B&K AVR202 Series User Manual

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B&K Components, Ltd.

AVR101 series 100 AVR202 series 200 A/V Receiver

Owner’s Manual

p/n 12699 Rev. 9812C

B&K Components, Ltd., 2100 Old Union Road, Buffalo New York 14227-2725

Phone (716)656-0026,Fax(716)656-1291,http://www.bkcomp.com,E-mail:info@bkcomp.com

p/n 12699 Rev. 9812C

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

The Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Making the connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Audio / Video connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

Digital Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

Speaker outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12

Antenna Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

Control outputs / IR Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

The Menu System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

User Preference Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Display Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Edit Preset Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Surround Mode Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

Setup/Configure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24

Speaker Size and Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24

Speaker Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28

Source Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

AM Tuner Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

FM Tuner Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30

Memory Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Power On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Sleep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Choosing a source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

Tuner Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

Adjusting the Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34

Temporary Level Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34

Surround Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35

Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38

Getting receiver Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39

Zone 2 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40

Advanced Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

41

Advanced Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

41

Zone Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42

Z1 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42

Z2 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

Power On Titles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

Control Out Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

Factory Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48

Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

49

Receiver Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50

The Menu System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

51

Rear Panel Enlarged View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

52

Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

53

Limited Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

55

Returning Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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p/n 12699 Rev. 9812C

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Manufactured under license from Dolby Laboratories. Dolby”, ”Pro Logic”,“AC-3",and thedouble-Dsymbol are trademarks of Dolby Laboratories. Confidential Unpublished Works. ©1992-1997Dolby Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.

DTS® is a registered trademark of Digital Theater Systems, LLC. Additionally licensed under the following US Patent 5,451,942 & National Patent applications derived from PCT/US95/00959. Additional U.S. and Foreign Patents pending. “DTS”, “digital sound”, and “coherent acoustics” logos are trademarks of DTS Technology LLC. All rights reserved.

Motorola®,, “Powered by Motorola”™, Motorola name and logo are registered trademarks of Motorola, Inc.

The AVR101 series 100 may be used to process Dolby Pro Logic and Dolby Digital

The AVR202 series 200 may be used to process Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby Digital, and DTS.

Accessories included: Owners manual, Remote control Manual, Power cord, Remote control,4-AAAbatteries

© Copyright 1998 All Rights Reserved.

B&K Components, Ltd., 2100 Old Union Road, Buffalo New York 14227-2725

Phone (716)656-0026,Fax(716)656-1291,http://www.bkcomp.com,E-mail:info@bkcomp.com

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p/n 12699 Rev. 9812C

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

PLEASE READ BEFORE INSTALLING

WARNING: to prevent fire or shock hazard, do not expose this unit to rain or moisture. Care should be taken to prevent objects or liquid from entering the enclosure. Never handle the power cord with wet hands.

The lightning flash with arrowhead, within an equilateral triangle, is intended to alert the user of the presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage” within the product’s enclosure that may constitute a risk of electric shock to you.

The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to alert the user of the presence of important operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the unit.

Caution: To prevent the risk of electric shock, do not remove cover. No user-serviceableparts inside. Refer servicing to qualified service personnel.

If an outdoor antenna is connected to the antenna input, be sure it is grounded to provide some protection against voltage surges and built up static charges. Keep the outdoor antenna away from power lines.

Unplug the receiver from the AC outlet when plugging in or unplugging cables, when left unused for an extended period of time, moving the receiver, or when you suspect lightning in your area.

Prevent damage to the power cord. Do not bend, pull, place objects on, alter, etc. Replace the power cord if it becomes damaged. Always grasp the plug on the power cord when plugging in or unplugging the receiver from the AC outlet.

Your system may produce sound levels capable of causing permanent hearing loss. Do not operate for extended periods of time at high volume levels.

Make sure the receiver is placed on a level surface.

Protect the receiver from impact. (Do not drop it!!!)

Do not climb on top of the receiver or place heavy objects on its top cover.

The receiver is equipped with raised feet to provide ventilation, reduce acoustic feedback, and provide protection against scratching the surface the unit is resting on. We advise against removing or altering feet.

Do not stack anything on top of the receiver (processor, source, etc.) Leave a minimum of 3” clearance from the top of the receiver to the next shelf (or component).

The receiver should be located away from heat sources such as heaters or amplifiers.

Do not perform any internal modifications to the receiver.

Always connect the receiver’s power cord to an unswitched AC outlet for normal operation.

If young children are present, adult supervision should be provided until the children are capable of following all rules for safe operation.

Do not plug the receiver’s power cord into an outlet with an unreasonable number of other devices. Be careful if using extension cords and ensure the total power used by all devices does not exceed the power rating (watts/amperes) of the extension cord. Excessive loads may cause the insulation on the cord to heat and possibly melt.

Mistaking CONTROL OUTPUT orIR INPUT connectors for audio/video inputs or outputs may damage your receiver or other components.

Damage can occur to your speakers if the power rating of each individual driver is exceeded by the receiver. Ensure that all the drivers in your system are capable of handling not only the average power being delivered by the receiver, but also the peak power that is likely to be generated during strong passages. If you are unsure of your speaker's power rating, contact the speaker manufacturer or the dealer where you purchased them.

The receiver should be serviced by qualified personnel when:

The receiver is not functioning properly.

Objects have entered the chassis.

The receiver was exposed to rain or other type of moisture.

The receiver was dropped, or the chassis is damaged.

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p/n 12699 Rev. 9812C

FEATURES

Your new receiver is a versatile audio/video control center. The receiver is designed to sound sensational and be an attractive, easy-to-useaddition to your audio/video system. Although you already have a good idea of your receiver’s features, we would like to take a moment to point out certain highlights.

Remote Control - easy control of your B&K equipment.

Front Panel Operation - nearly all functions can be controlled directly from receiver.

Two-zone operation - complete digital/analog preamp/processor for zone 1 plus fully independent analog preamp for second listening/viewing area.

Plug and Play operation - automatically selects the optimum input and surround sound format.

A/V presets - 20 preset memories allow instant recall of user settings.

Customized input and A/V preset names - assign names to presets, inputs, or the turn on message.

Internal Digitally Synthesized AM/FM Stereo tuner - stores 20 AM and 20 FM channels.

Analog inputs/outputs - seven A/V inputs and five A/V outputsall with stereo audio, composite video andS-videoplus one set of 5.1 channel surround outputs

Digital inputs/outputs - seven coaxial inputs and one coaxial output plus five optical inputs and one optical output.

Control Outputs - four 12 VDC @ 50 mA outputs for controlling external systems such as a projection screen or B & K amplifier.

IR inputs/outputs - two IR inputs and up to four IR outputs let you integrate the receiver with an infrared repeater control system.

Gold Plated Connectors - better sound with minimum signal loss and degradation.

State-of-the-artpower amplifier section -

ƒToroidal transformer and computer-gradeelectrolytic capacitors combine to provide for improved dynamics and extended low frequency control.

ƒDiscrete Circuitry for more accurate, 3-dimensionalreproduction.

ƒClass A Predriver improves low level detail for smoother, more musical sound.

ƒAB MOSFET Output Stage for efficient and linear power delivery.

Upgradable - modular design allows for future A/D, D/A, digital receiver, DSP and bass management enhancements.

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THE BASICS

The following is intended to familiarize users with common terms and applications of Home Theater equipment.

Sources - your receiver can directly provide audio from itsbuilt-inAM/FM tuner. It can also provide limited video from itson-screenmenu system. Typically you will want to connect a number of additional sources (VCR, DVD player, etc.) to your receiver. Your receiver is designed to accommodate a wide range of audio and video signals.

The following table lists the most popular home theater media and how the audio information is stored.

Source Media

Analog

PCM

Dolby Digital

DTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audio Cassette

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video Cassette

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laserdisc (LD)

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Compact Disc (CD)

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Versatile Disc (DVD)

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Satellite Broadcast

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Audio Tape (DAT)

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Compact Cassette (DCC)

 

X (compressed)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minidisc (MD)

 

X (compressed)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analog vs. Digital Audio - This refers to the method used to place audio information on the source material and how they are delivered to your receiver from the source. Analog signals exactly represent the sound you will hear through a continuously varying voltage. Audio and video cassettes are analog recordings and are normally delivered to your receiver over a pair of coaxial audio cables.

Digital signals closely approximate the original audio signals with a set of numbers referred to as a bitstream. CDs and DVDs are sources of digital audio and are normally connected to your receiver through a coaxial or optical digital cable. There are several different bitstream formats available. The simplest format is called Pulse Code Modulation (PCM). In PCM, the bitstream directly represents the original 2-channelaudio. In Dolby Digital and DTS (see “Surround Formats” below) bitstreams are modified using a process called compression to squeeze more information into limited space. DTS squeezes 5.1 channels into the space normally required for two uncompressed channels, while Dolby Digital squeezes 5.1 channels into about ¼ the space required for two channels. Your receiver automatically detects the bitstream currently being provided from the source and performs the required decompression and surround processing. If no digital signal is present your receiver will automatically switch to analog processing.

All sounds that you hear from your speakers are analog. Digital signals are automatically converted to analog by your receiver before being output to your speakers.

If analog signals exactly represent the audio, while digital signals only approximate it, why would I want to use digital?

All analog sources add some amount of noise and distortion to the audio signal. Additional noise can be picked up through the cables from the source to your receiver. It is impossible for the receiver to tell the difference between the desired signal and the added noise and distortion, so it reproduces both of them. The result is increased background noise and decreased dynamic range and fidelity. Digital signals are virtually immune to noise and distortion. The receiver can, therefore, reproduce the signal with the greatest possible fidelity. We recommend you use digital signals wherever possible. Also Dolby Digital and DTS (see “Surround Formats” below) work only with digital signals.

Surround Formats - Your source material will be in one of five possible formats described below.

Monaural (Mono) - This is the oldest format available. It contains a single, full range audio channel. Modern recordings are seldom made in this format, but most older movies and music are available only in this format. You may get mono from any source - digital or analog. Sound will normally come only from

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your center channel speaker, but your receiver can produce mono in two or four channels (see “Surround Mode”). Since all modern sources are stereo, the mono information is usually replicated on both the left and right channels.

Stereo - Stereo contains two discrete, full range audio channels. This is the most common format for music and is also used on many movies. You may get stereo from any source - digital or analog. Sound will normally come only from your front left and right speakers, but your receiver can additionally produce stereo in four or five channels (see “Surround Mode”).

Dolby Pro Logic - Dolby Pro Logic is a refinement of Dolby Surround which was the earliest form of true surround processing. Like Stereo, Dolby Surround contains two discrete, full range audio channels. In addition, a monaural, limited range rear channel is encoded on the two stereo channels in a process called matrixing. The rear channel information is encoded in positive polarity on the left channel and in negative polarity on the right channel. The Dolby Processor can detect this encoding (left minus right) and send that information to the rear channels. Dolby Pro Logic adds additional processing to produce a full range center channel by extracting the mono information from the left and right channel. This is the most common format for all but the most recent movies. Music sources are occasionally encoded in Pro Logic. However, many people prefer to use Pro Logic processing on all of their stereo sources. The center channel extraction process often yields improved stereo imaging, especially when you are sitting away from the “sweet spot” at center of the listening area. The rear channel processing often lends a pleasing ambiance even to material that is not Pro Logic encoded. Dolby Pro Logic is fully compatible with stereo and you may get it from any source - digital or analog. Sound will normally come from all five speakers in your system, but your receiver can reduce the number of channels to two or four (see “Surround Modes”).

Dolby Digital (also referred to as AC-3) - Dolby Digital contains up to five discrete, full range audio channels plus an additional Low Frequency Effects (LFE) channel. The LFE channel contains only low frequency information for enhanced sound effects in movies. This combination of five discrete channels plus a LFE channel is often referred to as 5.1 channels. Dolby Digital is a digital format only. It must be delivered to your receiver over a coaxial or optical digital cable. As of the writing of this manual, Dolby Digital is commercially available on DVD (Also seeDolby Digital RF below). It is also possible to create your own Dolby Digital CDs and DATs if you have the recording equipment. You can’t directly record Dolby Digital onto minidisc or digital compact cassette since these devices add their own compression which is incompatible with the Dolby Digital compression. Sound will normally come from all five speakers in your system, but your receiver can reduce the number of channels to two or four (see “Surround Mode”). Not all Dolby Digital recordings will include all five channels, and, in fact, it is common on DVDs to have two channel Dolby Digital with or without Pro Logic processing.

Dolby Digital RF (also referred to as AC3-RF) - Dolby Digital RF is identical to normal Dolby Digital except that it uses a special RF encoding scheme to put the bitstream on Laserdiscs without replacing the normal stereo (or Pro Logic) PCM bitstream that is normally available from laserdisc. In order to use Dolby Digital RF laserdiscs you must have a B&KDT-1RF demodulator or similar product from another manufacturer. For best results with your receivers Plug and Play capability we strongly recommend theDT-1.

DTS (Digital Theater Systems) - DTS is the latest surround sound technology. DTS is similar to Dolby Digital in that it provides 5.1 discrete audio channels. However, it uses more digital data to encode the information and may provide greater fidelity than Dolby Digital. DTS is a digital format only. It must be delivered to your receiver over a coaxial or optical digital cable. As of the writing of this manual, DTS is commercially available only on laserdisc and CD with DVD coming soon. No RF demodulator is required for DTS laserdiscs since the DTS bitstream replaces the normal PCM bitstream. Like Dolby Digital, you can create your own DTS DATs or CDs but not minidisc or digital compact cassette. As with Dolby Digital, sound will normally come from all five speakers in your system, but your receiver can reduce the number of channels to two or four (see “Surround Mode”).

NOTE: The AVR101 series 100 processes Dolby Pro Logic and Dolby Digital, it DOES NOT process DTS. The AVR101 can be upgraded to process DTS. Contact B&K or your B&K dealer for information on upgrades. The AVR202 series 200 processes Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby Digital, and DTS.

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Bass Management - Dolby Digital and DTS formats contain up to 5 full range channels plus LFE. Only a system with fivefull-range(large) speakers plus a subwoofer can directly reproduce these formats. However, almost all commercially available center channel speakers are small and incapable of reproducing the lowest bass frequencies without distortion or even damage to the speaker. Many people also use small speakers in the rear of their system, while others use small speakers all around. Use of a subwoofer is almost mandatory when using five small speakers, but people with at least two large speakers may or may not choose to use a subwoofer. Some people may not use a center channel or rear speakers at all. In order to handle any possible combination of large, small, or missing speakers, a home theater system must contain good bass management, a concept often missing fromtwo-piecesystems where the Dolby Digital or DTS decoder is separate from the preamp. Your receiver contains a complete bass management system. You can use as few as two large front left and right speakers or two small left and right speakers plus a subwoofer or as many as five full range speakers plus a subwoofer or any combination in between without missing any information. Wherever small speakers are used the bass management system prevents low bass information from going to that speaker (“high pass”). This bass information is rerouted to a speaker that can handle it, usually a subwoofer, but it can also send center, rear, or LFE bass to large front speakers if no subwoofer is available. When center or rear speakers are not used at all, the missing channel is sent (“downmixed”) to the front speakers.

Preamp - A preamp typically includes the capability to select from a number of sources, adjust volume levels and route the data to an amplifier. Your receiver includes a high quality preamp.

Processor - A processor typically includes the capability to decode one or more surround formats, and convert between digital and analog as required. Your receiver includes a high quality processor capable of decoding the surround formats described above.

Zone - A zone is usually a room that has speakers installed in it. Your receiver includes a full preamp/processor for zone 1 plus an additional analog stereo preamp for zone 2. This allows, for example, watching a Dolby Digital movie in zone one while simultaneously using thebuilt-inAM/FM tuner in another room.

Amplifier - An amplifier takes the output of a preamp/processor and increases its level to that necessary to drive a speaker. Your receiver includes a high qualityfive-channelamplifier capable of excellent results with most speaker systems. Your receiver also includes direct preamp/processor outputs if you wish to use external amplifiers. If you are using a subwoofer it must be aself-poweredtype or a passive sub with an external amplifier. You must also provide external amplification for the second zone if you should use that capability.

Speakers - A surround sound system typically uses 5 speakers located left front, center front, right front, right rear, and left rear plus a subwoofer located anywhere in the room. Best results are achieved using five identical full range speakers plus subwoofer. This is not always practical. Excellent results can be achieved using smaller and/or fewer speakers, as long as you go through the set up procedures described later in the manual.

Composite vs. S-video - Composite video is the oldest standard for color video. It combines the luminance (brightness orblack-and-white)and chrominance (color) information onto a single conductor. These signals must be separated again for display resulting in some degradation of the video quality.S-videois a newer standard that uses separate conductors for the luminance (Y) and chrominance (C) information resulting in better video quality. Your receiver is capable of switching both composite andS-videosignals, but it cannot convert between video types.

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1.Headphone Jack - Stereo headphones having a standard ¼ inch binaural plug can be connected to the headphone output. The receiver must be on and in HEADPHONE Mode for proper headphone operation.

2.Front panel buttons

S L E E P

Puts the receiver in standby (low power) mode.

P R E S E T

Steps through audio / video presets for instant recall of setups.

Pressing ENTER recalls the preset.

E N T E R

Confirm selection or display current status of the receiver.

Pressing ENTER and PRESET simultaneously will save preset.

 

M E N U

Enter / exit menu system

D O W NU P Step through menus, sources, or surround modes.

S O U R C E

Steps through the audio / video sources.

M O D E

Steps through the surround modes.

L E V E L

Selects MASTER, CENTER, REAR, and SUBWOOFER level

Also allows ZONE 2 operation.

3.Main power switch - Removes all power to the receiver. Normal operation of the receiver requires the power switch to remain on. Use the Sleep button for daily on and off of the receiver. It places the unit in standby mode that allows turning back on with the remote control. Turn the receiver off with the main power switch when not using the receiver for an extended period of time.

4.Volume control - For controlling system volume. Turning theshuttle-typevolume control clockwise increases the volume level, counterclockwise decreases the volume level. The volume knob is also used to change other receiver settings. See THE MENU SYSTEM and OPERATION

5.Level indicators - Display which volume level is being changed - MASTER, CENTER, REAR, or SUBWOOFER. The bottom indicator is for the activation of ZONE 2. It is lit when changes are made to zone 2.

6.Display - The receiver display is a 16 character alphanumeric fluorescent display. Displays current status of receiver and any changes being performed.

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