only. To prevent system problems or loss of data, use the reset switch only on the advice of Cisco service personnel.

Pressing the reset switch causes a nonmaskable interrupt (NMI) and places the GRP in ROM monitor mode. When the GRP enters ROM monitor mode, its behavior depends on the setting of the GRP software configuration register. For example, if the boot field of the software configuration register is set to:

0x0—TheGRP remains at the ROM monitor prompt (rommon>) and waits for a user command to boot the system manually.

0x1—Thesystem automatically boots the first Cisco IOS image found in flash memory on the GRP.

For more information on the software configuration register, see the “Configuring the Software Configuration Register” section on page 4-31.

 

 

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GRP Auxiliary and Console Ports

The auxiliary and console ports on the GRP are EIA/TIA-232(also known asRS-232)asynchronous serial ports. These ports connect external devices to monitor and manage the system.

The auxiliary port—A(male) plug that provides a data terminal equipment (DTE) interface. The auxiliary port supports flow control and is often used to connect a modem, a channel service unit (CSU), or other optional equipment for Telnet management.

The console port—A(female) receptacle that provides a datacircuit-terminatingequipment (DCE) interface for connecting a console terminal.

Caution To maintain Class B EMI compliance, use shielded cables when you connect to the auxiliary and console ports of original GRPs (Part Numbers GRP= andGRP-B=).An updated version of theGRP-B=board (Rev. F0) does not require shielded cables for Class B compliance.

GRP Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

The GRP has two types of Ethernet connections for Telnet use:

RJ-45port—An8-pinmedia-dependentinterface (MDI)RJ-45port for either IEEE 802.310BASE-T(10 Mbps) or IEEE 802.3u100BASE-TX(100 Mbps) Ethernet connections.

MII connector—A40-pinmedia-independentinterface (MII) that provides additional flexibility for Ethernet connections. The pinout of this standard40-pininterface is defined by the IEEE 802.3u standard.

Note TheRJ-45and MII interfaces on the GRP represent two physical connection options for one Ethernet interface; therefore, you can useeither theRJ-45connection or the MII connection, but not both simultaneously.

 

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The transmission speed of the Ethernet port is not user-configurable.You set the speed through an autosensing scheme on the GRP which is determined by the network that the Ethernet port is connected to. However, even at an autosensed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the Ethernet port can only provide a usable bandwidth of substantially less than 100 Mbps. You can expect a maximum usable bandwidth of approximately 20 Mbps when using either the MII orRJ-45connection.

The following LEDs on the front panel indicate traffic status and port selection (Figure 1-15):

LINK, COLL, TX, RX—Indicatelink activity (LINK), collision detection (COLL), data transmission (TX), and data reception (RX).

Note These LEDs are only used by theRJ-45Ethernet connector and are disabled when the MII Ethernet port is in use.

MII/RJ-45—Indicateswhich Ethernet port is selected.

Figure 1-15Port ActivityLEDs—FrontPanel

LINK

 

TX

COLL

 

RX

MII

RJ - 45

H10762

 

 

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GRP Alphanumeric Message Displays

The alphanumeric message displays are organized in two rows of four LED characters (Figure 1-16).

Figure 1-16Alphanumeric MessageDisplays—FrontPanel

PROCESSOR

Upper alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

Lower alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

H10780

The alphanumeric message displays show router status messages during the boot process, and after the boot process is complete.

During the boot process, the message displays are controlled directly by the MBus module.

After the boot process, the message displays are controlled by Cisco IOS software (through the MBus).

The alphanumeric message displays also provide information about different levels of system operation, including the status of the GRP, router error messages, and user-definedstatus and error messages

Note A complete, descriptive list of all system and error messages appears in theCisco IOS System Error Messages publication.

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GRP Memory Components

This section describes various types of memory used on the GRP to support router functions. Table 1-1 provides a quick reference of the different types of memory, andFigure 1-17 shows the location on the GRP board.

Table 1-1GRP Memory Components

Type

Size

Quantity

Description

Location

 

 

 

 

 

DRAM

1281 or

1 or 2

Uses 64 MB or 128 MB DIMMs

U39 (bank 1)

 

256 MB

 

(based on DRAM configuration) for

U42 (bank 2)

 

 

 

main Cisco IOS software functions

 

 

 

 

 

 

SRAM

512 KB (fixed)

Secondary CPU cache memory

 

 

 

functions

 

 

 

 

 

 

NVRAM

512 KB (fixed)

System configuration files, register

 

 

 

settings, and logs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flash memory

8 MB SIMM

1

Cisco IOS software images and other

U17

 

 

 

user-definedfiles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flash memory

20 MB1

1 or 2

Cisco IOS software images, system

Slots 0 and 1

card

 

 

configuration files, and other

 

PCMCIA2

 

 

user-definedfiles on one or two flash

 

 

 

 

memory cards

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flash boot

512 KB

1

Flash EPROM for the ROM monitor

ROM

 

 

program boot image

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.Default shipping configuration.

2.Type I or Type II PCMCIA cards can be used in either slot.

 

 

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Figure 1-17GRP Memory Locations

Bank 2

 

U42

 

 

DRAM DIMMs

 

U39

 

 

Bank 1

 

 

 

U17

 

 

CT

-1

ET

LL

RX

JE

T

CO

E

SLO

ES

 

 

 

T-0

R

 

 

 

SLO

AUX

 

 

 

 

K TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIN

 

 

Flash

 

SIMM

R

129255

J-45

 

II

GIGABIT ROUTE PROCESSOR

M

PCMCIA slot-0andslot-1

 

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GRP DRAM

The GRP uses Extended Data-Out(EDO) Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) to store routing tables, protocols, network accounting applications, and to run Cisco IOS software.

Table 1-2 lists the DRAM configurations for the GRP.

Table 1-2GRP DRAM Configurations

Total DRAM

Part Number

DRAM Sockets

Number of DIMMs

 

 

 

 

 

128

MB1

MEM-GRP/LC-64(=)

U39 (bank 1)

Two 64 MB

 

 

 

U42 (bank 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

128

MB

MEM-GRP/LC-128(=)

U39 (bank 1)

One 128 MB

 

 

 

 

 

256

MB

MEM-GRP/LC-256(=)

U39 (bank 1)

Two 128 MB

 

 

 

U42 (bank 2)

 

 

 

 

 

1. Default shipping configuration.

 

 

Caution DRAM DIMMs must be3.3-volt,60-nanoseconddevices only. Do not attempt to install other devices in the DIMM sockets. To prevent memory problems, use the Cisco approved memory products listed inTable 1-2.

GRP SRAM

Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) provides 512 KB of secondary CPU cache memory. Its principal function is to act as a staging area for routing table updates, and for information sent to and received from the line cards. SRAM is not user-configurableand cannot be upgraded in the field.

GRP NVRAM

Nonvolatile Random Access Memory (NVRAM) provides 512 KB of memory for system configuration files, software register settings, and environmental monitoring logs. Built-inlithium batteries retain the contents of NVRAM for a minimum of 5 years. NVRAM isnot user configurable and cannot be upgraded in the field.

 

 

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GRP Flash Memory

Use flash memory to store multiple Cisco IOS software and microcode images that you can use to operate the router. You can download new images to flash memory over the network (or from a local server) to replace an existing image, or to add it as an additional image. The router can be booted (manually or automatically) from any of the stored images in flash memory.

Flash memory also functions as a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server that allows other servers to boot remotely from the stored images, or to copy them into their own flash memory.

The system uses two types of flash memory:

Onboard flash memory (called bootflash) —Containsthe Cisco IOS boot image.

20 MB Type II PCMCIA flash memory cards (MEM-GRP-FL20=)—Containthe Cisco IOS software images.

Performance Route Processor Overview

The performance route processor (PRP) uses a Motorola PowerPC 7450 CPU that runs at an external bus clock speed of 133 MHz and has an internal clock speed of 667 MHz.

Figure 1-18 identifies the slots, ports, and LEDs on the PRP front panel.

Figure 1-18Performance Route Processor Front Panel

ETH 0

EJECT

SLOT

 

-1

 

-0

 

SLOT

PRIMARY

1

 

ETH 1

 

RX

EN

TX

 

LINK

PRIMARY

2

 

AUX

CONSOLE

 

 

 

 

RX

 

 

 

 

EN

TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESET

 

 

LINK

 

 

PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 1 (PRP-1)

 

 

 

 

129307

 

3

4

5

6

 

 

1

 

PCMCIA flash disk slots (shown with cover in

4

Console serial port

 

 

place) and slot LEDs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

RJ-45Ethernet ports and data status LEDs

5

Reset button

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

Auxiliary serial port

6

Alphanumeric message displays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PRP PCMCIA Card Slots and Status LEDs

Two PCMCIA card slots (slot 0 and slot 1) provide the PRP with additional flash memory capacity. All combinations of different flash devices are supported by the PRP. You can use ATA flash disks, Type 1 or Type 2 linear flash memory cards, or a combination of the two.

Note The PRP only supports +5.2 VDC flash memory devices. It doesnot support +3.3 VDC PCMCIA devices.

Status LEDs (Slot-0 /Slot-1)indicate when the flash memory card in that slot is accessed (seeFigure 1-18).Each slot has an eject button (located behind the cover) to remove a flash card from the slot.

PRP Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

The PRP has two 8-pinmedia-dependentinterface (MDI)RJ-45ports for either IEEE 802.310BASE-T(10 Mbps) or IEEE 802.3u100BASE-TX(100 Mbps) Ethernet connections. These ports are labeled ETH 0 and ETH 1.

The transmission speed of the Ethernet port is not user-configurable.You set the speed through an autosensing scheme on the PRP which is determined by the network that the Ethernet port is connected to. However, even at an autosensed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the Ethernet port can only provide a usable bandwidth of substantially less than 100 Mbps. You can expect a maximum usable bandwidth of approximately 20 Mbps when using an Ethernet connection.

 

 

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The following LEDs on the front panel indicate traffic status and port selection (Figure 1-19):

LINK, EN, TX, RX—Indicatelink activity (LINK), port enabled (EN), data transmission (TX), and data reception (RX).

PRIMARY—Indicateswhich Ethernet port is selected (ETH 0 or ETH 1).

Note Because both ports are supported on the PRP, ETH 0 is always on. ETH 1 lights when it is selected.

Figure 1-19Port ActivityLEDs—PartialFront Panel

ETH 0

-1SLOT0 - SLOT

PRIMARY

ETH 1

 

RX

EN

TX

 

LINK

PRIMARY

 

 

RX

EN

TX

 

LINK

 

70693

PRP Auxiliary and Console Ports

The auxiliary and console ports on the PRP are EIA/TIA-232(also known asRS-232)asynchronous serial ports. These ports connect external devices to monitor and manage the system.

The auxiliary port—A(male) plug that provides a data terminal equipment (DTE) interface. The auxiliary port supports flow control and is often used to connect a modem, a channel service unit (CSU), or other optional equipment for Telnet management.

The console port—A(female) receptacle that provides a datacircuit-terminatingequipment (DCE) interface for connecting a console terminal.

 

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PRP Reset Switch

Access to the (soft) reset switch is through a small opening in the PRP front panel (see Figure 1-18).To press the switch, insert a paper clip or similar small pointed object into the opening.

Caution The reset switch isnot a mechanism for resetting the PRP and reloading the Cisco IOS image. It is intended for software development use only. To prevent system problems or loss of data, use the reset switch only on the advice of Cisco service personnel.

Pressing the reset switch causes a nonmaskable interrupt (NMI) and places the PRP in ROM monitor mode. When the PRP enters ROM monitor mode, its behavior depends on the setting of the PRP software configuration register. For example, if the boot field of the software configuration register is set to:

0x0—ThePRP remains at the ROM monitor prompt (rommon>) and waits for a user command to boot the system manually.

0x1—Thesystem automatically boots the first Cisco IOS image found in flash memory on the PRP.

For more information on the software configuration register, see the “Configuring the Software Configuration Register” section on page 4-31.

 

 

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PRP Alphanumeric Message Displays

The alphanumeric message displays are organized in two rows of four LED characters each (Figure 1-20).

Figure 1-20Alphanumeric MessageDisplays—PartialFront Panel

PROCESSOR

Upper alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

Lower alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

H10780

The alphanumeric message displays show router status messages during the boot process, and after the boot process is complete.

During the boot process, the message displays are controlled directly by the MBus module.

After the boot process, the message displays are controlled by Cisco IOS software (through the MBus).

The alphanumeric message displays also provide information about different levels of system operation, including the status of the GRP, router error messages, and user-definedstatus and error messages

Note A complete, descriptive list of all system and error messages appears in theCisco IOS System Error Messages publication.

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PRP Memory Components

This section describes various types of memory used on the PRP to support router functions. Table 1-3 provides a quick reference of the different types of memory, andFigure 1-21 shows the location on the PRP board.

Table 1-3PRP Memory Components

Type

Size

Quantity

Description

Location

 

 

 

 

 

SDRAM

512 MB1,

1 or 2

Uses 512 MB or 1 GB DIMMs (based on

U15 (bank 1)

 

1

GB, or 2 GB

 

SDRAM configuration) for main Cisco IOS

U18 (bank 2)

 

 

 

 

software functions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SRAM

2

MB (fixed)

Secondary CPU cache memory functions

 

 

 

 

 

 

NVRAM

2

MB (fixed)

System configuration files, register settings,

 

 

 

 

and logs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flash

64 MB SIMM

1

Cisco IOS boot image (bootflash), crash

P3

memory

 

 

 

information, and other user-definedfiles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flash disk

64 MB1

1 or 2

Cisco IOS software images, system

Flash memory

(PCMCIA)

 

 

 

configuration files, and other user-defined

card slot 0 and

 

 

 

 

files on one or two Flash memory cards

slot 1

 

 

 

 

 

Flash boot

512 KB

1

Flash EPROM for the ROM monitor program

ROM

 

 

 

boot image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Default shipping configuration.

 

 

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Figure 1-21PRP Memory Locations

 

U18

Bank 2

Flash

P3

DRAM DIMMs

Bank 1

SIMM

 

U15

 

 

CT

-1

ETH 0

 

ETH 1

AUX

CONSOLE

EJE

SLOT

 

RX

 

RX

 

 

-0

 

 

 

 

 

 

SLOT

EN

TX

EN

TX

 

PRIMARY

LINK

PRIMARY

LINK

RESET

 

PCMCIA slot-1andslot-2(behind cover)

PERFORMANCE ROUTE PROCESSOR 1 (PRP-1)

129256

 

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PRP SDRAM

The PRP uses Error Checking and Correction (ECC) Synchronized Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM) to store routing tables, protocols, network accounting applications, and to run Cisco IOS software.

Table 1-4 lists the DRAM configurations for the PRP. If you are using:

One DIMM—Bank1 (U15) must be populated first.

Two DIMMs—Youcannot mix memory sizes; both banks must contain the same size DIMM.

Table 1-4PRP DRAM Configurations

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

SDRAM

Part Number

SDRAM Sockets

Number of DIMMs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

512 MB1

???(=)

U15 (bank 1)

One 512 MB DIMM

 

 

 

 

 

U18 (bank 2)

or

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two 256 MB DIMMs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 GB

???(=)

U15 (bank 1)

One 1 GB DIMM

 

 

 

 

 

U18 (bank 2)

or

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two 512 MB DIMMs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 GB

???(=)

U15 (bank 1)

Two 1 GB DIMMs

 

 

 

 

 

U18 (bank 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Default shipping configuration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caution DRAM DIMMs must be3.3-volt,60-nanoseconddevices only. Do not attempt to install other devices in the DIMM sockets. To prevent memory problems, use the Cisco approved memory products listed inTable 1-4.

PRP SRAM

Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) provides 2 MB of secondary CPU cache memory. Its principal function is to act as a staging area for routing table updates, and for information sent to and received from the line cards. SRAM is not user-configurableand cannot be upgraded in the field.

 

 

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PRP NVRAM

Non-volatileRandom Access Memory (NVRAM) provides 2 MB of memory for system configuration files, software register settings, and environmental monitoring logs.Built-inlithium batteries retain the contents of NVRAM for a minimum of 5 years. NVRAM isnot user configurable and cannot be upgraded in the field.

PRP Flash Memory

Use flash memory to store multiple Cisco IOS software and microcode images that you can use to operate the router. You can download new images to flash memory over the network (or from a local server) to replace an existing image, or to add it as an additional image. The router can be booted (manually or automatically) from any of the stored images in flash memory.

Flash memory also functions as a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to allow other servers to boot remotely from the stored images, or to copy them into their own flash memory.

The system uses two types of flash memory:

Onboard flash memory (called bootflash)—Containsthe Cisco IOS boot image

Flash memory disks (or cards)—Containthe Cisco IOS software imageTable 1-5 lists supported flash disk sizes and Cisco part numbers.

Table 1-5Supported Flash Disk Sizes

Flash Disk Size1

Part Number

64 MB2

MEM-12KRP-FD64=

128 MB

MEM-12KRP-FD128=

 

 

1 GB

MEM-12KRP-FD1G=

 

 

1.Standard Type 1 and Type 2 linear flash memory cards also are supported, although they may not have the capacity to meet the configuration requirements of your system.

2.Default shipping configuration.

 

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Alarm Card, Line Card, and Rout Processor Overview

Upper and Lower Cable Management Brackets

Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 series routers include upper and lower cable management brackets that work together with individual line card cable management brackets to organize interface cables entering and exiting the router (see Figure 1-1).

Network interface cables to the line cards are fed across the brackets, and then through the openings to the individual line card cable management bracket. This system keeps cables out of the way and free of sharp bends.

Caution Excessive bending of interface cables can damage the cables.

 

 

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Blower Module

Blower Module

The router has two blower modules to distribute air within the chassis. One blower module is located above the upper card cage; the second blower module is located below the lower card cage (see Figure 1-1).

Each blower module contains three variable speed fans and a controller card. The two front cover LEDs provide a visual indication of blower module status (Figure 1-22):

Figure 1-22Blower Module

LEDs

129308

OK (green)—Allthree fans are operating normally.

FAIL (red)—Thesystem has detected a fan failure or other fault in the blower module. The fault can be caused by any of the following:

One or more fans are not operating

One or more fans are running below speed

A controller card fault

The blower modules maintain acceptable operating temperatures for the internal components by drawing cool air through a replaceable air filter into the switch fabric card cage and then through the upper and lower card cages. Figure 1-23 illustrates the air flow path through the chassis.

 

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Chapter 1 Product Overview

Blower Module

Figure 1-23Cooling Air Flow

 

 

 

Power supply shelf

Top blower module

 

Air exhaust

 

(Plenum)

 

 

Upper card cage

Air filter

 

 

Room air

Middle card cage

 

Lower card cage

 

(Plenum)

 

Bottom blower module

 

Air exhaust

 

 

Front

Rear

26204

To ensure that there is adequate air flow to prevent overheating inside the card cages keep the front and back of the router unobstructed. We recommend at least 6 inches (15.24 cm) of clearance.

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Blower Module

Caution You should inspect and clean the air filter one time per month (more often in dusty environments). Do not operate the router without an air filter installed.

The blower module controller card monitors and controls operation of three variable-speedfans in the blower modules. Thevariable-speedfeature allows quieter operation by running the fans at below maximum speed, while still providing adequate cooling to maintain an acceptable operating temperature inside the card cages.

Two temperature sensors on each line card monitor the internal air temperature in the card cages:

When the ambient air temperature is within the normal operating range, the fans operate at their lowest speed, which is 55 percent of the maximum speed.

If the air temperature rises inside the card cages the fan speed increases to provide additional cool air to the cards.

If the air temperature continues to rise beyond the specified threshold, the system environmental monitor shuts down all internal power to prevent equipment damage due to excessive heat.

If the system detects that one of the three fans within a blower module has failed, it displays a warning message on the console window. In addition, the two remaining fans go to full speed to compensate for the loss of the one fan. If another fan fails, the system shuts down to prevent equipment damage.

For additional troubleshooting information, see the “Blower Module Operation” section on page 5-38.

 

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C H A P T E R 2

Preparing for Installation

Before installing your router, consider power and cabling requirements that must be in place at your installation site, special equipment for installing the router, and the environmental conditions your installation site must meet to maintain normal operation. This chapter guides you through the process of preparing for router installation.

The shipping package for the router is engineered to reduce the chances of product damage associated with routine material handling experienced during shipment.

The router should always be transported or stored in its shipping package in the upright position.

Keep the router in the shipping container until you have determined the installation site.

Use the Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Unpacking Instructionsincluded with the router to unpack it and inspect all items for shipping damage. If an item appears damaged, contact a Cisco customer service representative immediately.

This chapter contains the following installation topics:

Safety Guidelines, page 2-2

Site Requirement Guidelines, page 2-7

GRP Port Connection Guidelines, page 2-25

PRP Port Connection Guidelines, page 2-36

Alarm Card Connection Guidelines, page 2-45

 

 

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Safety Guidelines

Safety Guidelines

Before you perform any procedure in this publication, review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment. In addition, be sure to review the safety warnings listed in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication that accompanied your router before you begin router installation.

Note that the information in this section are guidelines and do not include every potentially hazardous situation. When you install a router, always use common sense and caution.

Safety with Equipment

Cisco equipment operates safely when used in accordance with its specifications and product-usageinstructions.

Never install equipment that appears damaged.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Never attempt to lift an object that might be too heavy for you to lift by yourself.

Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry, or other items that could get caught in the router.

Keep tools and assembly components away from walk areas.

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Keep the work area clear and dust-freeduring and after installation. Do not allow dirt or debris to enter into anylaser-basedcomponents.

 

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Chapter 2 Preparing for Installation

Safety Guidelines

Safety with Electricity

The installation shall be in compliance with national and local electrical codes: in the United States, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70, United States National Electrical Code; in Canada, Canadian Electrical Code, part I, CSA C22.1; in other countries, International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 60364, part 1 through part 7.

Before you begin any procedures requiring access to the interior of the router, locate the emergency power-offswitch for the room in which you are working.

Disconnect all power source cables before installing or removing a router.

Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Only a DC power source that complies with the safety extra-lowvoltage (SELV) requirements in UL60950,CSA-C22.2No. 60950, EN60950, ACATS001, AS/NZS 60950,and IEC60950 can be connected to the line card chassisDC-inputpower system.

A line card chassis configured with the DC-inputpower system shall have a readily accessibletwo-poleddisconnect device incorporated in the fixed wiring.

The line card chassis requires short-circuit(overcurrent) protection to be provided as part of the building installation.

If an electrical accident occurs, proceed as follows:

Use caution; do not become a victim. Disconnect power to the router.

If possible, send another person to get medical aid; otherwise, assess the condition of the victim and then call for help.

 

 

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Safety Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Many router components can be damaged by static electricity. Not exercising the proper electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions can result in intermittent or complete component failures. To minimize the potential for ESD damage, always use an ESD-preventiveantistatic wrist strap (or ankle strap) and ensure that it makes good skin contact.

Note Check the resistance value of theESD-preventivestrap periodically. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.

Before you perform any of the procedures in this guide, attach an ESD-preventivestrap to your wrist and connect the leash to the chassis or to another grounded, bare metal surface as shown inFigure 2-1.

 

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Safety Guidelines

Figure 2-1Connecting anESD-PreventiveStrap to the Router Chassis

ESD connection socket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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O

CRITICAL

 

MAJOR

 

MINOR

 

 

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ENABLEDFAIL

 

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0

 

 

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CSC

 

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0

A

C

CTIV

A E

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K

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SMB–6DS3

SMB–12DS3

F/H/P

F/H/P

 

 

EJECT

ACTIV

0

SLOT-0SLOT-1

CARE

 

AUX RESET

RXRIER

 

 

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COLL

 

 

 

 

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RJ-45

SCPOS-16-48/STM-OC

ATM 4-12/STM-OC

ETERNET FAST

PROCESSOR ROUTE

 

 

ROUTE PROCESSOR

FAST ETERNET

OC-12/STM-4ATM

45-RJ

 

 

 

 

MII

 

 

RX

 

 

 

COLL

TX

 

 

 

LINK

 

 

 

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RESET

XUA

 

 

0

1- 0-

 

 

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EJECT

 

 

OC-48/STM-16-SCPOS

TPK

IER XR

RR

A

IVETC

C

A

P/H/F

P/H/F

12DS3–SMB

6DS3–SMB

RX

 

11

 

TX

 

RX

 

10

 

TX

 

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9

 

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7

 

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5

5

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4

4

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0

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3/STM-OC-POS

SFC

2

ALARM

 

1

 

 

 

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Q

CSC

1

 

 

 

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ENABLED

 

 

FAIL

 

 

 

FAIL

 

 

 

ENABLED

RTKP

 

 

 

IERXR

 

 

 

EVRAC

 

 

 

ITCA

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

RTKP

 

 

 

IER XR

 

 

 

ERAC

 

 

 

VITCA

 

 

 

 

 

ACO/LT

 

2

 

 

 

TKP

 

 

 

REIRXR

 

MINOR

EVRAC

 

ITCA

 

MAJOR

 

 

CRITICAL

1

 

 

 

RTKP

 

 

 

IER XR

 

 

 

EIVRAC

 

 

 

TCA

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

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Safety Guidelines

Lifting Guidelines

A fully configured router can weigh as much as 275 pounds (lb)

(124.74 kilograms (kg)), while an empty chassis weighs 125 lb (56.7 kg). These systems are not intended to be moved frequently. Before you install the router, ensure that your site is properly prepared so you can avoid having to move the router later to accommodate power sources and network connections.

Use the following lifting guidelines to avoid injury to yourself or damage to the equipment:

Do not lift equipment alone; have another person help you to lift heavy equipment.

Ensure that your footing is solid; balance the weight of the object between your feet.

Lift the equipment slowly; never move suddenly or twist your body as you lift.

Keep your back straight and lift with your legs, not your back. When bending down to lift equipment, bend at the knees (not at the waist), to reduce the strain on your lower back muscles.

Caution To prevent equipment damage, never attempt to lift or tilt the router chassis using the handles on the blower module or on line cards. These handles do not support the weight of the chassis.

Compliance and Safety Information

The Cisco 12016, Cisco 2416 and Cisco 12816 routers are designed to meet the regulatory compliance and safety approval requirements. Refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Router

(Document Number 78-4347-xx)if you require additional compliance information (see“Cisco Technical Support & Documentation Website” section on page -xx for site information).

 

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Laser Safety

Some line cards are equipped with ports that can emit hazardous laser radiation from the aperture when there is no cable connected to the port. This invisible radiation can cause eye injury if you stare into the port.

Warning To avoid eye injury, never stare into open line card ports.

Site Requirement Guidelines

This section provides the following site requirement guidelines that you must consider before installing the router:

Rack-Mounting Guidelines, page 2-7

Air Flow Guidelines, page 2-15

Temperature and Humidity Guidelines, page 2-17

Power Connection Guidelines, page 2-17

NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines, page 2-22

Site Wiring Guidelines, page 2-24

Rack-MountingGuidelines

The router can be mounted in most 2-post,4-post,ortelco-type19-inchequipment racks that comply with the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) standard for equipment racks(EIA-310-D).The rack must have at least two posts with mounting flanges to mount the router chassis. The distance between the center lines of the mounting holes on the two mounting posts must be 18.31 inches

± 0.06 inch (46.50 cm ± 0.15 cm). The rack-mountinghardware included with the router is suitable for most19-inchequipment racks ortelco-styleframes.

Figure 2-2 shows examples of typical2-post,4-post,andtelco-typeequipment racks.

 

 

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Figure 2-2Equipment Rack Types

27959

a b c

Enclosed Rack

Figure 2-2a shows afree-standing,enclosed rack with two mounting posts in the front. The router shouldnot be installed in this type of enclosed rack, because the router requires an unobstructed flow of cooling air to maintain acceptable operating temperatures for its internal components. Installing the router in any type of enclosedrack—even with the front and back doors removed—coulddisrupt the air flow, trap heat next to the chassis, and cause an overtemperature condition inside the router.

Open Rack

Figure 2-2b shows afree-standing,4-postopen rack with two mounting posts in the front and two mounting posts in the back. The mounting posts in this type of rack are often adjustable so that you can position therack-mountedunit within the depth of the rack rather thanflush-mountwith the front of the rack.

 

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Telco Rack

Figure 2-2c shows atelco-typerack. Thetelco-typerack is an open frame consisting of two posts tied together by across-barat the top and a floor stand at the bottom.

This type of rack is usually secured to the floor and sometimes to an overhead structure or wall for additional stability. The router chassis can be installed in the telco-typerack either in afront-mountedposition or acenter-mountedposition (Figure 2-3).

In the front-mountedposition, you secure the chassisrack-mountingbrackets directly to the rack posts.

In the center-mountedposition, you secure a set of optionalcenter-mountbrackets to the rack posts. The chassisrack-mountingflanges are then secured to thecenter-mountbrackets. Thecenter-mountedposition moves the center of gravity of the chassis closer to the vertical axis of the rack posts, which adds to the stability of the rack installation.

 

 

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Figure 2-3Front-MountedandCenter-MountedInstallation in a Telco Rack

 

Front-mountrail

 

Cisco 12016

 

chassis

 

Center-mount

 

bracket

 

27958

Front-mountedchassis

Center-mountedchassis

in telco rack

in telco rack

 

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Site Layout and Equipment Dimensions

To help maintain trouble-freeoperation, adhere to the following precautions when planning your rack installation:

Ensure the site of the rack includes provisions for source AC or DC power, grounding, and network interface cables.

Allow sufficient space to work around the rack during the installation. You need:

At least 3 feet adjacent to the rack to move, align, and insert the chassis.

At least 2 feet in front of the power shelf to insert power entry modules.

Maintain at least 24 inches (61 cm) of clearance in front of and behind the chassis for maintenance after installation.

To mount the router between two posts or rails, the usable aperture (the width between the inner edges of the two mounting flanges) must be at least

17.7 inches (45.0 cm).

When fully populated with cards, the router can weigh as much as 440 lb (200 kg). Mount the router so that the bottom of the router chassis is no higher than 10 inches (25.4 cm) from the floor to keep the center of gravity of the rack as low as possible. To maintain equipment rack stability and to ensure your safety, make sure you install any stabilizing devices provided before you install the router.

If you use a telco-stylerack, the weight of the chassis is cantilevered off of the two rack posts. Make sure that:

The weight of the router does not make the frame unstable.

The frame is bolted to the floor and is secured to the building structure using either wall brackets or overhead brackets.

When mounting the router in a telco-typerack or4-postrack, be sure to use all of the screws provided to secure the chassis to the rack posts.

For the enhanced models of the Cisco 12016 series routers, the mounting rails on a 4-postrack must be recessed no more than 1.5 inches for the front door to fully open and close and to provide adequate room for cable routing.

 

 

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Install the cable-managementbrackets included with the router to keep cables organized. Be sure to:

Use appropriate strain-reliefmethods to protect cables and equipment connections.

Make sure that cables from other equipment installed in the rack do not restrict access to the card cages.

To avoid noise interference in network interface cables, do not route them directly across or along power cables.

Figure 2-4 shows the footprint and outer dimensions of the original series router chassis.

 

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Figure 2-4Router Chassis Footprint andDimensions—TopView)

17.3 in.

Back

Vertical rack-mountingflange (each side)

Front

Plastic front cover

18.75 in.

20 in.

2.75 in.

2.01 in.

2 in.

93774

 

 

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Figure 2-5 shows the footprint and outer dimensions of the enhanced version of router chassis.

Figure 2-5Enhanced Router Chassis Footprint andDimensions—TopView

17.3 in.

17.963 in.

25.694 in.

7.731 in.

18.950 in.

57090

 

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Air Flow Guidelines

Cool air is circulated through the router chassis by two blower modules. The blower modules maintain acceptable operating temperatures for the internal components by drawing in cool air through the air filter in front of the switch fabric card cage (middle), and circulating the air through both card cages (Figure 2-6).

Each power supply is also equipped with a fan that draws cooler air into the front of the power supply and forces warmer air out of the back of the chassis.

When selecting a site to install the router, observe the following guidelines:

Dust free area—Thesite should be as dust free as possible. Dusty environments can clog the air filter or power supply intake vents, reducing the cooling air flow through the router. Clogged filters and vents can cause an overtemperature condition in the router.

Unrestricted air flow—Allowsufficient air flow by maintaining a minimum of 6 inches (15.24 cm) of clearance at both the inlet and exhaust openings on the chassis and the power modules. If the air flow is blocked or restricted, or if the inlet air is too warm, an overtemperature condition can occur within the router. Under extreme conditions, the environmental monitoring system will power off the router to protect the components.

 

 

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Figure 2-6Air Flow Path through the Router - Side View

 

Power supply shelf

Top blower module

 

Air exhaust

 

(Plenum)

 

 

Upper card cage

Air filter

 

 

Room air

Middle card cage

 

Lower card cage

 

(Plenum)

 

Bottom blower module

 

Air exhaust

 

 

Front

Rear

26204

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Temperature and Humidity Guidelines

The operating and nonoperating environmental site requirements are listed in Table A-4 on page A-4.The router normally operates within the ranges listed in TableA-4,however, if a temperature measurement is approaching a minimum or maximum parameter it indicates a potential problem. Maintain normal operation by anticipating and correcting environmental anomalies before they approach critical values by properly planning and preparing your site before you install the router.

Power Connection Guidelines

You can configure the router with either an AC-inputorDC-inputpower subsystem, so the site power source requirements differ depending on the power subsystem in your router. Ensure all power connection wiring conforms to the rules and regulations in the National Electrical Code (NEC), as well as local codes.

Caution Proper grounding is necessary to avoid damage from lightning and power surges. See the“Router Bonding and Grounding Receptacles—Top Rear” section on page 2-23 for grounding requirements.

 

 

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AC-PoweredRouters

AC PEMs operate in the nominal range of 200 VAC to 240 VAC and require a minimum service of:

20 A for operation in North America

16 A for international operation

13 A for operation in the UK

Each of the AC power inputs requires separate dedicated branch circuit. For a list of the nominal and acceptable value ranges for source AC power, refer to

Table A-2 on page A-3.

Figure 2-7 shows different styles of AC power cords used to connect to the local AC power source that are available for North America and various locales.

Figure 2-7AC Power Cord Plugs and Appliance Coupler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North America

 

Australia, New Zealand

Europe, Argentine, Brazil

Rewirable twist-lockplug

 

 

 

 

SAA/3 plug

 

 

 

 

VIIG plug

NEMA L6-20P(20A)

AS/NZZS 3112-1993(15A)

 

CEE (7) VII (16A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26044

Italy

United Kingdom

Appliance coupler

1/3/16 plug

BS89/13

C19W coupler

CEI 23-16(16A)

BS 1363/A

Hot EN60320/C19 (20A)

 

(13A; replaceable fuse)

 

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Table 2-1 lists power cord options. AllAC-inputpower supply power cords measure 14 feet (4.3 m).

Table 2-1AC Power Cord International Options

Label

Description

Part Number

 

 

 

North America

20 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-US=

 

 

 

Australia, New Zealand

15 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-AU=

 

 

 

Europe, Argentina, Brazil

16 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-EU=

 

 

 

Italy

16 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-IT=

 

 

 

United Kingdom

13 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-UK=

 

(13 A replaceable fuse)

 

 

 

 

DC-PoweredRouters

Connections to DC PEMs are rated at 60 amps maximum. A dedicated, commensurately rated DC power source is required for each PEM connection.

For DC power cables, we recommend that you use a commensurately rated, high-strand-countcopper wire cable. Connection to the DC power shelf requires one earth ground cable and two cable leads; a source DC(–)and source DC return

(+) for each PEM. The length of the cables depends on your router location from the source power.

Note DC power cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.

 

 

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You must terminate DC power cables using cable lugs at the power shelf end. Ensure the lugs are dual-holeand that they are able to fit over M6 terminal studs at0.625-inch(15.88-mm)centers (for example, Panduit Part NumberLCD8-14A-Lor equivalent).

Figure 2-8 shows the type of lug required for theDC-inputcable connections.

Figure 2-8DC Power Cable Lug

2.24

End View

 

 

 

 

 

Ø 0.267

 

 

 

 

 

0.48

 

 

 

2 holes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.250.630.37 0.08

All measurements in inches

Crimp area

25527

Figure 2-9 shows a source DC power distribution scheme for aDC-inputpower shelf.

It shows two power cables attached to the DC-inputpower lugs for power shelf bay B1 (far right bay of theDC-inputpower shelf when looking at the back panel).

The color coding of the source DC power cable leads depends on the color coding of the site DC power source. Typically, green or green and yellow indicate that the cable is a ground cable. Because there is no color code standard for the source DC wiring, be sure that the power cables are connected to the DC-inputpower shelf terminal studs using the proper positive (+) and negative(–)polarity.

In some cases, the source DC cable leads might have a positive (+) or a negative (–)label. This is a relatively safe indication of the polarity, but you must verify the polarity by measuring the voltage between the DC cable leads. When making the measurement, the positive (+) lead and the negative(–)lead must always match the (+) and(–)labels on the power shelf.

A green (or green and yellow) cable typically indicate that it is a ground cable.

 

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Figure 2-9Typical Source DC Power Cabling Scheme for Power Shelf Bay B1

ground

 

 

 

Central

 

 

 

office

AC

Rectifiers

 

primary &

 

 

 

secondary

 

 

 

DC power

 

 

 

distribution

 

Plant

 

Ground

 

controls

Batteries

window

 

Battery plant

 

Central office

 

 

 

ground

+

Ground

+ –

Ground

27963

 

 

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Site Requirement Guidelines

Caution DC PEMs contains circuitry to trip the breaker on the PEM if the PEM detects a reverse polarity condition. No damage should occur from reverse polarity, but you should correct a reverse polarity condition immediately.

For a list of the nominal and acceptable value ranges for source DC power, refer to Table A-3 on page A-3.

NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines

Although the router chassis requires a safety earth ground connection as part of the power cabling to the power shelf, we also recommend that you connect the central office ground system or interior equipment grounding system to the supplemental bonding and grounding connections.

Supplemental connections are located at the top of the power interface panel on the back of the chassis (Figure 2-10),and near the lower corners of the switch fabric card cage on the front flanges of the chassis (Figure 2-11).The DC return of this system should remain isolated from the system frame and chassis(DC-I).

This grounding points are also referred to as the network equipment building system (NEBS) bonding and grounding connections.

Note These bonding and grounding connections satisfy the Telcordia NEBS requirements for supplemental bonding and grounding connections. If you are not installing the router in a NEBS environment, you can choose to bypass these guidelines and rely on the safety earth ground connections to the AC and DC power shelves.

 

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Figure 2-10Router Bonding and GroundingReceptacles—TopRear

29183

Supplemental bonding and grounding receptacle

Figure 2-11Router Bonding and GroundingReceptacles—Front

ENABLEDFAIL

 

 

0

 

 

1

CSC

 

0

 

 

1

 

ALARM

2

SFC

 

 

POS-3/STM-OCQ

 

RX

 

 

 

TX

 

 

 

11

OC

 

 

RX

 

F/H/PSMB–6DS3

F/H/PSMB–12DS3

SCPOS-16-48/STM-

ATM 4-12/STM-OC

ETERNET FAST

PROCESSOR ROUTE

NEBS supplemental earth ground receptacle

Air filter door

 

28022

 

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To ensure a satisfactory supplemental ground connection to the router, use the following parts:

Note These parts are not available from Cisco, but are available from commercial vendors.

Two grounding lugs, which have two M6 bolt holes with 0.625 to 0.75-inch(15.86 to19.05-mm)spacing between them, and a wire receptacle large enough to accept a6-AWGor larger, multistrand copper wire. This lug is similar to those used for theDC-inputpower supply leads (seeFigure 2-8).

Two M6 hex-headnuts and locking washers(nickel-platedbrass is ideal).

Two grounding wires. Although we recommend at least 6-AWGmultistrand copper wire, the wire diameter and length depend on your router location and site environment.

Site Wiring Guidelines

When planning the location of the router, consider distance limitations for signaling, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and connector compatibility. If the wiring is run for any significant distance in an electromagnetic field, interference can occur between the field and the signals on the wires. Poor wiring can cause:

Radio interference emanating from the wires.

Strong EMI, especially when caused by lightning or radio transmitters. EMI can destroy the signal drivers and receivers in the router, and can even create an electrical hazard by conducting power surges through lines and into equipment.

Note To predict and remedy strong EMI, you may need to consult with experts in radio frequency interference (RFI).

 

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Site wiring is unlikely to emit radio interference if you use twisted-paircable with a good distribution of grounding conductors. Use ahigh-qualitytwisted-paircable with one ground conductor for each data signal, when applicable.

Give special consideration to the effect of a lightning strike in your vicinity, especially if the wiring exceeds the recommended distances, or if it passes between buildings. The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) caused by lightning or other high-energyphenomena can easily induce enough energy into unshielded conductors to destroy electronic devices. If you have experienced EMP problems in the past, you may want to consult experts in electrical surge suppression and shielding.

Most data centers cannot resolve the infrequent but potentially catastrophic problems without pulse meters and other special equipment. In addition, these problems can take a great deal of time to identify and resolve. We recommend that you take the necessary precautions to avoid these problems by providing a properly grounded and shielded environment, with special attention to issues of electrical surge suppression.

GRP Port Connection Guidelines

This section contains detailed cabling and signal information for all interface and port connections to the GRP. It also provides information for Ethernet routing and equipment.

Caution Ports labeled Ethernet,10BASE-T,Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safetyextra-lowvoltage (SELV) circuits. Only connect SELV circuits to other SELV circuits.

GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections, page 2-26

GRP Ethernet Port Connections, page 2-29

PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines, page 2-36

PRP Ethernet Connections, page 2-40

 

 

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GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

The GRP has two EIA/TIA-232ports (Figure 2-12):

Auxiliary port— DB-25plug,DTE-modeport for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the GRP.

Console port—DB-25receptacle,DCE-modeport for connecting a data terminal to perform the initial configuration of the router.

Note The auxiliary and console ports are asynchronous serial ports. Devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission.

Figure 2-12GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

DB-25female

Modem

 

E

 

 

J

 

 

E

 

 

C

 

 

T

S

 

 

L S

O L

 

T O

 

-

T

 

0

-

 

 

1

AUX

R

E

 

E

 

S

 

 

T

Auxiliary

port

Console terminal

DB-25male

 

Console

port

L

 

IN

 

K

C

T

O

XL L

R

X

M

 

H10735

II

 

 

 

R

 

 

J

 

 

-

 

 

4

 

 

5

 

GRP

Because the connectors on some standard cables are large enough to interfere with the front covers installed on the card cages, a lower-profilecable adapter is included that permits you to connect a flat cable with modularRJ-45plugs to the GRP console port.

Note EIA/TIA-232cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.

 

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Caution To maintain Class B EMI compliance, you must use shielded cables when connecting to the auxiliary and console ports of original GRPs (part numbers GRP= andGRP-B=).An updated version of theGRP-B=board (Rev. F0) does not require shielded cables for Class B compliance.

GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

The GRP auxiliary port is a DB-25DTE port for connecting a modem or other DCE device to the router. The auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.

Table 2-2 lists the signals used on the auxiliary port.

Table 2-2GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

Pin

Signal

Direction

Description

 

 

 

 

1

GND

Shield ground

 

 

 

 

2

TxD

Output

Transmit data (to DCE)

 

 

 

 

3

RxD

Input

Receive data (from DCE)

 

 

 

 

4

RTS

Output

Request to send

 

 

 

(used for hardware flow control)

 

 

 

 

5

CTS

Input

Clear to send (used for hardware flow control)

 

 

 

 

6

DSR

Input

Data set ready

 

 

 

 

7

GND

Signal ground

 

 

 

 

8

DCD

Input

Carrier detect (used for modem control)

 

 

 

 

20

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready (used for modem control

 

 

 

only)

 

 

 

 

22

RING

Input

Ring

 

 

 

 

 

 

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GRP Console Port Signals

The GRP console port is a DB-25DCE interface for connecting a DTE terminal device to the router. Both Data Set Ready (DSR) and Data Carrier Detect (DCD) signals are active when the router is powered on. The console port does not support modem control or hardware flow control and requires astraight-throughEIA/TIA-232cable.

Before you connect a terminal to the console port, check the terminal setting for the data transmission rate, in bits per second (bps). The terminal transmission rate setting must match the default rate of the GRP console port, which is 9600 bps. Set the terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Table 2-3 lists the signals used on the console port.

Table 2-3GRP Console Port Signals

Pin

Signal

Direction

Description

 

 

 

 

1

GND

Shield ground

 

 

 

 

2

TxD

Output

Transmit data (from DTE)

 

 

 

 

3

RxD

Input

Receive data (to DTE)

 

 

 

 

6

DSR

Input

Data set ready (always on)

 

 

 

 

7

GND

Signal ground

 

 

 

 

8

DCD

Input

Data carrier detect (always on)

 

 

 

 

20

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready

 

 

 

 

 

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GRP Ethernet Port Connections

The GRP has the following two types of Ethernet connections (Figure 2-13):

RJ-45media-dependentinterface (MDI)

40-pin,D-shelltypemedia-independentinterface (MII)

Figure 2-13GRPRJ-45and MII Ethernet Connections

To repeater

or DTE

RJ-45cable

To transceiver, repeater, or DTE

MII cable

LINK

TX

COLL

RX

MII

RJ - 45

ROUTE GIGABIT

PROCESSOR

H10736

You can use either Ethernet connection, but not both at the same time. Two LEDs on the GRP front panel indicate which Ethernet port is active. Each connection supports IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with the 10BASE-Tand100BASE-TXstandards.

Note The Ethernet port can use either unshieldedtwisted-pair(UTP) or shieldedtwisted-pair(STP) cables. Shieldedtwisted-paircables are recommended for sites at which extremely high immunity to noise is required.

 

 

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The GRP Ethernet port does not provide external routing functions. Its primary roles are to act as a Telnet port into the router, and to boot or access Cisco IOS software images over a network to which the GRP Ethernet port is directly connected.

Caution Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions on these ports are switched off by default for security reasons. Cisco strongly cautions you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Figure 2-14 shows:

You cannot access Network 2.0.0.0 from Ethernet port (E0) on the GRP in Router A. You can only access Host A, Host B, and Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0 (see dotted-linearrows).

To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of the line cards (a POS line card in this example) in Router A. Data from Router A is routed through Router B and Router C, to reach Network 2.0.0.0 (see solid-linearrows).

Figure 2-14Using the Ethernet Port on the GRP

Router A

Network 1.0.0.0

(Cisco 12000

 

series router)

Host A

 

EO

 

POS

 

 

 

Host B

 

 

 

Network 2.0.0.0

EO

 

Host A

Router B

 

 

(Cisco 7500

 

 

series router)

Router C

26196

 

(Cisco 7500

 

series router)

 

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GRP RJ-45Ethernet Connections

The RJ-45Ethernet connection does not require an external transceiver.

Figure 2-15 shows the pin orientation of theRJ-45Ethernet port and the modular cable plug it accepts.

Figure 2-15GRPRJ-45Ethernet Receptacle and Modular Plug

87654321

RJ-45connector

H2936

Table 2-4 lists theRJ-45pin signals used on the connector.

Table 2-4GRPRJ-45Ethernet Receptacle Pinout

Ethernet Port

 

 

Pin

Signal

Description

 

 

 

1

TxD+

Transmit data +

 

 

 

2

TxD–

Transmit data –

 

 

 

3

RxD+

Receive data +

 

 

 

4

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

5

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

6

RxD–

Receive data –

 

 

 

7

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

8

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

 

 

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When connecting the RJ-45port to a hub or repeater, use thestraight-throughcable pinout shown inFigure 2-16.

Figure 2-16Straight-ThroughEthernet Cable Pinout

MDI wiring

1TxD+

2TxD–

3RxD+

6RxD–

MDI-Xwiring

1 RxD+

2 RxD–

6 TxD–

H11007

3 TxD+

 

When connecting two GRPs back-to-back,use the crossover cable pinout shown inFigure 2-17.

Figure 2-17Crossover Ethernet Cable Pinout

GRP

1TxD+

2TxD–

3RxD+

6RxD–

GRP

1TxD+

2TxD–

3RxD+

6RxD–

H11006

 

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GRP MII Ethernet Connections

The GRP MII Ethernet connection requires an external physical sublayer (PHY) and an external transceiver that permits connection to multimode fiber for 100BASE-FXor100BASE-T4physical media. Depending on the type of media between the MII receptacle and the switch or hub, the network side of your100-Mbpstransceiver should be appropriately equipped withfiber-opticSC-typeorST-typeconnectors, coaxial cable BNC connectors, or other appropriate hardware.

Figure 2-18 shows the pin orientation of the female MII connector on the GRP. The MII connector uses2-56screw-typelocks, calledjackscrews, to secure the cable or transceiver to the MII port. MII cables and transceivers have knurled thumbscrews that you fasten to the jackscrews on the MII connector to provide strain relief for your MII cable.

Figure 2-18GRP MII Ethernet Connector

Pin 1

H6538

Jackscrew

Pin 21

 

 

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Table 2-5 lists the signals used on the MII connector.

Table 2-5GRP MII Ethernet Pinout

Pin1

 

 

Input/

 

In

Out

Output

Description

14–17

Yes

Transmit data (TxD)

 

 

 

 

 

12

Yes

Transmit clock (Tx_CLK)2

11

Yes

Transmit error (Tx_ER)

 

 

 

 

 

13

Yes

Transmit enable (Tx_EN)

 

 

 

 

 

3

Yes

MII data clock (MDC)

 

 

 

 

 

4–7

Yes

Receive data (RxD)

 

 

 

 

 

9

Yes

Receive clock (Rx_CLK)

 

 

 

 

 

10

Yes

Receive error (Rx_ER)

 

 

 

 

 

8

Yes

Receive data valid (Rx_DV)

 

 

 

 

 

18

Yes

Collision (COL)

 

 

 

 

 

19

Yes

Carrier sense (CRS)

 

 

 

 

 

2

Yes

MII data input/output

 

 

 

 

(MDIO)

 

 

 

 

 

22–39

Common (ground)

 

 

 

 

 

1, 20, 21, 40

+5 V

 

 

 

 

 

1.Pins not listed in the table are not used.

2.Tx_CLK and Rx_CLK are provided by the external transceiver.

 

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Table 2-6 lists the cabling specifications for100-Mbpstransmission over unshieldedtwisted-pair(UTP) cables.

Table 2-6Specifications and Connection Limits for100-MbpsTransmission

Parameter

RJ-45

MII

 

 

 

Cable specification

Category 51 UTP, 22 - 24 AWG2

Category 3, 4, or 5, 150-ohmUTP or STP,

 

 

or multimode optical fiber

 

 

 

Cable length (max)

1.64 ft (0.5 m) (MII-to-MIIcable3)

Segment length (max)

328 ft (100 m) for 100BASE-TX

3.28 ft (1 m)4 or 1,312 ft (400 m)

 

 

for 100BASE-FX

 

 

 

Network length (max)

656 ft (200 m)4 with 1 repeater

1.EIA/TIA-568orEIA-TIA-568TSB-36compliant. Not supplied by Cisco.

2.AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568standard.

3.The cable between the MII port on the GRP and the appropriate transceiver.

4.Specifically, the length between any two stations on a repeated segment.

Table 2-7 lists IEEE 802.3u physical characteristics for100BASE-TXcabling.

Table 2-7IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics

Parameter

100BASE-TX

 

 

Data rate (Mbps)

100

 

 

Signaling method

Baseband

 

 

Segment length (max meters)

100 m between DTE and repeaters

 

 

Media

Category 5 UTP (for RJ-45)or MII

 

 

Topology

Star/hub

 

 

 

 

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PRP Port Connection Guidelines

This section contains detailed cabling and signal information for all interface and port connections to the PRP. It also provides information for Ethernet routing and equipment.

Caution Ports labeled Ethernet,10BASE-T,Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safetyextra-lowvoltage (SELV) circuits. Only connect SELV circuits to other SELV circuits.

PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines

The PRP has two RJ-45connection ports:

Auxiliary port— DTE RJ-45interface for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the PRP.

Console port—DCERJ-45interface for connecting a data terminal device to the router, which you need to perform the initial configuration of the router.

Note The auxiliary and console ports are asynchronous serial ports. Ensure that devices connected to these ports are capable of asynchronous transmission.

Figure 2-19 shows the auxiliary and console port connections from the PRP to the associated devices.

 

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Figure 2-19PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

 

 

S

 

 

 

L S

 

 

O L

 

 

T

O

 

PRIMARY

-

T

 

0

ETH

 

 

-

 

 

 

1

 

L

 

0

1

IN

 

 

K E

 

 

 

N

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

X R

 

PRIMARY

X

 

 

ETH

 

L

 

1

 

IN

 

 

 

K E

 

 

3

N

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

X R

 

 

X

 

 

 

AUX

 

 

 

CONSOLE

2

4

5

70692

1

Modem

4

Auxiliary port

 

 

 

 

2

Console terminal

5

Console port

 

 

 

 

3

RJ-45cables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

The PRP auxiliary port is a DTE, RJ-45interface for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the PRP. The auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.

Table 2-8 lists the signals used on the auxiliary port.

Table 2-8PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

Auxiliary Port Pin

Signal

Input/Output

Description

 

 

 

 

1

RTS

Output

Request to send

 

 

 

 

2

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready

 

 

 

 

3

TxD

Output

Transmit data

 

 

 

 

4

GND

Signal ground

 

 

 

 

5

GND

Signal ground

 

 

 

 

6

RxD

Input

Receive data

 

 

 

 

7

DSR

Input

Data set ready

 

 

 

 

8

CTS

Input

Clear to send

 

 

 

 

 

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PRP Console Port Signals

The PRP console port is a DCE RJ-45interface for connecting a terminal to the router. The console port does not support modem control or hardware flow control and requires aroll-overRJ-45cable.

Before connecting a terminal to the console port, check the terminal setting for the data transmission rate, in bits per second (bps). The terminal transmission rate setting must match the default rate of the PRP console port, which is 9600 bps. Set the terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Table 2-9 lists the signals used on the console port.

Table 2-9PRP Console Port Signals (with RJ45roll-overcable)

Console Port Pin

Signal

Input/Output

Description

 

 

 

 

11

2

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready

 

 

 

 

3

TxD

Output

Transmit data

 

 

 

 

4

GND

Signal ground

 

 

 

 

5

GND

Signal ground

 

 

 

 

6

RxD

Input

Receive data

 

 

 

 

7

DSR

Input

Data set ready

 

 

 

 

81

1. These pins are not connected.

 

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PRP Ethernet Connections

The PRP has two RJ-45MDI Ethernet ports; ETH0 and ETH1 (Figure 2-20).

Figure 2-20PRP Ethernet Connections

ETH 0

 

ETH 1

1

 

 

-

 

 

SLOT0

 

RX

-

 

 

SLOT

EN

TX

 

 

PRIMARY

LINK

PRIMARY

 

 

RX

EN

TX

 

LINK

 

70693

These connections support IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with 10BASE-Tand100BASE-TXstandards. The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is autosensing by default and is user configurable.

The PRP Ethernet port does not provide external routing functions. Its primary roles are to act as a Telnet port into the router, and to boot or access Cisco IOS software images over a network to which the PRP Ethernet port is directly connected.

Caution Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions on these ports are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

 

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Figure 2-21 shows:

You cannot access Network 2.0.0.0 from Ethernet port (E0) on the GRP in Router A. You can only access Host A, Host B, and Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0 (see dotted-linearrows).

To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of the line cards (a POS line card in this example) in Router A. Data from Router A is routed through Router B and Router C, to reach Network 2.0.0.0 (see solid-linearrows).

Figure 2-21Using the Ethernet Port on the PRP

Router A

Network 1.0.0.0

(Cisco 12000

 

series router)

Host A

 

EO

 

POS

 

 

 

Host B

 

 

 

Network 2.0.0.0

EO

 

Host A

Router B

 

 

(Cisco 7500

 

 

series router)

Router C

26196

 

(Cisco 7500

 

series router)

 

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PRP RJ-45Ethernet Connections

The RJ-45Ethernet connection does not require an external transceiver.

Figure 2-22 shows the pin orientation of theRJ-45Ethernet port and the modular cable plug it accepts.

Figure 2-22RJ-45Receptacle and Plug

87654321

RJ-45connector

210222

Table 2-10 lists theRJ-45pin signals used on the connector.

Table 2-10PRPRJ-45Ethernet Receptacle Pinout

Ethernet Port Pin

Signal

Description

 

 

 

1

TxD+

Transmit data +

 

 

 

2

TxD–

Transmit data –

 

 

 

3

RxD+

Receive data +

 

 

 

4

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

5

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

6

RxD–

Receive data –

 

 

 

7

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

8

Termination network

No connection

 

 

 

 

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Chapter 2 Preparing for Installation

PRP Port Connection Guidelines

When connecting the RJ-45port to a hub or repeater, use thestraight-throughcable pinout shown inFigure 2-23.

Figure 2-23Straight-ThroughCable Pinout to Hub or Repeater

MDI wiring

1TxD+

2TxD–

3RxD+

6RxD–

MDI-Xwiring

1 RxD+

2 RxD–

6 TxD–

H11007

3 TxD+

 

When connecting two PRPs back-to-back,use the crossover cable pinout shown inFigure 2-24.

Figure 2-24Crossover Cable Pinout Between PRPs

PRP

1TxD+

2TxD–

3RxD+

6RxD–

PRP

1TxD+

2TxD–

3RxD+

6RxD–

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PRP Port Connection Guidelines

Table 2-11 lists the cabling specifications for100-Mbpstransmission over unshieldedtwisted-pair(UTP) cables.

Note The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is autosensing by default and is user configurable.

Table 2-11Specifications and Connection Limits for100-MbpsTransmission

Parameter

RJ-45

 

 

Cable specification

Category 51 UTP, 22 to 24 AWG2

Cable length (max)

 

 

Segment length (max)

328 feet (100 m) for 100BASE-TX

 

 

Network length (max)

656 feet (200 m)3 with 1 repeater

1.EIA/TIA-568orEIA-TIA-568TSB-36compliant. Not supplied by Cisco.

2.AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568standard.

3.Specifically, the length between any two stations on a repeated segment.

Table 2-12 lists IEEE 802.3u physical characteristics for100BASE-TX.

Table 2-12IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics

Parameter

100BASE-TX

 

 

Data rate (Mbps)

100

 

 

Signaling method

Baseband

 

 

Maximum segment length

100 m between DTE and repeaters

 

 

Media

Category 5 UTP

 

 

Topology

Star/Hub

 

 

 

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Chapter 2 Preparing for Installation

Alarm Card Connection Guidelines

Alarm Card Connection Guidelines

The router is equipped with two alarm cards:

One alarm card occupies the dedicated far left slot in the upper card cage

The second alarm card occupies the dedicated far right slot in the lower card cage

Each alarm card has one 25-pinD-subconnector(ALARM) on the front panel that connects the router to an external site alarm maintenance system (Figure 2-25).When a critical, major, or minor alarm is generated, it energizes the alarm relays on the alarm card to activate the external site alarm.

Figure 2-25Alarm Card Connector Location

 

Critical, major, and

 

 

Handle

minor alarm LEDs

 

Pin 1

 

CRITICAL

ACO/LT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAJORMINOR

 

ALARM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pin 25

 

 

Audio alarm

 

 

CRITICAL

cutoff switch

 

 

MAJORMINOR

 

 

 

 

FAIL

 

 

CSC

 

SFC

 

FAIL

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

0

1

0

1

2

 

 

 

CSC

 

SFC

26867

FAIL

FAIL

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

ENABLED

0

1

0

1

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALARM

Clock and scheduler card and switch fabric card LEDs

The alarm relay contacts on the alarm card consist of standard common,normally open, andnormally closed relay contacts that are wired to the pins on the connectors.

Caution Only safetyextra-lowvoltage (SELV) circuits can be connected to the alarm connector. Maximum rating for the alarm circuit is 2 A, 50 VA.

 

 

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Note To comply with the intrabuilding lightning surge requirements ofGR-1089-CORE,Issue II, Revision 01, February 1999, you must use a shielded cable when connecting to the external alarm ports on the alarm card. The shielded cable is terminated by shielded connectors on both ends, with the cable shield material tied to both connectors.

Table 2-13 lists thepin-to-signalcorrespondence between the cable connector pins and the alarm card relay contacts.

Table 2-13Alarm Connector Pinout

Pin Group

Common

Normally Open

Normally Closed

 

 

 

 

Critical audible alarm

2

1

14

 

 

 

 

Major audible alarm

16

3

15

 

 

 

 

Minor audible alarm

5

4

17

 

 

 

 

Critical visual alarm

19

6

18

 

 

 

 

Major visual alarm

8

7

20

 

 

 

 

Minor visual alarm

22

9

21

 

 

 

 

Alarm input

13

25

 

 

 

 

 

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C H A P T E R 3

Installing the Router

This chapter contains the procedures to install the router in a rack. The installation is presented in the following sections:

Pre-Installation Considerations and Requirements, page 3-2

Rack-Mounting the Router Chassis, page 3-8

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections, page 3-21

Attaching the Vertical Cable-Management Trough, page 3-25

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables, page 3-27

Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables, page 3-31

Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables, page 3-36

Connecting an Alarm Card Cable, page 3-40

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf, page 3-41

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers, page 3-47

 

 

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Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Before you perform any procedures in this chapter, review the following sections in Chapter 2, “Preparing for Installation”:

Safety Guidelines, page 2-2

Site Requirement Guidelines, page 2-7

In particular, observe the guidelines for preventing electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage described in the Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage, page 2-4 and useFigure 2-1 on page 2-5 as a reference in locating and using the ESD sockets on the front of the router chassis.

A fully equipped router with an optional two-levelAC-inputpower shelf can weigh as much as 440 pounds (200 kg). The router ships on ascissor-jackplatform that enables two people to install a fully loaded router into a rack without removing any of the components from the chassis.

Warning This router is not designed to be installed as ashelf-mountedor afree-standingrouter. The router must be installed in a rack that is secured to the building structure. You must install the router in either atelco-styleframe or afour-postequipment rack.

For additional safety and compliance information, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication that accompanied your router.

 

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Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Required Tools and Equipment

Before you begin the rack-mountinstallation, you must read and understand the information in the“Rack-Mounting Guidelines” section on page 2-7 and have the following tools and equipment:

ESD-preventivewrist strap

Number 1 and number 2 Phillips screwdrivers

1/4-inch(6.35-mm)and3/16-inch(4.5-mm)flat-bladescrewdrivers

Tape measure

Level (optional)

3/8-inch(10-mm)nutdriver (for systems equipped with theDC-inputpower shelf)

9/16-inch(14-mm)wrench (for chassishold-downbolts and pallethold-downbracket bolts)

3/4-inch(19-mm)socket and ratchet wrench

Unpacking and Positioning the Router

Follow the unpacking instructions that came with the router and use a safety hand truck to move the router to the location where it is being installed in a rack.

Save the packaging materials in case the router has to be repackaged to be shipped again.

 

 

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Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Removing the Front Covers from Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

The chassis front covers for the power shelf and upper blower module, upper card cage, lower card cage, and lower blower module are fastened to the chassis by ball studs on the front of the chassis (Figure 3-1).

Note The power shelf and upper blower module front cover is packaged in the accessory kit to permit the foam shipping cap to fit securely on the top of the router, and to protect the router without damaging the front cover.

To remove a cover, grasp the outside edges of the cover and pull it straight out to detach it from the front of the chassis.

 

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Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Figure 3-1Router Chassis Front Covers

0

0

1

1

1

A

U

X

ETERNET FAST

2

ETERNET

/ /

/ /

 

11

 

 

10

 

 

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8

 

 

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5

5

 

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3

 

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1

1

 

0

0

93279

 

1

Ball stud

2

Ball stud clip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Removing the Front Cover from Cisco 12016 Enhanced Series Routers

The new cover on the Cisco enhanced series of routers has a two-piecefront cover. The covers have release buttons on both sides that give you the flexibility to open it from either the left side or from the right side.

To remove each front cover, grasp the sides of the cover and press both release buttons simultaneously to release the door from the chassis (Figure 3-2).

 

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Pre-InstallationConsiderations and Requirements

Figure 3-2Removing the Front Covers

1

1

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0

 

1

1

 

2

2

 

3

3

 

 

 

AUX

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4

 

5

5

 

 

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/ /

/ /

ETERNET FAST

ETERNET

/ /

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FAST

 

 

 

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XUA

 

 

 

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139043

1 Release buttons

 

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

The router chassis can be installed in either a front-mountedposition or acenter-mountedposition.

In a front-mountedposition, the chassisrack-mountingflanges are secured directly to the rack posts.

In a center-mountedposition, an optional set ofcenter-mountbrackets are secured to the rack posts and the chassisrack-mountingflanges are then secured to thecenter-mountbrackets. Thecenter-mountedposition moves the center of gravity of the chassis closer to the vertical axis of the rack posts, which adds to the security and stability of the rack installation.

Warning The chassis should be mounted on a rack that is permanently affixed to the building

Verifying Rack Dimensions

Before you install the chassis, measure the space between the vertical mounting flanges (rails) on your equipment rack to verify that the rack conforms to the measurements shown in Figure 3-3.

Step 1 Mark and measure the distance between two holes on the left and right mounting rails.

The distance should measure 18.31 inches ± 0.06 inches (46.5 cm ± 0.15 cm).

Note Measure for pairs of holes near the bottom, middle and top of the equipment rack to ensure that the rack posts are parallel.

Step 2 Measure the space between the inner edges of the left front and right front mounting flanges on the equipment rack.

The space must be at least 17.7 inches (45 cm) to accommodate the chassis which is 17.25 inches (43.8 cm) wide and fits between the mounting posts on the rack.

 

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Figure 3-3Verifying Equipment Rack Dimensions

Mounting flanges

Minimum usable aperture 17.7 inches(45.0 cm)

Hole centerline

to hole centerline18.31 inches ± 0.06 inches

(46.5 cm ± 0.15 cm)

28014

Installing Center-MountBrackets—Optional

If you plan to install the router in the center-mountposition, you must install thecenter-mountbrackets to the rack rails first. If you do not plan to use the optionalcenter-mountbrackets, proceed directly to the“Installing the Chassis Rack-Mounting Platform” section on page 3-13.

The optional center-mountbracket installation kit ships in the accessories box included with the router and contains the following:

Two center-mountbrackets.

10 (minimum) Phillips binderhead screws (usually provided with the bracket kit) to secure the brackets to the mounting flanges (also called rails) in the rack. Five screws should be installed on each bracket.

Contact a Cisco service representative for assistance if any parts are missing.

Note Make sure you have performed the measurements described in“Verifying Rack Dimensions” section on page 3-8 before installing thecenter-mountbrackets.

Use the following procedure to install the center-mountbrackets to the rack rails.

 

 

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Step 1 Determine the location in which you want to position the chassis in the rack, and mark holes at the same height on both the left and right rack rails.

Step 2 Identify the orientation of the left and rightcenter-mountbrackets (Figure 3-4).

Figure 3-4Center-MountBrackets

Threaded holes to chassis

Open holes to rack

 

28451

Left bracket

Right bracket

Step 3 Install the rightcenter-mountbracket (Figure 3-5).

a.Align the bottom screw hole of the bracket with the marked screw hole at the bottom of the rack and finger tighten a screw in that hole.

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

b.Finger-tightena second screw in the top hole of the bracket.

c.Finger-tightenthree more screws in the middle of in the bracket.

d.Use a screwdriver to tighten all five screws securely.

Step 4 Repeat Step 3 for the leftcenter-mountbracket.

Step 5 Use a level to verify that the tops of the two brackets are level, or use a measuring tape to verify that both brackets are the same distance from the top of the rack rails.

 

 

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Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Figure 3-5Installing aCenter-MountRack-MountingBracket

Chassis

Rack

Bracket

Chassis Bracket rack-mounting

rail

Rack

28450

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Threaded hole

Open hole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(chassis secured

(screw inserted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by screw)

through)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Installing the Chassis Rack-MountingPlatform

The rack-mountingplatform is installed at the bottom of an empty rack and acts as a permanent support platform for the chassis. It can be installed in either thefront-mountedposition or thecenter-mountedposition, to match the installed position of the chassis.

The platform is adjustable from a minimum height of 5.25 inches (13.34 cm) to a maximum height of 8.00 inches (20.32 cm). For telco-styleracks, the bottom edge of the platform can be raised to approximately 6.00 inches (15.24 cm) to clear thecross-membersat the bottom of the rack.

Warning The chassis should be mounted on a rack that is permanently affixed to the building

Use the following procedure to install the rack-mountingplatform.

Step 1 Remove the platform from the accessory box.

Step 2 Adjust the height of the platform to match the requiredrack-mountingheight for the chassis:

a.Turn each of the adjustable feet to approximately the required platform height (Figure 3-6).

b.Place the platform in the rack making sure that it clears any rack cross-members.

c.Use a level to be sure the platform is level from side to side and front to back.

d.Adjust the feet until the platform clears any obstacles and is level at the required platform height.

Step 3 Determine whether the platform is to be installed in thefront-mountedposition or in thecenter-mountedposition, and adjust the positioning brackets on the platform:

a.Locate the hole on the side of the platform that corresponds with the front-mountedorcenter-mountedposition of the table.

b.Align the side of the bracket with the round hole over the hole on the side of the platform, insert a screw, and use your fingers to loosely tighten it (see blow-outinFigure 3-6).

 

 

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Repeat these steps to attach a bracket in the same position on the other side of the platform.

Step 4 Align the platform between the rack posts and set it in position so that the sides of the positioning brackets with the oblong holes are flush against therack-mountingflanges.

Step 5 Secure the platform to the rack:

a.Locate an open screw hole through the oblong hole in the bracket, then insert a screw and use your fingers to loosely tighten it (see blow-outinFigure 3-6).

b.Repeat step a. for the other side of the platform.

c.Verify that the platform is level and seated squarely against the rack, then tighten all four screws.

Figure 3-6The ChassisRack-MountingPlatform

28447

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Unpack and Position the Router

Unpack the router following the instructions in the Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Unpacking Instructions that came with the router. Use a safety hand truck to move the router to the location where it is being installed and position it in front of the rack so that the back panel of the chassis faces the rack opening (Figure 3-7).

Figure 3-7Positioning the Router for Insertion into the Rack

Front panel

Rear panel

of chassis

of chassis

Rack

 

Rack-mounting

 

platform

Scissor-jack

29161

platform (closed)

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Installing the Chassis into the Rack

Use the following procedure to install the chassis in the rack.

Step 1 Rotate thescissor-jackscrew counterclockwise slowly and expand thescissor-jackplatform to raise the chassis to the required installation height (Figure 3-8).

Warning A second person should be holding the chassis to prevent it from tipping while the platform is raised.

Figure 3-8Raising the Chassis to the Installation Height

 

CONSOLE

Front of chassis

 

SETRE

AUX

1-TLOS0-TSLO

CT

 

JEE

 

L

EC

R

IE X

R R

EA VI C T CA

 

TKP

 

REIRRX

0

IVERAC

TCA

RX

 

6

 

TX

 

RX

RX

5

5

TX

TX

RX

RX

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RX

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A

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T

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EIRXR

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EV AC

IT

C

A

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T

R KP

IERXR

R

EV AC

TI

C

A

0

Chassis anchor clip and bolt

(2 on each side)

/LT ACO

R

MINO

AJOR

M

ITICAL

R

C

Scissor-jack

screw

Counter-clockwise

Clockwise

expands platform

closes platform

29187

Scissor-jack

platform

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Step 2 Remove the four bolts and chassis anchor clips that secure the base of the chassis to thescissor-jackplatform (Figure 3-9).

Figure 3-9Removing the Chassis Anchor Clips

Front of

chassis

CONSOLE

L

LE

C

REI X

R R

R

EIVAC

T

CA

 

 

 

TKP

ESET

AUX

 

REIRXR

R

 

0

EIVARC

1-SLOT0-OTSL

 

TCA

EJECT

RX

 

6

 

TX

 

RX

RX

5

5

TX

TX

RX

RX

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RX

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R

E

IR

R

EVI AC

TC

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T

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EIR XR

R

EVI AC

TC

A

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RK P ERI XR

R E A IV C TC

A

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O/LT

AC

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MINO

MAJOR

ITICAL

CR

29188

 

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Step 3 Grasp the handle on the back panel of the chassis to carefully pull the chassis off of thescissor-jackplatform and onto therack-mountingplatform while a second person pushes from the front of the chassis. (SeeFigure 3-10.)

Figure 3-10Inserting the Router into the Rack

29192

Warning Do not attempt to lift the chassis with the handles on the back and sides of the chassis. These handles are not designed to support the weight of the chassis, and should be used only to steady and guide the chassis while it is being inserted into or removed from an equipment rack. To reduce the risk of damage to the chassis and serious bodily injury, do not use these handles to lift or support the chassis.

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Step 4 Insert the chassis into the rack until the chassisrack-mountingflanges are flush against the mounting flanges on the rack (or the optionalcenter-mountbrackets, if installed).

The weight of the chassis is now supported by the rack-mountingplatform. Remove thescissor-jackplatform and set it safely aside.

Note Save and reassemble all parts of the shipping package in case it becomes necessary to transport the router to another location or return it to Cisco. Do not discard or destroy any of the shipping materials.

Step 5 Secure the chassis to the rack beginning (Figure 3-11):

a.Identify one of the holes in group A that aligns with a mounting hole on the mounting flanges of the rack.

b.Hold the chassis in position against the mounting flanges on the rack and have a second person insert and loosely tighten one of the mounting screws provided.

c.Repeat step b. for the mounting hole on the other side of the chassis.

Step 6 RepeatStep 5 for each group of chassis mounting holes (groups b through e).

Step 7 Tighten all mounting screws (five on each side of the chassis) securely.

 

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Rack-Mountingthe Router Chassis

Figure 3-11ChassisRack-MountingHole Groups

Chassis mounting holes group E

Chassis mounting holes group D

Chassis mounting holes group C

Chassis mounting holes group B

Chassis mounting holes group A

26864

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Before you connect power to the router, or power on the router for the first time, we recommend that you connect the central office ground system or new equipment building system (NEBS) to the supplemental bonding and grounding points on the router. For more information on supplemental bonding and grounding cable requirements, see the “Router Bonding and Grounding Receptacles—Top Rear” section on page 2-23.

There are two earth ground receptacles that you can use to connect a supplemental grounding cable to the chassis; one is on the front of the chassis behind the air filter door, and the other is located at the top rear of the chassis.

Use one of the following procedures to connect a grounding cable lug to the chassis:

Connecting to the Front Grounding Receptacle, page 3-22

Connecting to the Top Rear Receptacle, page 3-24

 

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Connecting to the Front Grounding Receptacle

Use the following procedure to connect the supplemental grounding cable to front grounding receptacle.

Step 1 Loosen the two captive screws on each side of the air filter door and pivot the door open (Figure 3-12).

Figure 3-12Opening the Air Filter Door

 

 

 

 

 

RX

E

 

 

 

 

 

NABL

 

 

 

 

 

EDFAIL

 

 

 

TX

 

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11

ALARM

1

CSC

Q

F/H/PSMB–6DS3

RX

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POS-3/STM-OC

F/H/PSMB–12DS3

 

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2

SFC

 

 

 

Switch fabric card cage

(behind filter door)

SCPOS-16-48/STM-OC

ATM 4-12/STM-OC

ETERNET FAST

PROCESSOR ROUTE

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Step 2 Attach the grounding cable to the chassis (Figure 3-13):

a.Insert two M6 bolts through the grounding holes in the chassis.

b.Place the cable lug over the bolts and secure with the locking washers and nuts.

Figure 3-13Router Front Bonding and Grounding Receptacles

EN

ABLE FA

D IL

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1C

SC

 

0

 

ALARM

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S

2

FC

POS-3/STM-OCQ

 

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SMB–12DS3

F/H/P

F/H/P

SCPOS-16-48/STM-OC

ATM 4-12/STM-OC

ETERNET FAST

PROCESSOR ROUTE

NEBS supplemental earth ground receptacle

Air filter door

28022

Step 3 Prepare the other end of the grounding wire and connect it to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate earth ground.

 

 

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Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Connecting to the Top Rear Receptacle

Use the following procedure to connect the supplemental grounding cable to top rear grounding receptacle.

Step 1 Attach the grounding cable to the chassis (Figure 3-14):

a.Insert two M6 bolts through the grounding holes in the chassis.

b.Place the cable lug over the bolts and secure with the locking washers and nuts.

Figure 3-14Router Top Bonding and Grounding Receptacles

29183

Supplemental bonding and grounding receptacle

Step 2 Prepare the other end of the grounding wire and connect it to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate earth ground.

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Attaching the Vertical Cable-ManagementTrough

Attaching the Vertical Cable-ManagementTrough

Refer to Figure 3-15 and use the following procedure to attach the verticalcable-managementtrough.

Step 1 Position the trough so that the access gate opens toward the front of the chassis.

Step 2 Align the top screw holes on the inside panel of the trough with the chassis standoffs.

Step 3 Hand tighten two screws into the holes to hold the trough in place.

Step 4 RepeatStep 2 andStep 3 for the middle two standoffs and the bottom two standoffs.

Step 5 Tighten all six screws with a Phillips screwdriver to secure the trough to the chassis.

 

 

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Attaching the Vertical Cable-ManagementTrough

Figure 3-15Attaching the VerticalCable-ManagementTroughs

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

This section describes how to route the network interface cables through the router cable-managementsystem and attach the network interface cables to the line card ports.

This procedure uses an 8-portfiber-opticFast Ethernet card as anexample to describe how to attach a network interface cable to a line card port and route the cable through thecable-managementsystem. Depending on which line cards are installed in your system, your cable connection procedure might differ slightly from this example. For cable connection information for your specific line card, refer to the installation and configuration note for that line card.

Note You can access the most current Cisco line card documentation on the World Wide Web at:http://www.cisco.com.

Use the following procedure as an example to route the network interface cables through the cable-managementsystem and connect them to the line card.

Step 1 Route an interface cable across the horizontalcable-managementtray, through the cable tray opening to connect it to the line card:

For legacy fiber-opticline cards, go toStep 2.

For current fiber-opticline cards, go toStep 6.

Step 2 Install a plasticbend-radiusclip on thestrain-reliefferrule on the connector (seeblow-outinFigure 3-16).

 

 

Note

The bag of bend-radiusclips (Part Number800-06119-01)in the

 

 

 

accessories box that shipped with your router contains two sizes of

 

 

 

bend-radiusclips. The clip size is determined by the diameter of the

 

 

 

strain-reliefferrule on the cable connectors. Use the size that provides the

 

 

 

most secure fit on the strain-reliefferrule on the cable connectors in use

 

 

 

at your site.

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3

Insert the cable connector into its assigned port.

 

Step 4

Route the cable up the cable-managementbracket and carefully press the cable

 

 

into the channel so it is held in place by the cable clips (Figure 3-16b).

 

 

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Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Step 5 Repeat Steps 3 through 5 for each additional cable connection to that line card.

Figure 3-16Connecting a Network Interface Cable to a Legacy Line Card

a

b

Line card

cable-managementbracket

Cable clips

Network interface cable

ETERNET FAST

ETERNET FAST

28350

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Step 6 Insert all cables into their assigned ports.

Step 7 Place several evenly spaced velcro straps through slots on thecable-managementbracket (Figure 3-17a).

Step 8 Route the cables alongside thecable-managementbracket and secure them with the velcro straps as appropriate (Figure 3-17b).

Caution Make sure the interface cables do not have any kinks or sharp bends which can destroy or degrade the ability of the optical fiber to propagate thesignal-encodedbeam of light accurately from one end of the cable to the other. Always allow adequate strain relief in the interface cable.

 

 

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Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Figure 3-17Current Style Cable Management Bracket

a

b

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ACTIVE RXCARRIER PKT

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ACTIVE RXCARRIER PKT

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ACTIVE RXCARRIER PKT

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Network interface cable

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

This section describes how to connect cables to the console, auxiliary, and Ethernet ports on the GRP. The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. For example, most modems are asynchronous devices.

Figure 3-18 shows an example of a data terminal and modem connections.

Figure 3-18GRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connections

Modem

DB-25female

 

E

 

 

J

 

 

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H10735

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-

 

 

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GRP

Caution The ports labeled Ethernet,10BASE-T,Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safetyextra-lowvoltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.

Note RP cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.

 

 

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Note To comply with TelcordiaGR-1089NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect all console, auxiliary, and Ethernet interfaces only to intrabuilding or nonexposed wiring or cabling. The intrabuilding cable must be shielded and the shield must be grounded at both ends.

Connecting to the GRP Console Port

The system console port on the GRP is an EIA/TIA-232DCEDB-25receptacle for connecting a data terminal to perform the initial configuration of the router. The console port requires astraight-throughRJ-45cable.

See “GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections” section on page 2-26 for additional information about the GRP console port.

Use the following procedure to connect a data terminal to the GRP console port.

Step 1 Set your terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Step 2 Power off the data terminal.

Step 3 Attach the terminal end of the cable to the interface port on the data terminal.

Step 4 Attach the other end of the cable to the GRP console port.

Step 5 Power on the data terminal.

 

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Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting to the GRP Auxiliary Port

The auxiliary port on the GRP is an EIA/TIA-232DTEDB-25plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) or another router) to this router.

See the “GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections” section on page 2-26 for more information.

Use the following procedure to connect an asynchronous serial device to the

GRP auxiliary port.

Step 1 Power off the asynchronous serial device.

Step 2 Attach the device end of the cable to the interface port on the asynchronous serial device.

Step 3 Attach the other end of the cable to the GRP auxiliary port.

Step 4 Power on the asynchronous serial device.

Connecting to the GRP Ethernet Port

The Ethernet port on the GRP supports two types of Ethernet ports as shown in (Figure 3-19):

A media-independentinterface (MII),40-pin,D-typereceptacle.

A media-dependentinterface (MDI)RJ-45receptacle.

The RJ-45and MII receptacles on the GRP represent two physical connection options for onlyone Ethernet interface; therefore, you can useeither theRJ-45connection or the MII connection, but not both simultaneously.

Caution The GRP can support only one Ethernet connection at a time. To prevent router and network problems, do not connect bothRJ-45and MII cables to the Ethernet receptacles at the same time, and use cables that comply withEIA/TIA-568standards.

 

 

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LEDs on the front panel indicate which Ethernet receptacle is active when the GRP is operating.

See “GRP Ethernet Port Connections” section on page 2-29 for additional information about GRP Ethernet ports.

Caution Ethernet ports are primarily used as a Telnet port into the Cisco 12000 series router, and for booting or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly connected. Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Figure 3-19GRPRJ-45and MII Ethernet Connections

To repeater

or DTE

RJ-45cable

To transceiver, repeater, or DTE

MII cable

LINK

TX

COLL

RX

MII

RJ - 45

ROUTE GIGABIT

PROCESSOR

H10736

 

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Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

RJ-45Connection

Use the following procedure to connect an Ethernet cable to the RJ-45receptacle.

Step 1 Plug the cable directly into theRJ-45receptacle.

Step 2 Connect the network end of yourRJ-45cable to your transceiver, switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other external equipment.

Note The Ethernet interfaces on the GRP are endstation devices only, not repeaters.

MII Connection

The MII receptacle requires an external transceiver that permits connection to multimode fiber for 100BASE-FXor100BASE-T4physical media. Depending on the type of media you use between the MII receptacle and your switch or hub, the network side of your100-Mbpstransceiver should be appropriately equipped withST-typeconnectors (forfiber-opticcables), BNC connectors, and so forth.

Use the following procedure to connect a cable to the MII Ethernet receptacle on the GRP.

Step 1 Connect the cable directly to the MII receptacle, or attach a100BASE-Ttransceiver (with the media appropriate to your application) to the MII receptacle.

Step 2 Connect the network end of your MII cable to your transceiver, switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other external equipment.

Note The Ethernet interfaces on the GRP are endstation devices only, not repeaters.

 

 

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Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

This section describes how to connect cables to the console, auxiliary, and Ethernet ports on the PRP. The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. For example, most modems are asynchronous devices.

Figure 3-20 shows an example of a data terminal and modem connections.

Figure 3-20PRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connections

 

 

 

 

S

 

 

 

 

 

L S

 

 

 

 

O L

 

 

 

 

T

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CONSOLE

 

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Console terminal

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Console port

 

 

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RJ-45Ethernet cables

 

 

 

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70692

Caution The ports labeled Ethernet,10BASE-T,Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safetyextra-lowvoltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.

 

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Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

Note RP cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.

Note To comply with TelcordiaGR-1089NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect all console, auxiliary, Ethernet, and

BITS (PRP2) interfaces only to intrabuilding or nonexposed wiring or cabling. The intrabuilding cable must be shielded and the shield must be grounded at both ends.

Connecting to the PRP Console Port

The system console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45receptacle for connecting a data terminal to perform the initial configuration of the router. The console port requires anRJ-45rollover cable.

See the “PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines” section on page 2-36 for additional information about the console port.

Refer to Figure 3-20 and use the following procedure to connect a data terminal to the PRP console port.

Step 1 Set your terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Step 2 Power off the data terminal.

Step 3 Attach the terminal end of the cable to the interface port on the data terminal.

Step 4 Attach the other end of the cable to the GRP console port.

Step 5 Power on the data terminal.

 

 

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Connecting to the PRP Auxiliary Port

The auxiliary port on the PRP is a DTE, RJ-45receptacle for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the router. The asynchronous auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.

See the “PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines” section on page 2-36 for additional information about the auxiliary port.

Refer to Figure 3-20 and use the following procedure to connect an asynchronous serial device to the PRP auxiliary port.

Step 1 Power off the asynchronous serial device.

Step 2 Attach the device end of the cable to the interface port on the asynchronous serial device.

Step 3 Attach the other end of the cable to the PRP auxiliary port.

Step 4 Power on the asynchronous serial device.

Connecting to the PRP Ethernet Ports

Two RJ-45Ethernet interface receptacles on the PRP providemedia-dependentinterface (MDI) Ethernet ports. These connections support IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with10BASE-Tand100BASE-TXstandards. The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is autosensing by default and isuser-configurable.

The RJ-45receptacles on the PRP provide two physical connection options for Ethernet interfaces. To connect cables to the PRP Ethernet interfaces (ports labeled ETH0 and ETH1), attach the Category 5 UTP cable directly to aRJ-45receptacle on the PRP.

See the “PRP Ethernet Connections” section on page 2-40 for additional information.

 

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Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

Note RJ-45cables are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from outside commercial cable vendors. Use cables that comply withEIA/TIA-568standards.

Caution Ethernet ports are primarily used as a Telnet port into the Cisco 12000 series router, and for booting or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly connected. Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Use the following procedure to connect an Ethernet cable to the PRP RJ-45

Ethernet receptacle.

Step 1 Plug the cable directly into theRJ-45receptacle.

Step 2 Connect the network end of yourRJ-45cable to a switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other external equipment.

Note The Ethernet interfaces on the PRP are endstation devices only, not repeaters.

 

 

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Connecting an Alarm Card Cable

Connecting an Alarm Card Cable

Each router alarm card has one 25-pinDsub connector, labeled Alarm (Figure 3-21).

Figure 3-21Alarm Card Cable Connection

 

Critical, major, and

 

 

Handle

minor alarm LEDs

 

Pin 1

 

CRITICAL

ACO/LT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAJORMINOR

 

ALARM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pin 25

 

 

Audio alarm

 

 

CRITICAL

cutoff switch

 

 

MAJORMINOR

 

 

 

 

FAIL

 

 

CSC

 

SFC

 

FAIL

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

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FAIL

 

 

 

 

 

ENABLED

ENABLED

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2

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALARM

Clock and scheduler card and switch fabric card LEDs

Alarm subconnectors can be used to connect the router to an external site alarm maintenance system. Any critical, major, and minor alarms generated by the router also energize alarm relays on the alarm card and activate the external site alarm. The alarm relay contacts on the alarm card consist of standard common,normally open, andnormally closed relay contacts that are wired to the alarm connector pins.

Table 2-13 lists thepin-to-signalcorrespondence between the connector pins and the alarm card relay contacts. Because alarm contact cables are entirely dependent on installation site circumstances, alarm connector cables are not available from Cisco. For information about alarm connector wiring requirements and the pinouts for the alarm connector interface, see the“Alarm Card Connection Guidelines” section on page 2-45.

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Caution Only safetyextra-lowvoltage (SELV) circuits can be connected to the alarm connector. Maximum rating for the alarm circuit is 2 A, 50 VA.

Note To comply with TelcordiaGR-1089NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, you must use a shielded cable when connecting to the external alarm ports on the alarm card. The shielded cable is terminated by shielded connectors on both ends, with the cable shield material tied to both connectors.

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Use the one of the following procedures to connect power to your router.

Connecting Power to the AC-Input Power Shelf, page 3-41

Connecting Power to the DC-Input Power Shelf, page 3-42

Caution A router must be operated with all its power modules installed at all times for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).

Connecting Power to the AC-InputPower Shelf

Use the following procedure to connect the AC power cords to the power shelf.

Note Connect each AC power supply to a dedicated power source (branch circuit). EachAC-inputpower supply operates between 200 and 240 VAC and requires at least a 20 A service for North American use, or a 13 A service for international use. For more information on AC power cords, see the“Power Connection Guidelines” section on page 2-17.

 

 

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Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Step 1 Connect each AC power cord to the back panel of the power shelf and secure them in place with their retention clips (Figure 3-22).

Figure 3-22Connecting AC Power Cords

Power cord retention clip

28019

Step 2 Plug each power supply cable into its AC outlet.

Connecting Power to the DC-InputPower Shelf

This section contains the procedures to connect the DC source power cables to a DC-poweredrouter.

The color coding of source DC power cable leads depends on the color coding of the site DC power source.

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Because there is no color code standard for source DC wiring, you must be sure that power source cables are connected to the power shelf with the proper positive (+) and negative (–)polarity:

In some cases, the source DC cable leads might have a positive (+) or a negative (–)label. This is a relatively safe indication of the polarity,but you must verify the polarity by measuring the voltage between the DC cable leads. Be sure that the positive (+) and negative(–)cable leads match the positive

(+) and negative (–)labels on the power shelf when making the measurement.

A green (or green and yellow) cable typically indicate that it is a ground cable.

Caution DC PEMs contain circuitry to trip the breaker on the PEM if the PEM detects a reverse polarity condition. No damage should occur from reverse polarity, but you should correct a reverse polarity condition immediately.

Note The length of the cables depends on the location of your router in relation to the source of DC power. These cables and the cable lugs used to attach the cables to the router chassis are not available from Cisco Systems. They are available from any commercial cable vendor. For more information on site power and source DC cable requirements, see the“Power Connection Guidelines” section on page 2-17.

Warning To ensure that power remains off while you are performing this procedure, tape the DC circuit breaker switch in the off (0) position.

Use the following procedure to connect DC power cables to the power shelf.

Step 1 Remove the cover over the cable terminal studs on the back panel of the power shelf (Figure 3-23):

a.Loosen (but do not remove) the screw that secures the cover.

b.Slide the cover down then pull the cover over the screw head and away from the PEM shelf.

 

 

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Figure 3-23DC-InputTerminal Connections on theDC-InputPower Shelf

B1

A1A1+ A2A2+

B2+ B2B1+ B1-

Ground

27964

Cover with slotted screw hole; fastens to standoff in middle of cable connection area

 

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Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Step 2 Connect the ground and each pair of power cables to theDC-inputterminal studs as follows (Figure 3-24):

Warning When reconnecting source DC power cables, always connect the ground cable first.

a.Connect the ground cable to the ground terminal studs. Beginning with terminal studs B2:

b.Connect the positive cable to the positive (+) terminal studs. For example: B2+.

c.Connect the negative cable to the negative (–)terminal studs. For example:B2-.

Repeat steps b andc for the remaining pairs of terminal studs.

Figure 3-24Reconnecting the Source DC Power Cables to the Power Shelf

 

26866

Positive (+)

Ground ( )

cable lug

cable lug

Negative (–)

cable lug

 

 

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Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Step 3 Reinstall the power cable cover (Figure 3-25).

Figure 3-25Reinstalling the Source DC Power Cable Cover

Cover standoff

27219

Cover with slotted screw hole; fastens to standoff in middle of cable connection area.

 

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original

Series Routers

The chassis front covers for the power shelf and upper blower module, upper card cage, lower card cage, and lower blower module are fastened to the chassis by ball studs on the front of the chassis (Figure 3-26).

Note The front cover for power shelf and upper blower module is packaged in the accessory kit to permit the foam shipping cap to fit securely on the top of the router and protect the router without damaging the front cover.

Step 1 Hold the front cover by its outside edges and align the ball studs with the ball stud clips on the front of the chassis.

Step 2 Push the front cover into the ball stud clips and the front cover is flush with the front of the chassis.

Step 3 Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 for the remaining front covers.

 

 

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Figure 3-26Router Chassis Front Covers

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Installing the Front Cover of Cisco 12010 Enhanced Series Routers

1

Ball stud

2

Ball stud clip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Front Cover of Cisco 12010 Enhanced

Series Routers

Refer to Figure 3-27 and use the following procedure to install the front cover for the Cisco 12010 enhanced series routers.

Step 1 Align the hinges on each side of the cover with the hinge connectors on each side of the chassis (see blowout inFigure 3-27).

Step 2 Push the front cover until the hinges snap into place.

Step 3 Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 for the remaining front cover.

 

 

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Figure 3-27Attaching the Front Covers

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Chapter 3 Installing the Router

Installing the Front Cover of Cisco 12010 Enhanced Series Routers

This completes the hardware installation procedures for Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 routers. Proceed to the next chapter to perform the initial router startup and basic configuration.

 

 

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C H A P T E R 4

System Startup and Basic

Configuration

The system startup process and a procedure for performing a basic configuration of your Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, or Cisco 12816 router is presented in the following sections:

Sources of Cisco IOS Software, page 4-2

Preconfiguration Requirements, page 4-2

Boot Process Overview, page 4-3

Powering On the Router and Observing the Boot Process, page 4-4

Manually Booting the System, page 4-11

Configuring the Router, page 4-14

Cisco IOS User Interface, page 4-15

Configuring the Software Configuration Register, page 4-31

Recovering a Lost Password, page 4-41

Using RP Flash Memory Cards, page 4-44

Post-Installation Procedures, page 4-63

 

 

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Chapter 4 System Startup and Basic Configuration

Sources of Cisco IOS Software

This chapter provides you with the information to configure your system so that it can access the network or enable other hosts in the network to access your system remotely by means of a Telnet connection. Detailed configuration procedures are beyond the scope of this document, but you can find more information in the “Post-Installation Procedures” section on page 4-63.

Sources of Cisco IOS Software

A default Cisco IOS software image for your system is available through any of the following internal or external sources:

Onboard flash memory on the Route Processor (RP)—Thelatest Cisco IOS software image is preloaded into the flash memory, and it is a single inline memory module (SIMM). Flash memory is also referred to as nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM). NVRAM retains its contents when you power off the system.

Flash memory card—Aflash memory card (sometimes referred to as a flash disk) inserted in a PCMCIA slot on the RP can serve as an external storage medium for a default Cisco IOS software image.

TFTP server—ATrivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server in the network can also function as an external source of a default Cisco IOS software image. You can download a valid Cisco IOS software image from such a remote host using a Telnet connection.

Preconfiguration Requirements

Before you configure your system, confirm the following:

All cards are securely installed.

All interface cable connections are secure and use cable strain relief where provided.

All source power cables are securely fastened to the PDUs, and are connected to the appropriate power source.

 

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Chapter 4 System Startup and Basic Configuration

Boot Process Overview

A terminal device is connected to the console port on the RP, powered on, and configured for 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits (9600, 8N2).

Note You must connect a terminal to the RP to perform the initial configuration of the router.

The flash memory card that shipped with your router is installed in slot 0 of the RP. The software configuration register is set to 0x0102 (default), causing the system to boot automatically from the Cisco IOS software image stored on the flash memory card.

After you complete the above, proceed to the following section to start the router.

Boot Process Overview

The following sequence summarizes a typical boot process.

1.Power on the router.

2.The RP MBus module receives +5 VDC voltage and starts executing MBus software.

3.The RP determines the router configuration by sending a message over the MBus requesting all installed devices to identify themselves. Their responses provide the RP with slot numbers, card, and component types.

4.The RP, line cards, switch fabric cards (CSCs and SFCs), and alarm card are then powered on.

5.The power-on-resetlogic of the RP is delayed to allow power for both local and CSC clocks to stabilize.

6.After the power-onreset logic is released, the RP begins to execute the ROM monitor software.

If the ROM monitor is configured to autoboot, the system automatically loads and boots the Cisco IOS software.

If the ROM monitor is not configured to autoboot, you must boot the Cisco IOS software manually.

 

 

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7.When the Cisco IOS software boots, it polls all other cards in the system, powers them on, and loads the Cisco IOS software they require.

8.The RP waits for all other cards to finish their boot processes.

Powering On the Router and Observing the Boot

Process

The first time you start the router, observe the following conditions:

Step 1 Switch on all the circuit breakers that control power to the router.

Step 2 Observe the power entry module LEDs:

AC PEMs—Thegreen PWR OK LED should be on and the power supply fan operating.

DC PEMs—Thegreen PWR OK LED should be on and the power supply fan operating.

Step 3 Check the blower module:

Ensure that the green OK LED is on.

Listen for the blowers in the blower modules; you should hear them operating immediately. In a noisy environment, the blowers may be difficult to hear. You can place your hand in front of the exhaust vents near the top rear of the chassis to verify that the blower is operating.

 

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Chapter 4 System Startup and Basic Configuration

Powering On the Router and Observing the Boot Process

Step 4 Observe the RP alphanumeric LED displays during the RP boot process (Figure 4-1).

Figure 4-1RP Alphanumeric LED Displays

PROCESSOR

Upper alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

Lower alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

H10780

Each 4-digitdisplay shows part of a2-linesystem message. During the RP boot process, the LED displays present a sequence of messages similar to that shown inTable 4-1.

Table 4-1RP Alphanumeric LED Display Sequence Examples

 

LED Display1

Meaning

Source

 

MROM

The MBus microcode begins to execute; nnnn is the microcode

MBus

 

nnnn

version number. For example, microcode Version 1.17 appears as

controller

 

 

01172.

 

 

 

 

LMEM

Low memory on the RP is being tested.

RP ROM

 

TEST

 

monitor

 

 

 

 

 

MEM

The size of main memory on the RP is being discovered.

RP ROM

 

INIT

 

monitor

 

 

 

 

 

RP

The system is operational and ready to execute basic Cisco IOS

RP ROM

 

RDY

software commands at the ROM monitor prompt (rommon>).

monitor

 

 

 

 

 

RP

A valid Cisco IOS image is running.

RP Cisco IOS

 

UP

 

software

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Table 4-1RP Alphanumeric LED Display Sequence Examples (continued)

LED Display1

Meaning

Source

PRI

The RP is enabled and is recognized as the system primary RP. A valid

RP Cisco IOS

RP

Cisco IOS image is running.

software

 

 

 

SEC

The RP is enabled and is recognized as the system secondary RP. A

RP Cisco IOS

RP

valid Cisco IOS image is running.

software

 

 

 

1.Some LED sequences may occur too quickly to view.

2.The version of MBus microcode running on your system might be different.

Step 5 Observe the status of the RP interfaces (seeFigure 4-2 for the GRP andFigure 4-3 for the PRP).

The LEDs on the RP show system status, the active flash memory card slot, the Ethernet connection in use, and the status of the Ethernet interface.

PCMCIA flash memory card slot LEDs (labeled Slot-0andSlot-1)are on when the slot is accessed.

PRP—RJ-45Ethernet port LEDs show the port activity:

LINK: Link activity

EN: port enabled

TX: data transmission

RX: data reception

GRP—RJ-45and MII Ethernet LEDs identify which of the two Ethernet connections is selected (only one port can be operational at a time).RJ-45LEDs show port activity.

LINK: Link activity

COLL: Collision detection

TX: data transmission

RX: data reception

 

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Chapter 4 System Startup and Basic Configuration

Powering On the Router and Observing the Boot Process

Figure 4-2GRPLEDs—PartialFront Panel View

EJECT

SLOTSLOT

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LINK

 

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Figure 4-3PRP Ethernet Ports andLEDs—PartialFront Panel View

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PRIMARY

ETH 1

 

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TX

 

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Step 6 During the line card boot process, observe the alphanumeric LED displays on each line card (Figure 4-4).

Note The line card boot process occurs immediately after the RP boot process.

The system attempts to boot identical line cards in parallel. Further, the system boots line cards as soon as they are powered on and become available. Each line card displays a sequence similar to those shown in Table 4-2.

Figure 4-4Line Card Alphanumeric LEDDisplays—PartialView Shown

Upper alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

Lower alphanumeric

LED display (four digits)

H11344

Table 4-2Line Card Alphanumeric LED Display Sequence Examples

LED Display1

 

Meaning

Source

MROM

 

The MBus microcode begins to execute; nnnn is the microcode

MBus

nnnn

 

version number. For example, microcode Version 1.17 appears as

controller

 

 

 

 

01172.

 

 

LMEM

 

Low memory on the line card is being tested.

Line card

TEST

 

 

ROM monitor

 

 

 

 

MEM

 

The size of main memory on the line card is being discovered.

Line card

INIT

 

 

ROM monitor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Table 4-2Line Card Alphanumeric LED Display Sequence Examples (continued)

LED Display1

Meaning

Source

ROMI

The ROM image is being loaded into line card memory.

RP Cisco IOS

GET

 

software

 

 

 

FABL

The line card is waiting for the fabric downloader to load.3

RP Cisco IOS

WAIT

 

software

 

 

 

FABL

The fabric downloader is being loaded into line card memory.

RP Cisco IOS

DNLD

 

software

 

 

 

FABL

The fabric downloader is being launched.

RP Cisco IOS

STRT

 

software

 

 

 

FABL

The fabric downloader is launched and running.

RP Cisco IOS

RUN

 

software

 

 

 

IOS

Cisco IOS software is being downloaded into line card memory.

RP Cisco IOS

DNLD

 

software

 

 

 

IOS

Cisco IOS software is being launched.

RP Cisco IOS

STRT

 

software

 

 

 

IOS

Cisco IOS software is running.

RP Cisco IOS

UP

 

software

 

 

 

IOS

The line card is enabled and ready for use.

RP Cisco IOS

RUN

 

software

 

 

 

1.Some LED sequences may occur too quickly to view. Sequence are shown in this tabular form as a baseline to represent line card functionality at startup.

2.The version of MBus microcode running on your system might be different.

3.The fabric downloader loads the Cisco IOS software image onto the line card.

 

 

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Chapter 4 System Startup and Basic Configuration

Powering On the Router and Observing the Boot Process

Step 7 The router automatically boots using the default image (if a flash memory card containing a valid Cisco IOS software image is inserted in slot 0 and the software configuration register is set to 0x0102).

As the router boots the Cisco IOS software image, a system banner similar to the following appears:

Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software

IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-M),Experimental Version 12.0(20010120:204554) [gha]

Copyright (c) 1986-2001by cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Sat20-Jan-0118:34 by ghall

Note The system banner depends on the image version of the Cisco IOS software that the system is running. Your system banner might be different than the examples throughout this chapter.

If the ROM monitor prompt (rommon>) displays, the router did not find a valid system image or the boot sequence is interrupted, and the system entered read-onlymemory (ROM) monitor mode.

In this case, you must boot a Cisco IOS software image manually by issuing the boot command.

For information on locating a valid Cisco IOS software image, refer to the “Locating a Valid Cisco IOS Software Image” section on page 4-12.

For information on using one of the various forms of the boot command, refer to the“Booting from the Cisco IOS Software Image” section on page 4-12.

After manually booting the router, continue to Step 8.

Step 8 When you start an unconfigured system for the first time, the system automatically starts the system configuration dialog. The interactive script prompts you through the steps to create a router configuration file defining basic system operation parameters.

---System Configuration Dialog---

Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]:

The router uses the system configuration file to activate network connections to the RP so the router can be administered from a remote location, or to activate the line card network interfaces. After the initial configuration, the RP and line cards can communicate with external networks.