Apple DESIGNING AIRPORT NETWORKS 10.5 Windows
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Designing

AirPort Networks

Using AirPort Utility

Mac OS X v10.5 + Windows

1 Contents

Chapter 1

3

Getting Started

 

5

Configuring an Apple Wireless Device for Internet Access Using AirPort Utility

 

6

Extending the Range of Your AirPort Network

 

6

Sharing a USB Hard Disk Connected to an AirPort Extreme Base Station or Time Capsule

 

6

Printing with an Apple Wireless Device

 

6

Sharing Your Computer’s Internet Connection

Chapter 2

9

AirPort Security

 

9

Security for AirPort Networks at Home

 

10

Security for AirPort Networks in Businesses and Classrooms

 

11

Wi-FiProtected Access (WPA) and WPA2

Chapter 3

14

AirPort Network Designs

 

15

Using AirPort Utility

 

17

Setting Up the AirPort Extreme Network

 

24

Configuring and Sharing Internet Access

 

40

Setting Advanced Options

 

42

Setting Up a Wireless Distribution System (WDS)

 

46

Extending the Range of an 802.11n Network

 

48

Setting up a Dual-Band(2.4 GHz and 5 GHz) Network

 

49

Keeping Your Network Secure

 

54

Directing Network Traffic to a Specific Computer on Your Network (Port Mapping)

 

56

Logging

 

57

Setting up IPv6

 

58

Sharing and Securing USB Hard Disks on Your Network

 

60

Using a Time Capsule in Your Network

 

60

Connecting a USB Printer to an Apple Wireless Device

 

61

Adding a Wireless Client to Your 802.11n Network

 

62

Solving Problems

Chapter 4

64

Behind the Scenes

 

64

Basic Networking

 

67

Items That Can Cause Interference with AirPort

Glossary

69

 

2

Getting Started

1

 

 

 

AirPort offers the easiest way to provide wireless Internet access and networking anywhere in the home, classroom, or office.

AirPort is based on the latest Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11n draft specification and provides fast and reliable wireless networking in the home, classroom, or small office. You can enjoy data transfer rates of up to five times faster than data rates provided by the 802.11g standard and more than twice the network range.

The AirPort Extreme Base Station and Time Capsule are dual-band,so they can work in either the 2.4 gigahertz (GHz) or 5 GHz spectrum. And they are 100 percent backwardcompatible, so Mac computers and PCs that use 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, or IEEE draft specification 802.11n wireless cards can connect to an AirPort wireless network. They also work flawlessly with the AirPort Express for wireless music streaming and more. The AirPort Extreme Base Station and Time Capsule have three additional 10/100/1000Base-TGigabit Ethernet ports, so you don't need to include another router in your network.

To set up an AirPort Extreme Base Station, an AirPort Express, or a Time Capsule, you use AirPort Utility, the easy-to-usesetup and management application. AirPort Utility has a simple user experience, with all software controls accessible from the same application. It provides better management of several Apple wireless devices, withclient-monitoringfeatures and logging. AirPort Utility enables guest accounts that expire, for temporary access to your network; you no longer need to give your network password to weekend visitors in your home or office. You can even set up accounts with time constraints for the best in parental controls. This version of AirPort Utility supports IPv6 and Bonjour, so you can “advertise” network services such as printing and sharing a hard disk over the WAN port.

Note: When the features discussed in this document apply to the AirPort Extreme Base Station, AirPort Express, and Time Capsule, the devices are referred to collectively as Apple wireless devices.

3

With an AirPort Extreme Base Station or a Time Capsule, you can connect a USB hard disk so that everyone on the network can back up, store, and share files. Every Time Capsule includes an internal AirPort disk, so you don’t need to connect an external one. If you want, you can connect additional USB disks to the USB port on your Time Capsule. You can also connect a USB printer to the USB port on any Apple wireless device, so that everyone on the network can access the printer or hub.

All Apple wireless devices provide strong, wireless security. They offer a built-infirewall and supportindustry-standardencryption technologies. Yet the simple setup utility and powerful access controls make it easy for authorized users to connect to the AirPort network they create.

You can use an Apple wireless device to provide wireless Internet access and share a single Internet connection among several computers in the following ways:

ÂSet up the device to act as a router and provide Internet Protocol (IP) addresses to computers on the network using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and Network Address Translation (NAT). When the wireless device is connected to a DSL or cable modem that is connected to the Internet, it receives webpages and email content from the Internet through its Internet connection, and then sends the content to wireless-enabledcomputers, using the wireless network or using Ethernet if there are computers connected to the Ethernet ports.

ÂSet up the Apple wireless device to act as a bridge on an existing network that already has Internet access and a router providing IP addresses. The device passes IP addresses and the Internet connection to AirPort or wireless-enabledcomputers, or computers connected to the wireless device by Ethernet.

This document provides information about the AirPort Extreme Base Station, AirPort Express, and Time Capsule, and detailed information about designing 802.11n networks with AirPort Utility for computers using Mac OS X v10.5 or later, and Windows Vista or Windows XP with Service Pack 2. You can set up an Apple wireless device and connect to the Internet without wires in minutes. But because Apple wireless devices are flexible and powerful networking products, you can also create an AirPort network that does much more. If you want to design an AirPort network that provides Internet access to non-AirPortcomputers via Ethernet, or take advantage of some of your wireless device’s more advanced features, use this document to design and implement your network. You can find more general wireless networking information and an overview of AirPort technology in the earlier AirPort documents, located at apple.com/ support/manuals/airport.

Note: The images of AirPort Utility in this document are from Mac OS X v10.5. If you are using a Windows computer, the images you see in this document may be slightly different from what you see on your screen.

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Chapter 1 Getting Started

 

 

Configuring an Apple Wireless Device for Internet Access Using AirPort Utility

Like your computer, Apple wireless devices must be set up with the appropriate hardware and IP networking information to connect to the Internet. Install AirPort Utility, which came on the CD with your wireless device, and use it to provide Internet configuration information and other network settings.

This version of AirPort Utility combines the ease of use of AirPort Setup Assistant and the power of AirPort Admin Utility. It is installed in the Utilities folder in the Applications folder on a Macintosh computer using Mac OS X, and in Start > All Programs > AirPort on computers using Windows. AirPort Utility walks you through the setup process by asking a series of questions to determine how the device’s Internet connection and other interfaces should be set up. Enter the settings you received from your ISP or network administrator for Ethernet, PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE), or your local area network (LAN); give your AirPort network a name and password; set up a device as a wireless bridge to extend the range of your existing AirPort network; and set other options.

When you have finished entering the settings, AirPort Utility transfers the settings to your wireless device. Then it connects to the Internet and shares its Internet connection with computers that join its AirPort network.

You can also create an AirPort network that takes advantage of the more advanced networking features of Apple wireless devices. To set more advanced AirPort options, use AirPort Utility to manually set up your wireless device’s configuration, or make quick adjustments to one you have already set up. Some of the AirPort advanced networking features can be configured only using the manual setup features in AirPort Utility.

Set up your Apple wireless device manually using AirPort Utility when:

ÂYou want to provide Internet access to computers that connect to the wireless device using Ethernet

ÂYou have already set up your device, but you need to change one setting, such as your account credentials

ÂYou need to configure advanced settings such as channel frequency, advanced security options, closed networks, DHCP lease time, access control, WAN privacy, power controls, or port mapping or other options

For instructions on using AirPort Utility to manually set up your wireless device and network, see “Using AirPort Utility” on page 15.

Chapter 1 Getting Started

5

 

 

Extending the Range of Your AirPort Network

You can extend the range of your network by using AirPort Utility to set up wireless connections between several devices in your network, known as a Wireless Distribution System (WDS), or to connect a device using Ethernet to create a roaming network. For more information on setting up a WDS or a roaming network, see “Connecting Additional Wireless Devices to Your AirPort Network” on page 40.

Sharing a USB Hard Disk Connected to an AirPort Extreme Base Station or Time Capsule

If you’re using the newest AirPort Extreme Base Station or a Time Capsule, you can connect a USB hard disk to it, and computers connected to the network—wiredor wireless, Mac orWindows—canshare files using the hard disk. Every Time Capsule includes an internal AirPort disk, so you don’t need to connect an external one. If you want, you can connect additional USB disks to the USB port on your Time Capsule. See“Sharing and Securing USB Hard Disks on Your Network” on page 58.

Printing with an Apple Wireless Device

If you have a compatible USB printer connected to your Apple wireless device, computers on the AirPort network can use Bonjour (Apple’s zero-configurationnetworking technology) to print to the printer. For instructions about printing to a USB printer from a computer, see“Connecting a USB Printer to an Apple Wireless Device” on page 60.

Sharing Your Computer’s Internet Connection

If your computer is connected to the Internet, you can share your Internet connection with other computers using Mac OS X version 10.2 or later, or Windows XP with Service Pack 2. This is sometimes called using your computer as a software base station.

You can share your Internet connection as long as your computer is connected to the Internet. If your computer goes to sleep or is restarted, or if you lose your Internet connection, you need to restart Internet sharing.

6

Chapter 1 Getting Started

 

 

To start Internet sharing on a computer using Mac OS X v10.5: 1 Open System Preferences and click Sharing.

2Choose the port you want to use to share your Internet connection from the “Share your connection using” pop-upmenu.

3Select the port you want to use to share your Internet connection in the “To computers using” list. You can choose to share your Internet connection with AirPort-enabledcomputers or computers withbuilt-inEthernet, for example.

4 Select Internet Sharing in the Services list.

5If you want to share your Internet connection with computers using AirPort, click AirPort Options to give your network a name and password.

Chapter 1 Getting Started

7

 

 

To start Internet sharing on a computer using Windows:

1 Open Control Panel from the Start menu, and then click “Network and Internet.”

2 Click “Network and Sharing Center.”

3 Click “Manage network connections” in the Tasks list.

4 Right-clickthe network connection you want to share, and then select Properties.

5Click Sharing and then select “Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection.”

Note: If your Internet connection and your local network use the same port(built-inEthernet, for example), contact your ISP before you turn on Internet sharing. In some cases (if you use a cable modem, for example) you might unintentionally affect the network settings of other ISP customers, and your ISP might terminate your service to prevent you from disrupting its network.

The following chapters explain AirPort security options, AirPort network design and setup, and other advanced options.

8

Chapter 1 Getting Started

 

 

AirPort Security

2

 

 

 

This chapter provides an overview of the security features available in AirPort.

Apple has designed its wireless devices to provide several levels of security, so you can enjoy peace of mind when you access the Internet, manage online financial transactions, or send and receive email. The AirPort Extreme Base Station and Time Capsule also include a slot for inserting a lock to deter theft.

For information and instructions for setting up these security features, see “Setting Up the AirPort Extreme Network” on page 17.

Security for AirPort Networks at Home

Apple gives you ways to protect your wireless AirPort network as well as the data that travels over it.

NAT Firewall

You can isolate your wireless network with firewall protection. Apple wireless devices have a built-inNetwork Address Translation (NAT) firewall that creates a barrier between your network and the Internet, protecting data fromInternet-basedIP attacks. The firewall is automatically turned on when you set up the device to share a single Internet connection. For computers with a cable or DSL modem, AirPort can actually be safer than a wired connection.

Closed Network

Creating a closed network keeps the network name and the very existence of your network private. Prospective users of your network must know the network name and password to access it. Use AirPort Utility, located in the Utilities folder in the Applications folder on a Macintosh computer using Mac OS X, or in Start > All Programs > AirPort on a computer using Windows, to create a closed network.

9

Password Protection and Encryption

AirPort uses password protection and encryption to deliver a level of security comparable to that of traditional wired networks. Users can be required to enter a password to log in to the AirPort network. When transmitting data and passwords,

the wireless device uses up to 128-bitencryption, through eitherWi-FiProtected Access (WPA), WPA2, or Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), to scramble data and help keep

it safe. If you are setting up an 802.11n-basedAirPort device, you can also use WEP (Transitional Security Network) if bothWEP-compatibleandWPA/WPA2-compatiblecomputers will join your network.

Note: WPA security is available only to AirPort Extreme wireless devices; AirPort and AirPort Extreme clients using Mac OS X 10.3 or later and AirPort 3.3 or later; and tonon-Appleclients using other 802.11 wireless adapters that support WPA. WPA2 security requires firmware version 5.6 or later for an AirPort Extreme Base Station, firmware version 6.2 or later an AirPort Express, firmware version 7.3 or later for a Time Capsule, and a Macintosh computer with an AirPort Extreme wireless card using AirPort 4.2 or later. If your computer uses Windows XP or Windows Vista, check the documentation that came with your computer to see if your computer supports WPA2.

Security for AirPort Networks in Businesses and Classrooms

Businesses and schools need to restrict network communications to authorized users and keep data safe from prying eyes. To meet this need, Apple wireless devices and software provide a robust suite of security mechanisms. Use AirPort Utility to set up these advanced security features.

Transmitter Power Control

Because radio waves travel in all directions, they can extend outside the confines of a specific building. The Transmit Power setting in AirPort Utility lets you adjust the transmission range of your device’s network. Only users within the network vicinity have access to the network.

MAC Address Access Control

Every AirPort and wireless card has a unique Media Access Control (MAC) address. For AirPort and AirPort Extreme Cards, the MAC address is sometimes referred to as the AirPort ID. Support for MAC address access control lets administrators set up a list of MAC addresses and restrict access to the network to only those users whose MAC addresses are in the access control list.

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Chapter 2 AirPort Security