Apple DESIGNING AIRPORT EXTREME NETWORKS V3.4 User Manual

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Designing AirPort

Extreme Networks

© 2004 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

Apple, the Apple logo, AirPort, AppleShare, Apple Store, AppleTalk, Mac, and Mac OS are trademarks of

 

Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Rendezvous is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.

 

Wi-Fiis a registered certification mark, andWi-FiProtected Access is a certification mark, of theWi-FiAlliance.

019-0152

Contents

Chapter 1

5

Getting Started

 

6

How AirPort Works

 

6

How Wireless Internet Access Is Provided

 

7

Configuring AirPort Extreme Base Station Internet Access

 

7

AirPort Setup Assistant

 

7

AirPort Admin Utility

 

8

Extending the Range of Your AirPort Network

 

8

Printing via an AirPort Extreme Base Station

 

9

Sharing Your Computer’s Internet Connection

Chapter 2

11

Network Basics

 

13

Software Used for IP Networking in Mac OS X

 

14

Software Used for AirPort Networking in Mac OS X

Chapter 3

15

AirPort Security

 

15

Security for AirPort Networks at Home

 

16

Security for AirPort Networks in Business and Education

 

17

Wi-FiProtected Access (WPA)

Chapter 4

19

AirPort Extreme Network Designs

 

20

Using the AirPort Setup Assistant

 

20

Using AirPort Admin Utility

 

21

Setting Up the AirPort Network

 

27

Configuring and Sharing Internet Access

 

48

Setting Advanced Options

 

62

Solving Problems

 

63

More Information About AirPort

Chapter 5

65

Behind the Scenes

 

65

Basic Networking

 

68

Using the AirPort Extreme Base Station

 

69

Items That Can Cause Interference With AirPort

3

Getting Started

1

 

 

 

AirPort offers an easy and affordable way to provide wireless Internet access and networking anywhere in the home, classroom, or office.

Instead of using traditional cables to create a network, AirPort uses wireless local area network (LAN) technology to provide wireless communication between computers. Through a wireless network you can access the Internet, share files, play multiplayer games, and more.

Using AirPort technology, you can:

Create a wireless network in your home or school using an AirPort Extreme Base Station, then connect to the Internet and share the connection among several computers simultaneously. An entire family or classroom can be on the Internet at the same time.

Set up a wireless connection to your standard computer network. AirPort-equippedcomputers can then have access to an entire network without being connected with a cable.

Connect multiple computers in a wireless “Computer-to-Computer”network so that you can share files or play network games.

You can set up an AirPort Extreme Base Station and connect to the Internet without wires in minutes. But since the AirPort Extreme Base Station is a flexible and powerful networking device, you can also create an AirPort network that does much more. If you want to design an AirPort network that provides Internet access to non-AirPortcomputers via Ethernet, or take advantage of some of the base station’s more advanced features, use this document to design and implement your network.

Note: Some of the AirPort features described in this book are available only in Mac OS X version 10.3 or later, using AirPort 3.4 or later. If you are using an earlier version of Mac OS X or AirPort, images shown in this book may be slightly different from what you see on your screen.

5

How AirPort Works

Traditionally, sharing files and information between computers required them to be connected by wires. With AirPort, the data is transferred between computers using radio waves through a wireless network.

There are two ways to create a wireless network:

You can use an AirPort-equippedcomputer to create a temporary“Computer-to-Computer” network, which otherAirPort-equippedcomputers within range can join.

You can create a more permanent wireless network using a base station. In this kind of network, all wireless communication goes through the base station to the Internet or to other computers on the network.

You can also incorporate AirPort technology into an existing Ethernet network by connecting an AirPort Extreme Base Station to the network. This allows non-AirPortcomputers to communicate with AirPort computers.

The typical indoor range for an AirPort connection is up to 150 feet (45 meters). Range in a wireless network may vary with site conditions.

How Wireless Internet Access Is Provided

Wireless Internet access requires an AirPort Card or an AirPort Extreme Card, an AirPort Extreme Base Station, and an account with an Internet service provider (fees may apply). Some Internet service providers (ISPs) are not currently compatible with AirPort. Some cable modem and DSL providers may not be compatible with AirPort. Contact your service provider for more information.

AirPort technology is similar to cordless telephone technology. The handset of the cordless phone makes a wireless connection to the base, which is connected to the telephone system. Likewise, with AirPort, your computer does not establish a

wireless connection with your ISP directly. You set up a wireless connection from the computer to a base station that is connected to the Internet by a wire, such as a DSL or telephone line.

Use AirPort to provide wireless Internet access and share a single Internet connection among multiple computers in the following ways:

Connect the AirPort Extreme Base Station to a DSL or cable modem. If the base station has an internal modem, you can connect it to a telephone line. The AirPort Extreme Base Station receives webpages and email content from the Internet via its Internet connection and then sends it to AirPort-equippedcomputers, using the wireless network.

Connect the AirPort Extreme Base Station to an existing network that already has Internet access, such as in a school or small office. AirPort-equippedcomputers connect wirelessly to the base station and receive network and Internet content.

6

Chapter 1 Getting Started

 

 

Configuring AirPort Extreme Base Station Internet Access

Like your computer, the AirPort Extreme Base Station must be set up with the appropriate hardware and Internet Protocol (IP) networking information to connect to the Internet. To provide the Internet configuration information, you can use the AirPort Setup Assistant to transfer your computer’s Internet settings to the base station. The setup assistant then asks a series of questions to determine how the base station’s other interfaces should be set up.

To set up more complex configurations, you use AirPort Admin Utility. For more information about the AirPort Setup Assistant and AirPort Admin Utility, see the following sections.

AirPort Setup Assistant

The AirPort Setup Assistant, located in Applications/Utilities, walks you through base station setup and changes your computer’s Internet settings to use AirPort instead of a wired connection to the Internet.

Use the AirPort Setup Assistant to enter the settings your base station needs to connect to the Internet. Enter the settings you received from your ISP for the internal modem, Ethernet, or PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE). You can also give your AirPort network a name and password. When you have finished entering the settings, the AirPort Setup Assistant transfers the settings to your base station and your base station shares its Internet connection with computers that join its AirPort network.

For instructions on using the AirPort Setup Assistant, see “Using the AirPort Setup Assistant” on page 20.

AirPort Admin Utility

AirPort Admin Utility is a convenient way to make quick adjustments to your base station configuration. The AirPort Extreme Base Station’s advanced networking features can be configured only with AirPort Admin Utility.

Use AirPort Admin Utility when:

You want to provide Internet access to computers that connect to the base station using Ethernet

You have already set up your base station, but you need to change one setting, such as the phone number for your ISP

You need to configure advanced base station settings such as channel frequency, security options, closed networks, DHCP lease time, access control, WAN privacy, power controls, remote dial-in,or port mapping

For instructions on using AirPort Admin Utility, see “Using AirPort Admin Utility” on page 20.

Chapter 1 Getting Started

7

 

 

Extending the Range of Your AirPort Network

You can extend the range of your network by using AirPort Admin Utility to set up wireless connections between multiple base stations in your network, known as a Wireless Distribution System (WDS), or to connect the base stations via Ethernet to create a roaming network. If your base station has an antenna port, you can also extend the range of your wireless network by connecting an Apple-certifiedexternal antenna to the antenna port. For more information on setting up a Wireless Distribution System or a roaming network, see“Connecting Additional Base Stations to Your AirPort Network” on page 49.

Some models of the base station can receive power through the Ethernet WAN port when it is connected to 802.3af-compliantPower Sourcing Equipment (PSE) with a CAT 5 Ethernet cable. A PSE is aline-poweredEthernet device, like a switch or a hub, that supplies power to Powered Devices (PDs) over the Ethernet cable. Powering the base station using a PSE is known asPower over Ethernet (PoE).

If your base station can receive power over Ethernet, the base station and the mounting bracket conform to UL Standard 2043,“Fire Test for Heat and Visible Smoke Release for Discrete Products and Their Accessories Installed in Air-HandlingSpaces,” for placement in theair-handlingspace above suspended ceilings. Using Power over Ethernet allows you to install a base station in places away from a standard electrical outlet. For more information about using PoE, see the documentation that came with your base station.

To use the base station in an air-handlingspace above suspended ceilings, you must connect the Ethernet WAN port to an802.3af-compliantPSE with aplenum-ratedEthernet cable. You cannot use the AC power adapter to power a base station installed in anair-handlingspace. When the base station receives power over Ethernet, the USB port is disabled. Do not connect an external antenna to a base station mounted in anair-handlingspace.

Printing via an AirPort Extreme Base Station

If you have a USB printer connected to the base station, computers on the AirPort network can print to the printer by selecting it via Rendezvous in Printer Setup Utility, located in Applications/Utilities. You must use Mac OS X version 10.2.3 or later to print to a USB printer via an AirPort Extreme Base Station. Check the AirPort website at www.apple.com/airport for a list of supported printers.

If your base station supports PoE, and is receiving power from an 802.3af-compliant

PSE, the USB port is disabled and you cannot connect a printer to the USB port.

8

Chapter 1 Getting Started

 

 

Sharing Your Computer’s Internet Connection

If you have an AirPort Card installed in your computer and you are connected to the Internet, you can share your Internet connection with other computers using Mac OS X version 10.2 or later. This is sometimes called using your computer as a software base station.

You can share your Internet connection as long as your computer is connected to the Internet. If your computer goes to sleep or is restarted, or if you lose your Internet connection, you need to restart Internet sharing.

To start Internet sharing:

1 Open System Preferences, click Sharing, and then click Internet.

2Select how you would like to share your Internet connection, then click Start. You can choose to share your Internet connection with AirPort-equippedcomputers, computers withbuilt-inEthernet, or both.

Note: If your Internet connection and your local network use the same port(built-inEthernet, for example), contact your ISP before you turn on Internet sharing. In some cases (if you use a cable modem, for example) you might unintentionally affect the network settings of other ISP customers, and your ISP might terminate your service to prevent you from disrupting its network.

Chapter 1 Getting Started

9